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SCHOOL PAGE ARTWORK, POETRY AND WRITING FROM TACOMA STUDENTS A5

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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

RECENT DEVELOPMENT DEALS MIGHT MEAN DOWNTOWN IS ON THE MEND DEVELOPMENTS IN THE WORKS

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

HAMMER TIME. Construction workers are no longer rare sights

around Tacoma’s downtown with a host of development deals hinting that the local economy is improving.

GOODWILL OPENS STATE-OFTHE-ART STORE

A week doesn’t go by these days without a developer or agency announcing plans on some new building, facility renovation or expansion, news that suggests Tacoma’s economy is on the mend. “Tacoma is on the move,” said Tacoma’s Economic Development Director Ricardo Nogu-

LESSEES EYE WAREHOUSE SPACES

era. “The announcement of State Farm’s arrival to Tacoma is drawing investment interest from near and far. We have institutional and local investment interests in Tacoma … The writing is on the wall. Tacoma is the place to invest, and we represent a clear alternative to developers, businesses and home seekers for a more affordable, safer, familyoriented, good night life and recreationally-oriented environ-

ment to live, work and play.” Developments in the works include a San Diego-based investment firm purchasing two multi-family developments in downtown; Carion Bros. launching a 161-unit, rental project along the Foss waterway called The Henry; John Wise, developer of The Metropolitan, set to break ground on 252 Broadway, a multi-family project, Noguera X See PROJECTS / page A4

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

PHOTO BY KATE BURROWS

NOW OPEN. Pictured from

left to right, chairman of the board of Tacoma Goodwill Chad Wright, Tacoma City Councilman Joe Lonergan, Tacoma Goodwill President and CEO Terry Hayes, Store Manager Gloria Eubanks and Tacoma/Pierce County Chamber President and CEO Tom Pierson all gathered June 6 to celebrate the grand opening of the newest Goodwill location. By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

The opening of a new Goodwill store in South Tacoma means more than the addition of 25 to 30 new jobs – it means the organization’s job training and support services will reach even more people in need. A grand opening ceremony took place June 6, and the community came out in droves to experience what Tacoma Goodwill President and CEO Terry Hayes calls its latest “fashion-forward” store. The store is focused more on creating a memorable shopping experience, offering high-end displays and well organized merchandise designed to feel like a department store, rather than a thrift shop. She stresses that customers will find the same low prices they have come to expect from traditional Goodwill locations. “It doesn’t have to be expensive to create a wonderful shopping experience,” she said, adding that employees are well X See GOODWILL / page A4

RENDERING COURTESY OF MDC

NEW ROLE FOR THE OLD BAYWATCH. MDC (formerly Metropolitan Development Council and now Making a Difference

in Community) is investing $4.1 million in restoring the building, which will reopen as secure housing with medical and social services for people who had been homeless with disabilities.

MDC TO RENOVATE BLIGHTED BUILDING –

AND SAVE BLIGHTED LIVES

By Kathleen Merryman

T

he Baywatch Apartments, infamous for blight and crime as they declined over the past decades at 502 S. Seventh St., are bound for restoration. MDC (formerly Metropolitan Development Council and now Making a Difference in Community) has bought the once-lovely brick building and, in September, will reopen it as secure housing, with services, for people escaping longterm homelessness. The 35 units will represent one more step forward in the county’s battle to end homelessness. Over the past decade the people waging that fight have cut the numbers of people living in encampments and cars. Over the past eight years, the county-wide Point In Time Count shows the number of people living unsheltered dropped from 727 to 126. The numbers are never complete in any year, but the 84 percent drop represents a trend in the right direction.

That social services have accomplished so much, even as the faltering economy has spit more people out of their homes, might be mistaken for a miracle. It is, instead, accountability. Leading members of the Pierce County Coalition to End Homelessness are strict. They study the data on how well programs work. They use those numbers to see what changes need to be made, and to guide funding. They have learned that, for the most broken souls, housing is not enough. People who have been living on the streets or in shelters for years need the housing first, then mental health, medical, counseling, education and job skills services as they are ready to accept them. The Baywatch will be for them, and it will be renamed The Randall Townsend Apartments for one of them. Townsend,

New manager A7

Tolmie’s garden A2

DEATH RACER: Tacoma man will push himself to the limit. PAGE A6

Done well, the kind of housing MDC plans saves money. Analyses of projects like it in Seattle, Portland, even Minnesota, prove it over and over again.

City Briefs ................A3 Pothole Pig ...............A3

Laramie examined B3

Sports ......................A6 A&E ....................... ..B1

a U.S. Navy veteran, was beaten to death after he landed on the streets because of mental illness. Programs like this have saved people like Townsend all across the nation. “This is based on national best practices,” said MDC’s Troy Christensen, chief of operations and strategy. “MDC will be the first to use it in Tacoma.” But the model itself has caused concern in the neighborhood. After MDC purchased the building, word spread that it would be running “wet housing” (meaning that residents can drink alcohol in their apartments). That term alarmed people who have invested in nearby homes and businesses, and with good reason. Tacoma’s history of homeless services has had its low points. On a Facebook conversation, some people worried about X See HOUSING / page A4

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Make A Scene ........ B5 Calendar ................. B6

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

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-VY[5PZX\HSS`ÂťZRP[JOLUHUKOLYINHYKLUZNYV^[OLWHZ[ By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

If William Fraser Tolmie did not have it in his workplace garden, Tracy Berryman, Mike McGuire and Chris Erlich will have none of it in theirs. Tolmie was the factor at Fort Nisqually in the mid-1800s, when the Husdon’s Bay Company fur trading outpost was truly on the Nisqually. Berryman, McGuire and Erlich are members of the crew who keep the replica of the old fort authentic at Point Defiance Park. To do that, they have made themselves experts in grafted fruit trees, heritage chickens and seeds that stretch the definition of heirloom across centuries. Over 15 years, they have developed the gardens behind the factor’s house, planted a display of barley and wheat and repelled the deer from a young orchard. Their task has required winters of research, summers of sweat, and rows of compost, manure and passion. Still, they yearn for proper sources of fertilizer – a small herd of cattle, perhaps, or a meadow of sheep and a sty of pigs. They, like Factor Tolmie, want to expand. For now, they have Speckled Sussex hens and a rooster protected from sun and wildlife by wattle walls of scrub maple. “Chickens and man have coexisted forever,� said McGuire while Erlich cuddled an agreeable young hen. Ah, but mustard from greens to seeds made those eggs and potatoes palatable, said Berryman, who grinds the seeds to show visiting school children where a hot dog’s best friend comes from. Berryman scouts vegetable sources the

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PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

-(*;69;6340,Âť:736; Tracy Berryman, Chris Erlich and Mike McGuire (left

to right) water, weed and rake the garden they maintain at Fort Nisqually Living History Museum at Point Defiance.

way Tolmie’s trappers might have tracked mink and beaver. “We are hoping to get a heritage breed of shallot from Fort Vancouver,� she said, then lamented the Great Canadian Marrow Embargo. Their Canadian source for the squash seed has dried up. This year, Berryman planted six seeds saved from last year’s harvest of the hardy squash bred to keep well. “You can see the advantage to keeper crops – potatoes, beets, turnips, onions, rutabagas,� McGuire said. That last root went by a more enticing name in 1854, Berryman said. In the cookbooks, diaries and fort records she reads it goes by “orange jelly turnip.� Anticipating many fine orange jelly turnips, McGuire is digging a root cellar. By 1854, this branch of Hudson’s Bay Company, begun in 1833 to trade in furs, was going agrarian, doing business as Puget Sound Agriculture Co. That’s the period the gardens recreate, said McGuire, but on a small scale. The original business raised thousands of sheep, cattle, pigs and chickens and fields of wheat and barley on a 160,000-acre land claim. “There was a lot of plowing and hauling of dung,� Berryman said. “I only wish we had 160,000 acres. As it is, we’re excited to have five chickens.� Berryman dresses in long skirts, leggings and a broad hat, as one of the Metis women who worked that farm. “The backbone of the labor force was Native American women,� McGuire said. “They hired local help to pick the bugs off,� Berryman added. She, too, picks bugs, pulls weeds and waters.

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2 - FREE Youth Admission to Northwest Trek or Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium (With Purchase Of Two Adult General Admission)

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An altercation between North End neighbors resulted in the deaths of two men on June 6. Michael Dillon and Frank Rossiter were next-door neighbors in the 4600 block of North Ferdinand Street. Other neighbors called 911 to report Dillon firing a gun. One of Rossiter’s roommates went to Dillon’s home to confront him about the gunshots. He walked back to his house with Dillon following him. When the roommate saw Dillon had a gun, he ran into his home. Rossiter came outside to investigate. Dillon fatally shot him. Dillon drove to the home of a friend in Gig Harbor and said he was suicidal. The friend called 911. Pierce County Sheriff’s Department deputies responded. As they approached the house, Dillon fatally shot himself while standing in the driveway.

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She also researches what grew where in the original fort, and plants accordingly. She has put medicinal plants by the bunk houses, herbs around the kitchen building and flowers around the factor’s home. There are records of roses and, surprisingly, dahlias, she said. She has tracked them to ships coming from Hawaii, and suspects they started out in Mexico. “You can see dahlia seeds moving around the world,� she said. In the same records and recipes, you can see ladyfinger and kidney potatoes, mangle wurzel beets, Bramley, Cox and Gravenstein apples and Prince Albert peas arriving and becoming part of life at Fort Nisqually. It is their pleasure, the volunteers say, to recreate Dr. Tolmie’s workplace garden, and to give us a taste of the past.

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Detectives seek the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s help to identify a suspect in a murder that occurred 15 years ago. In the early morning hours of June 8, 1998, 19-year-old Bryce Cheney and his father had just finished a delivery route for The News Tribune and returned to their home in the 300 block of East North Lane on the East Side. The father went outside to confront a prowler. His son followed and the prowler fatally stabbed him before fleeing. The suspect is described as a black male between the ages of 16 and 25. He was 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;7â&#x20AC;? and 150 pounds with curly black hair. A pink girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Huffy brand bicycle was found in the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s backyard. Investigators believe it may have been left there by the suspect. A reward of up to $1,000 is offered by Tacoma/Pierce County Crime Stoppers for information leading to an arrest and charges filed. Tips can be reported by calling (253) 591-5959.

CORRECTION

The CD cover art that accompanied the story â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nolan Garrett finishes his first CD,â&#x20AC;? (TW, 6/7/13) did not include the proper credits. Photographer Bill Bungard took the photo of Garrett and Jaci Sawtelle was the graphic artist. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for this oversight.

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#1 NOLAN GARRETT FINISHES HIS FIRST CD

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ALL THE TIMEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TO BE RELEASED TO THE PUBLIC ON JUNE 21

#2 FIRST VICTORY FOR TACOMA TRAUMA

DEFENSIVE EFFORT LEADS TEAM TO FIRST WIN IN HISTORY

#3 THA WILL TAKE APPLICATIONS FOR RENTAL ASSISTANCE #4 2013 TACOMA WEEKLY ALL-CITY BASEBALL TEAM YOUNGER PLAYERS MAKING THEIR MARK EARLY

#5 BUCKETS FULL OF OUTDOOR IDEAS AT THE URBAN GARDENER

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 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Š30Dd By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

General Motors and Australiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Adelaideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Holden Motor Body Builders reached a deal in 1923 for the manufacturing of fully imported, preassembled chassis for GM vehicles. This partnership allowed GM to avoid significant import duties and allowed Oldsmobiles to be sold in Australia at a relatively low cost compared to competitive cars. The Oldsmobile 30 series built between 1923 and 1927 proved to be very popular in â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Land Down Under.â&#x20AC;? Holden built the vast majority of the bodies for Olds in the 1920s, but the low-volume models such as roadsters and some sedans were still imported from other factories. With Australia feeling the Great Depression as harshly as the rest of the world, GM ceased exports of Oldsmobiles to Australia at the end of 1929, and did not resume until 1934.

City Briefs 73<*65;05.,5; -(*<3;@46=05. ;6<5065=6;,

In a precedent-setting ruling, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) rejected Pacific Lutheran Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s objections to allowing contingent faculty a vote on forming a union. PLU administration had blocked the efforts of contingent faculty for an election run by the NLRB, on the grounds that the religious affiliation placed it outside the labor boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jurisdiction. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a great day for all contingent faculty and students at PLU and other universities,â&#x20AC;? said Steve Lansing, PhD, former administrator of Region 1 Office of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and PLU alumnus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It shows that institutions cannot hide behind religious affiliation as an excuse to deny their employees a democratic voice.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have been trying to address issues like pay and benefit inequities without any success for a long time. Now that we have the opportunity to form a union, we will be able to bargain for fair improvements with PLU from a place of power,â&#x20AC;? said Glenn Guhr, PLU contingent faculty, lecturer, Music Department. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The NLRB ruling is a victory for the PLU com-

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A new poll by Patinkin Research Strategies shows nearly two in three Tacoma voters support a proposed

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Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Car Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Holden Oldsmobileâ&#x20AC;? was restored by Peter Gifford of Dunlop, Australia. He wrote about his mission to save the car from the junkyard and return it to its showroom quality. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I bought the Olds in 1975 as a pile of rubbish in a backyard for $100, and it was certainly not a complete car,â&#x20AC;? he wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After six years of restoration

munity because now we can move forward in improving the quality of our work lives and in turn our teaching,â&#x20AC;? said Dr. Michael K. Ng, lecturer in languages and literature. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We look forward to forming a union and ensuring that PLU invests in the professions of contingent faculty so we can sustain high educational standards.â&#x20AC;? The ruling comes as a growing number of contingents at other universities across the country are organizing in efforts to improve quality education for students. In April, contingent faculty at Georgetown University voted overwhelmingly in favor of forming a union with Service Employees International Union Local 500. With the NLRB ruling, the door is now open for an election as soon as fall of 2013 after classes resume. Pacific Lutheran University relies on a large group of highly trained contingents who make up nearly half the total faculty. They include lecturers, senior lecturers, instructors, clinical faculty, visiting faculty and resident faculty. Contingent faculty members earn only a fraction of what tenured professors make teaching the same course load, and their employment is tenuous.

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and countless miles of chasing parts, it was complete. I still think it was a great achievement to do this restoration in my shed.â&#x20AC;? The car is painted Chamois, a GM custom paint for the age. The chassis and the engine used in the restoration are from the same car. The car offered 61 horsepower through a V6 engine with three speeds.

paid sick days law for the city. According to the pollsterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s analysis, opposition to the measure is â&#x20AC;&#x153;anemic at best,â&#x20AC;? while support for the proposal is â&#x20AC;&#x153;intense.â&#x20AC;? Four in 10 (40 percent) voters said they would be â&#x20AC;&#x153;more likelyâ&#x20AC;? to vote for a candidate if they favored the proposal. Nearly 40,000 workers in Tacoma canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take a paid sick day; many of those least likely to have paid sick time work in retail, food service and other sectors with extensive public contact. About one-third of kids in Tacoma Public Schools have parents that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get paid sick days. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These poll results make it clear Tacoma residents think paid sick days are a good idea â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like our city council members to take the healthy, responsible course of action: pass a strong paid sick days law for our city,â&#x20AC;? says Sandy Restrepo, coordinator of the Healthy Tacoma campaign, a coalition of more than 30 groups working for a citywide paid sick days law.

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Between May 20 and June 2 extra law enforcement patrolled Pierce County roads looking for unbuckled drivers and passengers, and motorists using their cell phones or other electronic devices. During these patrols, 393 seatbelt infractions were written, in addition to 158 cell phone/texting or usage

of other electronic device tickets. In addition, three DUIs and two misdemeanor warrant arrests were made. Eighty-eight speeding violations, nine child passenger safety infractions as well as 82 uninsured motorists and 41 suspended/revoked license violations were issued. Statewide, during the patrols, law enforcement officers wrote 2,321 seatbelt violations and 1,448 cell phone/texting tickets. Last year, during this same time period, officers on the extra patrols statewide issued 3,171 seat belt violations and 1,059 cell phone violations were written. The Tacoma-Pierce County DUI and Traffic Safety Task Force, law enforcement from Pierce County, with more than 130 police and sheriff agencies statewide worked the extra patrols, funded by a grant from the Washington Traffic Safety Commission.

23rd and South â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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WHousing From page A1

PHOTO BY KATE BURROWS

:/67(/630* The South Tacoma Goodwill store strives to offer a memora-

ble shopping experience, with well-organized merchandise and employees highly trained in customer service.

WGoodwill From page A1

trained in customer service. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our employees are trained to give the customer all the attention they want and deserve, and they seem to appreciate that.â&#x20AC;? All proceeds from Goodwill support job training for people with disabilities, but the organization is more than willing to provide its services for anyone in need of assistance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anyone who needs help getting back to work can come to Goodwill,â&#x20AC;? Hayes stressed. For Goodwill employee Michelle Johannesen, being a stay-at-home mom for many years placed her in a less-than-desirable category for many employers when she wanted to join the work force once again. She lacked current job experience, making it even more difficult to find work in a competitive market. But thanks to Goodwill and its services, she was able to take part in on-the-job training as a cashier in one of its stores, and has been employed there for the past 12 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They gave me the training I needed, and I really enjoyed the team and everything they

stand for,â&#x20AC;? she said. The organization works with more than 800 employers and helps place its clients in positions that make the most sense for each person. This year alone, Goodwill will put more than 2,200 people back to work in the region. The 25,000-square-foot South Tacoma store is the newest of 32 stores in southwest and central Washington, and offers departments for clothing, housewares, toys, furniture, books/media and more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This new opening represents exciting new employment and job training for residents in South Tacoma,â&#x20AC;? said Tacoma City Councilmember Joe Lonergan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goodwill has served this city very well.â&#x20AC;? Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber President and CEO Tom Pierson estimates the additional jobs from this location alone will translate into more than $503,000. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each new employee that comes off unemployment and other programs saves businesses and individual taxpayers about $13,000 per year,â&#x20AC;? he added. The South Tacoma Goodwill is located at 8025 S. Hosmer St. For more information, visit www.tacomagoodwill.org.

drunks, prostitutes and predators taking over the streets that are just now reviving. Morgan Alexander, owner of Amocat CafĂŠ, a centerpiece of that revival, raised his concerns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is frustrating,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just what is the vision of downtown?â&#x20AC;? He has met with Christensen and MDC chief executive officer Mark Pereboom. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s less worried about the effect on the streetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life now that he understands the level of security under which Randall Townsend Apartments will operate. The entrance will be secure and staffed at all times. The residents will be diverse. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People may have various disabilities,â&#x20AC;? Christensen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mental health, substance abuse, physical or mental disability.â&#x20AC;? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get the medical and mental health care they need to get, and stay, stable. Sometimes, the clinics will come to them. Sometimes theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go to the clinics, or walk across the street for services at MDC headquarters. If they follow the national trend, most will beat their demons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our intention is not to bring people off the streets to drink themselves to death,â&#x20AC;? Christensen said. Still Alexander is concerned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It still doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sit well,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is it good for the city to have a concentration of poverty in one area?â&#x20AC;? That issue, the concentration of social services in some areas, is an ongoing discussion in Tacoma. In this case, investors purchased the Baywatch for $500,000 at auction and collaborated with MDC on a plan to renovate, and, where possible, restore the building. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We originally started out to do it as a turnkey project,â&#x20AC;? Pereboom said.

WProjects pointed out. He added that three other housing developments are in the works and his office is about to seek developers interested in two city-owned parcels that will likely bring more construction activity sooner rather than later. This is all good news for business watchers, who have recently seen vacancy rates hover around 50 percent and saw more for lease signs than construction crews. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would say that the momentum is shifting to the positive, but there arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a lot of new people

â&#x20AC;&#x153;But the types of funding we got would have made it more expensive,â&#x20AC;? Christensen said. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why MDC bought it earlier than planned for $2.1 million and is completing the work on the project. Funding includes $1,581,925 from Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s share of state funds meant to provide housing and services to homeless people; $1,533,000 from the state Housing Trust Fund; $703,500 in a Community Development Block Grant awarded by Pierce County, and $287,268 from the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. They total $4,105,693. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big money, most of which go into Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy in the form of construction materials and wages. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a sound investment. Done well, the kind of housing MDC plans saves money. Analyses of projects like it in Seattle, Portland, even Minnesota, prove it over and over again. On average, each chronically homeless person uses about $35,000 worth of fire, police, hospital and jail services, plus court and jail expenses every year. Taxpayers and people who carry health insurance and pay hospital bills pay for that. Now, for the math on the Randall Townsend: It will have 35 apartments for 35 people who, on the street, would cost taxpayers here a total of about $1,225,000 every year. In the Randall Townsend, housing and services for each of them will cost $18,000, or an annual total of $630,000. Some of them will pay for part of that with their Social Security benefits or other income. Savings like that â&#x20AC;&#x201C; of money and productive lives â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are why lawmakers and administrators at every level of government dealing with shrinking budgets vote to fund such programs. Programs like this are why Pierce County may well become a place where every resident lives in dignity and safety.

From page A1

coming into the market,â&#x20AC;? Kidder Mathews Associate Vice President Dominic Accetturo. The vacancy rate for office spaces in downtown Tacoma hovers at about 13 percent, according to industry reports. While high-end office space is tight with the news that State Farm Insurance Co is taking the bulk of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Class A office space with its lease of the former Russell Investment Group headquarters, there is a large stock of funky, historical warehouse spaces that profes-

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sional, office-space seekers are trending toward for regional or satellite offices of King County-based operations. Filling offices downtown eventually trickles down into filling the retail spaces, particularly in downtown. Flipping the â&#x20AC;&#x153;for leaseâ&#x20AC;? signs to â&#x20AC;&#x153;openâ&#x20AC;? will take the State Farm workers seeking options downtown as well as visible work at the former Elks Lodge into the wellanticipated McMenamins hotel and entertainment complex that has been set back a year to now open in late 2014. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d sure like to see them start pushing dirt, so to speak,â&#x20AC;? Accetturo said. Elsewhere downtown, a Bellevue developer has plans for the 108-year-old Columbia Bank building along Broadway. The 88,000-square-foot, fivestory former department store sold for $4.8 million in a foreclosure deal worth about two thirds of the assessed value. Plans in the works include renovating the few vacant offices this in the building later this summer for professional businesses. Up the hill, Tacoma Housing Authority has announced development plans at the mixed-use, public housing community of Salishan along Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stretch of Portland Avenue, which would have been served by the Link line. THA sold 143 lots in the development for $5 million to D.R. Horton. The nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest homebuilder is set to being construction of three-and-four-bedroom, single-family homes as early as this summer that will largely sell for market rates. A few dozen of the homes will be sold for less-than-market prices to lower-income families. Also, along Martin Luther King Jr. Way, another private developer is working on a deal to renovate the historic Pochert and Kellogg-Sicker buildings for apartments. Construction of the Hilltop Regional Health Center is well underway. The $16 million building is to begin offering health care service to local residents next year, another medical office along what is known as the Medical Mile between MultiCareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacoma General and Franciscan Health Systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Joseph Hospital on the other.

-YPKH`1\ULÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

SCHOOL PAGE

!247/2+ 0/%429 !.$ 72)4).' &2/- 4!#/-! 345$%.43 THERE ONCE WAS A MAN

There once was a man who went by the name of Sir Michael Edward IV. This man was a king with many wives. Of those many wives, many children were born. Out of those, there was a prince named after his Father, who had a wife of his own. They had three children. The firstborn was named Paul. Now Paul was important, because he would be the last king that would ever rule his Grandfatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kingdom. Paul was a young lad at the beginning of our story, only about 6 years of age. Although he was young, he was quite knowledgeable about math and science. These were, in fact, the two things he enjoyed the most. Little did he know that these two things would one day be what saved his Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kingdom. One day, Paul was sciencing and mathing in his room. He was working on an experiment that allowed him to create different noises by striking things with different measures of force. His Father walked in and said to him, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Son, it is time you began learning the ways of running this kingdom that you will one day have for yourself.â&#x20AC;? And so Paul did. Everything was peaceful for 12 years, then an opposing kingdom declared war upon Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kingdom. It was now Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, as his Father had

passed away just two years previously. Paul readied his troops and went to war. Many soldiers were slain the first day, and there were close to 500 of Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soldiers left, while the opposing kingdom still had about 2,000. He was outnumbered, but still strong in those small numbers. The next day they went to war again. This time Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soldiers wiped out about 1,300 soldiers until they themselves were eventually defeated. Then there was only Paul. As they sacrificed him, he realized that he was so alone in the world, so cold, so forgotten. He realized he had done nothing remarkable to be remembered by anyoneâ&#x20AC;Ś WAIT! WAIT JUST A MINUTE! HOLD IT! What about the sciencing and mathing genius talents that Paul had, that were going to save his Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kingdom?? So, all rightâ&#x20AC;ŚYou write a new ending below, and be sure and include some science and math!

S Kendall Mahoney, 12th gr., SOTA, Teacher: Terri Placentia

Austin Schwenk, SAMI

And here is: The Rest of the Story! _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ By:___________________________

S Rachel Lynch, 12th gr., Congressional Art Contest Winner. Her work will hang in the White House for a year. Terri Placentia is Rachelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teacher at SOTA.

These are all SAMI students, students of Ms. Mary Mann.

S Max King, 11th gr., SOTA, Teacher: Terri Placentia Divorce continues to ravage our nation and families. Below is a story of a 9th grade student and how she was affected, both positively and negatively, by her parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; divorce.

DIVORCED S Deon Anderson

S Emma Gregory

S Phoebe Winnett, winner of 2nd place for our SAMI Publication: In the Mind of a SAMI Student 2013.

S Rahman Barika S Sam McCoy S Arianna Perkins

One day, when I was 9 years old and my sister Abby was 7, we were playing outside, laughing, when we heard our parents fighting. Abby looked scared, wondering why they were yelling at each other again. I tried to tell her that Mom and Dad are just disagreeing on some things, but I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know if that was true myself. For the last couple of months all my parents have done is fight or yell at each other. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know that Abby and I know. I think they try to not fight when we are around, but sometimes that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work all the time. I remember well the day when Mom and Dad sat Abby and I down and told us that they were getting a divorce. Mom told us that we were going with her to her new house. Abby cried because she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to leave Dad behind. Mom and Dad tried to tell Abby that she would see Dad again, but we both still cried. A few months after the divorce, my Mom got together with her high school sweetheart, Michael. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like them together the first couple of weeks, but after a while I started to like him. Abby didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like him at all. She was mad that Mom and Dad were not getting back together. In March of 2009, two years after the divorce, Michael and my Mom got married. When I was 14, my Dadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new wife, Monica, kicked me out of the house. Monica didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want me to come back to my Dadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house. It was hard at first, just like the divorce, but my Mom and Michael helped me through it. At first I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand how my Dad and Monica liked Abby more than me? To this day I still wonder about that question. And to this day, I still donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know why. Everyone on my Momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s side of the family says, â&#x20AC;&#x153; Blood doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter as long as you have someone who loves you.â&#x20AC;? I finally figured out who they were talking about. It was Michael. These days, sometimes I feel better when my Mom tells me that my Dad doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what he is missing by not having me as part of his life.

Bridey Flanagan-Haynes, 9th gr., SAMI, teacher: Mrs. Shelton

HOME

S Elise Wolfer

S Aundrea Smith S Anastazia Kidder

S Breanna Forrest

S Michael McIntosh

S Max Mao, a freshman wowed us all by winning 1st place in our SAMI Publication 2013.

Love and the loss of love, does come in all different shades of anguish, as portrayed so well in Brettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poem/song: A THOUSAND SHADES OF LOVE As we whirled above a thousand shades of love like mating doves that love gliding through the air there was pity in my cry as the day our love dies. Who stained the earth with blood and lies? Faithless to the ashes as our eternal love lashes I seize I tear Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m torn

As we whirled above a thousand shades of love like mating doves that love gliding through the air, there was a tale. A tale too hard to tell. Who stained the earth with blood and shame? Faithless to the ashes as our eternal love lashes I weep at your lies as your innocence dies. My senses fade away with another day of shame.

I have a home, you have a home. You might think maybe we have the same home. Well, mineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s different. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s by a river and has jumps, a shack, and a gate in it. It has a rainy season, a sunny season, and a BMX track. This is my home, and my home is called the River Valley BMX. Every time I step onto the track I feel free of everything: politics, money, school, friends, and drama. All of it isâ&#x20AC;Śjust me and my bike, and I feel like this every time. In my home I have straight one, straight two, straight three, and straight four. Sometimes Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m at home by myself, or with my best friends: Kyle Hoge: 2012 State #1, and Colby Burke: Top 10 Nag Cruisers Age Group, and a State time. We all get along and have a great time. We race and jump together, but when I am all alone, I focus, I breathe, and I visualize, like a video, everything in my head first. When I step into my home I get nervous and breathe heavily. I clip in, put my gloves on, and wait at the gate of the cadence to start. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a riderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s random startâ&#x20AC;ŚAt the red flash you shove your hips and pull with your back leg and go as hard as possible down the track. But the track is not a simple track in first straight. There is a 21 foot tall on roller, and a step up into a 40 foot berm. This also means a turn on second straight has a 16 foot double and a big double, which is the biggest jump there, at 33 feet, followed by a triple. The 3rd straight is a rhythm second, and the last straight is a step up table with rollers at the end to the finish line. I have lots and lots of stories to tell about my home, but you probably donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to hear too many of them. On down days we try to accomplish, and try to see who can do the biggest one. Another cool thing that we do is racing our pit bikes in the rain, and doing some mud racing. All in all, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great place, filled with super nice people, great racers, and even little ones. It will be my home forever. My name is Beau Coffin, and my home is the River Valley BMX!

Beau Coffin, SAMI, Teacher: Mrs. Shelton

I seize I tear Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m torn Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re to blame for our fake love. Like the doves that died the tears in their eyes as they scream and cry Falling to the ground Down Down Down As we whirled above a thousand shades of love like mating doves that love gliding through the air

there was a tale. A tale too hard to tell. With my tears of pity and pain as the day our love dies Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the one who stained the earth with blood and shame Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the one who stained the earth with blood and lies Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the one faithless to the ashes as our eternal love lashes. I seize I tear Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m torn

Brett Hilligoss, SAMI

Teachers and students interested in submitting work may get guidelines or information from Shari Shelton, (253) 906-3769 (before 8 a.m. and after 3 p.m.) or at sshelto@tacoma.k12.wa.us, or may contact Donna McCracken, (253) 475-8387 or dmccrac@tacoma.k12.wa.us.

Sports

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

Tacoma man will push himself to the limit

PHOTO BY JOHN LARSON

ENDURANCE. Travis Gendron will put his

physical fitness on the line at an event in Vermont.

“There is no way to truly train for that. It keeps you on the edge. I think you have to be a little off your rocker to do this.”

WILSON GETS TITLE AT HOOPS ON THE HILL Local squads kicking off summer on the hardwood By Steve Mullen Correspondent

O

f the 16 coaches gathered at Bellarmine Prep for this year’s version of Hoops on the Hill on June 7-9, you would probably find 16 different opinions of what each was looking for. In the end, Dave Alwert’s Wilson Rams rode their tenacious 90 feet of defense to win the title over the host Lions by a score of 48-36 as the summer high school basketball tournament season kicks into high gear. “We finally started to live up to our creed of high intensity defense and up-tempo offense from start to finish, and it resulted in a title for our team,” Alwert said of his team, which many expect to make a run to the Tacoma Dome next year in the state 3A tournament. On the other end of the spectrum, Lincoln’s Aubrey Shelton was looking for moments of brilliance to go along with the anticipated mistakes from a young team that lost its top three players to graduation and transfers. But when all was said and done on Sunday afternoon, the third-place finish made Shelton very happy. “Our young guys really stepped up this weekend. Josiah Barsh, Cameron Collins and Samaj Booker will be big parts of our team this year, and they really played well.” The Abes claimed wins over Bethel, Peninsula and crosstown rival Stadium on the weekend. One of the more interesting squads was Bellarmine Prep, as veteran coach Bernie Salazar’s team will rely heavily on his backcourt with the losses of both Sefo Liufau and Lucas Meikle. Carson Hollyoak, Marquise Jackson and talented sophomore Malachai Flynn will be heavily relied upon by Salazar to carry the bulk of the load this year. “They were great this weekend with wins over Emerald Ridge,

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

GOING UP. (Top) Wilson’s Alphonso Anderson goes up for a layup

during the Rams’ title run at Hoops on the Hill. (Bottom) Bellarmine Prep’s Garrett McKay is fouled by a Kentwood player as he drives to the hoop.

Kentwood and Sumner,” Salazar said. “We’ll be better than most people think (next year).” Coming off of their 4A state title last season, Curtis Vikings head coach Tim Kelly has to replace the entire starting five, which was lost to graduation. Convincing wins over both Foss and Lakes helped soothe the coach a little, but Kelly hopes the remaining concerns will sort themselves out over the summer and fall. “It was an incredible year last year, and I think these kids will be alright in a tough SPSL,” he said. “We’ll try to get them to understand our concepts this sum-

mer.” Wilson, meanwhile, prepares for a much-anticipated season with a quickly maturing group. “These kids have finally bought into our system, and if they can maintain the intensity all year, it could be really special,” Alwert said. The Rams got wins over Clover Park, Kentridge, Puyallup, Curtis and Bellarmine Prep on the way to their title. “We’re a very talented team, and coach Alwert has us playing at a very high level as we’ve become a wellrounded team,” said Wilson guard Ivy Smith.

– Travis Gendron By John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

On average, only 15 percent of participants finish the Spartan Death Race. Given his physical training regimen and military background, Travis Gendron would seem to have a good chance to be in the elite group that completes the grueling test of mental and physical prowess. Gendron grew up in Vermont. After finishing high school he joined the U.S. Army and eventually was stationed at Joint Base Lewis McChord. He served a tour of combat duty in Afghanistan. He met his wife Kendall here and decided to live in Tacoma after his honorable discharge two years ago. He is a student at Pacific Lutheran University, where he is majoring in fine arts. He keeps up on news back home and learned about the Death Race, which takes place in Pittsfield, Vt., about a year ago. It began in 2005. Gendron has competed in some mud runs and five-kilometer and 10-kilometer runs, but nothing like the Death Race. Competitors must complete a series of challenges throughout a 40-mile course. They may be asked to chop wood for two hours, carry a 20-pound stump for hours, lift 10 to 30 pounds of rocks for five hours, cut a bushel of onions or recite the names of the first through 10th presidents of the United States. “This seemed like a whole new ballgame,” he said, especially the mental challenge. The theme for that component this year is gambling. “There is no way to truly train for that,” he said. “It keeps you on the edge. I think you have to be a little off your rocker to do this.” Unlike other endurance races that offer a detailed map, Death Racers have no idea what to expect since the map and list of challenges is kept secret. The time frame can range from 24 to 48 hours. Gendron has been running a lot to prepare for the Death Race. Point Defiance Park is one place he often runs. Sometimes he does so with a weighted backpack. He will have a support team on hand. His wife will be part of it, and his father may as well. Support teams provide their athletes with food, beverages, clean socks and words of inspiration. Some years about 200 people participate. It is open to male and female competitors. The only requirement to participate is meeting the minimum age requirement. Gendron paid a $300 entrance fee. He may or may not win, but expects to gain something through his participation. “As long as I learn something about myself, and test myself physically, I will be satisfied. I am excited in a strange kind of way.”

-YPKH`1\ULÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

RAINIERS FANS, MEET YOUR NEW MANAGER

Stearns carries wealth of experience, knowledge By Karen Westeen Correspondent

J

ohn Stearnsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; life in baseball covers more than 40 years. Before taking over as the Rainiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; skipper on May 2 he had been a roving catching coordinator, coached, scouted, been a fourtime Major League All-Star, managed three minor league championship teams, was Minor League Manager of the Year in the Appalachian League and had done some broadcasting for ESPN. Now 61, Stearns sat down recently with Tacoma Weekly baseball correspondent Karen Westeen to discuss his long and storied career.

TW: You took over as manager here on May 2, after being Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roving minor league catching coordinator for two years. How did you find out about the promotion? JS: I was in High Desert, and I got a call that I was needed because the Marinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; third base coach, Jeff Datz, was sick. I had about two days to get ready to go up. I coached third one night in High Desert, then went to Seattle. When I got up there I found out that Datz wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to be able to coach that day, so they threw me out to coach third. Then they decided to call up Rainiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; manager Daren Brown to coach third and send me down to manage the Tacoma team. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a problem with that. It was really a whirlwind for about a week. The hardest part was trying to learn the signs, since every team has a different set. When I came down here they were on an eight-day winning streak and that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put any pressure on me. TW: You know catchers well, but youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re coaching a whole team now. What did you do to learn about the pitchers and position players on the team? JS: It took a while. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just getting to know a lot of our kids. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a lot of turnover since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten here. Several guys have gone up to Seattle, a lot have come down to our team, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an ongoing learning process. Even though I had been in this particular job in the past itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little bit of an adjustment period for me to get back

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

IN GOOD HANDS. John Stearns (left), who took over as Rainiers manager on May 2 for the promoted Daren Brown, takes the ball from Tacoma starter Brandon Maurer during a recent game.

to managing because I hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been doing that at all for the past three or four years. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming all together now, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a nice staff here helping me out and we have a good team. We tried to make sure the players were here on time and played hard. If we do those two things we should have a good club all year here.

TW: How would you describe the

make-up of this team? JS: We have a really good Triple-A team here, a lot of guys down here with big league experience, some talented players on the infield and outfield. The kind of team that if we just come out and play the way weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re supposed to we should win 60 percent of our games, which means youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re usually in the playoffs. I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re capable of winning six out of 10. Our goal as coaches is to develop these kids for the Major League team and by doing that try to win and get us into the playoffs.

TW: Now that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not roving does your family get to come here to be with you? JS: (The Stearns have three grown sons.) My wife and I live close to West Palm Beach, Fla. Generally she would be up but she has a full-time job in the health care business. If she can get off for two or three days she might come up, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re used to this. One good part of my job is that I am home for four or five months in the offseason. TW: You were drafted in 1973, while

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you were a senior at the University of Colorado. Did you finish college? JS: I went to college for four years. I needed three classes for a degree and before I knew it I was in the big leagues, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in baseball ever since and I never went back and got my degree.

TW: You were a two-sport athlete in college. What was the other one? JS: I went to college on a football scholarship and played defensive back. (Back) then, 195 pounds was a decent size. I was drafted by the Buffalo Bills, but after I was drafted in the first round of the baseball draft by the Phillies I decided to go with baseball. TW: Of all the different jobs youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done in baseball is one of them your favorite? JS: The favorite part of the jobs is being in the big leagues. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve coached first, third, bullpen and bench in the big leagues. Everybody in baseball wants to be in the big leagues. Being a big league coach/ manager is actually the ultimate goal. So if you reach that goal youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lucky. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been lucky enough to be there five or six years and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in the Major League playoffs four years, all the way through the second round, which is one round beneath the World Series. In 2000 I was in the World Series as a coach with the Mets when we played the Yankees in the subway series. We got beat in five games and finished second.

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TW: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been around so many teams in so many different positions. Who are some of the favorite players youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve worked with? JS: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve worked with some pretty good guys â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mike Piazza from the Mets stands out. I coached for the Reds one year and had Barry Larkin, who was a pretty good guy. I was first base coach for the Orioles when Cal Ripken was there. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a parade. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most gratifying is when you send a kid to the big leagues for the first time. I had the unbelievable pleasure of sending David Wright to the big leagues. He fainted on my shoulder when I told him. It was a life-long dream. He was only 20 years old. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good stuff. TW: What do you like to do during your offseason? JS: I wake up in the morning and jog about a mile to a fitness facility. I have a workout routine that I follow with weights and different machines. Then I jog back home. By that time itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 9:00 in the morning and I get ready to play golf. I play golf about five days a week in the wintertime. TW: Have you played on any of the courses around here? JS: We played a few rounds here. The courses Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been on are just tremendously great. I should find out which ones they are so I can name them. TW: Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been the highlight of your

career?

JS: Just getting to the big leagues was the biggest thrill, since I never played on a championship team. In my rookie year (with the Mets), I was 23 years old and was the backup catcher. About a month into the season, I came out to the park one day. We were playing the Cincinnati Reds and I was in the lineup. Tom Seaver was pitching for us. I went out for the first inning to warm him up with 30-40,000 people in the stands. After I warmed him up I threw the ball down to second and got ready to flash the sign for the first pitch. I looked up and the guy getting into the box was Pete Rose. I can still remember saying to myself, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How did you get yourself in this situation?â&#x20AC;? After the first couple of pitches I was fine. Catching Seaver was easier than catching someone else because you knew where the ball was going to be most of the time.

SWAP AND FLEA AT CHENEY STADIUM SATURDAY, JUNE 15TH :: 9AM-3PM Come enjoy a day of bargain hunting at this monthly event at Cheney Stadium. Vendors will be selling everything from antiques, collectibles, some may say junk, clothing, everyday household items. Who knows what you may find here? 2502 South Tyler St | Tacoma, WA 98405

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73,5;@6-.6(3:*6905.()030;@;6/,(+305,;/,30:; By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

I

;(*64(>,,23@ (33*0;@)6@::6**,9;,(4 GK â&#x20AC;&#x201C; IAN FRY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; STADIUM GK â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MATVEY SHITIK â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WILSON DEF â&#x20AC;&#x201C; TYLER FOSTER â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; STADIUM DEF â&#x20AC;&#x201C; BRYCE IKEDA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; STADIUM DEF â&#x20AC;&#x201C; PEDRO RAMOS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WILSON DEF â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ADOLFO SANDOVAL â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MOUNT TAHOMA DEF â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTT SCHEERER â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WILSON DEF â&#x20AC;&#x201C; CONNOR THOMPSON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; BELLARMINE PREP MID â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DREW BARKER â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; BELLARMINE PREP MID â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JACOB BEARDEMPHL â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; STADIUM PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

MID â&#x20AC;&#x201C; GARRETT HARP â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; STADIUM

65,6565, (Top) Wilson defend-

MID â&#x20AC;&#x201C; RENE RAMOS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FOSS MID â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MUNASSAR SALEH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WILSON MID â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JUAN VICENTE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LINCOLN FWD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ANDREW FOREMAN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; STADIUM FWD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MAX HARVEY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; STADIUM FWD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; IAN KARANJA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MOUNT TAHOMA FWD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; OSWALD RAMOS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WILSON FWD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; PABLO SANTOS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FOSS FWD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; BRIAN WAMBAA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MOUNT TAHOMA

er Scott Scheerer (left) helped lead a stout Wilson defense this season, while Mount Tahoma senior Brian Wambaa (3) created a lot of the offensive pressure for the Thunderbirds. (Bottom) Stadium senior Max Harvey (6) was a dominant scorer and distributer this year, tallying 14 goals and 14 assists in earning the Narrows 4A MVP award.

t was an exciting season on the pitch for local high school soccer squads this spring, with most of the teams staying in contention for the playoffs until the very end. And with plenty of talent on those teams, we once again take a look at some of the top players with our All-City Boys Soccer Team. The group is headlined by a dynamic set of forwards which earned notice from every opposing coach. Stadium senior Max Harvey garnered the Narrows 4A most valuable player award after using his crafty moves to score 14 goals and dish out 14 assists, helping lead the Tigers to the state playoffs. Foss senior Pablo Santos grabbed a share of the Narrows 3A MVP award, displaying incredible range on a couple of his 12 goals on the year, while he added nine assists. Wilson junior forward Oswald Ramos earned the other half of the Narrows 3A MVP, leading the Rams to the state playoffs with 11 goals and six assists while displaying great speed. Stadium senior Andrew Foreman was another of the many threats for the Tigers, scoring nine goals and adding two assists in becoming a dominant force up front. Mount Tahomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cause this season was aided by lightning fast Kenyan senior forward Brian Wambaa and junior forward Ian Karanja. The duo had a keen connection on the pitch and always seemed to find each other, as Wambaa scored nine goals and added seven assists while Karanja had seven goals and nine assists to lead the Thunderbirds to the district playoffs. The midfielders are headed by Stadium senior Jacob Beardemphl, who showed both his selflessness and goal-scoring ability by putting up seven goals and 18 assists in dominating the middle. Teammate Garrett Harp was an underrated asset for the Tigers, scoring in key moments and tallying nine goals on the year. Bellarmine Prep junior Drew Barker was one of the more

promising players for the Lions, showing phenomenal ball skills and striking for 11 goals and 10 assists. Wilson sophomore Munassar Saleh continued to amaze as well with his pace, scoring seven goals â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including two against Auburn Mountainview in the district playoffs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; while adding eight assists for the Rams. Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rene Ramos was a steady presence in the middle for the Falcons, scoring five goals and adding seven assists. Lincoln senior Juan Vicente showed his versatility by scoring seven goals, including a hat trick against Foss, while also being able to drop back on the defensive side for the Abes. Not to be overlooked, a solid list of defenders this year is led by Stadium senior Tyler Foster, who anchored the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense and helped limit league foes to 14 total goals. Sophomore teammate Bryce Ikeda not only dominated the outside defensively, but showed the ability to bring the ball up the field and be a threat offensively. Mount Tahoma senior Adolfo Sandoval helped lead an enormous defensive turnaround in the T-Birdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; inaugural season in the Narrows 3A, as they limited opponents to 14 goals in the 12 league matches. Wilson junior Scott Scheerer was a dynamic defender for the Rams as well, locking down the middle while also getting up field to score two goals and create scoring chances with a powerful long throwin. Wilson sophomore Pedro Ramos was another key part of the unit that allowed just 15 goals in league play. Bellarmine Prep sophomore Connor Thompson anchored the defensive front for the Lions, using his height to thwart off attacks while also providing an offensive threat with two goals. Wilson senior Matvey Shitik earns a nod at goalkeeper after putting up five shutouts on the season and providing a solid last line of defense for the Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; stingy unit. Stadium senior Ian Fry gets the other nod at keeper as he was also credited with five shutouts.

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Local Restaurants at Fife is in its fourth generation of family All in the Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ownership, and plans to continue its tradition of offering

family By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com Although Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Fife has developed a strong following for its traditional, classic breakfast options, the family owned restaurant has something to offer just about anyone. The originators of the world-famous Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seasoning salt have also become widely known for French dips, homemade salad dressings and highquality service. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We serve truly great food,â&#x20AC;? owner Anita Crabill stresses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our service is excellent, and our customers have really enjoyed getting to know our servers over the years.â&#x20AC;? Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Fife also offers a coffee

high-quality food in a friendly atmosphere well into the future.

shop, lounge area, dining room and ample meeting space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a family restaurant,â&#x20AC;? said Alex Crabill, son of owners John and Anita Crabill. As the fourth generation family member involved in the restaurant, Alex believes this tight-knit atmosphere sets it apart from national chain restaurants. The local community has long supported Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurants over the decades. Sister restaurant Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock opened in 1953 by John Crabillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grandfather, John Meaker, who opened a variety of restaurants throughout the region. Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Fife has been in the Crabill family since 1968. Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Fife is heavily involved in the local community, and is currently gearing up for the Relay for Life of

10

Fife/Milton/Edgewood with its own fundraising team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really care about our community,â&#x20AC;? Alex added. Breakfast is served all day, along with daily happy hour specials from 5-8 p.m. During any Mariners or Seahawks game, Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Fife offers a burger and any draft beer for only $6.50. And with ample television viewing space, Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is an ideal venue to catch a game. The restaurant offers a variety of discounts and special offers for regular customers who are members of the Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loyalty club. To sign up for the loyalty club, either visit the restaurant, or its website at MRKQQ\VDWĂ&#x20AC;IHFRP Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Fife is located at 5211 20th St. E. in Fife.

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B3

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 2013

SECTION B, PAGE 1

Raise a glass at

BREW

FIVE

THREE First-time event features an afternoon of malty libation and the best in homegrown blues talent

PHOTOS BY ERNEST JASMIN

LOCAL BREW. Brewer and co-owner Ken Thoburn works on a batch of beer at

Wingman Brewers. His brewery has teamed up with Tacoma Brewing Co. to create a special collaboration. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Tacomans love their microbrews. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obvious from the thousands that flock to events like the Tacoma Craft Beer Festival and its offshoot Big Beer Festival every year, not to mention all those â&#x20AC;&#x153;hop-headsâ&#x20AC;? that pack the Red Hot, the Parkway Tavern, Engine House No. 9 and the three Harmon pubs on any given weekend. And now organizers at Broadway Center hope they are about to launch Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next big beer tradition. Starting at 1 p.m. on June 22, the inaugural Brew Five Three festival will take over Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Broadway, between Ninth and 11th streets, for an afternoon of malty libation and the best in homegrown blues talent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Washington state has a big impact on craft beer all across America,â&#x20AC;? Broadway Center programming manager Aaron Stevens said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So we decided with this festival we would do Washington-only breweries. We havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen that done. â&#x20AC;Ś We also liked the idea of getting some of the local brewers to collaborate; we weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got four breweries that are doing collaboration beers that will be debuted at the festival.â&#x20AC;? Brew Five Three has rounded up a whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who of regional craft beer makers, the likes of Pyramid, Mac & Jackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Pike, 7 Seas and Fish Brewing, with 35 brewers participating in all. The aforementioned collaborations are between Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s E-9 and Harmon breweries, which teamed up for a special Brew Five Three Imperial style IPA, and the smaller, newer Wingman Brewery and Tacoma Brewing Company, which collaborated on a session IPA. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We used some really interesting hops,â&#x20AC;? Wingman brewer and co-owner Ken Thoburn explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Morgan (Alexander, who owns Tacoma Brew-

ing) brought down Belma hops, which are kind of a strawberry tasting hop, a really kind of experimental variety. And then I got a popular but very limited variety from New Zealand, called Nelson Sauvin, that has kind of a white wine, grape flavor to it. We thought that strawberry and white wine flavor would be a really good compliment.â&#x20AC;? Some of the brightest talent in regional blues will provide the musical ambiance. Chris Stevens & the Surf Monkeys with Jay Maybin will play from 2 to 3 p.m., T-Town Aces from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., Snake Oil Blues Elixer All Stars from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., followed by the godfather of Northwest blues, Little Bill Engelhardt at 8 p.m. His band, Little Bill & the Bluenotes, has existed in many incarnations since it laid the foundation for Northwestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legendary garagerock scene in the mid-1950s. But the June 22 performance will feature a rare expanded version that he calls Little Billâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Band, featuring Buck England on keys, Rod Cook on guitar, Tommy Morgan on drums and a full horn section. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The original Bluenotes had a three-piece horn section, and we were the only ones that did that around here at all,â&#x20AC;? Engelhardt recalled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It also reminds me of where I did so much of my schooling, which was standing in front of the bandstand at the Evergreen Ballroom and watching BB King and his big band or Bobby Bland and his band and those guys, you know. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I remember thinking Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotta do that, and I was lucky enough to do it. In fact, my big band during most of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s and most of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s, out of all of the configurations that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had of the Bluenotes, that big band was and always will be my favorite band that I had.â&#x20AC;?

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THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE GRAND FLORAL EXHIBIT Enjoy a burst of vivid summer color at W.W. Seymour Botanical Conser vator y in Wright Park during the 2013 Grand Floral Exhibit on June 18-28. $3 ages 12 and over. Opening the display on June 18, classical vocalist Teresa Lin will present a summertime bouquet of songs, 6-8 p.m., admission $5, light refreshments will be served. Seating for 40 (max.) so RSVP at (253) 591-5330.

support from Jake Owen and Thomas Rhett. Tickets will go on sale at 10 a.m. on June 14, with prices ranging from $37.84 to $66.30.

THREE CATHEDRALS TACOMA

TWO JASON ALDEAN Jason Aldean is headed to the Tacoma Dome. The country superstar, known for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Green Tractor,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hicktownâ&#x20AC;? and other radio hits, will headline on Sept. 27 with

Cathedrals Tacoma features unique contemplative concerts by indie singer-songwriters in the welcoming and acoustically rich space of Immanuel Presbyterian Church. The next concert in this series is

scheduled for June 21 at 8 p.m. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. and will feature the seven-piece indie folk group Paper Bird, out of Denver, and Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own Shenandoah Davis. The concert will open with special guests Elk & Boar, from Tacoma. This is an all-ages concert and seating is general admission. Tickets are on sale now for $16. Visit www.broadwaycenter.org.

are on sale now, $28-$69, at the Broadway Center Box Office, 901 Broadway; at (253) 591-5894, toll-free 1 (800) 291-7593; and online at www.BroadwayCenter.org.

FIVE

RACE FOR CASEN

FOUR PAULA POUNDSTONE Appearing onstage with just a microphone, a stool and a diet Pepsi, Paula Poundstone is sure to dazzle crowds in Tacoma this July with her razor-sharp wit and spontaneity. Broadway Center for the Performing Arts, The Rainbow Center and Tacoma Pride Festival will present this stand-up comedy legend on July 12, 7:30 p.m., in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic Pantages Theater as part of the 2013 Tacoma Pride Festival. Tickets

One-year-old Casen Buswell of Puyallup was born with an extremely rare congenital vascular malformation, and his family and friends are raising money for his medical bills. The Race for Casen 5K Race takes place on June 15, 11 a.m. at Edgemont Junior High in Edgewood. The Vendor Fair will start at 10 a.m. and continue after the race, through awards, auctions, raffles, and presentations, until 4 p.m. Register to run/ walk at http://raceforcasen.webs.com.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, June 14, 2013

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, June 14, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

‘THE LARAMIE PROJECT’ IS COMPELLING, POWERFUL DRAMA

ZOOBILEE ONLINE AUCTION IS UNDERWAY By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TACOMA LITTLE THEATRE

EMOTIONAL. (Left) Mark Peterson, playing a hospital administrator, speaks to reporters during a press conference. (Right) Rachel Fitzgerald, playing a friend of Matthew Shepard, sheds tears at the fence where he was beaten. By John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

I

n her program notes, Brie Yost noted that one of her theater colleagues told her: “Tacoma is not ready for ‘The Laramie Project.’” Sometimes plays force people to address difficult subject matter. “The Laramie Project” does so in a very powerful manner. People should see it, regardless if some local playgoers may not be ready for it. Tacoma Little Theatre is staging this play, inspired by the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard, a 21-year-old student at the University of Wyoming. The writers, Moises Kaufman and members of Tectonic Theater Project, made several visits to Laramie. The play is the result of their conversations with residents. The play takes place after Shepard’s death. It examines various time frames, such as the several days after he was beaten, when he lay in a hospital bed in critical condition before dying; and the legal proceedings for the two young men who were charged and convicted. Reporters from around the nation descended on the small college town. They are portrayed interviewing people, and Kaufman and his colleagues operate in a similar manner. The cast consists of Jen Aylsworth,

Russ Coffey, Mike Cooper, Rachel Fitzgerald, Marty MacKenzie, Jefri Peters, Mark Peterson, Tiffani Pike and Jeremy Thompson. Each cast member has numerous roles. For example, Thompson’s roles include Kaufman, Shepard’s father, a Catholic priest and the governor. A screen above the stage flashes the name of the character, which helps the audience keep track of who is speaking. The set is basic but effective. One prop that appears a few times is the fence to which Shepard was tied while beaten. A television screen above comes on a few times when Peterson, when portraying a hospital administrator, gives updates to the media on Shepard’s condition and upon his death. Laramie’s religious leaders are interviewed – a Catholic priest, Baptist minister, bishop in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the leader of the Unitarian Universalists. They offer insight into the social and cultural fabric of the town. We learn the killers, Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson, had religion in their lives. One was raised Mormon, while the other occasionally attended the Baptist minister’s church. Actors change from character to character quickly, often by donning a hat or shirt backstage and adjusting their voice, from a dignified college professor to the

casual tone of a young tavern customer. It is a great cast under the guidance of Yost, an excellent director. Shepard’s murder has been widely portrayed as a hate crime. Certainly hostility toward gay men was a factor in the rage the killers displayed. Comments from townspeople, however, made this reviewer ponder additional motives. A friend of the killers noted their use of methamphetamine, a drug known to make some people paranoid and violent. They allegedly committed a similar crime before in another town, beating a gay man in a robbery. Shepard was very small for a 21-year-old man, making him an easy target. His parents were well off; he wore expensive shoes and perhaps had other valuable items (an expensive watch, perhaps, or a nice leather jacket). Shepard was killed due to his sexual orientation, but he likely was targeted as well for his wallet. Each performance is followed by a question and answer session with the cast. It is well worth staying for. Due to the subject matter, the play is not recommended for those under the age of 13. “The Laramie Project” runs through June 23. Shows times are 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. on Sundays. For more information visit www. tacomalittletheatre.com or call (253) 2722281.

In advance of Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium’s annual Zoobilee gala fundraiser on July 19, an online auction is now underway to give people a way to contribute in supporting the zoo’s education and conservation efforts, as well as providing for operating costs of PDZA throughout the year. The auction runs to July 5, when bidding closes at 11:45 p.m. Visit www.zoobilee.org or go directly to the auction site at http://auctions. readysetauction.com/zoobilee. Participants will be asked to set up a free account to bid on items. Every item will have a “Win it Now” price if you want to make sure the item is yours. Featured items: • A seven-night stay in Villa 12 at Ocean Oasis in Mexico, located in the Ocean Oasis gated community. This two-bedroom, 2.5-bath villa, community pool and BBQ is within walking distance of Malecon with lots of restaurants and shopping. Ocean Oasis is located in La Paz, Mexico on the baja about 120 miles from Cabo. A great place for relaxing and fishing. • Two end-zone tickets to the Seattle Seahawks game vs. the Jacksonville Jaguars on Sept. 22 at Century Link Field. These prime seats are at the south end of the stadium and are in the first row immediately above the executive suites. • S'mores with the red wolves. You will get a private party for you and 11 friends to sip on cocoa and cook up some s’mores while having a special experience with the red wolves at PDZA. Red wolves are considered by many to represent North America’s greatest conservation success, and their stunning exhibit is a great place to spend the evening. • Seattle Mariners game day package. Two tickets to the Aug. 26 Mariners game at 7:10 p.m. Includes a parking pass and $8 in concessions for each ticket. Terrace Club seating is in Section 236, Row 4, seats 1 and 2. This package also includes a $50 gift card to enjoy FX McRory’s Steak Chop and Oyster House. Tickets for the Zoobilee grand raffle are also on sale. Grand prize is a 10-day luxury cruise for two aboard Holland America Cruise Line. Tickets are only $10. For more information about raffle tickets call (253) 404-3657.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 14, 2013

Tell your story of transformation at Drunken Telegraph By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

M

egan Sukys brought Northwest residents’ personal stories to local radio airwaves as producer of KUOW Presents on Seattle public radio station KUOW-FM (94.9). Her Tacoma neighbor, Tad Monroe, was also familiar with the power of stories to connect people through his work as former pastor at Urban Grace Church. “In different ways, we were both using stories in our work as a central piece in how to build community as well as our understanding of how transformation happens,” Monroe says. And so they created Drunken Telegraph, a storytelling series that borrows its name from a travel piece novelist Rudyard Kipling wrote about debauchery he witnessed in Tacoma in 1889. “The crude boarded pavements of the main streets rumbled under the heels of hundreds of furious men all actively engaged in hunting drinks,” he wrote, a few years before “The Jungle Book.” “Overhead the drunken telegraph, telephone and electric-light wires tangled on tottering posts whose butts were half whittled through by the knife of the loafer.” But the Drunken Telegraph series is not so much about perpetuating Tacoma’s still rowdy reputation as it is about empowering locals to tell their personal tales of transformation publicly. Since June 2012, Sukys and Monroe have coached local storytellers and overseen storytelling events held at Anthem Coffee, Over the Moon Cafe and Medi’s Pizza & Pasta. The first half of each has featured five speakers telling tales that fit a loose theme, i.e. “first time,” “just my luck” or “the greatest gift.” Then the more structured half of the show is followed by a “story slam,” during which audience members are invited to spin their best fiveminute yarn in pursuit of a small prize. The only hard and fast rule is “it has to be something that happened to you,

STORY TIME. Tad Monroe helps Tacomans tell their personal stories through Drunken Telegraph. Sukys explains. “So it’s not tall tales, it’s not fiction. It’s not this thing I saw from somebody else. It has to be a story about something that happened to you, and at the heart of every story is transformation. When we’re working with people that’s what we’re looking for: What happened to you and how were you changed by it?” On June 20, the Drunken Telegraph curators will lead a workshop at King’s Books aimed at bringing new storytellers into the fold. Participants will learn about story structure and methodology; and those with the most compelling story pitches may wind up in an upcoming Telegraph performance, two of which will be

part of Broadway Center’s next season, in November 2013 and April 2014. “In workshop, I take people through the questions you can ask ... to figure out where the turning points of the story were,” Sukys says. “What’s at stake? What would happen if this didn’t work out? That gives you a sense of tension. If you can identify in your story what’s at stake and what the tension is, then you can start to roll out the details in a way that leads to an exciting conclusion.” “We just try to help people find their own voice,” Monroe says. “We spend a lot of time helping them discern what details are important and maybe what details

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aren’t as essential to the story.” The workshop will start at 7:30 p.m. at King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma. Follow Drunken Telegraph on Facebook (www.facebook.com/drunkentelegraph) for the most up to date information on upcoming events. Drunken Telegraph live storytelling workshop 7:30 p.m. June 20 King’s Books 218 St. Helens Ave., Free (253) 272-8801 or Kingsbookstore.com

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

STRANGELY ALRIGHT: POP-ROCK THAT WILL CURE WHAT AILS YA

Friday, June 14, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 5

Live Music TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

KAREEM KANDI BAND BRING THEIR JAZZ REPERTOIRE TO UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FINGER LICKINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CHICKEN AND RIBS ON JUNE 16. THE ALL-AGES SHOW BEGINS AT 3 P.M. AND THERE IS NO COVER CHARGE. THE RESTAURANT IS LOCATED AT 3709 S. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ST.

PHOTO COURTESY OF REGAN BARGER

THE BAND. Strangely Alright features guitarist Jeff Reiner, drummer

Preston Darvill, singer-guitarist Regan Barger, keyboardist Lee Gregory and bassist Ken Schaff. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

S

inger-songwriter Regan L. Barger has been a staple of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rock scene since the late â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70s with stints in Baby Knockors, Strypes and Groovy Times in Babylon, among other bands. But he remained largely A.W.O.L. for years following the breakup of his band, Brokenness, in 2005. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The songwriting never goes away. But the reality is, my wife and I had a baby,â&#x20AC;? he said recently, by way of explanation. Not that he could give in to â&#x20AC;&#x153;the old picket fence mentalityâ&#x20AC;? forever. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The simplest way to put it is when Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not doing music Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not whole,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So I started writing again and really getting back into it about a year ago. It makes me complete; I mean, I like being a dad. I like being a husband, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in some recovery-based stuff thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for me. But musicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been such an integral part of my life, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m such a

huge fan, too.â&#x20AC;? Bargerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s musical rediscovery led to Strangely Alright, the new pop-rock outfit he formed with bassist Ken Schaff. The name of the band is a reflection of the struggles he has overcome to find balance in his life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I used to be a dope fiend, and now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been clean and sober for quite some time,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It used to be breathing is good enough. But now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice to feel â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;strangely alright.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? The bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s debut album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Time Machine Is Broken,â&#x20AC;? recently surfaced on iTunes, Amazon and CDBaby.com, its title and many of its lyrics inspired by the philosophy that keeps him grounded. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The idea of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Time Machine Is Brokenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is that I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go forward and I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go back,â&#x20AC;? Barger said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So I want to live in the now. The whole record is really based on being in the now, being in the here. The things in the past are just that; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just illusions, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lessons. And the

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future: I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what that is?â&#x20AC;? The band also includes Lee Gregory on keyboards and vocals, Jeff Reiner on lead guitar and Preston Darvill on percussion. Their 11-song CD was recorded under the direction of Todd Ensminger. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What happens to me is I always wind up going back to pop music,â&#x20AC;? Barger said. That could be the Beatles, the Raspberries, Crowded House, Jellyfish. I like that kind of stuff. It just is what it is. But there are certain aspects of this record (inspired by) how Bowie has taken some modern instrumentation (with) synths and things used as sound effects and texture with the whole foundation still being a pop song that you can play on acoustic guitar.â&#x20AC;? Strangely Alright will next perform at 4 p.m. on June 22 on the main stage at Meeker Days, located at Meeker Street and Second Street SE, in Puyallup; at Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Point Defiance Park during Taste of Tacoma 2 p.m. on July 29; and at 7 p.m. at Seattle Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mural Amphitheatre during Bite of Seattle.

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BEFORE MIDNIGHT (108 MIN, R)

Fri 6/14: 1:55, 4:15, 6:45, 9:10 Sat 6/15-Sun 6/16: 11:35am, 1:55, 4:15, 6:45, 9:10 Mon 6/17-Thu 6/20: 1:55, 4:15, 6:45, 9:10

KON TIKI (118 MIN, PG-13)

Fri 6/14: 1:45, 3:55, 6:10, 8:25 Sat 6/15-Sun 6/16: 11:30am, 1:45, 3:55, 6:10, 8:25 Mon 6/17: 1:45, 3:55, 6:10, 8:25 Tue 6/18: 3:55, 6:10, 8:25 Wed 6/19-Thu 6/20: 1:45, 3:55, 6:10, 8:25

MUD (130 MIN, PG-13)

Fri 6/14: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Sat 6/15-Sun 6/16: 12:10, 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Mon 6/17-Thu 6/20: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35

WHAT MAISIE KNEW (99 MIN, R)

Fri 6/14-Sun 6/16: 2:05, 6:30 Mon 6/17-Tue 6/18: 2:05 Wed 6/19-Thu 6/20: 2:05, 6:30

FRANCES HA (86 MIN, R)

Fri 6/14: 4:25, 8:50 Sat 6/15-Sun 6/16: 11:45am, 4:25, 8:50 Mon 6/17-Thu 6/20: 4:25, 8:50

FRIDAY, JUNE 14

MONDAY, JUNE 17

EMERALD QUEEN: Social Network (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC

C.I. SHENANIGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Collaborative Works Jazz, 8 p.m. EAGLES LOUNGE: Darrell Data (Vocals/guitar) 6 p.m. GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Just Dirt (Rock covers) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: T-Town Aces (Blues) 8 p.m., $5 LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Blistered Earth (Metallica tribute) Agents of Chaos, Watcherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eye, 8 p.m., $10, AA MAXWELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER LOUNGE: Santee, Baltic Cousins, 8 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Height Requirement, 9 p.m. STONEGATE: Crosswalk, 9 p.m. SWISS: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m. TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (Jazz guitarist) 5 p.m. UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: American Roulette, 8 p.m. UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Gary Cook (Jazz guitarist) 5:30 p.m., NC, AA VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, JUNE 15 UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jumpinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Josh Violette, Maia Santell & House Blend (Blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA C.I. SHENANIGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Collaborative Works Jazz, 8 p.m. DESTINATION HARLEY DAVIDSON: Little Bill (Blues) Noon EMERALD QUEEN: Social Network (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nguyen Hung (Asian pop) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Jon Wayne & the Pain, Mighty High, the Approach (Reggae) 8 p.m., $10 NEW FRONTIER: Death By Stars, I Like Science, Oh Dear, 8 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Height Requirement, 9 p.m. STONEGATE: Crosswalk, 9 p.m. SWISS: Space Band (Top 40) 9 p.m. UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Calbrea, Trip Madam, 8 p.m. VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

SUNDAY, JUNE 16

STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino (Blues jam) 8 p.m.

JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke, 9 p.m. SWISS: Richard Molina (Blues) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Bill Pease, Paul Buck, Chris Gartland (Blues) 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, JUNE 18 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (Acoustic open mic) 8 p.m.

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (Blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSONS: Jho Blenis, Shelly Ely (Blues jam) 8 p.m. LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: (Acoustic open mic) 6 p.m. NEW FRONTIER: (Open jam), 9 p.m., NC UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Blenis/Ely Band (Blues jam) 7:30 p.m., AA

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19 TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (Jazz guitarist) 5 p.m.

A RHAPSODY IN BLOOM: Kevin Jones, 7 p.m. DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Rubber Band (Jam session) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Crazy Texas Gypsies (Jam session) 8 p.m. GIBSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S (STADIUM DISTRICT): Ephraim Richardson (Open mic) 7 p.m. STONEGATE: Dave Nichols, 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Tom Boyle, 8 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, JUNE 20

DAWSONS: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m., NC

UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jerry Miller (Blues) 7 p.m.

RENOIR (111 MIN, R)

Tue 6/18: 1:40, 6:30

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ANTHEM: Taxi Driver (Jazz) 7 p.m. NEW FRONTIER: (Bluegrass jam) 3 p.m. SPAR: Mark Dufresne (Blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman & All-Star Band, 8 p.m. UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Remedy (Jam session) UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Kareem Kandi Band (Jazz) 3 p.m., NC, AA

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew Band (Jam session) 8 p.m., NC EAGLES LOUNGE: Biff Moss (Ukelele/guitar) 6 p.m. JAZZBONES: Kry (Rock covers) 11 p.m., $7 ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lafferty (Open mic) 8:30 p.m. STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (Jam) 9 p.m. SWISS: Twang Junkies, 8 p.m. TOWER BAR & GRILL: Denny Foreman (Jazz)

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 14, 2013

SAT., JUNE 15 POINT DEFIANCE CLEANUP ETC – Join volunteers from Surfriders and CHIP in! to make a difference in the health and cleanliness of Point Defiance Marina. Beach clean-ups are held by Metro Parks Tacoma on the third Saturday of every month. Info: http:// www.metroparkstacoma.org. ROCK AND WALK

COMING EVENTS

BANNED BOOK CLUB ETC – Join this corrupt book club reading books that have been banned or challenged. June’s selection is “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Books are available for purchase at King’s Books. The group meets at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

THURS., JUNE 20 LIVE STORYTELLING WORKSHOP ETC – Megan Sukys and Tad Monroe, co-producers of Tacoma’s real-life storytelling show “Drunken Telegraph,” will share techniques and tips that can help you craft a stage-worthy story from memorable events of your life. The event starts at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

FRI., JUNE 21 BROAD HORIZONS BOOK CLUB ETC – Join this futuristic book club reading feminist speculative fiction! June’s selection is “Alif The Unseen” by Willow G. Wilson. Books are available for purchase at King’s Books. The group meets at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www. kingsbookstore.com.

SAT., JUNE 22 BREW FIVE THREE BEER AND BLUES FEST HAPPENINGS – This new beer lovers’ block party – orga-

production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

CELEBRATE THE 30TH ANNIVERSARY RELEASE OF CYNDI LAUPER’S ICONIC DEBUT ALBUM “SHE’S SO UNUSUAL!” THE ALBUM, WHICH SPAWNED FOUR TOP-5 HITS ON THE BILLBOARD 100 AND MADE LAUPER A DEFINING VOICE OF THE 1980S, WILL BE PERFORMED IN ITS ENTIRETY. INCLUDED WILL BE ALL-TIME HITS “GIRLS JUST WANNA HAVE FUN,” “SHE BOP,” AND “ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT.” CYNDI LAUPER HAS RECORDED NINE ALBUMS, WHICH HAVE SOLD MORE THAN 50 MILLION COPIES WORLDWIDE. OTHER HIT SINGLES SHE HAS RELEASED INCLUDE “TRUE COLORS,” “WE ARE THE WORLD,” “CHANGE OF HEART” AND “SHATTERED DREAMS.” SO, GATHER THE POSSE AND BUST OUT THE LEG WARMERS FOR THIS TRULY EPIC CONCERT! THE SHOW TAKES PLACE JUNE 16 AT THE PANTAGES THEATER AT 7:30 P.M. TICKETS: $59-$129.

The TEARS Foundation invites the community to join a fundraising effort to support families who have experienced the loss of a child. The Rock & Walk is a family friendly event boasting good food, music and an uplifting balloon release held at Cheney Stadium on June 15. Kids are also invited to run the bases with Rhubarb. The aim of the Rock & Walk is to let bereaved families know they’re not alone, raise funds to support families that have experienced the loss of a child and build community awareness about pregnancy and infant loss. The event starts at 10 a.m. at Cheney Stadium, located at 2502 S. Tyler St. in Tacoma. Info: http://www. thetearsfoundation.org.

TUES., JUNE 18

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater

TW PICK: CELEBRATION OF CYNDI LAUPER’S ‘SHE’S SO UNUSUAL’

HAPPENINGS –

‘WHAT’S COOKING?’ AT FORT NISQUALLY ETC – The smell of campfires, sizzling bacon, and simmering stews will greet visitors during “What’s Cooking?” at Fort Nisqually Living History Museum. This year, celebrity guest judge Dick Stein, co-host and producer of KPLU’s “Food for Thought,” will help select the winner of the event’s cooking competition and award the Golden Skillet. The Fort’s reenactors will cook on a wood stove and over numerous campfires to prepare a variety of 19th century dishes. There is also a presentation about 19th century cooking and a demonstration of all things butter related – churning, paddling and molding. Visitors of all ages can enjoy playing games, taking a turn at churning butter, and engaging in conversations with dozens of re-enactors throughout the Fort, including blacksmiths, wool spinners, trappers and traders, laundresses, and ladies and gentlemen. The event starts at 11 a.m. at Fort Nisqually Living History Museum, located at Point Defiance Park. Info: call (253) 591-5339 or http://www.fortnisqually.org.

Promote your community event,

tors and DJs, playing awesome swing music from the 1930s and 1940s, and it is sure to keep all the dancers hopping all night long! In addition, we also offer blues every blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month, and Friday, and Kizomba every fourth Sunday. BALLROOM DANCING AT STAR CENTER HAPPENINGS – The STAR Center hosts ballroom dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. Phone: (253) 404-3939. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/star. The STAR Center is located at 3873 S. 66th St. ZIP LINE NOW OPEN HAPPENINGS – Two courses at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium test physical agility and mental toughness – and anyone can conquer them. Zoom is more than a zip line; it is an aerial activity course that includes a number of challenges such as a swinging log bridge strung between trees; a high wire to walk; and a fishermen’s net strung between trees to climb through. And, yes, there are sections of zip line to put some zing into the adventure experience. Zoom will be open weekends through June 14. It opens daily for the summer season on June 15. There are two distinct circuits to Zoom, one for kids as young as 5, sized just right for smaller children, and one with appeal for a range of ages, including adventureseeking adults. Info: www.pdza. org/zoom.

nized by Broadway Center and Beer Essentials – will take over Broadway, between South Ninth and 11th streets, from 1-10 p.m. Tacoma Brewing, Engine House No. 9 and other local brewers will serve up the suds, with music provided by T-Town Aces, Chris Stevens’ Surf Monkeys, Snake Oil Elixir All Stars and the godfather of Northwest blues, Bill Engelhardt, and his latest version of Little Bill & the Bluenotes. Tickets are $25 through June 15, $30 later. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org. SENIOR PROM The 4th Annual Senior Prom, “Some Enchanted Evening,” will be held from 6-9 p.m. at Stadium High School for anyone 55 or better. Welcomed back is Route 66, a 16-piece big band that wowed the crowd at last year’s Senior Prom. Kick up your heels or simply come to listen. This big band plays sounds from the swing era and has been providing great music in the Puget Sound for more than 25 years. Their repertoire consists of the classic and authentic big band hits by such greats as Glenn Miller, Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole and Count Basie among others. The lovely and very talented vocalists, Cindy Solvang and Ingrid DuMosch, add a special touch of glamour and excitement to the music. Route 66 has a very large and loyal following earned from years of appearances at many corporate, civic and private functions all over the Seattle and Puget Sound area, and they make the Senior Prom a very special occasion. Tickets are $5 each, and can be purchased online at www.franktobeyjones. com or at the door. HAPPENINGS

SUN., JUNE 23 TACOMA STREET SCRAMBLE – Starting from the Washington State History Museum in downtown Tacoma, scour this historic area looking for as many checkpoints as you can find in 90 minutes or three hours! Discover many of Tacoma’s landmarks and neighborhoods like the waterfront along Ruston Way, the Thea Foss Waterway, the Tacoma Dome, Commencement Bay and Old Town. Have fun while exploring this great city. The event HAPPENINGS

starts at the Washington State History Museum, located at 1911 Pacific Ave., at 12:30 p.m. Info: streetscramble.com.

TUES., JUNE 25 CAPES AND COWLS BOOK CLUB ETC – Join this book club adapted to mutants, aliens, technogeeks and puny humans who like to read superhero comics. June’s book is “Uncanny X-Force: Apocalypse Solution” by Rick Remender. Books are available at King’s Books. The club meets at 8 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com. VEGAN BOOK CLUB ETC – Join the Vegan Book Club, coordinated by The South Sound Vegan Meetup Group. The book club is open to anyone interested in a vegan diet, vegans and vegancurious alike. The book for June is “Extra Virginity” by Tom Muller. Books are available at King’s Books. The group meets at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

WED., JUNE 26 FOOD JUSTICE BOOK CLUB ETC – Join the new Food Justice Book Club organized by the Pierce County Gleaning Project, focusing on fiction, non-fiction and memoir around the topics of food justice, gleaning and food security. June’s book is “Rebuilding the Foodshed” by Philip Ackerman-Leist. Books are available at King’s Books. The book club meets at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

THURS., JUNE 27 PILL JUNKIES READING ETC – Joshua Swainston, author of the novel “The Tacoma Pill Junkies,” will be joined at this special reading by Titus Burley and Melissa Thayer. “The Tacoma Pill Junkies” follows the lives of working class, twenty-something pill addicts as they find out what trouble success can bring. The event starts at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

SAT., JUNE 29 BILL BARCLAY TALK ETC – King’s Books welcomes Bill Barclay as he discusses “The Failure of Neoliberalism: Financial Panic, Economic Stagnation, and What We Can Do About It.” Dr. Bill Barclay was in financial services for 22 years before retiring in 2004. The event starts at 2 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www. kingsbookstore.com.

BULLETIN BOARD EXPLORE THE SHORE HAPPENINGS – Explore the Shore will provide hands-on learning about sea creatures and train participants how to be citizen scientists. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium will teach children, adults and families more about Puget Sound’s beaches and the creatures that live there. The zoo’s Explore the Shore programs are set for June 26, July 7, July 22 and Aug. 20 at Owen Beach in Point Defiance Park. All are timed to take best advantage of the low minus tides that reveal many of Puget Sound’s most interesting shoreline creatures. The events and programs are free and open to the public and reservations are not required. Bring sunscreen and wear shoes and clothing appropriate for walking on rough beach terrain. Zoo naturalists accompany participants on low tide beach walks, where kids and adults will learn to identify tide pool animals and record their presence and location for addition to the scientific Nature Mapping database (www.naturemappingfoundation.org). Participants will learn about the biological diversity of local beaches and better understand how to protect them. For more information about Explore the Shore, go to www.PDZA.org or call (253) 404-3665. T-TOWN SWING – Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located in downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m. is $5. The atmosphere is super laid-back and fun, and features great guest instrucHAPPENINGS

TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC MUSIC – Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd. For more info, visit www.tbmoutreach.org. HOT HULA FITNESS ETC – Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. FREE FIRST WEEKENDS ETC – Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. Info: museums. bankofamerica.com. UKULELE CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 2723211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic. com.

Many more calendar listings available at www.tacomaweekly.com

Friday, June 14, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

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HIGH GROSSING, VERY PROFITABLE COFFEE SHOP CAFE FOR SALE $130,000 High trafic Count location. VINOTIQUE WINE SHOP/BAR/ DELI IN LAKEWOOD Business is for sale for $150,000. Cash/ terms. GREEN PUP SPORTS BAR & GRILL (famous for its pizza) $199,000, cash. LOCAL HIGH GROSSING POPULAR BAR & GRILL $220,000, terms negotiable, ngcap. endiseating 74, great kit.p PORT OF TACOMA DINER Breakfast & Lunch, M-F, Price $70,000. Long-time established & great location. VERY SUCCESSFUL/ PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR e $320,000 Terms Business is Forpr Sale icfor reduced are avail. LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. Same location 15 years in Lakewood. Excellent lease with contract terms. price $36,000 reduced LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $565,000 (R.E. $525K) Bus. $40K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNDISCLOSEDâ&#x20AC;? BEAUTY SALON In Puyallup, Great Location, $35,000 Cash. Call Angelo, price d reduce (253) 376-5384. RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WARestr./Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, price laundromat. duced re

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All New King Pillow Top Mattress Box Set 3 Pieces. New & Factory Sealed w/Warranty.. $249. Can Deliver (253) 537 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3056 New Adjustable Bed With Memory Foam Mattress. Wall Hugger with Warranty. $2,800 :LOO6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FHIRU 253.539.1600 New Platform Bdrm Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand, H e a d b o a r d , Footboard, Rails. Still Boxed. Retails at $2,600. Will Take $850. 253.539.1600 New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID Loveseat. Still in plastic Can have for $750 (253) 539-1600 Absolutely New! Memory Foam Mattress Set! Can Deliver. Worth $2,000 Asking $450 (253) 537-3056

ANTIQUES WANTED

City of ma o Tac Jobs www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs â&#x20AC;˘ Is your business struggling in the new economy? â&#x20AC;˘ Are you working more hours for less profit? â&#x20AC;˘ Would you like to create an additional profit center using your existing client base? For more information contact: Lynette (253) 304-2262 Email: lynette2325@aol.com Web Developer & IT Technician Pierce County Community Newspaper Group (PCCNG) is the premier producer of community newspapers in the Tacoma and Pierce County area. Along ZLWKRXUĂ DJVKLSSXEOLFDWLRQWKH7DFRPD:HHNO\ZH SXEOLVKWKH)LIH)UHH3UHVV0LOWRQ(GJHZRRG6LJQDO DQG3X\DOOXS7ULEDO1HZV3&&1*LVLQQHHGRID :HE'HYHORSHU ,77HFKQLFLDQ Â&#x2021;$QXQGHUVWDQGLQJRI WEB DEVELOPER SKILLS 6RFLDO1HWZRUNLQJDQG NEEDED/PREFERRED KRZWRPDUNHWZLWKLW Â&#x2021;([SUHVVLRQ(QJLQH Â&#x2021;:LQGRZV;3  Â&#x2021;3+3M4XHU\-DYDVFULSW management and repair Â&#x2021;0\64/ VNLOOV Â&#x2021;'RPDLQ KRVWLQJ Â&#x2021;0DF26;   management management and repair Â&#x2021;*RRJOH$SSV VNLOOV NICE TO HAVE Â&#x2021;$ELOLW\WRPDQDJHURXWÂ&#x2021;:RUNLQJNQRZOHGJHRI HUVVZLWFKHVDQGFDEOH $GREH&UHDWLYH6XLWH modems ,Q'HVLJQ3KRWRVKRS Â&#x2021;([SHULHQFHPDQDJLQJ ,OOXVWUDWRU

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, June 14, 2013

NOTICES

TO: Luis Mora, aka Moran, aka Gerardo Mendez Ortiz and John Doe In the Welfare of: K., J. DOB: 04/19/1999 Case Number: PUY-TPR-04/12-003 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

NOTICES

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE-PML

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You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 12th day of September, 2013 at 2:30 p.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

The City of Milton has received a the following applications which require public Notice: â&#x20AC;˘ 05-2013 - T-Mobile Site Plan approval â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Upgrade existing wireless facility to current technology. â&#x20AC;˘ 04-2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Hamel Short Plat â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Proposed short plat to create 3 lots out of 1 existing lot located at 1207 11th Ave.

TO: Kelly Iyotte

Both projects are SEPA exempt. A full copy of the plans and applications are available upon request at the Planning and Community Development Department located at 1000 Laurel St Milton, WA 98354.

In the Matter of: I., K. Case Number: PUY-CV-NC-2013-0128 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 25th day of June, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Byron Lyle Fryberg In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Byron Lyle Fryberg Case Number: PUY-FH-SHELL-2013-0015 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 13th day of August, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

Comments on the above application must be submitted in writing to Chris Larson, Contract Planner, Planning and Community Development Department, 1000 Laurel Street, Milton, WA 98354, by 5:00 PM on June 28th, 2013. If you have questions about this proposal, or wish to be made a party of record and receive additional information by mail, please contact Chris Larson, at 253-517-2715 or clarson@cityofmilton.net. Anyone who submits written comments will automatically EHFRPHDSDUW\RIUHFRUGDQGZLOOEHQRWLĂ&#x20AC;HG of any decision on this project.

VOLUNTEERS Changing Rein Volunteer Orientation & Training Sunday, June 30th, 2013 12pm through 6pm 6204 288th St E Graham, WA 98338 253-370-1429 www.changingrein.org

2013 Freedom Fair July 3rd-6th Looking for volunteers for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Freedom Fair on Ruston Way July 4th and Wings and Wheels at the Tacoma Narrows Airport on July 6th! Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something for everyone; set-up, take-down, logistics, hospitality, air show cruise and VIP dock, security, parking assistance, and admissions. Come down and join the fun and help make this

another memorable year for the beautiful city of Tacoma! Contact Jen at jlinenko@gmail.com for more info or http://www. freedomfair.com

AmeriCorps Opportunity Read2Me Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to assist in the Read2Me Program in local elementary schools. Read2Me is a one-on-one adult/ student reading proJUDPIRUVWUXJJOLQJĂ&#x20AC;UVW second, and third grade readers. Duties include gathering resources for tutor strategies, recruiting new volunteers, leading in tutor recruitment and retention, helping the Read2Me Coordinators in assess-

VOLUNTEERS ment, tracking student success, and tutoring. Applicants must be 1825 years of age at the start date of service (Sep 1, 2013-Jul 15, 2014). Contact Karen Thomas at (253)-3833951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse. org for more information.

AmeriCorps Opportunity Employment Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to serve closely with the employment staff to develop and conduct work-readiness workshops for youth and adult participants. Duties include assisting adult and youth participants with online job search, resumes, and applications, assisting in the planning and execution of workshops, assisting with afterschool tutoring for refugee and immigrant youth, and mentoring youth in the Career Pathways Program. Applicants must be 18-25 years of age at the start date of service (Sep 1, 2013-Jul 15, 2014). Contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Help teach English to Spanish Speaking Seniors We need a volunteer to teach ESL to a group of Spanish speaking seniors Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10:3011:30am weekly. Maybe also stay to help translate during the other programs until 2:30 pm. The class is at Portland Ave Community Center 3513 Portland Ave E Tacoma, Contact Bonnie Elliser at 253-591-5391. Volunteer with Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful! Make your neighborhood more beautiful and help your neighbors in need! Volunteer with Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful! Apply now as an individual or crew to paint houses of low-income homeowners during the summer of 2013. Learn more at: http://associatedministries.org/community-mobilization/ paint-tacoma-piercebeautiful/volunteer/ Contact Info: Megan Shea at 253-383-3056*142 or megans@associatedministries.org Volunteer needed to teach exercise class for seniors Tai Chi, sails class or yoga. Tuesday & Thursday mornings 10 or 11 AM. Portland Ave Community Center, 3513 Portland Ave E Tacoma, WA 98404. Call and speak with Bonnie @ 253591-5391

PETS Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. They DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HGYDFFLQDWHG and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www. southsoundoutreach.org. Project Homeless Connect is an annual event where homeless individuals can receive free services. The next event will be held in Sumner, WA on Friday, May 17th. For more information visit www. pchomelessconnect.com or call 253.593.2111. Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! The Business & Responsive Agency Council helps district leadership with busiQHVVSODQQLQJĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDOVXVtainability decisions, revenue development and quality assurance. Monthly meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/business-volunteer to learn more or call Brett Freshwaters, Chief FinanFLDO2IĂ&#x20AC;FHUDW Brettf@tacomaparks.com. Metro Parks Tacoma Special events bring the community together and provide families with affordable fun. Metro Parks Tacoma needs volunteers to help produce memorable events. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/volunteer and signup WREHQRWLĂ&#x20AC;HGRIVSHFLDOHYHQW service opportunities. To learn more, contact Roxanne Miles, Volunteer Manager, at 253.305.1068. Roxannem@ tacomaparks.com.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks. com or 253.305.1025. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and TherDSLHV D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W RIIHUV equine assisted services to differently-abled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253-3701429 or volunteer@changingrein.org.

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wafflesâ&#x20AC;? Craving something sweet and comforting? Then youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ZDQWWRPHHWRXU)HDWXUHG3HWWKLVZHHN:DIĂ HVLVMXVW as delightful as her name suggests. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a beautiful and independent lady whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s looking for the perfect forever KRPH:DIĂ HVLVDQLQGRRUNLWW\EXWORYHVWRH[SORUH WKHRXWVLGHZRUOGRQFHLQDZKLOH6KH¡VDQH[FHOOHQW FRPSDQLRQIRUDQDGXOWZKRHQMR\VDTXLHWKRPHDQGD UHDGLQJSDUWQHUWRFXUOXSQH[WWR,QWKHSDVW:DIĂ HV has only lived in households with adults and no other SHWVVKHZRXOGSUHIHULWWRVWD\WKDWZD\%XWGRQ¡WZRUU\ sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll give you all the love and attention youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need. Take :DIĂ HVKRPHZLWK\RXWRGD\5HIHUHQFH$

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Henry Henry is a super affectionate little boy with tons of love to give his future Forever Family! He is a laid back guy who will get along with pretty much anything.

Sophie

Sophie is the most incredible cat! She is a gentle, intelligent, super sweet, and laid back. She is a beauty, although born with a cleft lip, which requires she be fed primarily soft food. Sophie is the absolute perfect companion, a master of purring who enjoys rubs and attention. She truly needs a loving Forever Family to bring her home.

www.MetroAnimalServices.org

Friday, June 14, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV NEW LISTING

Doug Arbogast (253) 307-4055 Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

2914 N 30th St $419,000

Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs.

4424 6th Ave Suite 1, Tacoma, WA 98406

Tired of renting? Jennifer Pacheco Monthly payments Mortgage Officer on a new home Loan NMLS #486264 could be less than 253-926-4131 your rent. Call me www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com for details!

Stephanie Lynch 253.203.8985 HOMES FOR SALE

Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities.

Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

318 68TH AVE TACOMA, WA 98424 Fife School District Price: $400,000 Beds: 3 Baths: 2.25 Home size: 3,200 sq ft Lot Size: Shy of one acre

HOMES FOR SALE

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future!

Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

FIFE HEIGHTS RETREAT HOME

HOMES FOR SALE

CALL 253.922.5317

For qualifications contact Jen

Loan products subject to credit approval

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE 723 S. Tyler

3 bed 1.75 bath 2,340 sf. Majestic views. 0RYH LQ UHDG\ PLGFHQWXU\ PRGHUQ 1HDU 3URFWRU 'LVWULFW  5XVWRQ :D\ ZDWHUIURQW Minutes from I-5 for easy commuting. 6WXQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFH JOHDPLQJ KDUGZRRGV ORYHO\  HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW NLWFKHQ D VHFOXGHG  backyard, deck w/ view. MLS# 489114

HOMES FOR SALE $219,000

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

Classic Brick home in amazing condition with 3 bedrooms and 1.75 baths. Living rm. with newer pellet stove to keep you warm in the winter months! Retro kitchen w/newer appliances and eating nook, VHSDUDWHGLQLQJUPDQGEHDXWLIXOKDUGZRRGVPDLQĂ RRUEHGURRPV and a full bath. Basement has 1 bedroom and 3/4 bath with space for Ă&#x20AC;QLVKLQJDQDGGLWLRQDOUHFIDPLO\URRP3ULYDWHIXOO\IHQFHGEDFN\DUG with mature landscaping and a sprinkler system! Really great house. Come see! MLS# 391728 &DOO3DP/LQGJUHQ 253 691-0461 for more info or for a private showing! %HWWHU3URSHUWLHV13URFWRU

Terrific neighborhood with Puget Sound VIEW! 923 N. G St, Tacoma, WA 98403

WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT 1RUWK6DOPRQ%HDFK&RPPXQLW\ RQ7DFRPD1DUURZVIHHW overwater frontage leasehold SURSHUW\'HFNZ SDUNLQJORW rights. $25,000 &RQWDFW6DOPRQ%HDFK1RUWK Marilyn Jorgenson 253-219-0883 HOMES

HOMES

Owners say sell!!

Margo Hass Klein

You will love the hardwood floors, leaded windows, French Doors & custom builtins throughout this wonderful 3 BR, 2 BA home in North Tacoma. Formal dining room w/boxed ceiling, eat-in kitchen w/ lots of storage space + appliances are included. Formal living room includes a cozy woodstove, access to the covered balcony & reading room. The beautiful staircase leads to the master w/private VIEW balcony, 2 additional bedrooms, office nook & another full bath. The basement includes a multi-purpose family room, laundry room & tons of storage. Large corner lot features mature landscaping + fully fenced backyard including extra parking. Alley access to the oversize single-car garage.

Coldwell Banker Bain

(253) 279-9949 margohassklein@cbbain.com www.margohassklein.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I act in your best interest, not mine. You deserve respect from the first time we shake hands to the last.â&#x20AC;?

Call Margo for more information or to schedule a private viewing.

$399,000

43:  3504 N. Monroe 5VY[O,UK*SPURLY )YPJR-P_LY

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in nd

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43:  6423 47th St Ct W IKIHZM <UP]7SHJL

43:  7829 S 19th St IKIHZM ;HJVTH

43:  15421 Rose RD SW IKIHZM 3HRL^VVK

Call Mark Hulen today! 253.761.8888 )L[[LY7YVWLY[PLZ57YVJ[VY

1505 S Mason Ave, Tacoma WA 98405

$224,000 MLS # 479914

REAL ESTATE I N V E S T M E N T

SERVICES REIS

For Sale

www.REISinvest.com www.REIS4rentbyowner.com Property Management Receiverships Condo/Home Owners Association Management Bank REO Acquisitions Commercial Sales/Leasing

For Rent

For Lease

3 Beds, 1.75 Baths, 2,040 sf Bring your vision and you are set! Lovely roomy 3 bedroom home with formal dining and rec room. Plus, an extra bonus room. Large back yard with plenty of shade; deck off kitchen with hot tub. Imagine your barbecues. Locate on nice quiet street. Good access to bus lines and freeways. Shopping and entertainment just blocks away. Home has a heat pump system for HIÂżFLHQWFRVWHIIHFWLYHKHDWLQJDQGFRROLQJ

Ralph Garlington Real Estate Specialist

206-399-6764 Ralph@johnlscott.com

TWO FOR THE PRICE OF ONE MLS # 472004

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Lease Also 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

2 Condos $295,000 6319 19th, #s 9 & 11 1921 sq ft In UP across from TCC 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Mixed Use REO $350,000 4141 6th Ave 1 Comm. unit; 8 res 253-752-9742

Waterview Crossing $13,900,000 1600 Unit Dev.Des Moines. Currently 3 Mobil Parks. GI $563,168 253-752-9742

Tacoma (253) 752-9742

u

Newly Remodeled $1275 7034 S Junett St 3br 2 bath 1250 sf 253.752.9742

www.REISinvest.com

Beckenridge Rambler $1,450 9051 Ridgeview Circle W 3br 2 bath, 1557 sqft 253-752-9742

University Place Stratford Heights Apt 1, 2 or 3 bd w/ Garage On Site 253-565-0343 253-752-9742

Office/Warehouse 3875 Steilacoom Blvd, Lakewood From 2500 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com www.REISinvest.com

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Sale or Lease 253-752-9742

Newly Priced $1500 2429 163rd St CT E 3br 2.5 bath 2256 sqft. 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

u

Office/Retail 7609 Steilacoom Blvd SW Lakewood 1340 sq ft. $12.95 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Downtown Office Condos 705 S 9th. Tacoma for Sale & Lease 253-752-9742

DuPont (253) 207-5871

Seattle South Lake Union (206) 319-5981

$179,500

3614 Tacoma Ave S - A&B

3614 A A spacious charming Craftsmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with 4 %HGURRPVRUEHGURRPVDGHQRIÂżFHZLWK7KLV LQFOXGHVXSVWDLUVPDLQĂ&#x20AC;RRUDQGEDVHPHQW 3614 B A charming mother-in-law unit approximately 64IWZLWKRQHEHGURRPOLYLQJNLWFKHQXWLOLW\ The combined living space is over 3000 sq. ft; located in the historic Lincoln district. And is block away from Lincoln High School, bus and shopping. Both units come with washer, dryer and refrigerator.

Ralph Garlington Real Estate Specialist

206-399-6764 Ralph@johnlscott.com

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 14, 2013

Billy Gardell

CageSport MMA

Ted Nugent

June 22, 8:30pm

July 6, 7pm

July 19 & 20, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom, $25, $35, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom, $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom, $35, $45, $60, $65

Randy Travis

Moonwalker

Andrew Dice Clay

August 18, 7pm

August 29, 8pm

September 7, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom, $30, $45, $60, $65

I-5 Showroom, $10, $20, $35, $40

I-5 Showroom, $25, $40, $60, $65

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


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