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FREE s Friday, February 21, 2014

GOLDEN GLOVES RETURNS

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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

CHARTER REVIEW LOOKS TO TACOMA’S PAST TO FORM ITS FUTURE By Steve Dunkelberger Stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

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acoma’s Charter Review Committee got an earful of issues to ponder on its task at the Feb. 12 public hearing through a parade of former city council members and former mayors

taking to the stand to give their thoughts. The committee interviewed Mayor Marilyn Strickland, former mayors Karen Vialle, Harold Moss and Doug Sutherland, as well as former council members Connie Ladenburg and Rick Talbert as part of the committee’s efforts to draft a list of changes to the city’s charter to then be reviewed by the

city council in May. Three main issues arose again and again during the discussion. A possible shift to a “strong mayor” system filled most of the testimony with the balance covering the oversight of Tacoma’s utilities and the level of independence of the city council. “I am of the camp that it isn’t the what; it’s the who,” Strickland

said about her neutral stance on the city’s current council-manager form of government, adding that the current calls for a system that has Tacoma’s mayor playing more of an active role in policy making could be done under the current system as well. Phoenix, San Antonio, Dallas and Sacramento have Tacoma-like council-manager forms of govern-

ment, while Spokane and Federal Way recently changed to a “strong mayor” system found in Seattle. Both systems have proven records of working and both have evidence of failures, which shows that talking about any change in government is worth the committee’s effort. “It is worthy of examination X See CHARTER / page A4

GIVING BACK

Assistance League donates 150 uniforms to Stanley Elementary

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK BRADY

GOOD DEED DO-ERS. Mark

PHOTO BY MATT NAGLE

HONORING GREATNESS. Members of the Dr. Gordy Klatt Recognition Project committee, managers from Mountain View Funeral Home, Memorial Park and Crematory and Relay for Life supporters gathered Feb. 18 to celebrate the funeral home’s donation to the project. Pictured here are: (front row, left to right) Stewart Maier, Tony Anderson (committee), Beth Ravitz (project artist) and Barbara Patterson (committee); (back row, left to right) Paul Friden (Mountain View), Pat Flynn, Sandy Snyder, Dr. Gordy Klatt, John Forkenbrock (Mountain View), Clarke Thompson (Mountain View), Dan Lasham (Mountain View) and Harvey Rosen (committee).

DR. GORDY KLATT RECOGNITION PROJECT RECEIVES BIG DONATION By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

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he Dr. Gordy Klatt Recognition Project took a giant leap forward on Feb. 18 when Mountain View Funeral Home, Memorial Park and Crematory presented the project committee with a check for $20,000. These funds will go toward the construction and installation of a permanent memorial in honor of Klatt to be installed at Baker Stadium on the University of Puget Sound campus. This location is significant in that it was on the stadium’s running track where Klatt singlehandedly started the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life 30 years ago. Today, this fundraising event for cancer research has surpassed the $5 billion mark and is firmly established as a worldwide movement to end cancer. To formally present the check, a gathering of project committee members, managers from Mountain View and Relay for Life supporters gathered at Water Concepts on South Tacoma Way for a meet-and-greet with Klatt and Beth Ravitz, the artist tasked with creating the memorial. “He is a local hero who has touched the world over,” said Clarke Thomson, general manager of Mountain View Funeral Home, Memorial Park and Crematory. During the check presentation, Thomson praised Klatt

– Clarke Thomson

General manager of Mountain View Funeral Home, Memorial Park and Crematory

for his passionate vision. “Cancer is something that has impacted all of our lives in one form or another. I look back at the years that I’ve been a part of Relay for Life and not knowing that one day I’d be standing in the same room with the very person that kicked it off for the entire world. It is a great honor for me and the entire staff of Mountain View to publicly thank you for your work.” In 2012, Klatt was diagnosed with cancer of the stomach. As a survivor, he continues to push forward in working for a cure for cancer. He addressed this at the Feb. 18 event. “Even though we are making some progress, we’re seeing more cancer cases because there are more people in that age group now. It touches all of us. “It’s a real struggle, but we are making progress. It’s just a matter of time.” Klatt thanked those who are helping to make the memorial possible. “I really thank the community and UPS for their

involvement to do this for me and for the American Cancer Society.” Committee member Tony Anderson agreed. “UPS has been fabulous to work with. We can’t commend them enough for their cooperation.” Longtime Relay for Life supporter and UPS alumnus Harvey Rosen is one of the key movers behind the memorial, as it was his brainstorm to permanently recognize and celebrate Klatt’s personal contribution to the fight against cancer and the inspiring achievement of this one individual. The idea for a permanent marker on the UPS campus came to him before Klatt was diagnosed, making the Dr. Gordy Klatt Recognition Project all the more important now. “They honor people after they’re gone and that’s always bothered me,” Rosen said. “This piece of art will be the cornerstone to the new entrance and walkway (at X See KLATT / page A10

Lady Abes win playoff opener A7

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) Fight the impulsive urge to get too involved. Things will smooth out after next week when Mercury moves forward. Plans will be clearer and fall into place. Share your honest thoughts with your partner or a close friend. Avoid selfish interests. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) You have a great support group of friends and loved ones that are happy to help you. Utilize this when needed without taking them for granted. Your advantages are being revealed to you. This week may be emotionally demanding as you try to connect to that special person. Keep it light and lively. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) Change is coming so get ready. This week may be confusing as leads may turn up as dead ends. Clarity will surface when Mercury moves forward. Hold onto your receipts and hold off on any major purchases if you can. Surprising news comes from an unlikely source. Keep a positive mindset. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) You may feel full of ideas. Friends can help you sort through them. Dragging your feet does not make problems go away. Support your partner and try to understand how they are feeling. You both are growing in a parallel journey, and when you intersect it is like magic. Keep communication open. LEO (July 23 – August 22) Share your secret desires with one you trust. You are in touch with deep feelings this week pondering the past. This will help you sort out what has been missing for you all this time. Things surface so we can deal with them, allowing us to move forward. Satisfy your soul. VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Too much wishful thinking can get in the way of progress. Misunderstandings can manifest easily this week so be very aware of how you present yourself with others. Siblings or friends may not understand your intentions that may be viewed as selfish. Be aware of others’ needs. LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Push for what you want although you may have to move in an opposite direction. Reexamine

CHARTER REVIEW: Learn from the past to build a stronger future. A guest editorial by Bill Baarsma. PAGE A5

By Derek Shuck Derek@tacomaweekly.com

When donating to schools, most groups go the route of supplies and money. Few people think of donating underwear en masse, but that’s exactly what one Tacoma non-profit did for Stanley Elementary School, and the students and staff couldn’t be happier. The Assistance League of South X See DONATIONS / page A4

“He is a local hero who has ų WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA touched the world over.”

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

Stadium advances to regionals A6

Brady (left), Courtney Teddy (left center) Biance SandersBeach (right center) and Rebecca Nelson represented the Assistance League at Stanley Elementary School, both delivering uniforms and working with children one-onone.

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

an important relationship with clear eyes without falling into too much self-doubt. Your assertive side may come out this week giving you the courage to say what’s needed. Balance your feelings with sound judgment. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Try to have patience this week as disappointments could be in store for you. Things may not go the way you want. You may feel bottled up or restless, which will pass when Mercury moves forward next week. Take this time to look within to find other opportunities. Walk tall and hold your head up.

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) This may be a fun and busy week for you. Others rely on you for guidance and solutions. Delegate to those who may do a better job. Remember that it’s the end result that matters. Jealousy is in the air so avoid sending mixed signals. Keep an open mind to change. CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) Re-establish peace on the home front. Taking your work home doesn’t solve anything. Not everyone works as hard as you do! Present viable solutions to your boss or partner. Decompress from the office allowing you to recharge your batteries. Exercise and take good care of yourself. AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) Don’t waste your time trying to make fast changes. Focus on what’s really important and prioritize your work assignments or projects. Write down your important ideas for future execution. All things happen in their own time. Meaningful connections spark your creative side. PISCES (February 19 – March 20) You are charming and sincere. Someone may try to take advantage of that. Treat yourself to a movie or read that book you have been putting off. A shopping spree may be tempting. Budget your finances and avoid large purchase this week. Exercise regularly and avoid overeating.

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Horoscope, word search and more B6

WE NEED YOU! Be a part of ‘The Lucky Woman’s Guide to Breast Cancer’

By Kathleen Merryman I have met the machines, and they have made me love them. Mammog rams, ultrasounds, an MRI, a PET scan and heart scans – and the people who conduct them – located the lump I didn’t notice. They searched out cancerous lymph nodes. They located the outlier cells building up for an attack behind my breastbone. The machines triggered the response that is saving my life X See CANCER / page A10

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Sports ........................A6 Make A Scene ........B5 A&E ....................... ....B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages

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72nd and Warner Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holeyness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church - ELCA Mark E. Woldseth, Pastor 3315 South 19th St. Tacoma, WA 98405 (253) 383-5515 lutheransonline.com/gloriadeilutherantacoma

“Come and see!�

Sunday Worship - 10:45am

SAVE THE DATE 2014 Pierce County Financial Fitness Fair:

Healthy Finances, Healthy Lives First Creek Middle School 1801 E. 56th Street, Tacoma WA 98404

10 am - 3 pm Saturday March 1, 2014 Medical / Health services Credit (and report) services Tax preparation assistance Foreclosure education Financial education and resources Document Shredding Kid Zone available Hosted by

Pierce County Asset Building Coalition

Bulletin Board MAYOR TO HOST STATE OF THE CITY ADDRESS MARCH 19 In collaboration with the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber of Commerce, Mayor Marilyn Strickland will host the 2014 State of the City Address on Wednesday, March 19 at 11:30 a.m. in the Hotel Muranoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Venice Ballroom (1320 Broadway). Speaking on the theme â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma 2.0,â&#x20AC;? Strickland plans to discuss an array of topics including economic development, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regional and national presence, education, and her youth summer employment program, SummerJobs253. Event attendees and members of the public will be encouraged to engage with the mayor during her address using the #SOTC253 Twitter hashtag, and a live Twitter feed will be displayed prominently at the venue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma is an attractive waterfront city that has recently experienced some great wins, but there is some heavy lifting to be done if we are serious about realizing our full potential,â&#x20AC;? says Strickland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am pleased to share my vision for how our entire city must work together to ensure that growth benefits our neighborhoods, our business districts and the residents who choose to call Tacoma home.â&#x20AC;? Tickets are $25 for students with an ID and persons aged 55 and up. Tickets for general admission are $40 in advance. For more information, contact Janice Hutchins at the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber of Commerce by calling (253) 627-2175 or visit the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber of Commerceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.tacomachamber. org. *644<50;@05=0;,+;6;/+0:;90*;;6>5/(33 State Senator Jeannie Darneille and State Representatives Laurie Jinkins and Jake Fey will hold a District Town Hall on Saturday, Feb. 22, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Jason Lee Middle School Cafeteria, 602 N. Sprague Ave., Tacoma. The 27th District Legislators will give a mid-legislative session update and answer questions from constituents on issues important to them. Residents are encouraged to attend. Doors open and sign-in begins at 9:30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;STANDARDIZEDâ&#x20AC;? ARGUES THAT ;,:;05.0:9<0505.7<)30*,+<*(;065 Parents and Friends for Tacoma Public Schools (PFTPS), a community group dedicated to strengthening our public education system, is partnering with Washington Badass Teacher Association (WA-BATS) to screen a film focused on the effects of standardized testing in public education. The documentary will run at 2pm, Sat., March 1, in University of Puget Soundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tahoma Room in Commencement Hall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;STANDARDIZED. Lies, Money & Civil Rights: How Testing is Ruining Public Educationâ&#x20AC;? created by Daniel Hornberger is a 75-minute exposĂŠ of how mandated testing is undermining public education. Participating in a panel discussion immediately following the film will be Representative Jake Fey of the 27th Legislative District as well as author and professor Wayne Au. There is a suggested donation of $5 per person. According to Rockfish Productions, â&#x20AC;&#x153;For decades, standardized testing has been a part of public education. Within the last 10 years, however, the testing has taken on a more important, and possibly more damaging, role. Test scores, mistakenly viewed as effective assessments of student ability and teacher/school effectiveness, are anything but. This film sheds light on the invalid nature of these tests, the terrible consequences of high-stakes testing, and the big money thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s involved.â&#x20AC;? PFTPS is a grassroots organization with membership comprised of parents, community members, current and retired education employees, grandparents, and community activists. PFTPS also welcomes high school and college students, civic leaders, retired school district employees and neighborhood leaders who are interested in joining. Members are expected to support the mission and attend at least two meetings per year. For more information about Parents and Friends for Tacoma Public Schools, visit http://PFTPS.org or visit Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ParentsAndFriendsForTacomaPublicSchools. (>05-69-(9405.0570,9*,*6<5;@ After a three-year battle, the developer Invesco and the City of Sumner have withdrawn their appeal of a Growth Management Hearings Board decision prohibiting the rezoning of 182 acres of prime agricultural land in Pierce County for residential and commercial development. This is a victory for anybody who wants to preserve farmlands and ensure a long-term farming economy in Pierce County. Among numerous issues, the development would have expanded the urban growth boundary around the City of Sumner and placed significant residential and commercial development on prime agricultural land and within the land subject to geological hazards. If the project had gone forward it would have opened the floodgates to development on prime agricultural land in the Puyallup Valley south of

Sumner. An active coalition of organizations came together to oppose the rezone and prevent any further loss to Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remaining prime farmland. The coalition included Futurewise, American Farmland Trust, Tahoma Audubon, PCC Farmland Trust, and the Friends of Pierce County, who successfully challenged the proposal before the Growth Management Hearings Board in 2012. The Washington Sustainable Food and Farming Network; Cascade Harvest Coalition; Organically Grown Company; Tilth Producers; Terra Organics; Tahoma Farms; Let Us Farm; Washington State Farmers Market Association; and Charlieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Produce also joined these organizations in opposing the rezone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were delighted when the Hearings Board agreed with our argument that building a big project like this on productive farmland is wrong,â&#x20AC;? said Tim Trohimovich, Planning and Legal Director of Futurewise, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are even more delighted now that the developer and the City of Sumner have decided to end the appeal of the Growth Boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision. Sumner and Pierce County have plenty of land available for urban growth without paving over farms.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a big step towards a better future for farming in Pierce County,â&#x20AC;? said Dick Carkner of local berry producer Terryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Berries, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lost far too much farmland to subdivisions and shopping malls in this area. Pierce County has a proud tradition of farming, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time we protect our farms.â&#x20AC;? According to Rebecca Sadinsky of PCC Farmland Trust, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re seeing a big revival of the agricultural industry in Pierce County due to the strong interest in local food. We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have local food without local farms, and the Orton Junction project wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve taken us in the wrong direction.â&#x20AC;? In 2011, the Pierce County Planning Commission recommended against the conversion of the 186 acres of prime agricultural land at Orton Junction, but the Pierce County Council went forward with approval. The large coalition of organizations are now working together to develop and implement long-term solutions that will better protect farmlands in Pierce County, especially those around the urban fringe â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to ensure the long-term sustainability of farming in the county. For more information, contact: Tim Trohimovich at tim@futurewise.org or (206) 343-0681 x118; Dennis Canty, Pacific Northwest Director American Farmland Trust, at (206) 860-4222; and Krys McArthur Kyer, Executive Director Tahoma Audubon Society, at (253) 565-9278.

;(*64()9,>05.*647(5@/,37:565796-0;: Tacoma Brewing Company is proud to call Tacoma home. Its rich heritage inspires us, and community support sustains us. For this, we return the favor by donating a full 10 percent of Thursday taproom beer sales to local charities. This commitment allows Tacoma Brewing Co. to elevate the financial assistance we can provide to local nonprofits that support us by making Tacoma a better place to live. Beginning Thursday, March 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; coinciding with Tacoma Beer Week â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and every Thursday through June, the Emergency Food Network will be the featured organization in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;10% For Tacomaâ&#x20AC;? program. Then, starting in July, a new non-profit partner will be selected quarterly. Besides the cash donations raised through the â&#x20AC;&#x153;10% For Tacomaâ&#x20AC;? program, Tacoma Brewing Co. also donates beer to many non-profit organizationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fundraising efforts and provides merchandise for charity auctions on an ongoing basis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beer is fun and gets people in the giving mood,â&#x20AC;? says Morgan Alexander, Tacoma Brewing Co. owner, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re glad to participate knowing that our beer can help the success of community organizations. Spaces are still available for the Tacoma Brewing Co. â&#x20AC;&#x153;10% For Tacomaâ&#x20AC;? program. Organizations must be a taxdesignated charity or registered non-profit. */<9*//63+:-9,,:*9,,505. 6-Âş05,8<(30;@-69(33Âť On Thursday, Feb. 27, 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7 p.m. there will be a free public showing of the film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inequality for Allâ&#x20AC;? with Robert Reich at First United Methodist Church, 621 Tacoma Ave. S. Discussion and refreshments will follow. This public viewing of an important documentary is part of a coordinated national Watch Party in hundreds of locations. Reich, former Secretary of Labor and present faculty member of the University of California at Berkeley, has been working with the organization Democracy for America in seeking to alert the American people to the deliberate disempowering of workers and others of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;99 percent,â&#x20AC;? so that the â&#x20AC;&#x153;redistribution of wealthâ&#x20AC;? in this country upward to the few can continue. According to the event organizers at First United Methodist Church, it is hoped that the showing of this powerful film â&#x20AC;&#x153;in churchâ&#x20AC;? will spark a strong local effort to design and take effective action to reverse the trend. Information concerning the central biblical call for economic justice, as a very high priority on Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agenda, will be available, along with lists of resources which expose the roots of the growing inequality of life-resources now being experienced by so many.

Sip  &  Swirl Open  House

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   Invited!  

Friday,  February  2Â&#x2021;2pm  to  5pm If  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  55+  and  considering  a  move,  take  self-­guided   tours  while  you  enjoy  delicious  wines  and  cheeses! 5693E\)HEDW  RU ZZZ$IÂżQLW\DW2O\PSLDFRP

4701 7th Ave. SW Olympia, WA 98502 AFO-­053

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If  you  love  to  save  money  (without  giving  up  the  nicer  things),   \RXœOOORYH$I¿QLW\DW2O\PSLD2QHORZUHQWVWDUWLQJDWMXVW $1,110  includes  all  utilities,  satellite  TV  and  WiFi  plus  30,000   square  feet  of  extra  living  space!  

-YPKH`-LIY\HY`Â&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

;(2,;/,763(973<5.,-69:7,*0(363@470*: By David Rose

athletes makes it all worthwhile.â&#x20AC;? Ruston Police Chief Jeremy Kunkel, University Place Police Chief Mike Blair, Fife Police Chief Brad Blackburn and yours truly will lead a contingent of over 100 law enforcement officers plunging Saturday but without good citizens like you, the event wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t achieve the goal of $75,000!

Correspondent

We REALLY need you to join us Saturday for the Special Olympics Washington Polar Plunge in Tacoma at DAVID ROSE Owen Beach/Point Defiance presented by Waste Connections, Inc. Almost 300 plungers, including 100 Pierce County Law Enforcement Officers, will brave the frigid water in support of Special Olympics Washington. There will be live music, Taco Time and a post-event festival. Pledge, plunge and win prizes, including roundtrip Alaska Airlines tickets, in support of 10,000 athletes across the state. Too chicken to plunge? Cheer on Polar Plungers from the sidelines in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chicken Coop.â&#x20AC;?

WHEN:

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ROSE

)999 Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted host David Rose takes the plunge.

Chickens can still raise money and support Special Olympicsâ&#x20AC;Ś all while not getting wet! Fircrest Police Chief John Cheesman surprised Pierce County Detective Ed Troyer last year when he pushed him into the water from a boat

SATURDAY, FEB. 22, 9 A.M. TO 3 P.M. (OPENING CEREMONY 11 A.M., PLUNGE AT NOON)

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as they checked to see how cold it was. You can expect some payback this year. Troyer says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all in good fun and even though itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called the Polar Plunge, the wonderful feeling you get afterward knowing how much it helps the

OWEN BEACH, POINT DEFIANCE PARK IN TACOMA

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Shoplifting cases are fairly rouTacoma in tine aroundWeekly the 253,is asinterested some Tacowhat is apparently happening have in oursticky community. mans fingers Please your to news and storystores. ideas whensend it comes department toBut news@tacomaweekly.com. some shoplifting cases are just sad. This is one of those stories. Officers responded to a call from a loss prevention officer at the 23rd Street Target store concerning two people who had been caught trying to steal clothes and DVDs by first tearing off the tags of a backpack and filling it with items as they walked through the aisles. The man-and-woman team used the womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 8-year-old sister as a pack mule to carry the backpack while the couple stuffed items into the bag. Security officers watched them through cameras the entire time. At first, the couple gave false names to avoid getting arrested for warrants and told security officers that they were homeless. The grandmother and legal guardian of the woman and her young sister arrived, and the truth came out. The man had an extensive record, including gang membership. The females went home with their grandmother. The man went to jail. By Steve Dunkelberger

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PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

9,(+05. The downtown library is the closest branch to Hilltop ever since the Martin Luther King Jr. branch was sold in 2012.

MLK community seeks library options By Steve Dunkelberger Stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

More than two dozen community leaders from various businesses, churches and civic groups in Hilltop gathered last week to brainstorm how to provide books and literacy programs to the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s children in the wake of the Martin Luther King Jr. library branchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closure two years ago. More community meetings are in the works, but this first meeting marked the beginning of the journey ahead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a great meeting of community leaders,â&#x20AC;? organizer Al Nurse said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were able to

tap into some great resources.â&#x20AC;? The community has lacked a library since the Martin Luther King Jr. branch of the Tacoma Public Library at 19th and Cedar was sold to a medical center in 2012. The closest branch now is the Main Library in downtown, which would require children to walk along busy streets and run the gauntlet of homeless people that often congregate outside its doors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than just about the books,â&#x20AC;? Nurse said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the reading comprehension and the literacy programs too. A library is an essential part of a community. When

you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a library, you are telling kids that they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter.â&#x20AC;? Ideally, the current effort would like to have the return of a library and its educational programs, specifically for early readers from kindergarten to third grade. But with library budgets being what they are these days, all sorts of options are being examined to provide educational programming, resources, computers and reading materials to the youth in the Hilltop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are open to any suggestions,â&#x20AC;? Nurse said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It might not be a brick-and-mortar library.â&#x20AC;? The effort could begin as

#1 MILEY CYRUS TAKES OVER THE TACOMA DOME WITH HER FREAKY NEW BANGERZ TOUR

a lending library with donated books as a way to provide the foundation of things to come and add literacy programs as volunteers step up and other resources are found and added. The next meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on Feb. 26 at the Peace Lutheran Church, 2106 S. Cushman, with a third meeting planned for 6 p.m. on March 6 at the Hilltop Regional Health Center, 1202 Martin Luther King Jr. Way. A spaghetti dinner will be provided at both events. For further information, contact Bil Moss (253) at 7591437 or Al Nurse at (253) 3071660.

#2 READY. SET. GROW.

PRINCESS PROMENADE KICKS OFF 2014 DAFFODIL FESTIVAL SEASON

#3 HEARING, THEN TELLING

PART TWO OF â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;THE LUCKY WOMANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GUIDE TO BREAST CANCERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

#4 TACOMA BAPTIST RIDES DEFENSE, SENIORS TO WIN IN SEASON FINALE

LADY CRUSADERS SECURE THIRD SEED TO DISTRICT PLAYOFFS

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3%2)!, Pierce County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible for a series of robberies in the Parkland and Spanaway area. On February 10th, 2014, the pictured suspect robbed a Twin Star Credit Union located in the 13500 block of Pacific Ave. S. The suspect entered the bank, presented the teller with a robbery note, then took the cash and fled on foot. The same suspect is believed to be responsible for forcibly stealing cash from a register on December 31st at a Dennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurant located

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WDonations From page A1

Puget Sound completed its first big project by donating over 150 school uniforms to Stanley Elementary School on Feb. 13. The South Puget Sound Guild (they are still in the process of becoming a chapter) is fairly new, becoming active in the last year with a 12-member team. While raising money to donate clothes to children, the group was able to strike a deal with the Tacoma School District allowing them to distribute their funds in the area, with Stanley Elementary School being their first partner. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to start with Stanley because we heard itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great school. We got to talk PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK BRADY with [Principal Cindy Johnson] and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GIVING. Courtney Teddy (left) and Bianca Sanders-Beach are two Assistance just so amazing. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been such a great day League of South Puget Sound members who helped deliver over 150 uniforms and a great place to start,â&#x20AC;? Assistance League to Stanley Elementary on Feb. 13. member Courtney Teddy said. Several members of the League brought â&#x20AC;&#x153;The assembly was just awesome,â&#x20AC;? Teddy Stanley will keep the uniforms in a closet the uniforms to the school early last Thurs- said, after she and her fellow Leauge mem- and loan them out to students whose families day, where they had an opportunity to talk bers assisted the students in a chorus of â&#x20AC;&#x153;We may not be able to afford the cost of mandaone-on-one with several students while they Shall Overcomeâ&#x20AC;? and gave high-fives and tory uniforms, which are important to the had breakfast, as well as help out in class- hugs to the kids they chatted with at break- school. rooms before addressing all of the students fast. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone was having a good time. It â&#x20AC;&#x153;The uniform policy is an equalizer. You directly at their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Voices of Americaâ&#x20AC;? assem- felt emotional.â&#x20AC;? donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have children with expensive jeans bly. The time with the students gave the and clothes, and some without,â&#x20AC;? fifth-grade â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unbeknownst to me or you, these people Assistance League a chance to see who their teacher Don Haase said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It levels the playwere thinking of you,â&#x20AC;? Johnson told her efforts are affecting, and just how mature and ing field so all the kids dress similar and feel assembled school, who all delivered a heart- engaging the students of Stanley are. equally important.â&#x20AC;? felt unified â&#x20AC;&#x153;thank youâ&#x20AC;? to the organization â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to go where the need was, Stanley has many low-income students, gathered in front of them. but youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never know it,â&#x20AC;? Teddy said. and many of their families simply donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have

WCharter

From page A1

and deep study,â&#x20AC;? Strickland said, adding that any talks about changing the roles of a mayor and council should also include a holistic approach that also looks at the need for term limits, the transparency of government and the involvement of the wider community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some of this is very, very nuanced,â&#x20AC;? she said. Vialle served as Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mayor in the early 1990s, when the city was struggling with ways to boost economic development of its waterfront and downtown. It also went through a charter review that recommended 13 changes, and all but one were later

adopted. She advocated that the city charter should change the way it hires key department heads like the city attorney, fire chief, police chief and directors of economic development and finance from being appointed by the city manager to one that faces approval by the full council as a way to make those departments more accountable. She also suggested that adding staff to provide administrative support to the city council would help the city run more efficiently. She considered herself an agnostic on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong mayorâ&#x20AC;? question.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;A form of government is only as good as the people who serve in it,â&#x20AC;? she said. Moss fell into the camp of supporting the status quo for the most part by saying he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see the current council-mayor system as being broken the way â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong mayorâ&#x20AC;? supporters do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Insofar as governing the community, we have done pretty well,â&#x20AC;? he said, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is better than the self-imposed â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (of a strong mayor system). I think the more fingerprints on a knife the better.â&#x20AC;? Moss served at a low point in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history that saw vacant blocks of downtown and abandoned landmarks around the city that included Old City Hall, Union Station and the Pantages. The city didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a â&#x20AC;&#x153;visionaryâ&#x20AC;? strong mayor to guide the city into what needed to be done. A series of community summits that

included some 10,000 people and 250 program suggestions did that. Sutherland echoed those remarks from the position of being a former mayor under the current system and being a former two-time Pierce County executive that has a system similar to a â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong mayorâ&#x20AC;? form of government. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I got far less done as the Pierce County executive than I did as the mayor of the City of Tacoma,â&#x20AC;? he said, noting that personality clashes between Pierce County Council members and between he and the council hampered progress on his policies. He also cautioned against the creation of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong mayorâ&#x20AC;? system because it would duplicate a lot of the work because the mayor would have his or her staffers researching policies while the council would have its own set of staffers doing

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the means to buy a new uniform should their child grow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are bright, brilliant, unbelievable families who get just a little short,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not that they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to [buy uniforms], they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the means.â&#x20AC;? With this in mind, Johnson and the Stanley staff were extremely grateful for the donation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They asked, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;What do you need?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; rather than what they thought we needed,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Organizations like this, their entire mission is to come in, do good and come out. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask anything of me, isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that awesome?â&#x20AC;? The groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts toward not only donating items, but working directly with the children, impressed Johnson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I really liked about them was their sincerity. This is what they want to do,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t because their boss told them to volunteer, or they have to do community service hours because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of their company charter.â&#x20AC;? The Assistance League is already looking ahead, planning to go on a membership drive in the spring with a fundraiser in the summer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The money] stays 100 percent in the Tacoma community,â&#x20AC;? Teddy said. To find out more about the Assistance League of South Puget Sound, contact them at alsouthpugetsound@gmail.com, or visit their website at www.alsouthpugetsound.org. Meetings are held every third Monday of the month.

likewise. He did suggest the city look into creating a way for customers of Tacoma Public Utilities who live outside of the city limits to have a seat on the utilities board. About half of Tacoma Powerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s customers reside outside of Tacoma but have no direct say in its policies, oversight or rates because board members are required to be Tacoma residents. Dramatic changes could cause a customer revolt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going to be pretty,â&#x20AC;? he said. The current charter states that the City Council appoints members to the public utility board that oversees Tacoma Public Utilities and ultimately approves its budget, but has little say over rates. That independence both helped and hurt ratepayers, many followers of history note. TPU, for example, passed a short-term rate hike during the energy crisis 15 years ago that sent other cities deeply in debt. Those rate increases were also approved by the City Council. Utility board

decisions in the 1970s, however, got the utility invested in Washington Public Power Supply Systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nuclear power plants in Hanford and Grays Harbor County. That decision still ranks among the top failures of government spending in state history and involved more than a dozen other cities to invest in nuclear power plants that were plagued by mismanagement and cost overruns. The roster of â&#x20AC;&#x153;whoopsâ&#x20AC;? projects cost ratepayers around the state millions of dollars when the WPPSS defaulted on $2.25 billion in bonds without the creation of a single watt of power. Tacoma eventually paid $40.3 million to settle its share of the debt through a 15-percent surcharge on power bills that came with no added benefit to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s power supply. The Charter Review Committee meets at 7 p.m. every Monday and Wednesday in Room 16 of the Tacoma Municipal Building North, located at 733 Market St. and is set to submit its final recommendations to the city council on May 6.

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Guest Editorial

Charter Review Learn from the past to build a stronger future

By Bill Baarsma

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Guest Editorials

Putting risk in perspective By Don C. Brunell Where there is life, there is risk. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not some insightful quotation; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a fact. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re exposed to risk from the moment we get up in the morning â&#x20AC;&#x201C; slip and fall, dog bite, traffic accident, lightning strike. We can manage risk, we can minimize risk, but we cannot eliminate it. That fact used to be accepted as common sense, but in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s society, people have come to believe that any degree of risk is unacceptable. In fact, trial lawyers have won lawsuits, not because their clients were injured, but because they feared they might be. Why does this matter to you? When government tries to ensure a virtually risk-free environment, it imposes regulations that are needlessly punitive and costly. We pay those costs through higher prices and lost jobs. Case in point: estimating environmental risk. There are two common ways to calculate risk. One method is easier and cheaper; the other is more accurate. Most government agencies use the first one. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called the â&#x20AC;&#x153;deterministicâ&#x20AC;? method. This method is easier for agencies to use because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simple and it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t require a lot of data. The only problem is itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s less accurate. It tends to overestimate risk. But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not all. Regulators routinely take that overestimated risk level and compound it by adding an additional layer of buffer â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;just to be safe.â&#x20AC;? As a result, you end up with regulations that are

far more restrictive and costly than necessary to provide protection. Last November, the Washington Department of Ecology announced that it will likely use this method as it updates the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fish Consumption Level â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one factor in a complex formula that determines our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water quality standards. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a problem. Ecologyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s starting point on this issue was extreme to begin with. They wanted to use the same FCR that Oregon used, one which resulted in water quality standards that are virtually impossible to meet because the technology to comply doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exist, and may not for decades. In some cases, the allowable levels are so low they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be measured with existing technology. A recent study by HDR Engineering estimates that imposing these standards in Washington would cost local governments, ports, ratepayers and businesses billions, with little or no environmental benefit. Despite that, Ecology still plans to use this less accurate method to calculate environmental risks. There is a better way. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called the probabilistic method, as in â&#x20AC;&#x153;probabilities.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more comprehensive, more precise and more accurate. This method analyzes large amounts of data and thousands of variables in order to calculate a range of exposures and risks across various populations and circumstances. The result is a more nuanced, realistic picture of environmental risk.

Think of it this way: When you walk out of your house, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a risk you could get struck by lightning. Lightning strikes occur every day somewhere on the globe. But how likely is it that it will happen to you? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the question that is better answered by the probabilistic method. Ecology has used the probabilistic method, and the EPA says it provides the best basis for decision-making. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because the results of the refined risk assessment show the range of possible environmental impacts and which ones are most likely to occur, they provide a better basis for decision-making.â&#x20AC;? If thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true, why isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Ecology using it now? Good question. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a question being asked by the members of the Northwest Pulp & Paper Association, who recently submitted a report to Ecology on the probabilistic method prepared by ARCADIS, a global leader in environmental engineering and risk assessment. NWPPA has asked Ecology to use the more accurate probabilistic method as the agency updates our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water quality standards. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hope they listen. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

Charter review offers prime opportunity for change By Bill Johnston I was not born in Tacoma but I was â&#x20AC;&#x153;Made In Tacoma.â&#x20AC;? While my Dadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ship was being built at Mojean-Ericson Shipyard, he and Mom lived a 711 South â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Kâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (now MLK). The ship was commissioned in October 1944 and Dad sailed off to Iwo Jima and Mom went home to Port Angeles quite pregnant with me! Since the 1890â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s various members of the Johnston family have lived in the city of Tacoma. My grandparents raised my Mom and her siblings at 2410 N. Union, My grandfatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brothers lived in South Tacoma and worked for Tacoma Power as linemen. We loved visiting my dear Aunt Florence because she lived on the top floor of the Park Terrace Apartments overlooking Wright Park. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those people look just like ants down there!â&#x20AC;? my brother Steve and I would yell pointing out the window. Port Angelesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; highest building was a mere three stories. I moved to Tacoma almost 35 years ago. I changed jobs and I could have picked any city to live in from Seattle South to Portland â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I picked Tacoma. Not once have I regretted that decision! Tacoma is funky â&#x20AC;&#x201C; diverse â&#x20AC;&#x201C; full of character (and characters) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; great parks â&#x20AC;&#x201C; beautiful, unique neighborhoods, museums, universities and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Mountain!â&#x20AC;? I could go on. As my grandmother Foley used to say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma is where it is happening.â&#x20AC;? But there is one thing about Tacoma that is not good. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s city government stinks! Maybe that is a bit harsh, but over the past 30-plus years I have watched as it lumbers slowly along with a philosophy out of an Andy Hardy movie: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey, I know, my Dadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a barn, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s put on a show!â&#x20AC;? There is

no big picture, just one big idea after another from a city council with little community input and seldom any follow through. The reason? Because the city council has no power under the current city charter that puts the city manager and the bureaucrats who work for him in charge. You want to know what happens when bureaucrats get hold of a reasonably simple directive? Just look at the marijuana initiative after it was turned over the to bureaucrats! But Tacomans have an opportunity to change the situation this year. Every 10 years the Tacoma City Charter comes up for review. The City Charter is 60 years old. That means we are running a city of over 200,000 citizens with a 1955 system meant for populations under 50,000. A political scheme not fully thought out developed at the turn of the century. Under it your council member is not allowed to take a problem to a department head directly but has to go through the city manager. Think for a second here â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who was it that you elected to represent you â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the council member or some bureaucrat? Here is the good news. A charter review committee has been confirmed by the Tacoma City Council and several of them are thinkers who give me hope that Tacoma may join the ranks of democratic governments. Former Mayor Bill Baarsma will be the chair, and Baarsma, a retired University of Puget Sound professor, knows more about Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history, government and personalities than anyone on the face of the earth! (And that is not an overstatement!) Jim Merrit, who narrowly lost his bid for mayor four years ago, will be a member of the committee. Jim had many great ideas during his campaign.

Unfortunately I also recognize names on the list of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;usual suspectsâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; those who often show up on appointed commissions and boards over and over. People who are â&#x20AC;&#x153;safeâ&#x20AC;? and wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cause problems for those in the city who would just like to see things just continue down the same old path. Why would I rather see Mayor Marilyn Strickland running the City of Tacoma than a city manager? Easy â&#x20AC;&#x201C; because if she messed up we know who did it and the next election is never more than four years away. We can blame the mayor and the city council all we want now and throw everyone of them out of office tomorrow and it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change a damn thing. They are only an advisory board! Ask yourself this. Who knows the ins and outs of the City of Tacoma best? Mayor Strickland or a city manager from Texas or Iowa or wherever they find these people (after spending thousands on a â&#x20AC;&#x153;nationwide searchâ&#x20AC;?). The answer is easy. Tacoma deserves a modern representative democratic government and we have an opportunity to get one this year. Contact your city council member and tell him/her, â&#x20AC;&#x153;DEMOCRACY FOR TACOMA NOW!â&#x20AC;? William F. (Bill) Johnston is a Vietnam-era veteran of the U.S. Air Force and a graduate of Western Washington University with a Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in journalism and history and a Masters in political science. He is a first-place award recipient for Excellence in Journalism from the Society of Professional Journalists and is a current member of the National Writers Union â&#x20AC;&#x201C; UAW 1981 (AFL-CIO).

Mayor Marilyn Strickland and members of the City Council recently appointed a new Citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Charter Review Committee, as required every 10 years by the City Charter (governing laws for Tacoma). The committee has the responsibility of examining all aspects of the Charter, including consideration of a change in the form of government. No final recommendations to the council will be made until the first week in May. In the meantime, the committee will be taking testimony, reaching out to stakeholder groups, and holding public hearings. A number of substantive issues have already been discussed in open sessions, including: independent staff, as well as a city attorney for the city council; the managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exclusive appointment authority as it relates to department heads (such as the police chief); and the role of Tacoma Public Utilities in relationship to general government. Shakespeare said it best in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tempestâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Śwhat is past is prologueâ&#x20AC;Ś.â&#x20AC;? In other words, events in history are the basis from which future events are formed. We cannot formulate a strategy for our future unless we have a firm grasp on what has brought us to where we are today. Therefore, one important part of the Charter review process is an examination of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history, in order to provide a context for recommendations our committee might make. In this regard, I first became keenly interested in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s government, and its history, while attending graduate school in Washington, D.C. in the mid 1960â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. During that time, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second city manager, David Rowlands, was serving as president of the International City Management Association (ICMA) and was quite a player on the national scene during this, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great Societyâ&#x20AC;? era. Remarkably, Mayor Harold Tollefson was president of the National League of Cities and became known as one of President Lyndon Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite mayors. It was a heady period for Tacoma with federal dollars flowing into the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coffers. Then it all came to an abrupt end in 1967. What followed were three years of intense political turmoil. Tollefson lost his re-election bid in a landslide to State Senator A.L. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Slimâ&#x20AC;? Rasmussen, and later Rowlands was forced to resign, along with popular Police Chief Charles Zittel. Floyd Oles was quickly appointed city manager in a split council vote then abruptly fired on a split vote. And finally, five council members were recalled from office by a two-to-one margin by citizen vote in September of 1970. I was puzzled by all of this because, when Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s citizens changed the form of government from the commission system in 1952, political calm and administrative professionalism were supposed to come to the city. And yet the events that characterized the commission era â&#x20AC;&#x201C; i.e. recall elections, hiring and firing of police chiefs plus continuous turmoil, mistrust and uncertainty in government â&#x20AC;&#x201C; seemed to persist even in the city manager system. I decided to explore the reasons for this ongoing conflict through my doctoral dissertation research. What I found was that dissention inevitably grew when citizens and important interest groups were consciously left out of the decision-making process. There was a perception by many that important policy discussions were being held in private, that only the North End of town counted and that the city manager was initiating policy and taking on the role of an unelected strong mayor. Even council members committed to the city manager system complained of being considered nothing more than a â&#x20AC;&#x153;statutory nuisance.â&#x20AC;? Mayor Gordon Johnston was so concerned by the state of affairs that he called for a charter review committee in 1973. I sat on that committee and chaired a later 1983 body. Citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; charter committees were appointed in 1992 and 2004. As a result, the Charter has been amended some 50 times over the past 40 years. And yet, Tacoma faced a recent return to turmoil and dissention with the tragic selection of a police chief, as well as the firing of two city managers by the council. The following key issues are now before the committee, council and citizens: 1) Is the current system the right fit for todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacoma? 2) Can the charter be improved further by offering more amendments? Or 3) should we recommend a big change to the voters as the city faces the decade ahead? Bill Baarsma is a former Tacoma mayor and chair of the City of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Charter Review Committee.

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Sports

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2014

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DRAMATIC WINS LEAD STADIUM TO DISTRICT SEMIFINALS

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

LINCOLN WRESTLERS HEADED TO TACOMA DOME Abes qualify eight at regionals

Lions, Falcons, Abes also have early postseason success

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

GOOD POSITION. (Top) Lincoln senior

Robert Mathews (right) gets a hold of Peninsula’s Kevin McPherson in his opening match at 132 pounds. (Middle) Abes senior J.J. Saili (right) tries for a takedown of Auburn Mountainview’s Andre Pellow in his opener on his way to taking third place at 285 pounds. (Bottom) Foss sophomore 132-pounder Joey Wurtz (right) tries to subdue Auburn Mountainview’s Yahya Mirazyi.

By Jeremy Helling

By Jeremy Helling

jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

S

tadium has seen its fair share off drama early in the playoff season. But the Tigers have come out unscathed so far, notching victories over SPSL South foes Emerald Ridge and Curtis last weekend to advance to the district semifinals. The Tigers held on for a 45-44 win over Emerald Ridge at home in their opener on Feb. 13, surviving after the Jaguars charged back from a 12-point deficit in the fourth quarter. Marcus Harris – who scored 16 of his game-high 22 points after halftime – drove for a layup with 33 seconds remaining to cut it to 41-39, but Bobby Moorehead and Mark Galanesi clinched the game with two free throws apiece in the final seconds. “My shot wasn’t really falling tonight, so I knew I had to take it to the hole, and maybe get fouled,” said Moorehead, who scored 10 of his 12 points in the second half. Ben Cottrill’s three-pointer midway through the third quarter had given Stadium a 28-17 lead, as Emerald Ridge missed their first 10 shots of the half and scored four points in the period. “I think that’s what won us the ballgame,” said Stadium head coach Doug Cocke’. The Tigers gutted out a 39-37 overtime win over Curtis on Feb. 15, as Lucious Brown fed Moorehead for the game-winning layup with 33 seconds remaining. “Lucious is the best passer I’ve ever coached,” Cocke’ said, “and Bobby does a great job of dive cutting like that.” The Tigers had taken a 17-10 lead into halftime, outscoring the Vikings 7-1 in the second quarter. Curtis’ Tory Causey hit four three-pointers in the second half, the last of which gave the Vikings a 33-31 lead with 1:48 remaining in regulation. Brown – who finished with 13 points and nine rebounds – hit a tying jumper with 24 seconds left, send-

X See BASKETBALL / page A9

jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

SCRAPPY EFFORT. (Top) Stadium forward Malik Mayeux (30) smacks Emerald Ridge’s Marcus Harris as the two battle for the ball in the Tigers’ victory. (Bottom) The Tigers’ Bobby Moorehead rises for a jumper over the Jaguars’ Trey Darst.

Lincoln claimed two individual championships and qualified eight wrestlers for the Mat Classic at the 3A regional meet on Feb. 15 at Bonney Lake High School. Senior 195-pounder Aliyas Fletcher won 15-5 over junior teammate Jeremy Lukosh, headlining the day’s success as the two will advance to the state tournament. Lukosh had outlasted Decatur’s Max Henry for a 9-8 win in the semifinals, while Fletcher squeaked past Peninsula sophomore Chance Stolz 3-1 in the other semifinal to advance. Senior Keidrick O’Bannon claimed the other championship for the Abes at 170 pounds, getting a 9-8 win over Decatur’s A.J. Sarno in the finals. Senior 160-pounder Murad Vagabov was pinned by Decatur’s Brandon Zimmerman early in the finals, but had earlier scored wins over Bonney Lake’s Jared Miester and Jason Day to punch his ticket to the Dome. Lincoln senior Robert Mathews fell to Peninsula’s Kevin McPherson on a late pin in his opener, but recovered to claim third place and advance. Mathews edged Auburn Mountainview’s Yahya Mirazyi 4-3 in the consolation bracket, and got revenge with a 3-2 win over McPherson in the consolation final. Junior B.J. Hawthorne rattled off wins over Shelton’s Colton Paller, Foss’ Hien Ly and Peninsula’s Luke Holsinger to place third in the 182-pound bracket, and senior 285-pounder J.J. Saili took third with first-round pins over Bonney Lake’s David Smith and Peninsula’s Tre Starks. Abes freshman William Willsey pinned Decatur’s Joe Johnson in his opener and eventually qualified for state with a fourth-place finish at 220 pounds. Sophomores Marcus Wiley (138 pounds) and Solomon Sok (126) qualified as alternates to state for the Abes after taking fifth place. After falling to Hawthorne, Ly qualified as an alternate for Foss at 182 pounds, pinning Enumclaw’s Levi Ward midway through the second round. Falcons teammates Clayton Nichols (160 pounds) and Joey Wurtz (132) fell just short of qualifying as alternates. Wilson’s Alex Gore fell 13-3 in the 152-pound fifth-place match to North Thurston’s Michael LaFrenier, who had earlier eliminated Wilson senior Brant Powers in the consolation bracket. The Mat Classic takes place at the Tacoma Dome, beginning on Feb. 21 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 4 p.m.-9:30 p.m., and continuing on Feb. 22 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m.

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LADY ABES ADVANCE WITH HARDFOUGHT WIN OVER ENUMCLAW BELLARMINE PREP WINS FIRST TWO TO EARN BERTH TO REGIONALS By Justin Gimse Correspondent

Lincoln overcame several obstacles on way to their 53-51 loser-out playoff victory over Enumclaw in the West Central/Southwest District Regional Tournament at Clover Park High School on Feb. 17. The Lady Abes (17-4) scored the first basket of the game, never to see another lead until 5:07 remained in the fourth quarter. Enumclaw (10-12) connected on five threepoint shots in the first half while keeping Lincoln off-balance with a tenacious defense. The Hornets led 34-27 at the half and looked as though they might be taking control of the game. Down five points in the third quarter, Lincoln head coach Jamila Jones switched to a full-court pressure defense and Enumclaw was unable to match Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intensity and hustle from that point forward. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were doing a great job of catching and shooting and we needed to take that away. When our team decides to play team defense, we do it very well,â&#x20AC;? said Jones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mindset, and Kiaira (Thomas) sparked it and everybody else was right there with her. We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t looking to trap, but wanted to keep their players in front of us and make them work for shots.â&#x20AC;? With Tacoma sensation Tamia Braggs spending the majority of the game on the bench with foul trouble, Lincoln was sparked by Thomas, the smooth junior guard who finished with 27 points and five steals. The perimeter pressure Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thomas, Aamira Turner and Joy Failauga turned up in the final minutes of the game keyed several Lincoln steals and fast-break baskets. Possibly no bigger play was when Thomas got her hand on the ball with 2.5 seconds remaining as the Hornetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kimmy Aubert turned up-court to attempt a desperation heave before the final buzzer. Previously, Aubert launched a half-court

shot as the first half expired, barely missing as it rattled in and out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She (Aubert) can shoot and their team is full of shooters,â&#x20AC;? Thomas said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew if I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get that deflection she might have a chance. At halftime she almost hit it from half-court and we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to see that again. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about hustling, and defense is the name of the game. Our defense is Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s namesake.â&#x20AC;? Lincoln trailed by as many as 11 points in the second quarter, unable to answer the Hornetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; five firsthalf three-pointers. The Lady Abes upped the defensive ferocity in the second half and were able to hold the Hornets to a single three-pointer the rest of the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We came out here in this first playoff appearance a little nervous to begin with, but we adjusted well and got back to playing like we do,â&#x20AC;? Jones said. The Lady Abes faced a second-round matchup against Auburn Mountainview on Feb. 19.

LADY LIONS INTO DISTRICT SEMIFINALS

For three quarters the host Bellarmine Prep girls team was unable to shake a quick and determined squad from Auburn Riverside in the first-round of the West Central District III/Southwest District 4 4A Girls Basketball Tournament on Feb. 13. The scoreboard read 29-29 at the start of the fourth-quarter and the flow of the game said it may go down to the wire. Having sewn up the Narrows 4A title several weeks prior, Lady Lions head coach Kevin Meines was anticipating a possible difficult start to the postseason. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We struggled in this (first) round because we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t played a meaningful game in a couple of weeks,â&#x20AC;? Meines said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auburn (Riverside) has been fighting for their playoff lives and was in that playoff mentality already. It just took our kids a while to pick it up.â&#x20AC;?

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At the first whistle to start the fourth quarter Bellarmine (16-2) came alive, stifling the Ravens (11-10) on defense and outscoring them 13-2 in the first 4:30 of game time. The Lions never let up until the final buzzer, pulling away with a 52-34 victory and momentum to advance to face Kentwood on Feb. 15. Auburn Riverside guard Brittni Williams was trouble for the Lady Lions in the first half. Williams drove the lane several times, converting difficult shots over a host of defenders en route to a 12-point first half. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was one of the things that we identified at halftime,â&#x20AC;? coach Meines said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a driver, and we wanted to make her a shooter.â&#x20AC;? It worked. Williams would muster just six points in the second half and the Ravensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; biggest threat was neutralized. Bellarmine junior center Claire Martin led all scorers with 22 points, 14 rebounds and three blocked shots. Senior Jasmyne Holmes added 12 points, hitting 12 of 14 free-throw attempts and sophomore guard Jayana Ervin delivered a hard-fought eight points and eight rebounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought it was going to be a close and intense game,â&#x20AC;? said Martin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a good team and really fast. We looked for each other in the fourth quarter and decided we needed to be communicating better on defense, and it all starts on defense.â&#x20AC;? Bellarmine (17-2) defeated Kentwood (12-7) 49-45 on Feb. 15 in the second round of districts to advance to the semifinals. Kentwood was able to limit Bellarmineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Claire Martin to just nine points and six rebounds; however Jasmyne Holmes stepped up with 18 points while Jayana Ervin added 10 points and 12 rebounds. The Lady Lions were set to face SPSL South champion Todd Beamer (17-5) at Puyallup High School on Feb. 20 at 6 p.m.

HOT DEALS

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

STANDOUT. Lincoln junior guard Kiaira Thomas (1)

drives to the hoop for a layup, as she scored a gamehigh 27 points in the Lady Abesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; district-opening win over Enumclaw.

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SPORTSWATCH GOLDEN GLOVES RETURNS TO ARMORY

The 66th Annual Tacoma Golden Gloves will return to the historic Tacoma Armory this year, and with it a number of local names return to try to claim a title once again. Prelims for Golden Gloves will take place on Feb. 28 at 7 p.m. at the Al Davies Boys & Girls Club, with finals taking place at the Armory on March 1 at 7 p.m. Normally held in midJanuary, the Golden Gloves was pushed back to late February due to the USA Boxing National Championships â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an event several local competitors participated in â&#x20AC;&#x201C; being held in Spokane in late January. Among the contingent of local returnees from the Tacoma Boxing Club is 19-year-old defending 132-pound champion Hector Rendon, who graduated from Chief Leschi High School last year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He can adjust really well, he uses his jab really well,â&#x20AC;? said Tacoma Boxing Club coach Tom Mustin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be ready. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be in shape.â&#x20AC;? After falling in the super heavyweight championship at Golden Gloves last year, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elvis Garcia â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who recently took the silver medal in Spokane â&#x20AC;&#x201C; also returns.

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

:8<(905.<7 Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elvis Garcia (right) is one of a number of local boxers set to return to Golden Gloves this year.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a hard-worker,â&#x20AC;? Mustin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He throws twice as many punches as (other boxers). Finishing second at U.S. championships just turned his hunger up.â&#x20AC;? Strong-punching light heavyweight Dugan Lawton returns to try to defend his crown after winning the bronze medal in Spokane, and Golden Gloves veteran Nick Jefferson also returns and will look for another 141-pound title. Mustin noted that 17-year-old 108pounder Edward Rojas is an up-and-comer and a former Junior Golden Gloves national champion.

Mustin expects strong competition this year from a group of boxers out of Prince George in British Columbia. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to battle with us because of the number of boxers they have,â&#x20AC;? Mustin said. By Jeremy Helling

RAM SWIMMERS ADVANCE TO STATE

Wilson will have plenty of representation at the 3A state swim meet, thanks to the Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; performance at the district meet on Feb. 14-15 at Hazen High School. Junior Conner Schell took third place in the 500yard freestyle in a time of 5:11.48, and seniors Jesse Gayvoronski and Cody Dodge took third and fourth, respectively, in the 200-yard freestyle to qualify for state. Dodge, Gayvoronski, Alex Gayvoronski and Austin Lawrence teamed up to finish fourth in the 200-yard freestyle relay in a time of 1:34.00 to earn a bid to state, where the quartet will also swim the 400-yard freestyle relay. Schell took fifth place in the 100-yard backstroke and will also swim in the event at the state meet. The Rams put up 154 points as a team at the dis-

trict meet to tie for second place with Peninsula, as Hazen ran away with the team title by scoring 233 points. The 3A state swim meet takes place at the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Center in Federal Way, with prelims on Feb. 21 at 6:15 p.m. and finals on Feb. 22 at 6:30 p.m.

LION WRESTLERS HEAD TO MAT CLASSIC

Bellarmine Prep qualified three wrestlers for the Mat Classic state wrestling tournament at the 4A district tournament on Feb. 15 at Central Kitsap High School. Junior 220-pounder Elliott Villars led the way with a second-place finish, getting a 9-7 win over Snohomishâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alex Fairhurst and a 6-4 win over Olympiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alex Grant before being pinned by Snohomishâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tristan Baus in the finals. Lions junior Hunter Taylor avenged an earlier loss to Mason Beaver in the consolation finals at 170 pounds, pinning the Lake Stevens junior to take third place after falling to him in the opening round. Bellarmine Prep sophomore 106-pounder Jed Klein got an opening-round 10-5 win

BE WELL

over Edmonds-Woodwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sidat Kanyi, but fell to eventual champ Jeremy Nygard and was topped by Kanyi in the consolation finals to settle for fourth place. The Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Josiah Mayo is set for a play-in match at state in the 120-pound bracket after topping Yelmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jacob Nolan 7-1 to place fifth, and sophomore 285-pounder Luke Yi was topped by Arlingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tyler Lindberg in the fifth-place match to be eliminated. The Mat Classic takes place at the Tacoma Dome, beginning on Feb. 21 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4-9:30 p.m., and continuing on Feb. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5-9:30 p.m.

LOGGERS SIT 05;/09+73(*,

A couple of road wins have put the Puget Sound menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team in third place in the Northwest Conference with two games left in the regular season. The Loggers traveled across town for a 61-57 win over Pacific Lutheran on Feb. 11, hanging on despite shooting just 38.3 percent from the field. Erin Barber led UPS with 13 points and 10 rebounds, while Rex Nelson added 12 points and

inside & out

Dan Cheledinas came off the bench to score 10 points. Brandon Lester led PLU with 16 points, while Billy Kiel came off the bench to sink three three-pointers and tally 11 points. The Loggers followed with a 67-63 win at Willamette on Feb. 15, again overcoming a poor shooting performance as they finished just 18-for-54 from the field. But UPS converted 27 of 33 free-throw attempts, as Nelson was 8-for-11 from the charity stripe and put up a teamhigh 14 points. Nick Holden scored 12 points and Barber added 11 points for the Loggers. Puget Sound moved to 13-10 overall and 9-5 in conference play, and finishes the regular season by hosting George Fox on Feb. 21 at 8 p.m. and Pacific (Ore.) on Feb. 22 at 8 p.m.

LADY LOGGERS STAY IN FOURTH

The Puget Sound womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team also remains in playoff position in the Northwest Conference, notching two wins last week to sit in fourth place. The Loggers topped crosstown Pacific Lutheran 70-57 on Feb. 11, shooting over 50 percent from the field in the second half. They outscored the Lutes 46-28 in the period, as Emily Sheldon scored 16 of her team-high 18 points after halftime and hit four three-pointers. Alexis Noren added 15 points off the bench and Katy Ainslie scored 14 points for the Loggers, while Sarah Barnes led PLU with 15 points and Samantha Potter added 14 points. The Loggers ran away for an 85-58 win at Willamette on Feb. 15, as Ainslie was 13-for-17 from the field for a game-high 30 points. Sheldon added 18 points and eight rebounds, and Hannah Lekson scored 11 points off the bench. UPS finishes the season by hosting George Fox on Feb. 21 at 6 p.m. and Pacific (Ore.) on Feb. 22 at 6 p.m.

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instructor know if you have any injuries or conditions that could affect your practice. If you are rehabilitating an injury, feel a little under the weather or tired, skip poses you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t or shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do, or modify. Be respectful: Having an extended or loud conversation can be distracting to others. Acknowledge friends and acquaintances quietly, knowing that you can catch up after class. Bring a towel, water and mat: Studio Hot Yoga has mats and towels for rent and water for purchase. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re committed to a regular yoga practice, purchase a high quality mat made for the heat. Embrace the sweat: Yes, you are going to sweat, a lot, especially during hot yoga sessions. While itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tempting to wipe it away, it is helping your body cool down. Wiping the sweat

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away may make you feel hotter. Listen to your body: Stay centered and focused on your own mat and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about what everyone else is doing. Modify and rest as needed. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go farther faster if you have patience with yourself and work from where you are, not from where you think you should be. Studio Hot Yoga and Wellness is located at 7504 86th St. SW, Lakewood, WA 98498. Call (253) 582-2244 or e-mail studioyogawellness@gmail.com.

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WBasketball ing the game to overtime. Malik Mayeux added 11 points, 12 rebounds, three blocks and three steals for Stadium in the win. The Tigers were set to face Todd Beamer in the semifinals at Auburn High School on Feb. 20 at 6 p.m.

),33(9405,79,7 STUNS UNION LATE

Bellarmine Prep provided quite an encore to Stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strong finish the game before. Marâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;kese Jackson converted a threepoint play with four seconds remaining, helping the Lions charge back from an eight-point deficit for a 46-45 win over Union on Feb. 15 at Auburn High School. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just always want to stay together,â&#x20AC;? said Jackson, who scored 11 of his team-high 18 points in the fourth quarter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We stuck to our defenseâ&#x20AC;Śour defense won us the game.â&#x20AC;? Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s late dramatics came after Malachi Flynn poked the ball away from Unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Micah Paulson, Garrett McKay corralled the steal and passed to Carson Hollyoak, who fed a charging Jackson in the lane. Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first attempt missed, but he grabbed the rebound and sank a layup while being fouled by the Titansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Riley Hawken. Cameron Cranstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s threepointer at the buzzer was off the rim, giving the Lions the win. Paulson had given the Titans a 41-33 lead with a driving layup with 5:23 remaining, but the Lions slowly crept back. Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three-pointer at the 2:37 mark pulled them within 41-39, and Flynn followed by tying it with two free throws on the next possession. The Lions found it tough going in the middle against Union, as 6-foot-8

From page A6

forward Isaiah Robinson had nine blocks for the Titans. Hawken was an inside monster as well, finishing with 22 points and 10 rebounds for Union. But the Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Will Wolf tallied 14 points and 11 rebounds, while Rex Bodoia added six points and 10 rebounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those two guys are warriors,â&#x20AC;? said Bellarmine Prep head coach Bernie Salazar. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They battle all the time. We are extremely proud of them.â&#x20AC;? The Lions advanced to face Kentridge in the district semifinals at Auburn High School on Feb. 20 at 7:45 p.m.

FOSS ROLLS OVER 79(090,

Minus a small hiccup in the second quarter, Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; district playoff opener went exactly as planned. The Falcons jumped all over Prairie in the first quarter, as their

defensive pressure helped build a big lead on the way to an eventual 71-52 win on Feb. 17 at Rogers High School. Senior forward Olashawan Miller scored all 13 of his points in the first quarter to lead the offense, as his layup after a nice pass from Arâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mond Davis put Foss up 15-2 at the 2:54 mark. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we go as Olashawan goes,â&#x20AC;? said Foss head coach Mike Cockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When Olashawan Miller shows up and plays, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a different team.â&#x20AC;? The Falcons led 22-8 at the end of the first quarter, as Prairie committed 12 turnovers in the period and had just six shot attempts. Prairie finished with 28 turnovers in the game, as Davis collected four steals and Michel Cockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Dabalos-McMahon added three steals apiece. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really wanted to establish our tempo in the first quarter and then try to extend the lead,â&#x20AC;? Mike

305*6357<;:/(A,5 AWAY EARLY

Lincoln decided to put the suspense of a loser-out scenario to bed early. The

Abes started a monster run late in the first quarter, as a whirlwind of three-pointers created a sizable lead that allowed Lincoln to coast to a 66-47 win over Hazen on Feb. 17 at Rogers High School in their 3A district opener. With the Abes leading 7-6 five minutes into the game, Trevion Brown drove for a layup to ignite a 27-2 run in just over four minutes of game time. Brown â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who finished with a team-high 18 points â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sank all four of his three-pointers during the run, the last of which put the Abes up 34-8 with 7:05 to go until halftime. Josiah Barsh added two threes and Ahmaad Rorie sank another trey during the stretch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got very good shooters, but as a team weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a little bit streaky,â&#x20AC;? said Lincoln head coach Aubrey

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Shelton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you make one or two, it kind of snowballs and guys start feeling more confident. I think we were moving the ball well and finding guys, and getting stops. The defense led to offense.â&#x20AC;? Hazen could never threaten the Abes from that point on, as the Highlanders finished just 15-for-52 from the field and 2-for-15 from three-point range. Barsh and Rorie finished with 12 points apiece for Lincoln, while Justiss Warren added nine points and Justice Martion tallied seven points and 10 rebounds. Dominic Green led Hazen with 18 points. The Abes traveled down south to face Columbia River in the quarterfinals on Feb. 19.

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Cockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was just a good overall effort by a lot of different guys.â&#x20AC;? Prairieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s James Phillips scored 10 of his team-high 21 points in the second quarter, helping cut the deficit to 27-22. But Foss finished the half on an 8-2 run that was capped by Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lay-in at the buzzer. Davis then took over in the third quarter, scoring 15 of his game-high 32 points â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including 10 points during a 16-3 run by Foss â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to put the game away. Chris Reynolds added 14 points and seven rebounds in the win for Foss, who faced Kennedy Catholic in the quarterfinals on Feb. 19.

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From page A1

Baker Stadium). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really exciting. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a lot of great community support across the board.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harvey is pretty humble, but he deserves a lot of credit for leading our committee,â&#x20AC;? Anderson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He really thought about this three or four years ago, then when Dr. Klatt contracted cancer, it was time to not wait any longer. We wanted to recognize him before the chance came that he may be no longer with us.â&#x20AC;?

Anderson is a great admirer of Klatt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The great thing about this project is weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re helping recognize a person who has made a difference because of what his vision turned out to be in the lives of who knows how many millions of people.â&#x20AC;? Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mom is one of those people. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My mother is a cancer survivor and Dr. Klatt operated on her two years ago and saved her life. She wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be here if it werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t for him.â&#x20AC;? He said Klatt would visit her regularly while she recuperated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how devoted he is to his patients, and Relay for Life and cancer research.â&#x20AC;? Artist Beth Ravitz was obliged to stay

WCancer



  



 

   

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through surgery, chemotherapy and, come the fall, radiation. In the midst of my personal gratitude, the Canadian National Breast Screening Study has posted findings of a 25-year clinical trial. It followed 90,000 women, of whom half got regular mammograms and half got breast exams by trained nurses. Both groups had about the same rate of death from breast cancer. The big discussion now is whether mammograms are valuable lifesavers, or tools that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make much difference and sometimes lead to unnecessary treatment. We should all be listening to that discussion, learning more about the studyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guidelines, and

mum about details of what sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creating to honor Klatt, as the three different examples she is proposing were due the next day to be presented to the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Campus Art Advisory Council. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are going to be the first to see them,â&#x20AC;? Rosen said. The council will spend about a month reviewing the three before the selection process moves on to the next step. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope to have it dedicated in the fall,â&#x20AC;? Rosen said, and the public will be invited to the dedication event. Ravitz said of her work that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not partial to one over the others. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really like my children â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I love them all but

From page A1

thinking about how closely they fit our personal experience. In my Lucky Womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s journey into breast cancer treatment, this study is one more thing for which to be thankful. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve written two columns so far, and both of them have been about me, me, me. Though that works for introductory purposes, and though it has delivered to me the great gift of your good wishes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no way to go forward. If this column is to do any good, it will be as a discussion. Why write about breast cancer if we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t share our experiences, opinions and advice? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my proposal: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll use my treatment path as our outline. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re wrapping up the diagnosis in this installment, and will move on to surgery, through chemotherapy for a few months, then radiation and a clinical trial as the grand finale. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll talk about lumpectomies and mastectomies, singles and doubles. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll explain chemo ports, and reveal the mystery behind those inchlong scars you see on so many upper torsos. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll propose a Survivor Girl band: A Port in Every Girl. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have a photo of a port in action in an infusion suite, which, Dr. Who fans, will remind you of an Ood Glee Club. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll talk drugs. Just say yes.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go wig shopping, and revisit R. J. Palaccioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wonder,â&#x20AC;? last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacoma Reads book, for insight on what it feels like to see, or be, a person â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially a woman â&#x20AC;&#x201C; walking around with the incorrect amount of hair. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do all of this together, if it works the way I hope it does. The stories, in print, on-line and on Facebook will be the starting point each week. You can then log in your thoughts in the comments section, or in e-mail to me at kathleen@tacomaweekly.com. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll pick up the discussion as part of the next installment. It may be as part of the main column, or as a sidebar, or as part of a quote box. If you log a comment and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want your name used, please let me know. For anticipated lack of journalistic manners, please allow me to ask your forbearance in advance. Surgery, just a simple lumpectomy, slammed me onto my backside. I expect chemo to whomp me into the ground, then do squat jumps on me. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be operating on low battery, and I may not have the energy to get back to you personally. Please know that I appreciate what you are bringing to the discussion. And now, back to the discussion of that Canadian study. Back to the machines. Call me Science Girl. I love data, and I love technology that catches stuff that touch and intu-

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I love them all differently. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like any one better than the other. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be happy with whichever one is selected because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all really strong.â&#x20AC;? Rosen said project fundraising is at about 75 percent of the goal thanks to the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 130 donors that range from businesses and foundations to private individuals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So far weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve raised approximately $100,000.â&#x20AC;? Those who wish to contribute can call (253) 677-566 or send a check or money order made out to American Cancer Society, PO Box 11185, Tacoma, WA 98411 (indicate that the funds are for the Dr. Gordy Klatt Recognition Project). ition canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I love mammograms, especially the oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten at the Carol Milgard Breast Health Center. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not that the place is spa-peaceful, with white bathrobes and old People magazines. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aggressive in reaching out to women for whom breast health is not a habit. It educates women in breast self-exams, similar to the manual exams in the Canadian study. It also provides tech back-up, images of masses. I want both. I want them because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m fallible to the point of sloth. I have never been a good breast self-examiner. Raise your hand if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re with me here. Give yourself a personal Brava if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not. I missed my lump. The mammogram caught it. Once caught, other machines got closer to it in a sonogram and ultrasound. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatever it is, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manageable,â&#x20AC;? the radiologist said. But the machines looked even deeper. An MRI recorded slices of my body, and found trouble in the lymph nodes. A PET scan lit up those breastbone bad boys. Without that technology, we might have thought I was good to go with a lumpectomy followed by radiation. It would have been a cheap victory, and a short one. Now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready for the real war. Call me Science Girl. And letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talk cancer.

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City Life x TED Tacoma Miley Cyrus at the Dome

B2

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

PHOTO BY SCOTT HAYDON

Tacoma musician Emily Ann Peterson will focus on shared experience and “resonance” during her presentation at T.E.D.x Tacoma.

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

T.E.D. is headed to Tacoma next week. You know, T.E.D., as in T.E.D. Talks, those lecture videos – on topics ranging from cultivating mindfulness to how to spot liars – that have become so popular on Netflix. Several such presentations will take over Broadway Center’s Theatre on the Square on Feb. 28 for a conference dubbed T.E.D.x Tacoma. T.E.D. is a non-profit group dedicated to “ideas worth spreading,” and it started in 1984 with a conference that brought together innovators from three worlds:

3-9 p.m. Feb. 28 Theatre on the Square 901 Broadway, Tacoma $79 www.broadwaycenter.org new.ted.com

technology, entertainment and design. The general idea is that everyone has at least one great idea that’s worth sharing, and T.E.D. presenters are invited to give short talks on those topics that are then recorded and shared for free. Lecture videos are distributed for streaming and download at new.ted.com, where you can find more than 1,500 of them. Among the topics du jour are philosopher Yann Dall’Aglio’s “Love – You’re Doing it Wrong,” sculptor Aparna Rao’s “Art that Craves Your Attention” and British film producer David Puttnam’s “Does the Media Have a Duty to Care?” Among those presenting at T.E.D.x Tacoma is cellist Emily Ann Peterson, a member of local indie-rock band Goldfinch and co-founder of the Coda School of Music. Her talk will focus on holistic teaching, shared experience and the idea of “resonance.” “Resonance, to me, means making action happen, or making movement occur,” Peterson explained. “In the cello, that means the bow has movement, and

the movement of the bow makes the string vibrate, which makes the bridge buzz, which makes the front of the cello vibrate … and everything comes out of the two holes in the front and you have sound.”

NBC-TV’s “The Voice” in 2011. Technology speakers at T.E.D.x Tacoma include Milenko Matanovic, who runs the non-profit Pomegranate Center, a group that specializes in community problem solving; Tony Blau, founder of the University of Washington’s Center for Cancer Innovation; and iQ Technologies founder Jim Tisch. Joining Peterson and Martinez from the entertainment world are Seattle radio veteran Bob Rivers, host of “The Bob Rivers Show,” which airs mornings on KJR-FM (97.5); Becci Crowe, known for wildlife art inspired by her travels in Africa; and Muh Grog Zoo, a Tacoma group that specializes in improvised, oneact plays. Design speakers include Adam Argyle, a web developer for Lively, an innovative company that brings fans and artists together. T.E.D.x presentations will run from 3-9 p.m. on Feb. 28. Tickets are $79. Presenter bios and other information can be found at www.broadwaycenter.org.

“My idea with global resonance and building community is that if you can teach, perform or live your life really trying to make movement happen … then the world can be a better place.” – Emily Ann Peterson People and communities can similarly connect to create harmony. “My idea, with global resonance and building community,” Peterson said, “is that if you can teach, perform or live your life really trying to make movement happen … then the world can be a better place. You have world peace and beautiful humans and all that good jazz.” Peterson will also perform a musical piece with Vicci Martinez, the Tacoma singer-songwriter who became a national sensation when she finished second on

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE DIAPHRAGM BLUES “Singing the Diaphragm Blues” is a compelling comedy-drama about chickens, diaphragms and female sexuality. Directed by Dale Westgaard and written and performed by Rebecca Lea McCarthy, the play is based on the book “Writing the Diaphragm Blues and Other Sexual Cacophonies.” “Singing the Diaphragm Blues” offers a critical and humorous investigation of female sexuality, from childhood to menopause. Plays March 13-15, 8 p.m., at 4th Wall Players, 15019 Meridian E., #A, in Puyallup. Tickets are $10.50 at the door and at http://www.brownpapertickets. com/event/581308. Info: (253) 229-9741. Visit 4thwallplayers.org.

TWO WHAT ABOUT GRANDMA? Elliot Weiner, local playwright, will be presenting a world premier performance of his

one act play “What About Grandma?” as a performance to benefit the Tacoma Humane Society’s Cinderella Program for Spay and Neuter as well as the Northwest Spay and Neuter CFOUFS. Classified as a “slightly dark comedy,” “What About Grandma? shows the lengths one feisty grandmother will go to ensure the happiness and safety of those near and dear to her. Plays Friday, Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets will be sold at the door on a donation bases. Info: outwiththedogs@gmail.com.

THREE GOSPEL OPRY Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 3315 S. 19th St. in Tacoma, will host the very entertaining eight-piece bluegrass group Gospel Opry for a free, all-ages concert on Feb. 21 starting at 7 p.m. A reception with the band will follow in the social hall. Hailing from Port Townsend, Gospel Opry takes the Grand Ol’

with a Downton Abbey theme on Feb. 22, 2-6 p.m. Wear your Downton Abbey attire or jewelry for an extra bonus and fun. Peruse the gallery’s beautiful jewelry and art and be there for the drawing at 3 p.m. 3811 N. 26th St. Visit www.proctorartgallery.com.

FIVE Opry and adds a gospel flare.If you like good gospel music, hand clapping, and a good time, you’ll want to be here. The band includes local artists such as JJ Jenkins, Jon Parry on fiddle, Bill Wolfe on pedal steel, Jack Reid and many others Info: (253) 383-5515.

FOUR TEA PARTY Proctor Art Gallery is cooking up a different kind of Tea Party where, instead of politics being the order of the day, it will be a “Let Them Eat Cake Tea Party”

HOWARD LEVY Multiple Grammy Award winner Howard Levy will be the University of Puget Sound Jazz Band’s guest artist on Wednesday, March 12, at 7:30 p.m. in Schneebeck Concert Hall on campus. Equally at home with jazz, classical music, rock, folk, Latin, and world music, Levy brings a fresh lyrical approach to whatever he plays, making him a favorite with audiences worldwide. Tickets are $9 and can be ordered online at tickets.pugetsound.edu or by calling Wheelock Information Center at (253) 879-6013.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, February 21, 2014

WILD, WEIRD AND CRASS Miley Cyrus brings freaky Bangerz tour to the Dome

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

I

f you were an unescorted 15-year-old girl, braving blustery conditions in a teddy bear unitard or glittery hot pants on Sunday, the best case scenario was that you were headed to the Tacoma Dome. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s twerkiest pop star, Miley Cyrus, was unleashing her new â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bangerz Tour â&#x20AC;&#x153;on the United States, two days after launching north of the border in Vancouver, B.C. For those of you whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in a coma, Cyrus has gone to great lengths to shed the wholesome image she had last time she headlined the Dome in 2009. Back then, she was best known for Disneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hannah Montana.â&#x20AC;? Fresh in everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memory now, though, is Miley dry humping her way through MTVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Video Music Awards with a foam finger, an army of dancing â&#x20AC;&#x153;furriesâ&#x20AC;? and that guy who says he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rip off Marvin Gaye. Cyrus set a high bar for being gaudy and ridiculous with that TV appearance, yet it paled in comparison to the insanity fans witnessed at the Dome. Her set was a relentless barrage on the senses that was mostly entertaining and often laughout-loud funny. At worst, though, her shtick felt incoherent, cynical and overly sexual for her youngish fan-base. It was like watching a Lady Gaga performance, stripped of arty pretense, mashed up with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yo Gabba Gabbaâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Showgirls,â&#x20AC;? and viewed on magic mushrooms. Head â&#x20AC;Ś spinning. So much to process. Huh? Was that a giant butt plug on the big screen? Swedish duo Icona Pop got things warmed up with technopop anthems from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is â&#x20AC;Ś Icona Popâ&#x20AC;? album. It wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprising if they headlined next year based on how enthusiastically fans sang and pogo-hopped through their walk-off performance of radio hit, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Love It.â&#x20AC;? Half an hour later it was Mileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turn, and she wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exactly going for subtlety. The pop star made her entrance sliding down a giant tongue that snaked out of a projection of her face. She got the party started with â&#x20AC;&#x153;SMS (Bangerz),â&#x20AC;? joined by a posse that included dancers in plushy costumes, a little person in latex and an amazon whose main role seemed to be displaying her jiggly booty. (The way Cyrus presented her dancers as freaky props and worse â&#x20AC;&#x201C; caricatures of hypersexualized black women â&#x20AC;&#x201C; was sometimes cringe-worthy. Then again, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of a caricature herself.) Backed by a seven-piece band, the pop star followed her opener with â&#x20AC;&#x153;4 X 4,â&#x20AC;?which featured a checkered square dance

motif. From there, her set got exponentially weirder. A bboy bobble head joined her for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love, Money, Party,â&#x20AC;? as she spun down the catwalk on the hood of a gold lowrider. She serenaded a giant puppet, kind of a cross between Snuffleupagus and an emu, that followed her during â&#x20AC;&#x153;FU.â&#x20AC;? And a 30foot, inflatable husky towered over the stage for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Be Tamed,â&#x20AC;? one of the few cuts that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t originate from Mileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bangerzâ&#x20AC;? album. For one of her best tricks, though, Cyrus turned into Justin Bieber. No, really, she bore a striking resemblance to her embattled peer, sporting an oversized T-shirt and glittery, backward baseball cap as she and her band showed up on a secondary stage midway through the show. Thankfully, she lifted her shirt for a couple of crotch shots, in case anyone was confused. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m too early in my tour to take my panties off now,â&#x20AC;? she teased after â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rooting for My Baby.â&#x20AC;? You know, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about the art with her. That was during the semi-unplugged part of the set, which actually included a couple of decent covers: a pedal-steel infused riff on Outkastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey Yaâ&#x20AC;? and a run at her godmother, Dolly Partonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jolene.â&#x20AC;? Miley seemed to be singing without the aid of a vocal track, unlike many of her pop peers, and the latter was a bold choice. But she pulled it off, and later soared on her own ballads. She took a bow with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Someone Else,â&#x20AC;? or rather she floated off stage straddling a big hot dog. (Get it?) Soon she returned for the first of two encores, which kicked off with hit single â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Stop.â&#x20AC;? (Mindless party anthem or cautionary tale? You decide.) Up next was her dramatic karaoke classic in the making, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wrecking Ball.â&#x20AC;? But a blast from the not-so-distant past served as the finale. She and her dancers wrapped up with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Party in the U.S.A.â&#x20AC;? in presidential-themed costumes. The Abe Lincoln stilt walker and the Mount Rushmore costume were cool, but I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take my eyes off the giant kitten dancing on the big screen. Awwww. The whole show was at turns fun, hilarious, crass and corny; probably not your cup of tea if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a dude and over 25. Also, you might want to reconsider sending your preteen daughter next time Miley is in town. Overheard from a grumpy dad after the show: â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was the best concert Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever seen â&#x20AC;&#x201C; except for every other concert Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever seen. I think Credence was kind of like that.â&#x20AC;? Visit the online version of this story at www.tacomaweekly.com and the web site of freelancer Bill Bungard, www. billbungard.com, for more images from the show.

PHOTOS BY BILL BUNGARD

Tacoma, WA 98465.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, February 21, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

Camille Patha brings tropical color to town in new TAM show

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA Scandinavian Cultural Center Pacific Lutheran University Hours: Sun. 1-4 p.m.; Tue. and Wed. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Info: www.plu.edu/scancenter

By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

N

orthwest painter Camille Patha is featured in a small retrospective in a recently opened show at the Tacoma Art Museum. Called “A Punch of Color: Fifty Years of Painting by Camille Patha,” the show relates a tale of how Patha exercised her passion for bright color despite initial resistance from her professors at UW. Presumably these were stodgy old adherents to the Northwest school of painting in which colors are very muted (think of murky, muddy Mark Tobey). Patha seems to have been rather stylistically restless if not uncertain. The show gives an experience of compressed time and one can walk through the exhibition and track Patha’s zigzag course from abstract expressionism, minimalism, surrealism and back to abstraction. Throughout these twists and turns, however, Patha remained steadfast in her commitment to using bright color, which is the unifying feature of the show. The story put forth is that Patha, born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, discovered bright color during a sojourn in Arizona where she was exposed to the brilliance of desert hues. She then brought her love of color back to the Northwest where she earned her art degree at University of Washington. Her color is indeed stunning. The brilliant yellow and orange “Space Game” is a minimalistinspired work. It was this work that brought early success to the young painter with its inclusion in the

The Scandinavian Cultural Center celebrates the history and culture of Scandinavia with special events, exhibitions, and programs. The Center is located at Pacific Lutheran University, in recognition of the University’s Nordic heritage. The Center is open to the public three days a week with a few exceptions. Admission is free and everyone is welcome! FEB 2014

Events this week:

Feb. 23, 1 p.m. Soup with Sallie: Tacoma Peace Prize Recipient 2013 Sallie Shawl

PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMA ART MUSEUM

BRILLIANT. Camille Patha’s “Self-Portrait at

Midnight, 2013” is a prime example of the highcaliber work that the artist is putting out five decades into her career.

Washington State Pavilion at the 1970 Osaka World’s Fair. Patha’s surrealist period (much of the 1970s) is also marked by brilliant color. She painted apples that blend into purple brick walls and Roman arches that fade into the sky of Italian landscapes. Later, Patha became more grounded in the landscape of our region by painting beaches, islands, bodies of water and floating docks along with long-legged shore birds. Always Patha can’t resist notching up the loudness of her color. The landscape of the beach is variously done in orange sherbet, burgundy or dreamy, creamy pink. Her most recent works are explosions of color. They are multi-layered, musical color jumbles with titles like “Tropican,” “Yella Thrilla,” “The

Juicer and the Berry” and “Punch” (from whence the show title is derived). Detached from any shred of regionalism, these latest paintings are more citrus and sunshine than fir needle and fog bank. But in this post, post modern age in which we live, anything is fair game. A curious feature of the show is that there is a 20-year gap in the chronology of the paintings presented. There is no work from 1985 through 2004. The subtitle “Fifty Years of Painting” is thus a little misleading. That being said, this is a great show. It is encouraging to see the work of an artist who, like a fine wine, has gotten better and better with age. “Punch” runs through May 25. For further information visit TacomaArtMuseum.org.

Perhaps best known for her work with Associated Ministries, Sallie Shawl served as Director of Paint Tacoma Beautiful for 21 years. Shawl led “Tacoma Arabs, Jews, and Others” (TAJOS) and “Palestinian-Israeli Peace Endeavors” (PIPES) from the mid-1980s through early 1990s. After the terrorist attacks of 9/11, she formed the groups “People for Peace, Justice,” and “Healing and United for Peace of Pierce County.” She also founded a local chapter of the international group, “Jewish Voice for Peace.” Shawl participated in protests of nuclear weapons at the Bangor Naval Base in Kitsap County, through the Ground Zero Center for Non-Violent Action protests. She helped create and run the Interfaith Youth Camp on the Key Peninsula. She was instrumental in the inauguration of the South Sound Peace and Justice Center.

Mondays, Feb. 17 through March 24: Scandinavian Dance Classes Chris Knutzen Hall West

Current Exhibits:

“Us Local People: Sámi Vuoiŋŋa and Resilience” On display in the Hildahl Gallery Through April 1

Examining Sámi culture, history and resistance to colonial pressures, “Us Local People: Sámi Vuoiƾƾa and Resilience” relates how the Sámi have endured land theft, racism and attempts to eradicate their culture and language – not only resisting and surviving, but also building a vibrant society of their own. The Sámi, historically nomadic reindeer herders, today are considered leaders in the indigenous rights movement.

“Danish Rescue of the Jews” On display in the SCC Meeting Room

Exhibition from the Danish Resistance Museum

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, February 21, 2014

TACOMA WEEKLY AND RADIO 253 SHOWCASE LOCAL TALENT

L

ast year on tacomaweekly.com, we had the Weekly Mix Tape, sort of a virtual compilation that showcased the best in regional indie rock and hip-hop. Now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve taken it up a few notches with our new Radio 253 channel, which youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find at www.tacomaweekly.com/radio253. Now we stream massive local mega-mixes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking 50 to 80 songs with no repeats â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that let you sample some of the best bands playing clubs around the Sound. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got local pop, punk, metal, country and indie-rock; and we even pay homage to the classic bands that paved the way for all of that, the Sonics, the Wailers and the Ventures. Check it out at www. tacomaweekly.com/radio253. And weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re always looking for more fresh tunes to showcase. Send your bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mp3s for consideration to ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com.

Local Restaurant Spotlight LAURAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAYVIEW BAR AND GRILL: FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE WITH A VIEW

Lauraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bayview Bar & Grill

By Derek Shuck Derek@tacomaweekly.com

T

acoma is a lucky city. Great food is abundant in so many areas of the city. But few restaurants can hit the trifecta of great food with a fantastic view and friendly atmosphere. A few years ago, Laura Carlson took steps to open a restaurant that fulfilled all three of these sweet spots. Carlson opened Lauraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bayview Bar and Grill at 229 St. Helens Ave. in 2009 with great food, service and sights in mind. The restaurant presides over a fantastic view of Commencement Bay while offering an eclectic mix of breakfast, lunch and dinner foods. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not Italian, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not bistro and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not deli. We do a little bit of everything,â&#x20AC;? Carlson said. If you want to catch the sunrise over the Bay, the breakfast menu at Lauraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offers a ton of variety, including artisan French toast. Other popular choices are fresh hash browns with a side of bacon, buttermilk biscuits and fresh omelets. Lauraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s *]a/M\ is avoiding the popular trend of using carton eggs to make omelets, instead opting to use real, fresh eggs on the order. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re known for cooking from scratch, including our dressings,â&#x20AC;? Carlson said. The lunch menu from Lauraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contains

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Big Wheel Stunt Show says farewell with free performance

Friday, February 21, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

LEGENDARY CROONER SMOKEY ROBINSON WILL DELIVER “QUIET STORM,” “TEARS OF A CLOWN” AND OTHER MOTOWN HITS AT 8:30 P.M. ON FRIDAY, FEB. 21. TICKETS ARE $50 TO $100; WWW.EMERALDQUEEN.COM.

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIIN

YOU’LL BE MISSED. Big Wheel Stunt Show’s Justin Gimse, Evan Nagle and Jake Melius take a break during a video shoot at Supernova in 2010. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

B

ig Wheel Stunt Show is calling it a day. The power trio – singer-guitarist Evan Nagle, drummer Justin Gimse and bassist Jake Melius – has been a pillar of the local rock scene for the last five years; but the Big Wheel will go for its final ride in Tacoma some time after 9 p.m. on March 1, at the New Frontier Lounge. The Hardcount and Gold Records will add support that night. The show will be free, but get there early since it’s sure to be packed. The trio released three classic-rock inspired albums, “Brand New Bag” (with original bassist Stunt Man Mike), “Cheetah Milque” and “Wonderful Life,” and a quirky holiday single, “Fireball,” named after Rudolph the RedNosed reindeer’s sidekick from the 1964 Christmas special. Those last three can be found on iTunes. Band members say the catalyst for breaking up is the impending departure of Melius, who will soon head south to pursue better job opportunities and to be closer to his family. But right before he leaves, the band will make its long awaited debut on the Bob Rivers Show around 9:30 a.m. Feb. 28 on KJR-FM (97.7). Better late than never. Meanwhile, we turned to Nagle, one of Tacoma’s most talented shredders, hoping the breakup might just be temporary. TW: So what’s going

on? I hear that Jake guy is leaving. Nagle: Yeah, that’s it. He’s gonna take off for Arizona to do whatever Arizonans do. TW: Is this more like an extended hiatus, or is this it? Nagle: I don’t know. It’s hard to say. It’s so early on, but I never wanna just say anything good in my life is done and over. It may just be for this little phase in time. I would never just wanna say “done” and then maybe next year he comes back for a week and we record an album. Stuff like that could happen, you know. TW: You have some big changes of your own, like you’re a newlywed. Congratulations. Nagle: Yeah, thanks, man. TW: But I hear you were kind of taking a break from music for a little while before that. Nagle: Shows were always fun and everything, but it was nice to ease back a little bit. In the Big Wheel (we spent) four and a half years straight playing shows, sometimes three nights in a week. It was a long run of very hard work, and lots of partying over the top of it. (He laughs.) TW: What are some of the highlights or all-time favorite performances? Nagle: Definitely, the first Tacoma Hempfest that we did. That one was really cool. Music and Art in Wright Park, 2013 was good, but 2012 was really awesome. I don’t know. “Cheetah Milque’s” CD release (in 2011) at the

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BELLARMINE

KITTREDGE GALLERY

CRUSADERS

LIGHT RAIL

CAROL MILGARD

RETURN TO SENDER

TWERKING

TENA DUBERRY

LINCOLN

ASIA PACIFIC

New Frontier was one of the ones that stand out. We had a bunch of shows at the Sunset (Tavern, in Seattle) that were killer, and Slim’s (Last Chance Saloon.) West Seattle was always awesome. There’s been a lot of shows, so it hard to pinpoint. Those are just a few I can think of off the top of my head. TW: On your Facebook announcement you promise a few surprises, and you mentioned that Hempfest show where you jammed on “Everyday People” with a big Tacoma super-group. Do you have a lot of your rocker buddies coming out to jam with you? Nagle: It’s a possibility. I can’t say for sure yet. But we might put together a couple of collaborations. TW: What are the odds that (original bassist) Stunt Man Mike could show up for a brief reunion? Nagle: I don’t know. I would say one in 20. (Laughs) I think he lives in Olympia. We kind of got out of touch. We’re always kind to each other and everything. It’s not like hard feelings, I don’t think. I haven’t seen him in forever. MONUMENTS MEN (118 MIN, PG-13)

Fri 2/21: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 Sat 2/22-Sun 2/23: 11:50am, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 Mon 2/24-Thu 2/27: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00

PHILOMENA (98 MIN, PG-13)

Fri 2/21: 1:55, 6:35, 8:50 Sat 2/22-Sun 2/23: 11:35am, 1:55, 6:35, 8:50 Mon 2/24: 1:55, 6:35, 8:50 Tue 2/25: 1:55 Wed 2/26: 1:55, 6:35, 8:50 Thu 2/27: 1:55

ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATED ANIMATED SHORTS (102 MIN, NR)

Fri 2/21: 4:15 Sat 2/22-Sun 2/23: 11:30am, 4:15 Mon 2/24-Thu 2/27: 4:15

THE GREAT BEAUTY (142 MIN, NR)

Fri 2/21-Thu 2/27: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30

NEBRASKA (115 MIN, R)

Fri 2/21: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 Sat 2/22-Sun 2/23: 12:00, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 Mon 2/24: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 Tue 2/25: 5:30, 8:15 Wed 2/26-2/27: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15

OSCAR NOMINATED DOCUMENTARY SHORTS (180 MIN, NR)

Tue 2/25: 1:45, 6:45

MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC

B SHARP COFFEE: Ryan Heffner (acoustic) 8 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Greg Kettner (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Randy Hansen (Jimi Hendrix tribute) 8 p.m., $12 LOUIE G’S: Fan Halen, Sin Circus (Van Halen tribute, rock) 5 p.m., $10, AA NEW FRONTIER: NWCZ Radio showcase with Garage Heroes, Black Nite Crash, Thomas Mudrick (rock) 9 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Jonny Smokes (rock) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kry (top 40 covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Josh Wolf (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM’S: Violent Hallucinations, Skinwalkers (metal) 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Urban Rhapsody (jazz, funk) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

SATURDAY, FEB. 22 LOUIE G’S: Darklight, Above Ground, Ashes of Eden, Seventh Science (metal) 6:30 p.m., $5, AA B SHARP COFFEE: Kareem Kandi Band (jazz) 7 p.m., NC, AA BOB’S JAVA JIVE: Blackstone Rangers (rock) 9 p.m. DOYLE’S: Velocity featuring Cliff Colon (jazz fusion) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Greg Kettner (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Ben Union, The Breaklites, James Redfern (pop-rock, hip-hop) 8 p.m., $8 ROCK LODGE: Everclear’s Art Alexakis, True Holland, Demure (rock) 8 p.m., $20 THE SPAR: Red (classic rock) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: The Hipsters (covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Josh Wolf (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM’S: Justice Creek, Abate (rock) 8 p.m. URBAN GRACE: Tacoma Youth Symphony “A Trip to the Bull Fights” (classical) 7 p.m., $7-$17 adults, free for children, AA

THE SPAR: Rod Cook (blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman Allstars (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Battle of the Sexes (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

MONDAY, FEB. 24 TACOMA COMEDY: 1,000th show special featuring Jubal Flagg, Brad Upton, Duane Goad and more (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & Beyond (live jam) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Hambone Blues Band (blues) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Blues jam, 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, FEB. 25

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26 CLIFF HOUSE: Champagne Sunday (folk, pop) 6:30 p.m., NC

DAVE’S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar)

THURSDAY, FEB. 27 THE SWISS: Vicci Martinez (singersongwriter) 9 p.m., $15-$20

SUNDAY, FEB. 23 THE SWISS: Radio On, The Dignitaries, Gold Records (garage-rock, alternative) 5 p.m., NC, AA CLIFF HOUSE: Kareem Kandi Band (jazz) 6:30 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m. IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN: Blues Vespers (blues) 5 p.m., NC, AA NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 4 p.m. PANTAGES: Tacoma Symphony Orchestra “Verdi & Friends” (classical) 2:30 p.m., $19-$77, AA

502 MARTINI: Kim Archer (singer-songwriter) 5 p.m., NC B SHARP COFFEE: Lucas Smiraldo (spoken word) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Andy Haynes (comedy) 8 p.m., $10 TREOS: Scot Desart (singer-songwriter) 9 p.m., NC, AA TRIPLE PLAY: Comedy open mic, 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 21, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: ‘12 ANGRY MEN’

CHILI CHASE Sat., Feb. 22, 9 a.m. STAR Center, 3873 S. 66th St. Features a chip-timed 5K run along with a 1-mile kid’s dash. Afterward come inside to feast on tasty chili. Registration closes Feb. 20. Info: www.starcentertacoma.org

LGBT WEDDING EXPO Sun., Feb. 23, 1:30-4:30 p.m. The McGavick Conference Center, 2500 Steilacoom Blvd. SW, Lakewood You and your partner are invited to the 2nd Annual “Same Love, Same Rights” LGBT Wedding Expo in Tacoma. Info: www. SameLoveSameRights.com/

Fri., Feb. 21, 8 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse A 17-year-old boy has just stood trial for the fatal stabbing of his father. It looks like an open-and-shut case until one of the 12 jurors begins opening the others’ eyes to the facts. A classic and tense American drama about our judicial system. (Parental guidance suggested.) Plays through March 16. Info: www.lakewoodplayhouse. org or (253) 588-0042. TACOMA DANCE STUDIO Fri., Feb. 21 Tacoma Dance Studio, 5412 South Tacoma Way Tacoma’s newest dance venue has a large dance floor and dancing every Friday and Saturday. On Feb. 21, Casanova will play. Info: dancingmanllc@ yahoo.com or (253) 224-8244. TRIBUTE TO JIMI HENDRIX Fri., Feb. 21, 8 p.m. Jazzbones, 2803 6th Ave. Born Dec. 8, 1954 in Seattle, Randy Hansen is a guitarist best known for his emulation of Jimi Hendrix. He clearly has a bit of physical resemblance to Hendrix

in his facial features, and carries that resemblance further by emulating such signatures of Hendrix’s style as playing a guitar with his teeth or behind his back. Info: www.jazzbones. com/events MOUNTAINEERS DANCE Sat., Feb. 22, 8-10:30 p.m. Normanna Hall, 1106 S. 15th St. Tacoma Mountaineers hold their fourth-Saturday dance, a lively evening of great music and dancing featuring award-winning folk fiddler Bruce Sagan and the popular music group “North and South.”

CIVIL WAR PATHWAYS Sun., Feb. 23, 7 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. Join the Washington State History Museum in its groundbreaking exploration of the American Civil War, and the role and impact it had on the Northwest territories. Info: (888) 238-4373

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

You have the entire month of February to enjoy each of Tide Tavern’s 16 beers on tap, after which you’ll receive your name on the tavern’s wall of fame and a T-shirt commemorating your achievement (limit four beers daily). Info: (253) 858 3982

your questions to get answers on using Microsoft Office, e-books and e-readers, email and any Pierce County Library e-source. Registration may be required. Register at a Pierce County Library or online @ piercecountylibrary.org/calendar. Info: www.piercecountylibrary.org/

WE’RE ALL PEOPLE Tues., Feb. 25, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Bates Technical College Downtown Campus Auditorium, 1101 S. Yakima Ave. The public is invited to Bates Technical College’s Black History Month event, featuring celebrated poet and slam artist Joshua Bennett, and spoken word and poetry performances by students. Info: www.bates. ctc.edu/

JEWELRY/ METALSMITHING Thurs., Feb. 27, 6-9 p.m. Tacoma Metal Arts Center, 3833 6th Ave. In this class for beginning jewelry/metalsmiths, you’ll learn the basic techniques to create jewelry of your own design. Possible projects include a cuff bracelet, textured earrings and a ring or pendant with a bezel set cabochon stone. Info: www.tacomametalarts.com/

COMICS AND PIZZA CLUB Tues., Feb. 25, 7 p.m. Harmon Tap Room, 204 St. Helens Ave. Join this book club adapted to mutants, aliens, technogeeks and puny humans who like to read comics. Info: kingsbookstore. com/event/comicsfeb

GOOD DEEDS DOG DRIVE Mon., Feb. 24, 10 a.m. Mattress Discounters, 6001 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Sooner or later, everyone needs a helping hand – or a helping paw. So, Mattress Discounters is raising money to help train assistance dogs for those in need. Info: www.mattressdiscountersdogs.com

PAJAMA DRIVE FOR KIDS Wed., Feb. 26, 7 p.m. Sleep Country USA, 5225 Tacoma Mall Blvd b101 Sleep Country’s annual Pajama Drive aims to make nighttime cozier for local foster children, ensuring they go to bed wearing their own pair of comfortable pajamas. Info: www.sleepcountryfosterkids.org/

TAPMASTER 2014 Mon., Feb 24, 11 a.m. Tides Tavern, 2925 Harborview Dr., Gig Harbor We are proud to present Tapmaster 2014 featuring all Pacific Northwest breweries!

COMPUTER CLASS: DROP-IN HELP Wed., Feb. 26, 3-5 p.m. Lakewood Pierce County Library, 6300 Wildaire Rd. SW, Lakewood Stuck? Need more help? Bring

A HISTORY OF THE GUITAR Thurs., Feb. 27, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Garfield Book Company at PLU, 208 Garfield St. S. Elizabeth C.D. Brown will illustrate the history of the guitar with performances on period instruments, adding commentary on the physical and musical development of the guitar. $10 Info: www.plu. edu/lifeelderhostel/ COMEDY OPEN MIC Every Thursday, 9 p.m. Triple Play Sports Bar, 3829 6th Ave. The Happy Thursday Comedy Open Mic is a weekly standup comedy event hosted by comedian Kareem Walters and featuring some of the best rising comics and established headliners. Info: www. tripleplaytacoma.com

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www. AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) Fight the impulsive urge to get too involved. Things will smooth out after next week when Mercury moves forward. Plans will be clearer and fall into place. Share your honest thoughts with your partner or a close friend. Avoid selfish interests. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) You have a great support group of friends and loved ones that are happy to help you. Utilize this when needed without taking them for granted. Your advantages are being revealed to you. This week may be emotionally demanding as you try to connect to that special person. Keep it light and lively. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) Change is coming so get ready. This week may be confusing as leads may turn up as dead ends. Clarity will surface when Mercury moves forward. Hold onto your receipts and hold off on any major purchases if you can. Surprising news comes from an unlikely source. Keep a positive mindset. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) You may feel full of ideas. Friends can help you sort through them. Dragging your feet does not make problems go away. Support your partner and try to understand how they are feeling. You both are growing in a parallel journey, and when you intersect it is like magic. Keep communication open. LEO (July 23 – August 22) Share your secret desires with one you trust. You are in touch with deep feelings this week pondering the past. This will help you sort out what has been missing for you all this time. Things surface so we can deal with them, allowing us to move forward. Satisfy your soul. VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Too much wishful thinking can get in the way of progress. Misunderstandings can manifest easily this week so be very aware of how you present yourself with others. Siblings or friends may not understand your intentions that may be viewed as selfish. Be aware of others’ needs. LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Push for what you want although you may have to move in an opposite direction. Reexamine

an important relationship with clear eyes without falling into too much self-doubt. Your assertive side may come out this week giving you the courage to say what’s needed. Balance your feelings with sound judgment. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Try to have patience this week as disappointments could be in store for you. Things may not go the way you want. You may feel bottled up or restless, which will pass when Mercury moves forward next week. Take this time to look within to find other opportunities. Walk tall and hold your head up. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) This may be a fun and busy week for you. Others rely on you for guidance and solutions. Delegate to those who may do a better job. Remember that it’s the end result that matters. Jealousy is in the air so avoid sending mixed signals. Keep an open mind to change. CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) Re-establish peace on the home front. Taking your work home doesn’t solve anything. Not everyone works as hard as you do! Present viable solutions to your boss or partner. Decompress from the office allowing you to recharge your batteries. Exercise and take good care of yourself. AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) Don’t waste your time trying to make fast changes. Focus on what’s really important and prioritize your work assignments or projects. Write down your important ideas for future execution. All things happen in their own time. Meaningful connections spark your creative side. PISCES (February 19 – March 20) You are charming and sincere. Someone may try to take advantage of that. Treat yourself to a movie or read that book you have been putting off. A shopping spree may be tempting. Budget your finances and avoid large purchase this week. Exercise regularly and avoid overeating.

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Friday, February 21, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

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NOTICES

PAWS NEEDS WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERS PAWS in Lynnwood is looking for volunteers to help care for wildlife this spring. Every year, PAWS cares for more than 3,000 injured, orphaned or abandoned wildlife. Join the team and

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In re the Estate of: Janice Kay Lammert, Deceased. Case No. 14-4-00623-1 SEA NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO: Jessica Rivas

The personal representative named below has been appointed personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent that arose before the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in R.C.W. 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney at their respective addresses stated below a copy of WKHFODLPDQGĂ&#x20AC;OLQJWKHRULJLQDORIWKHFODLP with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under R.C.W. 11.40.020(1)Š, or (2) four months after the date RIĂ&#x20AC;UVWSXEOLFDWLRQRIWKHQRWLFH,IWKHFODLPV into presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in R.C.W. 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: February 14,2014 Joyce K. Lammert, P.R. 1509 Fifth Avenue N. Seattle WA 98109 Ross Radley, Attorney for P.R. 146 North Canal St, #350 Seattle WA 98103 (206) 323-3800 rradley@mindspring.com

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you can help feed and care for these remarkable animals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a remarkable H[SHULHQFH\RXZRQ¡WĂ&#x20AC;QG anywhere else! For any questions please contact Mark Coleman, Communications Manager, at 206.419.6646.

AUTOS

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Show Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Show Hearing on the 15th day of April, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

TO: Timothy Reed BRYAN, Annette and Jennifer vs Timothy Reed

1999 Toyota Solara SLE Automatic transmission, power windows, leather interior, sun roof, tinted windows, smooth ride, great condition and runs well. Mileage: 134,515 Asking $4,500 If you interested call (253) 474-6556 and leave a message.

Case Number: PUY-CV-PO-2013-0268DV YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 29th day of April, 2014 at 1:30 p.m.

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TO: Denise Elseth Bowen Kristine Siddle vs Denise Elseth Bowen Case Number: PUY-CV-PO-2014-0009 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

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You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 25th day of March, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Selena Adrian IN RE: Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mya Adrian Case Number: PUY-CV-PC-2013-0249 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on April 22nd, 2014 at 1:30PM If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. TO: Spapull Gottfriedson In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs GOTTFRIEDSON, Spapull Case Number: PUY-FH-SHELL-2013-0037 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Revocation Hearing on March 11th, 2014 at 9:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Velma Satiacum & Lawrence W. Hatch Sr. In the Welfare of: H Jr., L. DOB: 04/11/2013 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2013-0015 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Disposition Hearing Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Guardianship Hearing on Monday the 2nd day of June, 2014 at 1:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: SILVA, Naomi Louise In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs SILVA, Naomi Louise

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Busterâ&#x20AC;? Just like humans, dogs have a rainbow of personalities. Here at the shelter, every dog that comes to us is given a personality test to determine the character of our furry friends. Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Featured Pet falls into the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goofballâ&#x20AC;? category. Buster is a wonderful brown and white Pit Bull Mix with the perfect disposition for a fun-loving family. This 5 year old boy meets WKHGHĂ&#x20AC;QLWLRQRIKDSS\JROXFN\DQGZLOOEHWKHVPLOLQJIDFH to meet you at the door after a long day at work. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re guaranteed to have a blast with this pup and make memories that will last a lifetime. Love exploring the great outdoors? Buster will be right by your side, most likely with a toy in toe. It is unknown if Buster has any past experience with young children, so it is recommended that his new forever family has children over the age of ten. If Buster sounds like the dog for you, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait, take him home today. Reference #A482720

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Check out my beautiful eyes! You might just fall in love with me just gazing into them. Snow is a shy girl, with a big heart. It may take her some time to get to know you, but once she does, she is sure to cuddle. Help this unique kitty find the Forever Family sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been waiting for.

Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0059 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on March 18, 2014 at 9:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

ANTIQUES WANTED Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

VOLUNTEERS Citizenship Volunteers Looking for a rewarding experience? Help immigrants prepare to become citizens. You will help to provide instruction to legal permanent residents who need practice with the written and oral. Training will be offered the Ă&#x20AC;UVW ZHHN RI -DQXDU\ DQG classes will start in mid-January. Please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor for Tacoma Community House, you can be that person who makes a difference. We are on the lookout for committed tutors for grades 1-3. There are sessions at Manitou Park, Mann, McCarver, and Roosevelt Elementary Schools. The next orientations will be held in January. Call 253.383.3951 for more information. These are exciting times and you can make a difference! South Sound Outreach Services invites you to be trained as an In Person Assister Volunteer to help Pierce County residents enroll online for health insurance in the Washington Health Plan Finder. Open Enrollment is October 1 until March 31st. Coverage begins January 1st, 2014 for those enrolled by December 15th. Interested trainees may call Heather at SSOS 253-593-2111. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be glad you did!

Meals on Wheels Office Volunteer Do you want to put your RIĂ&#x20AC;FH VNLOOV WR ZRUN LQ D rewarding volunteer opportunity? We are seeking a volunteer with strong customer service and computer skills to assist in our Meals on Wheels TaFRPD RIĂ&#x20AC;FH RQH PRUQLQJ a week. Must enjoy working with seniors, using the telephone and computer, inputting data and setting XS Ă&#x20AC;OHV  )RRG KDQGOHU¡V card required. For more information call Linda at Lutheran Community Services: 253-272-8433. Become a Senior Companion today! Volunteers help frail or disabled seniors stay in their own home and maintain their independence. Activities include running errands, providing transportation or simply being a friend. Hourly stipend and mileage reimbursement provided. Requirements: must be 55+, serve at least 15 hours a week and be low-income. Drivers are especially needed currently. For more info call Julie Kerrigan, Program Director: 1(800) 335-8433, ext. 5686 Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.â&#x20AC;? Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at volunteer@ nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868. Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs We need a volunteer to host programs Tuesday & Thursday 9:30-12, & 1-2:30 pm at Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs. Volunteer will be calling Bingo and doing some extreme crafting, gardening during spring & summer and into fall. If interested call Bonnie @ 253-278-1475 MondayFriday 8:30-4PM. Ayusa International SeeksTacoma Host Parents for High School Exchange Students Ayusa International, a \HDUROGQRQSURĂ&#x20AC;WWKDW promotes global learning through the hosting of high school foreign exchange students, is seeking parents/families in Tacoma to host for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. Ayusa students are 15-18 years old and come from more than 60 countries around the world including Brazil, Japan, Germany, Ecuador, France, Peru, Morocco, China and Spain; WKH\DUHDOOSURĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW in English. For more information, please visit our website: www.ayusa.org South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www. southsoundoutreach.org.

Senior dogs need love too! Phoebe just wants your time and comfort. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d make an excellent companion dog for someone looking for a mellow friend. Hurry, she wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t last long!

Project Homeless Connect is an annual event where homeless individuals can

receive free services. The next event will be held at Tacoma Dome on Oct 23rd. For more information visit www.pchomelessconnect.com or call 253.593.2111. Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! The Business & Responsive Agency Council helps district leadership with busiQHVV SODQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO sustainability decisions, revenue development and quality assurance. Monthly meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/business-volunteer to learn more or call Brett Freshwaters, &KLHI )LQDQFLDO 2IĂ&#x20AC;FHU DW 253.305.1081. Brettf@tacomaparks.com. Metro Parks Tacoma Special events bring the community together and provide families with affordable fun. Metro Parks Tacoma needs volunteers to help produce memorable events. Visit www. metroparkstacoma.org/ volunteer and signup WREHQRWLĂ&#x20AC;HGRIVSHFLDO event service opportunities. To learn more, contact Roxanne Miles, Volunteer Manager, at 253.305.1068. Roxannem@tacomaparks. com.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www. metroparkstacoma.org/ nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@ tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and 7KHUDSLHV D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W offers equine assisted services to differentlyabled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253-370-1429 or volunteer@changingrein.org. The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00 CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED Help adults learn to speak English! Mornings, no experience or foreign language skills needed. South Tacoma. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy, 253-571-1887. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS NEEDED If you enjoy helping toddlers learn, you can help us! Seeking retired or experienced volunteers to assist in expanding our capacity and provide quality learning for busy little people. (No diaper changing!) Background check required. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy 253-571-1887 Meals on Wheels at Federal Way Senior Center seeks morning volunteers: One Co-coordinator, Friday and Monday; two Callers, Monday; three Packers, Wednesday; two Drivers, Thursday. To learn more, call 206-7276250. Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several SURJUDP RSWLRQV WR Ă&#x20AC;W your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agencyplanned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 253.396.9630.

Friday, February 21, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

Why NOW is the Time to Sell Your Home!

HOMES FOR SALE

CALL 253.922.5317

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

1232 S Adams St.

805 N Steele St

Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, KDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWH UDLOV SHULRGVW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKH ambience, while newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer ZLULQJSOXPELQJ JDVĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKH ahhhh factor. Spacious living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and FXWHUHPRGHOHGEDWKURRPJUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVW Ă RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJZHOFRPH home. Move in and make it yours. $219,950

Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer at your old houseWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQGĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG Welcome! $368,000

â&#x20AC;˘ Interest rates are on the rise. Sell now and buy your next home before prices increase.

â&#x20AC;˘ Buyers are plentiful and listings are few. More buyers means a better environment for you to sell.

â&#x20AC;˘ Your home may no longer meet your needs. It is amazing how when you are in a home 3, 5, or 10 years how much your needs change. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get you into the right home for you while prices are still affordable for your next move.

I have buyers approved wanting to buy homes! Call Me Today! <RXUQH[WVWHSLVWRFDOOPHIRUDPDUNHWDQDO\VLVWRĂ&#x20AC;QGRXW what your home will sell for in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market!

253-203-8985

www.StephanieLynch.com

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

1388 N Lenore St. Information deemed liable but not guaranteed.

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

33 N Salmon Beach

CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA

PUYALLUP

7304 N SKYVIEW LN H304

2419 S MERIDIAN #11

$950

$1100

2 BED 1.75 BATH 1124 SF. LARGE UPPER FLOOR CONDO INCLUDES W/S/G & CABLE, GREAT AMENITIES AND SMALL DOG OK.

2 BED 2.5 BATH 1306 SF. TOWNHOME INCLUDES HARDWOODS, HUGE LIVING ROOM, DECK, GARAGE SPACE AND MORE.

TACOMA

FIFE

14406 PACIFIC AVE S # 8

5336 35TH ST E

$515

$1195

1 BED 1 BATH 575 SF. PERFECT 1 BED APT INCLUDES W/S/G, EAT IN KITCHEN, 6 MONTH LEASE AND ONSITE LAUNDRY.

2 BED 1.5 BATH 1114 SF. NEWER GATED COMMUNITY CONDO HAS ALL APPLIANCES, EXTRA STORAGE AND 2 CAR GARAGE.

LAKEWOOD

PUYALLUP

8401 SARDONYX DR SW # B

11304 185TH ST E

$1100

$1495

3 BED 2 BATH 1500 SF. AMAZING DUPLEX HAS BRAND NEW APPLIANCES, EAT IN KITCHEN, DECK, FENCED YARD & CATS WELCOME.

4 BED, 2.5 BATH 2430 SF. HUGE HOME ON GOLF COURSE HAS 5 PIECE MASTERS, FAMILY ROOM, FENCED YARD & PETS OK.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800 Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood burning Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQ all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including URRIVLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJ boat hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

936 S Sheridan $229,000

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High Ceilings, gas ÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG &DOOIRUSULYDWHVKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

$399,000

Fantastic mid century modern centrally located near stores, schools, parks and easy commuting to freeways, yet house feels secluded and private due to professionally landscaped, lovely yard with zen paths and sustainable design. Fantastic NLWFKHQKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDVWHURQPDLQ great patio for entertaining- this is a wonderful home with lots of space. Move in ready and awaiting new owners. $282,000

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back \DUGWRR+DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $204,950

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

PROPERTY

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000

Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peek-a-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique Old Town property! City has given Ă&#x20AC;QDOSODWDSSURYDOIRUORWVRQWKLVSULPH acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

COMMERCIAL

Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, downtown, parks. 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW KDV RQH EHGURRP SOXV attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920

Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

Gil Rigell

PROPERTY

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract RURAL LIVING: Restaurant/Lounge in Ashford, WA Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel.

price reduced

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at o cost to buyer. LAKEWOOD CAFE/ LOUNGE on a busy intersection, $81,500 CASH.

CALL RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 21, 2014

Smokey Robinson Merle Haggard

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February 21, 8:30pm

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March 14, 8:30pm

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I-5 Showroom $20, $30, $40, $45

Battle at the Boat 95

Keith Sweat

Michael McDonald

March 22, 7pm

March 29, 8:30pm

April 5, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $100

I-5 Showroom $30, $40, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom $40, $60, $95, $100

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You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


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