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FREE s Friday, November 2, 2012

Elections 2012: You Have Spoken:

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

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Tacoma Weekly Poll Results

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DOWNTOWN NIGHTLIFE

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TACOMAWEEKLY 24 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E BE C A U S E CO M M U N I T Y MAT T E R S

CITY OF TACOMA BUDGET

‘TWEAKS’ EXPECTED FOLLOWING COMMUNITY FORUMS By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Being the bearer of bad news is never fun. But it has to be done. Such is the case with the latest round of community budget talks working their way around Tacoma, which are the city’s effort to “touch bases” with residents after

a previous round of talks this summer that helped direct municipal spending and cuts as Tacoma officials work to fill a $63 million projected gap over the next two years. “The second round of community budget input meetings will provide an opportunity for the community to see how their initial input (from this past summer) was

incorporated into the budget,” said City Manager T.C. Broadnax. “I want to hear their thoughts on any adjustments they feel are necessary so that the city council can consider those during their review of the proposed budget.” City staff keeps notes on the meetings to summarize residents’ comments into specific themes. The Oct. 22 meeting at

Gray Middle School, for example, had 26 attendees and eight speakers. Of those, one supported the police department’s community liaison officers, six worried about the deteriorating streets, three complained that taxes are already too high and oppose the $20 vehicle tab proposal and advocated for the selling of naming

X See BUDGET / page A8

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

Tribal planner gets in Coyote’s ways

LIBRARY HITS GLITCH, BUT SYSTEM NOW UPGRADED

Cuts coming for new materials, staffing and main library hours but programs being added By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

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n unforeseen trouble with transitioning the Tacoma Public Library System’s 140,000 records into a new cataloging system prompted a few extra days of library closures to allow technicians to fix the computer bug. All branches were set to reopen last week, but the glitch in the computer code meant they were closed through the weekend as staff went all-hands-ondeck to clear the issue. The main downtown branch reopened on Oct. 29, while the neighborhood locations reopened on Oct 30. “It all works,” said Library Director Susan Odencrantz. “But it was a lot of work for us and a lot of work for them to do, but it all works.” Library staff had been successfully testing the massive data migration since September and hit a snag last week when the final uploading failed to complete successfully. The California-based software company Innovative Interfaces, which provides Integrated Library Systems to thousands of libraries of all types in more than 50 countries, reworked some code during the marathon work session last weekend and found the issue. During the library closures the system neither had the ability to check

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CREATIVE YOUTH: Tacoma students show their artistic side. PAGE A7

PHOTO BY ED CURRAN

COYOTE STYLE. Poet David Whited

appreciates Coyote’s mythic mission to upend order, snicker at folly then sing the stories to the stars. He has translated those stories into a book of poetry that Tacomans will appreciate.

“Instead of saying, ‘Why can’t we do stuff?’ it’s ‘Can we do this together?’” – David Whited By Kathleen Merryman

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

BOOKING. The Tacoma Public Library System was shut down for a few

extra days when a computer upgrade went a bit wonky over the weekend. The system is now ready to go however, with a host of new features.

out materials to its patrons, nor could patrons access the online library catalog. The new system adds several features that will make checking out, returning and searching for books and materials more user friendly. Patrons are now

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Pothole Pig ...............A2 City Briefs ................A3

able to create their own reading lists, read reviews of books, share book suggestions, do renewals by phone, receive text alerts and conduct deeper searches on specific topics. Searches on specific topics, for example, will now include X See LIBRARY / page A2

Back when David Lloyd Whited moved to Tacoma, it was Old Man Coyote’s kind of town. Coyote could lope along Pacific Avenue downtown, past a life sentence of bars and strip joints punctuated by card rooms. The trickster could find all the mischief, make all the mischief, his reputation demanded. Out on the East Side, out on the tribal lands, he could spice up his diet with a prowl through the backyards and thickets, snacking on uppity cats and lying about love. Whited the poet appreciates Coyote’s mythic mission to upend order, snicker at folly, then sing the stories to the stars. He has translated those stories into poetry for us in “Olde Man Coyote Goes to Towne,” published this fall by nine muses books ($15, ninemusesbooks.net). Whited the numbers man, the Puyallup tribal planner and grant writer, appreciates Coyote’s real-world cost. He has, for some 30 years, used numbers, good partnerships and proven programs to get in Coyote’s way. Tacoma is not so easy anymore for Olde Man Coyote. Born 61 years ago in the doctor’s bedroom in Canyonville, Ore., Whited claims Native American, Finnish and Norwegian ancestry, and that

Lutes prevail A10

Sports ......................A9 A&E ....................... ..B1

X See WHITED / page A4 Funny lady B5

Make A Scene ........ B7 Calendar ................. B8

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Two Sections | 24 Pages

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Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

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 FfAaIiRrLlAaNnEe By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

21st and Jefferson Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative,� and in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and is continuing those efforts well in to 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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The battle of the brands was in full force between Ford and Chevrolet during what is now called the “golden age of classic cars.� Both motor companies fought each other for market share with new features and designs. Ford almost lost that battle to Chevrolet in the early 1950s. But then came the Ford 1955, which offered a new design and boosted engine. The new Fairlane car line turned heads when it replaced the Crestline as the top-trim level, while a new Crown Victoria-style featured a chrome “basket handle� across the familiar “Victoria� hardtop roof. The 1955 Ford also featured the new panoramic windshields found on Oldsmobiles, Buicks and Cadillacs the previous year. Also that year came a new feature, although only as a dealer option: seatbelts could be installed as well as a feature called “Select Aire,� which had an integrated heater core and evaporator coil unit

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The Ranch Wagon and Custom Ranch Wagon, for example, were two-door wagons, while the Country Sedan and Country Squire models were four-doors wagons, the latter featuring wooden appliquĂŠ side mouldings that would be the signature feature of the line.

;HJVTHÂťZUL^LZ[W\ISPJHY[[VILKLKPJH[LK Inspired by the natural history of Metro Parks’ STAR Center (3873 S. 66th St.), Tacoma’s newest public art piece, “Sempervivumâ€? by local artist Lisa Kinoshita, will receive its formal dedication on Nov. 10, at 2 p.m., in STAR Center’s Journey Hall. The Tacoma Arts Commission and Metro Parks invites anyone who is interested in learning more about this piece to meet the artist at this free, public event. “My outdoor art installation pays tribute to the wetlands during its early-20th century heyday,â€? said Kinoshita. “This sculpture trilogy seeks to link the past to the future, celebrates South Tacoma’s fascinating natural heritage and highlights the sensitive balance between humans and their surroundings.â€? “Sempervivum,â€? Latin for “ever + living,â€? is located at STAR Center’s SERA Campus. The piece consists

of three large forms combining steel, live plants, and green roof technology, and pays homage to the natural history of STAR Center’s site, which originally was covered by extensive wetlands. The 32,000 square foot STAR Center, which opened in April 2012, is on track to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) silver status. “It has been rewarding to work with the City of Tacoma’s Arts Program on this project, helping to increase public art opportunities for Tacoma artists and to increase art in our parks for everyone to enjoy,� said Tareena Joubert, manager of Cultural and Community Services for Metro Parks. “Lisa has been a delight to work with and her zest to create amazing and meaningful artwork for this community is impressive.� “Sempervivum,� a $25,000 commission, was made possible through

a partnership between Metro Parks and the City of Tacoma’s Public Art: In Depth (PA:ID) program which trained a group of professional Tacoma artists on best practices and provided hands-on experience for working in public art. Artists in the PA:ID program had the opportunity to compete for public art projects with Metro Parks, Sound Transit and the City of Tacoma. Kinoshita is an artist and jeweler who lives and works in Tacoma. Her artwork has been exhibited at the Tacoma Art Museum, Fife Historical Museum, Vetri Gallery, Fulcrum Gallery, Kittredge Gallery, Woolworth’s windows and other regional venues. She was a 2011 nominee for the Contemporary Northwest Art Awards at the Portland Art Museum. In 2010, she received the Foundation of Art Award from the Greater Tacoma Community Foundation.

3VJHSZLHYJOHUKYLZJ\LKLWSV`LK[V,HZ[*VHZ[ Washington State Task Force 1 (WA-TF1), one of 28 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) urban search and rescue teams in the nation, was activated Oct. 31 to support rescue efforts on the east coast. The Task Force is assisting local responders in areas hard hit by Superstorm Sandy. The Task Force had been readying itself early in the

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week, and was put on alert Oct. 30 for possible deployment. Processing of the team members took place at the Department of Emergency Management, 2501 S. 35th St. in Tacoma. The Washington Task Force 1 (WA-TF1) was established in 1991 and currently has 36 different participating agencies from three pri-

recordings. The changes will be rolled out during the next few months with additional features being added periodically from then on. The new system is very “Amazon-like.� “It will all just keep

From page A1

PORTABLE

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

within the dash and cold air discharge vents located on top of the dashboard on either side of the radio speaker. The feature would go down in history as air conditioning. Station wagons were offered as a separate series for the first time in 1955.

magazine articles found through keyword prompts as well as books, DVDs and

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mary jurisdictions, Seattle Fire, King County and Pierce County. The Task Force comprises over 210 team members, drawn from a variety of organizations including fire departments, hospitals, law enforcement and public works agencies in the City of Seattle, King County and Pierce County.

coming,� Odencrantz said. “You can just select what level of search you want and go. It will all be on one spot.� One addition will include the ability for patrons to search the vast archives of the Northwest Room for historical research of all sorts. The new system will also integrate e-books and printed materials into one location rather than having separate locations on the library’s website. Library staff not working on the computer system still reported for duty as usual, despite the branch closures. They were working on side projects, reshelving books and filing clipping files that take back seats to helping patrons. “No one gets paid to stay home,� said library spokesman David Domkoski. “We were working on little things that we didn’t have time to do that we are getting done.� Tacoma has a history

of being unkind to software upgrades. The sting of the city of Tacoma’s $50 million computer integration effort back in 2004 was the most costly. Cost overruns for customization work, computer consultant contracts with TUI Consulting Inc. and a parade of glitches marred the roll out of that municipal system when the SAP software failed to deliver on expectations, including the inability of city officials to draft a budget while facing a $30 million funding gap. The library’s new computer system costs $568,000 over five years. Any cost overruns associated by the computer glitches are borne by the vendor, which is good news for a library facing a $3 million cut during the next two-year, $22.4 million budget. Those cuts will largely come in three areas: the materials budget will drop from $3 million to $2 million, the main library will shift from a six-day week to just five days for a savings of $969,000, and the layoffs of 16 technicians and support staffers for a savings of $980,000. Tacoma’s library system is used by about a million patrons a year. In the que for the coming months are the addition of a mobile StoryLab with state-of-the-art computers and editing software, a mobile phone application, a new website, expanded lists of brochures in additional languages, additional senior services to connect them to technological resources and community partnerships.

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Police Blotter EAST SIDE DRIVE-BY

A drive-by shooting occurred in the 2000 block of East 41st Street on Oct. 27. A man was driving with his girlfriend as a passenger. Another car pulled along his car. A person in the other car fired several shots. The man was hit in his chest and taken to a hospital. His injuries are not life threatening. The other car drove off.

HOUSE SET ON FIRE

A house fire that occurred on Oct. 27 in the 6000 block of South Warner Street was intentionally set, according to Tacoma Fire Department. No one was injured in the fire, which caused damage estimated at $103,000. The matter was referred to police.

MAN KILLED WITH HATCHET

A Tacoma man is accused of killing his father with a hatchet. The incident occurred on Oct. 25 in the victim’s home. Jonathan Meline was charged with first-degree murder. He pleaded not guilty. Bail has been set at $2 million. Prosecutors claim he attacked his father, Robert Meline, while the victim slept. According to charging documents, the younger Meline had threatened to kill his father and purchased a hatchet. His sister was awakened by her father screaming. She met her brother on the stairs. He said he would not harm her. They walked to Pierce County Jail, where he turned himself in. The suspect has a history of mental illness with a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. In 2010 he was found mentally incompetent to stand trial on charges of first-degree robbery and obstruction of a law enforcement officer. He was civilly committed to Western State Hospital. In January he was released to his parents.

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Police responded to a report of domestic violence and shots fired on South Mason Street on Oct. 25. A pit bull was at the home when officers arrived. They told people at the scene to keep the dog under control. The dog broke free and charged officers, including a K-9 officer with his dog. Police shot the pit bull, which died.

SHOT FIRED DURING ROBBERY

An armed robbery and pistol whipping occurred near the County/City Building on Oct. 25. The incident occurred at the intersection of South 9th Street and Tacoma Avenue. A man was trying to rob the victim and his gun accidentally discharged when he used it to hit the victim in the face. The suspect fled the scene.

City Briefs MORE CLOSURES FOR NALLEY VALLEY

Several ramp and lane closures will occur over the coming days as crews continue working on the Interstate 5/State Route 16 eastbound Nalley Valley project. The closures are scheduled as follows: Nov. 1: 4 a.m. – reopen southbound I-5 exit to South 38th Street; 11 p.m. – close southbound Sprague Avenue on-ramp to westbound SR 16. Nov. 2: 6 a.m. – reopen southbound Sprague Avenue on-ramp to westbound SR 16. Nov. 5-6: 11 p.m. – close southbound I-5 exit to South 38th Street; 4 a.m. each following morning the ramp will reopen

TACOMA GETS ULTRA-MODERN WENDY’S

Customers will experience for the first time in the Pacific Northwest an Ultra-Modern Wendy’s when they visit the new restaurant at 1401 E. 72nd St. A grand opening and ribbon cutting event was held Oct. 29 at the Wendy’s with members from the Eastside Neighborhood Association Council of Tacoma. A donation was made to Dome Top Neighborhood Alliance in honor of the grand opening celebration. “This restaurant features an innovative interior and exterior design. It is the first of Wendy’s new designs to be unveiled in the Pacific Northwest… actually the entire West Coast,” said Division Vice President Chris Hutchinson. “It’s very different from what our customers are used to, but we think they will really like the look and feel of the restaurant.” The company conducted nationwide research and studied every aspect of the customer’s restaurant experience. Based on this feedback, Wendy’s completely overhauled the interiors and exteriors of four different designs. The Ultra Modern design features a bold curb appeal and was inspired by architectural genius Frank Lloyd Wright. The new restaurant will engage more than just taste buds. Customers can lounge by the fireplace, watch the flat-panel TV, surf the Internet with free Wi-Fi and choose from more than 100 beverage choices at the Coca Cola Freestyle drink machine. Three other restaurant designs are being tested in multiple cities across North America.

TACOMA HOUSING AUTHORITY BANS SMOKING

In an effort to provide healthier housing for its residents and a healthier workplace for its employees, the Tacoma Housing Authority (THA) board recently voted to prohibit smoking in all of its rental housing units. The move makes THA one of the larger housing providers in Pierce County to adopt a smoke-free housing policy. The smoking ban will go into effect March 1. THA has long prohibited smoking in common areas. This new policy will apply to all indoor spaces, including the inside of rented apartments and homes. It also will apply to designated outdoor areas. As part of the implementation of this policy, THA and the Community Transformation Partnership of the Tacoma/Pierce County Health Department will connect residents to smoking cessation services and products. “THA is pleased to join the growing number

of public and private property managers that have prohibited smoking,” said Michael Mirra, executive director of THA. “A smoking ban is necessary to allow us to fulfill our fundamental responsibilities as a landlord and an employer to provide safe housing and a safe workplace.” The Tacoma/Pierce County Health Department and other partners have worked with THA to support this significant health policy decision. The Oct. 24 board vote was the result of a nine-month review that included consultation with residents, staff, other property management firms and the expertise of the health department, CHEF, the Tobacco Free Alliance of Pierce County and the Pacific Northwest Regional Council of the National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Office. Among other research and outreach activities, THA, the health department and these partners hosted numerous meetings and conducted a survey throughout THA properties to elicit the views of residents.

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Gheewhan Kim, minister for economic affairs at the Korean Embassy in Washington, D.C. met with CEO John Wolfe and Commissioner Clare Petrich Oct. 24 during a visit to Tacoma. Kim learned more about the port’s capabilities and relationship with Korea and toured the port industrial area. As minister, Kim promotes political, economic and trade relations between the United States and South Korea. He was previously director general for multilateral trade in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. His past overseas posts include the Korean Embassy in Muscat, Oman, the United Kingdom and Russia.

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In 1982, Andy Warhol set his sights on Tacoma with a proposal to drape the Tacoma Dome with a pop art flower. Today, those flowers are coming to Tacoma Art Museum and have inspired the Harmon Brewery to create Hop Art Ale, a special, seasonal India pale ale to celebrate Warhol’s Tacoma connections. The flower-inspired ale is the fourth seasonal beer that Harmon Brewery has crafted in partnership with Tacoma Art Museum. “In crafting this beer we took our signature Point Defiance IPA and aged it with rose hips, hibiscus, lavender and chamomile to tie in with Warhol’s love of flowers,” said Pat Nagle, owner of The Harmon Brewery and Restaurant. “The lavender has a nice presence and each flower does its part to provide the aroma and the taste of this amazing IPA.” Made with hops and flowers from Washington, Hop Art Ale can be enjoyed on tap or in bottles at The Harmon Restaurant, The Hub, The Tap Room and Tacoma Art Museum’s Relish Cafe, while supplies last. Only 35 cases of the Hop Art Ale were bottled. The beer sells for $6 a bottle. The museum and the Harmon have been collaborating on projects and unique seasonal beers since 1998. Most recently, they have created the Biennial Brew and Mighty Tacoma Ale, both of which sold out at all locations. Tacoma Art Museum has a long history of connecting the community through diverse art exhibitions, programs, and events. The Harmon Brewery was established in

1997 as Tacoma’s first microbrewery. Their award-winning beers help make their three Tacoma locations (The Harmon Brewery, The Hub, and The Taproom) a favorite spot for downtown businesses, local residents and tourists alike.

GANG MEMBER CHARGED WITH MURDER

Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist charged William Horton, Jr., 32, with first-degree murder and first-degree unlawful possession of a firearm. The defendant shot to death 29-year-old Charles Pitts at a Lakewood apartment complex. The defendant and the victim, both gang members, were hanging out at the apartment of a friend. A heated discussion began regarding whose gang was better. The argument elevated into a match of “slap boxing” and the defendant shot the victim twice. “This case highlights the senselessness of gang violence,” said Lindquist. “The Prosecutor’s Office is committed to helping change this culture of violence so we see fewer lives wasted.” Witnesses heard shots and saw the victim stumble backwards and fall to the floor. The defendant then dragged the victim to the parking lot. When officers arrived on scene, they found the defendant holding a gun and standing over the victim. The defendant told officers that Pitts was dead and laughed. The defendant explained that he is a Gangster Disciple from Chicago and the victim, a Lakewood Hustler Crip, insulted the defendant for his gang affiliation and hit him too hard during the slap boxing match. In response, the defendant pulled a .45 caliber pistol from his waistband and shot the victim in the chest and abdomen.

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WWhited From page A1

middle name, that Lloyd, is Welsh. He grew up in Southern Oregon fascinated by numbers and charmed by words. His undergraduate degree is in math. His masters’ is in poetry. “They are both elegant,� he said. “A good proof in math is elegant. It gets you to the solution in the least possible steps. Poetry is the best words in the best possible order.� He was fresh from living a poet’s life in academia when a friend told him the Southwest Oregon Indian Health Project was looking for someone to figure out Oregon Health System’s data on Native Americans compared to other groups. “They needed a grant writer, so they hired a poet,� Whited said. “The data showed a big difference,�

he said. He put that difference to work in grant applications that brought in money to pay for increased and improved services. “That’s when I got my first eagle feather,� he said. “For warrior acts on paper.� In 1981, Puyallup tribal leaders hired Whited to work on health education services. “When I first moved here, we had a health clinic out of a doublewide. I’m not sure it was even a double-wide,� he said. “We were operating out of portables. Back in those days, we weren’t the second or third biggest employer in the county.� As the tribe improved its fortunes, Whited made the difference between using money wisely, or Coyote-style. The difference is in the numbers. They light up the gap between an intriguing, innovative, good-

treatment licensed and certified,� Whited said. “I did a recent gang briefing paper. I took the city’s gang report and boiled it down to where it’s relevant to the tribe. It’s a good current summary.� It is a tool for educators, cops and youth services workers with the tribe and local governments. It is a good example, too, of the growing cooperation with other governments and districts. When Coyote’s making trouble, he slips in and out of jurisdictions. He slips into the gulches and through the blackberries on the East Side and hooks up with the desolate souls he finds there. But it is getting harder for him to find them in the old places. Tribal police, Tacoma police, code enforcement officers, volun-

hearted idea, and one that works. If kids graduate, if moms carry healthy babies, if elders get the medical care that keeps them independent, if a cleaner neighborhood cuts crime, the numbers show it. “You have to demonstrate change,� Whited said. “If it doesn’t change, you need to redesign the program. If you apply pressure to a spot to stop the bleeding, and it doesn’t stop, you need to try a different spot.� Demonstrable change attracts grant money, and it earns community acceptance. At the tribal mental health center, Kwawachee Counseling Center, cognitive therapy and functional family therapy are working. Strategies to keep people sober, housed and supported with mental health care once they return from treatment programs are working. “I worked to get health, mental health and children’s services and

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It was a rainy, eight-elephant day with furniture on Oct. 27 at the Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last community clean-up of the year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had excellent volunteers,â&#x20AC;? organizer David Whited said of the crew of eight, including Merrilee Satiacum-Combs and her family. Excellent, and lucky. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of our volunteers has a nephew who just got a new house, but didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have furniture,â&#x20AC;? Whited said. The family was figuring out how to help when a woman pulled

ing lot behind the tribal administration building at 3009 Portland Ave. It chased away the workers, some of whom stuffed tissues in their noses. It ambushed the people who dropped off stuff abandoned near a sweat lodge on Browning Street. It encouraged the hasty off-loading of 77 tires and the chunks of concrete that brought the dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s haul to 24.32 tons, including metal sent to recycling. That is worth eight threeton Outta Here Elephants in the parade of junk gone from Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alleys, yards and gulches. Excellent.

up in a rented U-Haul. She was moving, and there was no room for the six or eight chairs, two dressers and beds she had packed into the rented van. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was all in good shape,â&#x20AC;? Whited said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Half an hour after it got there, it was off to a new home. The pickup truck was too small, and they loaded it quick, so it looked like the Beverly Hillbillies.â&#x20AC;? That, he said, was the best thing of the day. The worst was a cooler. Something dead had spent far, far too long in it. The stench rose out of the container, one of five in the park-

teers from the tribe, neighborhood and conservation outfits are getting there first. They are shutting down encampments, rooting out blackberries and old couches. They are planting gardens where old cars went to die and rot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much more cooperation,â&#x20AC;? said Whited, who initiated a chunk of it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Instead of saying â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Why canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we do stuff?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Can we do this together?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all driven by enlightened decisions by the Tribal Council.â&#x20AC;? Olde Man Coyote eyes enlightened decisions sideways. This new town is turning into one of his nightmares, one of the many nightmares he mixes up with his dreams and the songs he sings at the stars.

Born on the heartbeat southside of the Reservation â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the Eastside by the Ave. he owns the town he had lived every nightmare heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d ever had. hallucinations, blackouts & despair. finally beaten by the cat at dominoes, he thought he had true humility & an open mind. & he was proud of it. And that was how it was. coyote scootches his bony butt down on the curb glances to the moon â&#x20AC;&#x201C; low, setting: dawn glowing in the east, fringing a speckled blanket of stars. he surveys acres and acres of alleys, vacant lots, impromptu dumps, empty buildings, hedges gone riot through neglect, and grins. thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of good stuff here for a patient critter: abandoned & homeless cats, well fed lap pets, over confident dogs (poodles), more rats than anybody needs. there must be trash everywhere. brilliant. yup, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to move into the suburbs. gonna get a new pair of used sunglasses. he desires the keen eagle look of designer shades.

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OPINION

-YPKH`5V]LTILYÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

Our Views

Tragic deaths point to frayed mental health service system

EDITORIAL CARTOON BY CHRIS BRITT á CBRITTOON@GMAIL.COM

Guest Editorials

A message from the mayors: approve Proposition 1 for our future By Marilyn Strickland, Bill Baarsma, Brian Ebersole & Karen Vialle We have struggled reading the tone of the attacks on Proposition 1, the proposal to maintain transit in our communities. We understand concerns about tax levels. But letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get the facts straight before making a bad decision that will significantly harm the tens of thousands who have no other transportation option; our neighbors, friends, relatives, fellow church parishioners, seniors, veterans, students, employees and people with disabilities. The cost of approving Proposition 1 is three additional pennies on every $10 taxable purchase. If you spend $500 a month, this will cost you an extra $2.50. Opponents of Proposition 1 claim this increase will drive consumers away from our retailers. They claim that you would rather drive to King County to save a grand total of $0.83 a month, or put at least 20 miles per trip on your car to save $5.50 a month in Thurston County. Opponents of Proposition 1 claim a sales tax increase puts a higher burden on lower income individuals. This is true. But this is an easy

decision for them: an extra three pennies for every $10 they spend; or no weekend bus service, no service past 7 p.m. on weeknights and fewer buses with limited connections during peak commuter hours. The failure of Proposition 1 for them could mean having to drop out of school, the loss of a job, the loss of health care or no connection to the outside world. Opponents of Proposition 1 claim Pierce Transit should have put a sunset clause on this proposal. Sunset clauses are a good idea for capital projects, like a school or road infrastructure, but not operations. We would all have to believe that the economy is going to grow at recordbreaking rates for the foreseeable future to see the kind of improvement in the economy the opponents think is right around the corner. Didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t these people just spend the last three years complaining that government should have planned better for the recession? By the way, the large number of baby boomers aging in Pierce County and those choosing to retire here are already pushing transit to capacity on regular buses and paratransit service. A sunset clause would close the door to access to all services for too many seniors.

But what is most startling about those who oppose Proposition 1 is the total lack of vision for the future. They can live with the second largest county in Washington not having a viable transit system. Rejecting Proposition 1 would be a critical blow to employers who must comply with state commute trip reduction standards. A critical blow to economic development in the South Sound, at a time we need to attract new businesses. A critical blow to addressing the growing congestion problem on Interstate 5 at Joint Base Lewis/McChord. A critical blow to our neighbors, friends, relatives, fellow church parishioners, seniors, veterans, students, employees and people with disabilities who have no other transportation option. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stand together; letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approve Proposition 1! Marilyn Strickland is the current mayor of Tacoma and chair of the Pierce Transit Board of Commissioners. Bill Baarsma served as Mayor from 2002-09. Brian Ebersole served as mayor from 199501. Karen Vialle served as mayor from 1990-94 and currently serves on Tacoma School Board. All have served on the Pierce Transit Board in their capacity as mayor.

A horrific event that occurred in the North End last week is another sad reminder of the failures of our mental health system. Jonathan Meline was released from Western State Hospital in January, after doctors deemed that he no longer posed a threat to himself or others. He was criminally committed to the Lakewood facility from October 2010 to May 2011 and civilly committed from August 2011 to Jan. 12. His time there was a result of an incident at a car dealership. Authorities claim he tried to run over a salesman and police officers subdued him with a Taser. Meline has a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Hospital staff agreed to release him to the custody of his parents. On Oct. 25, he allegedly attacked his father with a hatchet, killing the respected teacher in Bethel School District while he slept. His sister was home and accompanied her brother to jail, where he turned himself in. He told investigators he had planned to kill his father for some time. This is another in a string of similar incidents, where people with long-standing mental health problems act out violently. On Oct. 27, a South Hill woman was arrested for allegedly killing her mother, telling authorities that her mother was a witch and â&#x20AC;&#x153;spiritually rapedâ&#x20AC;? her. Meshawn West has been charged with first-degree murder. In August, a young woman walked into a store near Wauna, pulled a gun and began shooting. Three people were struck by gunfire and one of them died in October. The suspect, Laura Sorenson, faces several charges, including first-degree murder. Her family had tried to get her the help she needed, to no avail. These incidents point to the need for a more comprehensive, and effective, system to care for people with serious mental illnesses. The people arrested for these crimes will most likely get the help they need, but unfortunately only after the violent deaths of innocent people. Many other mentally ill people are wandering the streets, sleeping under bridges or having brief stays in homeless shelters. Others end up in jail, where their condition boosts the cost to care for them, costs born by local governments with already strained budgets. Tacoma City Council took commendable action earlier this year by approving a small increase in the sales tax, with the funds earmarked for social services for the mentally ill and chemically dependent. More attention needs to be paid to the problem at other levels of government. Treating the mentally ill does not get enough discussion among politicians, either those already in office or those running for one. It is an issue few candidates have discussed during this election. We hope some of the recent tragedies in Pierce County will add emphasis to need to address this pressing issue.

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC

Approve Proposition 1 for a transit system that benefits everyone

2588 Pacific Highway, Fife, WA 98424  Â&#x2039;-(?! 

By Elena Moreno

7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY! Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ!John Larson / jlarson@tacomaweekly.com Kate Burrows / kburrows@tacomaweekly.com Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY!Jeremy Helling/ jhelling@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com; Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Tammy Vince Cruz >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, David B. Hardt, Dave Davison (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Nicole Boote / nicole@tacomaweekly.com

Voters, I beg you: please approve Proposition 1. Why? I wish as much as you that there was another way, more money in the budget, another alternative, but right now there just is not, and right now we need to sustain and reinstate our limited bus service in this county. As an educated, middle-aged, fulltime-night-shift-working woman, a commuter and a student who has not had a car since she was about 19 (by choice, for economical and environmental reasons), I am here to say that in Pierce County I am a witness to the true dependence that so many of our fellow citizens have on buses seven days a week, morning and night. I am an anomaly on the bus because I am not one who is absolutely dependent on it, though with these cuts I will be forced to buy a car somehow just to get to work and school. Historically, I have chosen to be car-less and use public transportation because it was always

reliable and available (in King and Pierce counties, where I have lived for the last 18 years. It helped me to save money in gas, insurance, maintenance and car payments). It also allowed me to take another car off the road, which lightens your traffic and helps the environment. We, the riders of Pierce Transit buses, are your neighbors, your teenagers, your elderly, your mobilityimpaired fellow citizens and your fellow commuters trying to get to our jobs, doctor appointments and schools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and back home again, safely â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to survive. Many jobs have shifts during nights and weekends, such as hospital, road and grocery store workers. Many schools have libraries and other services offered then as well. (Think of evening students and library patrons.) And certainly, many medical services are needed and provided for 24/7. (Think of trips to urgent care centers and emergency rooms.) Without Proposition 1 approval, bus service reductions will leave too

many in our community stranded on evenings and weekends when life still goes on. You may think you will not be impacted by these cuts, but surely you will, at least indirectly, and surely someone you know and care about will be affected immensely. I do not have kids, but I have supported school levies for your children because they are my fellow citizens and neighbors too. Nobody wants higher taxes, if asked, of course. But in times like these when we all â&#x20AC;&#x201C; citizens and legislators alike â&#x20AC;&#x201C; must weigh the priorities and needs of our community with great conscientiousness, we have to ask ourselves what we just might need to be willing to tolerate to help each other survive and carry on. All of us, bus riders included, will be affected by the tax â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but so much more negatively than we would without it. Thank you for thoughtfully considering a yes vote on Prop. 1. Elena Moreno is a Tacoma resident.

Letters to the Editor Dear Editor, I have never been involved in a political campaign before, but I am deeply involved in Jeannie Darneilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign for State Senate in the 27th Legislative District. I first worked with Jeannie when she was the director of Pierce County AIDS Foundation and I was a volunteer at Three Cedars, an AIDS hospice. I got to see firsthand Jeannieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s courage in fighting for disadvantaged people and in standing up for just but unpopular causes. I contacted her again recently with my concerns about education, and she took most of the morning to meet with my colleagues and I. I was so impressed with her responsiveness that I decided to volunteer my time in support of her campaign. As I became more familiar with the logistics of her race, I realized how important it was for me to stand beside her, for womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reproductive rights, for marriage equality, for economic justice. In all the time I have spent with Jeannie, listening to her rally her many volunteers and supporters, I have never heard her bash her opponent or resort to negative campaign tactics. That, in itself, speaks volumes. Please join me in voting for Jeannie Darneille for State Senate. Alisa Solberg Tacoma

Dear Editor, Many people are inherently attracted to the same sex; this is a reality. Intolerance and ignorance do not have to be present for people to have different legal opinions. Marriage is not in the same category as other historical wrongdoings and mistakes. I do believe that society will be affected if children are increasingly raised in homes without a male and female parent present. It makes sense that negative public service consequences would result from Referendum 74. This basic definition change also opens a very real and steep â&#x20AC;&#x153;slippery slopeâ&#x20AC;? for other legal topics that we currently take for granted. Current definitions provide representation for two opposing beliefs. Civil unions and marriages legally solidify relationships with all benefits. Referendum 74 molds these two definitions into one, literally erasing the second of those valued viewpoints. Legal definitions are the only solid and confident voice that many children, teens and young adults will ever know. They deserve to hear both sides. Please vote no on Referendum 74. Shara Jackson Tacoma

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Tacoma Weekly welcomes letters to the editor, your opinions and viewpoints. Anonymous letters will not be published. Tacoma Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Please send them to above address or e-mail us at letters@tacomaweekly.com.

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YOUR VOTE IS YOUR VOICE BE HEARD NOV. 6

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Election 2012

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Washington State Legislation

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Election 2012 - =V[LYZ[VKLJPKLJOHUNL[V7PLYJL*V\U[`*OHY[LY By John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

#OUNTY VOTERS ARE BEING ASKED WHETHER TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF VOTES NEEDED FOR 0IERCE #OUNTY #OUNCIL TO RAISE TAXES !MENDMENT  TO 0IERCE #OUNTY #HAR TER WOULD RAISE THE NUM BER OF VOTES NEEDED FROM FOUR TO FIVE )N -AY THE COUNCIL VOTED   TO PUT

THE MEASURE ON THE BALLOT 4HE TWO $EMOCRATS 2ICK 4ALBERT AND 4IM &ARRELL OF 4ACOMA CAST THE DISSENT ING VOTES 'IGI 4ALCOTT OF 4ACO MA WHO SERVED SEVEN TERMS IN THE 3TATE (OUSE OF 2EPRESENTATIVES IS ONE OF THREE PEOPLE WHO WROTE THE STATEMENT IN THE VOTERS PAMPHLET SUPPORTING THE AMENDMENT

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SAME SEX MARRIAGE 4AL COTT ADMITS THIS CHARTER AMENDMENT IS GETTING LIMITED ATTENTION !S HER PHONE NUMBER WAS LISTED IN THE VOTERS PAMPHLET

SHE HAS FIELDED JUST A FEW CALLS FROM VOTERS WHO WANT MORE INFORMATION -OST HAVE EXPRESSED SUP PORT FOR MAKING IT MORE DIFFICULT FOR POLITICIANS TO RAISE TAXES 4HE CHARTER CAN BE CHANGED BY HAVING A REVIEW COMMITTEE OF ELECTED CITI ZENS WHO DELIBERATE ON CHANGES THEN SEND THEM TO A VOTE OF THE GENERAL PUB

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LIC )T CAN ALSO BE AMENDED BY THE COUNCIL SENDING A CHANGE TO VOTERS 3HOULD THIS MATTER HAVE WAITED UNTIL THE NEXT CHAR TER REVIEW 4ALCOTT SAID THE MAJORITY OF COUNCIL MEMBERS WANTED TO PUT ON THE BALLOT BEFORE THE ,EG ISLATURE APPROVES ANOTHER TWO YEAR STATE BUDGET !ND BECAUSE OF THE HIGH VOTER TURNOUT EVERY FOUR YEARS IN THIS STATE WHEN WE VOTE FOR PRESIDENT AND GOVER NOR 4ALCOTT NOTED THIS IS AN IDEAL YEAR SINCE IT IS THE CYCLE WHEN THE LARGEST NUMBER OF PEOPLE VOTE

4HE ,EAGUE OF 7OMEN 6OTERS OF 4ACOMA0IERCE #OUNTY OPPOSES THIS BALLOT MEASURE 0RESIDENT 4ERRI "AKER SAID IT VIOLATES THE BASIC DEMOCRATIC CONCEPT OF MAJORITY RULE h4HIS TAKES THAT AWAYv 3HE ALSO FEELS THIS SHOULD BE DETERMINED THROUGH THE CHARTER REVIEW PROCESS 7HILE THE COUNCIL IS ALLOWED TO USE THIS METH OD "AKER SEES NO URGENCY THAT WARRANTS IT h4HIS IS NOT AN EMERGENCYv )F APPROVED THE AMEND MENT WOULD GO INTO EFFECT AS OF *AN  

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SCHOOL PAGE

!247/2+ 0/%429 !.$ 72)4).' &2/- 4!#/-! 345$%.43 Students in Mrs. Shelton’s Creative Writing classes at SAMI (Science & Math Institute), were challenged to [VMXI E WXSV] SV VIÀIGXMSR in 100 words or less. It turned out to be a bit more HMJ¿GYPXXLERXLI]¿KYVIH

stay where you are. Honestly, I love everything about you, especially your unique shapes and colors. You may look like a bunch of blobs to others, but to me, I see water and shapes that remind me of many memories. I wonder what you feel like? Too bad you can’t be closer. You are up too high, as if you belong there for a special reason. Whatever you are, I want to cover myself in you. Clouds, please be mine.

GLASSES Every once in a while, the boy would put on his mother’s glasses just to see through someone else’s eyes. He stumbled through the house the first few minutes, before his eyes would adjust. He tripped down the porch stairs and into the backyard. Everything cleared in the evening air, and the colors burned together in a brilliant sunset. It was now that he could see everything magnified through magic lenses, detailed bark patterns and scintillating moths’ wings. The boy combed though darkening grass, turning up beetles, pebbles, seeds. Soon, his mother called from the porch. “Where are my glasses?” “Here, Mommy,” the boy said, and his adventures would wait again until tomorrow.

ABSENT-MINDED That morning Dennis was lost in his train of thought, from the time he had woken up to the time he went to school and back. He thought of many things, like what he would have for lunch, and he wondered what would be on his next math quiz, what he should study, and if he’d be ready to take the test. But that wasn’t the only thing he was pondering. He wondered why his feet felt so cold…That is until his friend tapped him on the shoulder. “Did you forget to wear shoes today?” Dennis glanced down at his feet, “No wonder.”

Gieger students under the tutelage of Natasha Arakaki, a teacher in the after school YMCA program, designed this marvelous Halloween poster.

By: Carlos Ortiz, 10th gr.

By: Natalie Stephens, 12th gr.

By: Amaranth Perkins-Booker, 10th gr.

Sand bar shark feeding, swallowing crabs and fish, then eaten in soup.

Look, it’s white and fluffy. I wish you could be my pillow ‘til you get me wet. For now you can

By: Johnathan Sipes, 10th gr., SAMI, Teacher: Mrs. Shelton

Nanci Haddigan’s 6th grade art students at Truman Middle School tried their hand at perspective drawings this fall.

Katy Hassing November, the month of Thanksgiving and family get togethers where we often eat too much. It is here, and during other times like these, that the elders in our families play a very vital role, their wisdom often keeping our families LIEPXL]8LIWTIGM¿GWERHNS]WSJXLMWJEGXEVIGPIEVP]IZMdent in the lovely letter Tianna Carbonatto wrote to her Grandma from the heart earlier this year.

Dear Grammy,

Isabel Albert

Irena Plotnikova

Victoria Le

Beverly Stines-VanCourt

YOUNG

In the summer we’d laugh and play and lose track of the day. We’d joke and play and waste away the Entire Day. Then came the day when you moved away. I felt the lack of shine and the brightness of your ways. But sadly, it felt like the older I got the more I forgot to stay young. Soon I found myself doing things

I had sworn I wouldn’t, and right before my eyes I lost my youth. It might hurt me, but it is the truth. So on this day, I am remembering to remind myself. We don’t stop playing because we’ve grown up. We’ve grown up because we stopped playing. By: David Rockwell, Stewart M.S., Teacher: Ms. Raike

Feb. 14, 2012 We have this silly little Valentine’s Day assignment in that Creative Writing class I told you about. We are to write a letter of appreciation to someone we love. I chose you because you are the most admirable, influential, and understanding person in my life. I know that you say I have Mom to talk to, but you know how hard that is sometimes. Talking to you every morning before school always reminds me that someone cares, and that there is someone there for me. I want to thank you for always supporting me, giving me great advice, and for being my best friend. I have no idea what I would do without you. I know it’s something we’ve talked about before, but even a year later, I still get really emotional about this. When Aunt Ginny died, I felt really alone. I didn’t know how to cope with it. I wanted so much to be able to have Mom and I lean on each other during our time of grieving. That didn’t happen because we coped in different ways. When you came to visit and you held me while I cried for what felt like forever that night. It meant the world to me. I had been waiting for months for someone to comfort me like that. I am so glad you were there. You are closer to me in ways I will never truly understand. I look up to you in ways of strength as well. You always manage to appear so strong when everything is going wrong, or in times when most would panic and break down. You always want to do as much for your family as possible, and you love nothing more than spending time with everyone. Remember when uncle David got married and we had the big family barbeque? That was one day in my life I will never forget. Although half of them aren’t family anymore, the way we all bonded that summer was amazing. You brought everyone together in your home, cooked for us, and provided for us. I never realized how hard it is to prepare for a big event like that. You made it look so easy, and everything turned out so nicely, and all of this, still, with the biggest smile on your face. Someday, I hope to be like that. You have all the perfect qualities of my best friend. You listen to me. You give me advice. You are there for me. A lot of people say that mothers give great advice, but I think grandmothers really know best. You’ve been through a lot more than Mom or I have, and you still help us both, especially when we have problems with each other. We butt heads a lot, and I am so grateful for you to be the mediator. Also, you don’t have a problem telling me when it’s me that is causing the problem, and vice versa. You give me a whole new perspective, and are a lot more insightful, and this is coming from a teenager. I am aware that it is pretty obvious, but I just want you to know how much it means to me. You are my best friend, Grammy, and like I said earlier, I don’t know what I would do without you. I cannot wait for this summer, with me, you, and Sydney. I am even more excited to move down there after graduation. In my favorite place, with my favorite person, and it shall be perfect. I love you Grammy. Thank you for every single little thing you do. It all means so much.

Love Always, Cutie Patootie Tianna Carbonatto, 12th gr., SAMI, Teacher: Mrs. Shelton

Students of Ms. Mann at the Science and Math Institute (SAMI)

Eris Egan, 12th, Elephant, watercolor and ink

Daylon, 11th grade, Shark Recycle Symbol, watercolor

Lauren Budd, 11th, polar bear, watercolor and ink

Teachers and students interested in submitting work may get guidelines or information from Shari Shelton, (253) 906-3769 (before 8 a.m. and after 3 p.m.) or at sshelto@tacoma.k12.wa.us, or may contact Donna McCracken, (253) 475-8387 or dmccrac@tacoma.k12.wa.us.

:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`5V]LTILY

Wbudget From page A1

rights for the Tacoma Dome. One speaker suggested the Puyallup River bridge between Tacoma and Fife become a toll bridge. The Oct. 24 meeting at Wheelock Library had 24 attendees and eight speakers, who talked about police cuts translating into more overtime pay and negating any savings, fear of more street maintenance cuts and increased sales taxes. The community meetings include a video about the 2013-14 biennial budget as well as short presentations by city staff and community questions answered by department officials on what the cuts will mean for city services. While it is not all rainbows, flowers, glitter and unicorns, city staff felt the meetings were necessary to show members of the public that they were heard during the previous forums this summer rather than a call for new ideas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I attended eight of the 10, and I must say that I believe that city manager has done a damn good job of listening at those meetings and developing a budget based on the community input he received from the forums,â&#x20AC;? City Councilmember David Boe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So now that he is going back out, I think it is more of a back check of what he heard this summer now in a budget format, and thus is should be more of a tweaking than a change in direction for me personally.â&#x20AC;?

And, of course, there is the politics of new fees to work into the mix. The city budget proposal, for example, calls for a $20 vehicle licensing fee that would fund a yet-tobe-formed Transportation Improvement District. The fee would bring in about $4 million to fund much-needed street repairs. Many cities are considering similar fees and are pondering the political question of adding a fee that wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t solve their street issues. Tacoma has an $800 million roster of needed road work, so the projected $4 million over two years wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make a dent in the backlog. But it would be something and buy time to find other dollars to fill that hole, which could mean higher property or sales taxes or other fees. The political question is to enact a new fee only to seek a more comprehensive, voter-approved tax down the line or hold off and lump everything in an â&#x20AC;&#x153;all or nothingâ&#x20AC;? ballot item. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Voters are completely counterintuitive about taxes,â&#x20AC;? Councilmember Anders Ibsen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meaning, that when deficits are large and government needs the money the most, voters are less likely to support a tax measure. The reason being that in those situations, people mistrust the government and blame elected officials for what appears to be mismanagement. Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s direct experiences inform their take on reality. And service cuts and deficits equals government isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t working, so why should I trust it? Conversely,

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when everything is running smoothly and government isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hemorrhaging money, people are content with tax measures. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why Seattle almost always passes school levies. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got boatloads of cash. So logically, a $20 car tab increases our chances of a levy being successful in the future. Because the people will see more work being done. Or at least they wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see as much cut.â&#x20AC;? While the meetings so far have been largely lightly attended by a dozen or more residents, comments are flowing in to city council members. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I find it helpful to hear where people have concerns,â&#x20AC;? Councilmember Marty Campbell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have heard from people dif-

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Here is a schedule of upcoming budget workshops and community forums: Mon., Nov. 5 at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; there will be a community budget forum between at Center at Norpoint, 4818 Nassau Ave. NE. Tues., Nov. 6 at 12 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the Fire Department budget will be discussed in the Council Chambers on the first floor of the Tacoma Municipal Building, 747 Market St. Tues., Nov. 13 at 12 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Municipal Court; Information Technology Services; Public Assembly Facilities; and Non-Departmental budgets will be discussed as well as a budget wrap-up in the Council Chambers on the first floor of the Tacoma Municipal Building, 747 Market St. A public hearing on the budget is also set for 5:30 p.m. Tues., Nov. 20 at 12 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the Council will hold a budget workshop in the Council Chambers on the first floor of the Tacoma Municipal Building, 747 Market St. Tues., Nov. 27 at 12 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the Council will hold a budget workshop in the Council Chambers on the first floor of the Tacoma Municipal Building, 747 Market St. Nov. 30, is the deadline for comments to City Hall is through its online community budget input box at cityoftacoma.org. Tues., Dec. 4 at 12 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the Council will hold a budget workshop in the Council Chambers on the first floor of the Tacoma Municipal Building, 747 Market St. Budget presentations, documents, streaming video and archived videos are available online at cityoftacoma.org.

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ferent points of view that help us to see the whole picture. While the proposed budget is well drafted, we need to make sure all the parts are working in unison. Many times, it the overlooked small things that can swell into larger problems in the future.â&#x20AC;? One item Campbell wanted tweaked was the proposed reductions to storm and snow response crews. While the proposed budget calls for a cut from nine to five snow trucks, for example, Campbell wanted details on the cost of delaying those cuts until after the snow season rather than making the cut in January, right as the cold season dawns. I have also received emails thanking us for our

unprecedented level of transparency and information,â&#x20AC;? Campbell said. While residents might have been seeing details, a union representing city workers is claiming otherwise. Teamsters Local 117, which represents about 250 city workers, has filed a lawsuit in Pierce County Superior Court against the city of Tacoma, saying the proposed budget violates their labor contracts. Some 217 positions are set to end under the budget as presented through cuts in funding or in Broadnaxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reorganization plan to merge departments. The Human Rights and Human Services Department are set to now include code enforcement, which was under Public Works, and Community Based Services is to become the new Neighborhood and Human Services Department under the planned shuffle. The Planning Division and Building and Land Use Services would be removed from their current home in the Community and Economic Development and become a new Planning and Development Services Department. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Utilities Department would move from Public Works to a new Environmental Services Department. Of the jobs targeted for elimination in the cutbacks and reorganization, 64 are vacant positions. Those employees who will remain will have no cost of living adjustments if they are nonunion members although the budget would restore pay cuts made this year, and eligible employees would see step increases. Salaries for union members would fall under their labor contracts.

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HIGH SCHOOL 96<5+<7

A11 X

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2012

SECTION A, PAGE 9

;(*64()(7;0:; .,;:9,=,5., 6<;3(:;: *96::7605; Crusaders prepare for district playoffs

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

203305.0; Tacoma Baptist’s Natalie

*/(93,:>90./;.,;:3,(.<, */(47065:/07:;(;,),9;/ Lincoln puts away Foss in second half

A

fter struggling all night against the Eatonville defense, the Charles Wright offense finally struck when it mattered most. Trailing 6-0 in the fourth quarter, the Tarriers launched a 10-play, 45-yard drive, scoring on Colin Reynolds’ 10-yard run with 7:36 left to beat the Cruisers 7-6 and claim the Nisqually League title for the first time since 1989. “I don’t like to give score predictions, but I knew it was going to be close, I knew it was going to be physical and that’s exactly what you got today,” said Charles Wright head coach Mike Finch, adding that it was the program’s biggest win since the 1989 team advanced to the state title game. Eatonville had one last opportunity late in the fourth quarter, but Fritz Jacobson intercepted quarterback Zach Fairhart near midfield on the first play of the drive to clinch the victory. The interception was the second of the game for Jacobson – the Tarriers’ quarterback making his first start at safety – after he squashed an Eatonville drive in the second quarter with a pick on the Tarriers’ five-yard line. “Because I’ve played quarterback for so long, it’s easier for me to read the plays,” Jacobson said. “Instincts kick in, and I know where I’m supposed to be.” The game was a defensive struggle through most of the first half, but the Cruisers finally broke a scoreless tie on Bradon Atkins’ one-yard plunge with just under a minute left in the second quarter. But Charles Wright’s Robert Luke, Jr. came charging through the line to block the extra point, making it only a 6-0 deficit at the half. The Tarriers struggled to move the ball early in the second half, but finally got good field position after a penalty forced the Cruisers to re-punt early in the fourth quarter, and Collin Hungate’s 15-yard return set Charles Wright up at Eatonville’s 45-yard line. Hungate came up with a huge 12-yard reception from Jacobson on 4th-and-7 to keep the resulting drive alive, and Reynolds then provided the winning score six plays later after taking a sweep right, cutting back to the middle of the field and sprinting in from 10 yards out. “The captains, we went up to our team in the huddle and said ‘This is our drive. This is what we’ve been working

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

:;(*2,+<7 (Top) Eatonville running back Bradon Atkins is swarmed

by Charles Wright’s Wunmi Oyetuga (58), Nick Ho (24) and Drew Vipond (66). (Bottom) Tarrier safety Fritz Jacobson (19) picks off a pass intended for the Cruisers’ Brendan Davis in the second quarter, as Charles Wright defensive back Collin Hungate (11) helps in coverage.

for all season,’” Reynolds said. “We drove the field and punched it in, and that was huge.” Reynolds finished with 11 carries for 66 yards, while Raheem Hughey led the Tarriers with 17 carries for 70 yards. Atkins led Eatonville with 19 carries for 52 yards, as the Cruisers mustered just 150 total yards. “Our defense (was) lights out,” Finch said. “Hats off to our defensive coordinator Neil Biermann. (It was an) amazing game plan.” The win not only gives the Tarriers the league title, but a bye directly into the 1A state playoffs, where they await

their first matchup on either Nov. 9 or 10. By Jeremy Helling

(),:;67-(3*65:79,7(9, -69;6<./4(;*/<7

After the Lincoln Abes dispatched the Wilson Rams on Oct. 19, thoughts turned to the Foss Falcons and a seemingly easy walk in the park. But the Falcons were up to the challenge at first, trailing just 12-7 early in the fourth quarter before Lincoln shifted into another gear and topped Foss 32-7 on Oct. 26. X See FOOTBALL / page A10

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Snyder dominated up front for the Crusaders in the big win over Crosspoint Academy, putting up a game-high 24 kills. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

After doing much of the damage for Tacoma Baptist near the net, senior Natalie Snyder closed out a key victory against Crosspoint Academy from the serving stripe. Snyder delivered two late aces and led a 10-0 run in the deciding fifth set to lead the Crusaders over the Warriors 25-12, 21-25, 25-20, 17-25, 15-5 in their regular season finale at home on Oct. 25. The win not only solidified a district playoff spot for Tacoma Baptist, but avenged a loss to the Warriors on the road earlier this season. “We just all had a really good time playing together,” said Snyder, who finished with a game-high 24 kills and eight aces. “It was a team effort. It wasn’t just one person individually.” The Crusaders dominated the first set, with Snyder slamming four kills and three aces early and junior libero Brittany Vandouris later adding two aces to give the Crusaders a 14-4 lead. But after Tacoma Baptist took a 10-6 lead in the second set, the Warriors launched an 8-0 run to take control and level the match. “They are a really scrappy team,” said Tacoma Baptist head coach Rusty Carlson of Crosspoint Academy. “We had to just persevere, because they don’t let a lot of balls hit (the ground).” Snyder led the Crusaders back in the third set, delivering three kills in the span of five points to give Tacoma Baptist an 18-14 advantage. “I just go up there and try to see what spots are open and just hit,” Snyder said. “I get nervous sometimes, but my coach just tells me to go out there and swing.” After watching Crosspoint tie the third set 19-19, Kathryn Carlson and Lily Powell delivered back-to-back kills to help the Crusaders claim the set. But the Warriors took an early 5-4 lead in the fourth set and never let up, clinging to a slim advantage to send the match to the decisive fifth set. That is when Snyder stepped up again, forcing a side out to tie it 5-5 and then serving for the final 10 points to clinch the win. Junior McKenna Neufeld led the Crusaders with 38 assists, while Kathryn Carlson had seven kills and Vandouris added a team-high 12 digs. After falling in four sets to the Warriors on Oct. 9, Rusty Carlson noted that several factors led to the turnaround. “We were more focused, we played more aggressively and we played better on offense,” he said. “We matched their intensity.” With the win, the Crusaders prepare for the district playoffs at Stanwood High School, with a loser-out matchup against Darrington on Nov. 3 at noon. The winner advances to play Bear Creek at 2 p.m. “We don’t have anything to lose,” Snyder said. “We’re going in as the underdogs, like we always are. I’m just excited about trying to go to state.”

:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`5V]LTILY

3<;,:7<33(>(@-96436..,9:05:,*65+/(39\UUPUNIHJRZ[VVT\JOMVY<7:KLMLUZL By Steve Mullen Correspondent

One can usually expect the unexpected when Puget Sound and Pacific Lutheran get together on the football field. It was no different on Oct. 27 at Baker Stadium. Tied 14-14 at the half, the Lutes went on to score 27 unanswered second-half points to record a 41-14 win to improve to 5-2 overall and 4-1 in conference play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did not panic at halftime, and our entire staff came out with a great second-half plan to record a great 30 minutes of play for the win today,â&#x20AC;? said PLU coach Scott Westering. The first half of play was a bit sloppy on both sides, as the Lutes turned the ball over three times and the Loggers twice. The problems started early for the Lutes. Starting on their own 28-yard line, they drove to the Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 13 and on the driveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 15th play, Ryan Rogers pounced on a Lute fumble to halt the threat. The Loggers began to find some continuity midway through the second quarter. Quarterback Braden Foley engineered a nineplay, 74-yard drive with Kevin Miller on the receiving end of an 18-yard touchdown pass with

WFootball From page A9 â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did a good job of screwing around in the first half,â&#x20AC;? said Lincoln head coach Jon Kitna. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Foss was doing a good job of bring-

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

:;0--(94 Pacific Lutheran running back Niko Madison stiff arms Puget Sound linebacker

Max Mirande as he makes his way to the outside in the Lutesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 41-14 win.

7:55 left for a 7-0 lead. But the Lutes answered in a little more than a minute, with quarterback Dalton Richey hitting a streaking Kyle Warner down the right sidelines for a

ing a lot of guys that we could not pick up early.â&#x20AC;? The Abes got on the board when quarterback Jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Maka Love engineered an eight-play, 60-yard drive with Jonathan Hardnett finding the end zone from five yards out for a 6-0

42-yard score to tie it at 7-7. Not to be outdone, the resurgent Loggers regained the lead when Ryan Rogers hauled in a sixyard touchdown pass from Foley to make it a 14-7. The Loggers

Lincoln lead in the first quarter. The Falcons would employ a new wrinkle with 6-foot-1, 250-pound running back Patiole Pesefea collecting early yards against a befuddled Lincoln defense, but the Abes found a way to stymie the bruising Foss

     

missed a couple chances to take a halftime lead, as kicker Everett West missed two field goals late in the second quarter from 45 and 39 yards out. That would prove to be det-

back in the second half. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We changed up a little bit in the second half on the defensive side and forced Foss to go over the top a little,â&#x20AC;? said Kitna. Leading 12-0 early in the fourth quarter, the Falcons found a spark in quarterback Omar Morris. After missing on three prime scoring opportunities in the first half, Morris found the end zone on a four-yard sprint on the first play of

rimental to the Loggers, as the Lutes assumed total control in the third quarter. Midway through the quarter Pacific Lutheran running back Niko Madison reached the end zone from four yards out to give the Lutes a lead they would not relinquish at 21-14. Disaster struck the Loggers on their next possession when Foley lost the ball on the third play from scrimmage, and Derik Larsen recovered for the Lutes at the Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10-yard line. Two plays later, Cody Pohren scored from two yards out for a 28-14 Lute lead. The Lutes would seal the deal midway through the fourth quarter, with Madison reaching the end zone for the second time from 24 yards out to increase their lead to 35-14. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The thing that pleases me most about this game is the way that our young team responded to adversity in the first half and closed it out after halftime,â&#x20AC;? said Westering. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The experience we gained by playing the number three, eight and 17th- ranked teams in (Division III) tells me a lot about the talent of this team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They have adjusted well to our system and I hope they can continue the improvement the rest of the year.â&#x20AC;?

the fourth quarter to cut the deficit to 12-7. The Lincoln offense found their mojo after that. Love was the catalyst again, taking Lincoln 65 yards in seven plays to make it 19-7. The Abes put the game away three minutes later, as Love hit Dionte Simon from seven yards out for a 25-7 lead with 5:11 left. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love played a great game,â&#x20AC;? said Kitna, who was also pleased with his

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patchwork offensive line. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The fill-in (linemen) did a great job tonight. I was very pleased with their effort.â&#x20AC;? After the game the attention turned to Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s district playoff opponent on Nov. 2, the defending 3A state champion Bellevue Wolverines. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bellevue is a great football team, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have to get into them very early if we hope to win this game,â&#x20AC;? said Kitna. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll definitely have to bring our A game and maintain it all game long. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see what happens. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That would be one great thing to pull that game out in our first year.â&#x20AC;? By Steve Mullen For blog updates on this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s featured games visit The Daily Mash-Up at www.tacomaweekly.com/ dailymashup.

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HIGH SCHOOL ROUNDUP WILSON TAKES NARROWS 3A For the first time in 30 years, Wilson has a league title in girls soccer. Jumping on Timberline early, the Rams topped the Blazers 3-0 at Stadium Bowl on Oct. 30 to win the Narrows 3A. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It means so much,â&#x20AC;? said senior forward Brittainy Canonica. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re so excited. It took us forever to get here. The girls worked really hard. They played with heart, and they did what we came here to do.â&#x20AC;? Canonica helped get the Rams on the board in the eighth minute, sending a low cross through the defense to the foot of sophomore Megan Chambers, who slammed it in for a 1-0 lead. Wilson doubled the lead 11 minutes later when Payton Costello collected a loose ball 40 yards away from goal and sent a high shot over the head of Blazers keeper Hailey Holder and in. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the end of the season itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just come down to a mental game,â&#x20AC;? said Wilson head coach Angie Karabaich. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just kind of who wants it moreâ&#x20AC;Śtonight it just showed that we wanted it more.â&#x20AC;? Canonica helped seal the game in the 26th minute, sending in another cross from the right side that was flicked by Alexa Blackman and headed in by Chambers to make it 3-0. The Rams coasted from there, never allowing the Blazers a serious look at goal. Taking the first seed into district play, Wilson now awaits its matchup against either Bonney Lake or Kennedy Catholic on Nov. 3 at 2 p.m. at Sunset Chevrolet Stadium in Sumner. By Jeremy Helling

CROSS COUNTRY RESULTS There will be plenty of local representation at the state cross country meets in Pasco on Nov. 3 with the completion of the Westside Classic at American Lake Golf Course on Oct. 27. The Bellarmine Prep girls placed third at the 4A district meet to advance to state, led by senior Daryl Phillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sixth-place finish in 18 minutes and 46.7 seconds. The Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

STRIKING TWICE. Wilson sophomore forward Megan Chambers (left), who scored two goals for the Rams, battles for a ball with Timberlineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ashley Martinez.

boys placed eighth to also advance, as senior Tom Bolt finished in just over 17 minutes and Jack Yearian, Will Sherman and Quentin Purtzer were five seconds behind. Curtisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; boys will also advance after placing seventh, led by senior Jackson Hoganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finish in 16 minutes and 36.2 seconds. Lakesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; boys took third at the 3A meet to advance, as junior Stephen Nelson led the way by finishing in 16 minutes and 48.7 seconds. Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shelby Alongi placed 20th at the 3A girls meet, finishing in a personal best 20 minutes and 49.6 seconds to earn a state bid. Missing their top runner, Charles Wrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boys still won the 1A meet, with seniors Ruben Riordan and David Goldstone placing

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;,550:73(@,9:(+=(5*, Several local tennis players advanced to the state tournaments at the 3A and 4A district tournaments held last week. Stadium senior Aaron Park took the

=633,@)(334(;*/<7: After winning the 4A Narrows League tournament on Oct. 27, Bellarmine Prep takes the top seed into the district tournament and will take on Tahoma at 11 a.m. at Kentwood High School. Win or lose, the Lions will play again at 3 p.m. Wilson earned the third league spot to the district tournament and will face a loser-out match against Kennedy on Nov. 3 at 4 p.m. at Auburn-Mountainview High School. The winner moves on to play top seed Bonney Lake at 6 p.m. At the 1A district tournament at Kings High School, Annie Wright will take on Kings on Nov. 3 at 3 p.m., with the winner to take on top seed Life Christian at 5 p.m. in the championship game. By Jeremy Helling

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third and fourth, respectively. The Tarriersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bryn Mayo and Sarah Dimakis will also advance after placing 17th and 18th respectively at the 1A girls meet. Annie Wrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Juli Jugan qualified for state after placing 19th in 20 minutes and 35.5 seconds. In the 2B boys meet, Tacoma Baptistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tucker Boettcher finished in 20 minutes and 18.8 seconds to place 20th and earn a state berth. By Jeremy Helling

fourth seed to state while freshman teammate Callan Peterson claimed the fifth seed in the 4A singles tournament at the Capitol City Club in Tumwater on Oct. 26-27. Park was impressive in winning in straight sets over Kentridgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s James Dugan and Todd Beamerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jimmie Stone before falling to defending state champ Mitch Stewart of Federal Way. After falling to Stewart in his second match, Peterson rattled off three straight wins in the consolation bracket, including a 6-1, 6-1 win in the consolation finals over Kentlakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Derek Welch to claim fifth. Bellarmine Prepâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chase Hassing and Henry Wurst won their first three matches before being topped in the doubles final to get the second seed to state. At the 3A meet at Sprinker Recreation Center on Oct. 25-26, Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Peter Koessler claimed the third seed to state by topping Lakesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jordan Richardson 6-4, 6-0. Mount Tahomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Danny Tran won three matches, including a 6-2, 7-5 win over Kennedyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brandon Lowry to become a second alternate to state. Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seth Thomas and Cooper Eddy won 6-1, 4-6, 6-3 over Auburn Mountainviewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Austyn Cunningham and Alec VanEtten in their doubles opener, but lost their next two matches to be eliminated. The state tennis tournaments will be held on May 24-25, 2013. By Jeremy Helling

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City Life

Comedian Chelsea Peretti

B5

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2012

SECTION B, PAGE 1

New venues give downtown nightlife a boost

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

NIGHT CREW. Tacoma Cabana (above) offers island-themed drinks and tasty “pu pu” platters. Taylor Parrish and Brian Wright dance at the Deltan Club (right) as DJ Omar spins high-energy dance tunes.

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

S

everal Tacoma nightclubs went dark this year: Hell’s Kitchen, Tempest Lounge, Mandolin Cafe, Chopstix. But after hours business is booming down on Pacific Avenue. Encore, Big Whisky and Dorky’s Barcade were already popular P.M. destinations. And now, with the addition of several new venues, Pac Ave is looking more like it did a decade ago, when Drake’s Pub and the Loft anchored the city’s busiest club zone. “I think it’s coming back,” said Encore co-owner Jon Tartaglia, who opened the now defunct Loft in late 2000. “I don’t know that it’s turned around, but I think it’s encouraging that people are investing down here.” Jason Alexander is one of those investors. (No, not that Jason Alexander.) This month, he and wife Robin Murphy opened Tacoma Cabana, a tiki-themed bar and grill that has taken over part of the space, at 728 Pacific Ave., that formerly housed

Surreal Ultralounge. “My dad has a condo on the Big Island of Hawaii, and me and Robin went out to see him last September,” Alexander said, explaining the catalyst of their idea. “That’s the first time I had an actual Mai Tai and a real zombie. And when we came back here, I tried to search for (a Mai Tai) and we couldn’t find it anywhere.” Armed with a unique theme and their experiences running the Villa Cafe, they plotted their new island-themed establishment. At first, they were attracted to the idea of opening on Sixth Avenue, where there is lots of late-night foot traffic on weekends. “But our deal fell through there,” Alexander said. They noticed the Surreal space was for lease one night while sitting across the street at the Matador. “Once we walked through there, it seemed like the right fit.” It has been choppier sailing for Lonnie Reed, who has set up shop a couple of blocks over at 928 Pacific Ave., a space that still displays the marquee of

u See NIGHTLIFE/ page B6

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIN

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE OPERA AND MOZART

free dance-training program for children in the Tacoma area. It will be performed on Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. at Theatre on the Square. Tickets are $18, or $12 for students with valid identification.

Tacoma Opera has assembled one of the finest casts of talented emerging artists for its production of “Con fan tutte” Nov. 2 at 8 p.m. and Nov. 4 at 2 p.m. at Rialto Theater. Performed in collaboration with Tacoma Symphony Orchestra, this Mozart masterwork is light and celebratory but also personal and intimate – perfect for kicking off Tacoma Opera’s 2012-13 season. Get tickets at www.tacomaopera.com.

TWO MODERN DANCE MLK Ballet presents “Move #19.” This latest installment of the contemporary dance series will raise funds for its tuition-

THREE ‘620 BANK STREET’ Claressa, a 12-year-old African American girl living in Louisiana in 1966, steps forward on the stage and vows to her audi-

ence, “I know things.” She takes the audience into her world, one where teenagers discover that school, friends and family are not always what they appear. The play, written by C. Rosalind Bell, is based on her experiences growing up in Louisiana. It will be performed Nov. 1, 2 and 3 in Jones Hall on the University of Puget Sound campus (contains strong language and challenging social themes). Tickets are $7 and $11. Info: http://tickets.pugetsound. edu or (253) 879-6013.

FOUR LECTURE ON WARHOL Amy McBride, arts administrator for the city of Tacoma, will discuss the competition

that led the late Andy Warhol to create a flower design for Tacoma Dome. She will also discuss the new exhibit based on it at Tacoma Art Museum. The lecture will be on Nov. 3 at 2 p.m. at TAM. It is free with museum admission. Info: www.tacomaartmuseum.org or (253) 272-4258.

FIVE SO YOU THINK YOU ARE FUNNY? The Tacoma Weekly’s own writer gone wild, Steve Dunkelberger, will be a guest judge of Round #3 of the Seattle International Comedy Competition on Saturday at the Tacoma Comedy Underground, located in Big Whisky Saloon at 100 S. 9th St. in downtown Tacoma. There will be a 7 p.m. and a 10 p.m. show. The “Dunkelberger” will be judging the second show. Tickets are $15 and available online at comedyunderground.com.

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, November 2, 2012

If it’s November, it’s Art at Work Month 11th annual event features more than 300 things to do By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

Every November for the past 10 years, Tacomans have celebrated the city’s vast array of arts and culture during Art at Work Month. A truly community-based celebration, this year’s Art at Work Month includes more than 300 community-hosted arts and culture events, exhibits and workshops for all ages happening throughout the month. Every day on the calendar, there is something new to see, do and experience whether it be music, theater, dance, visual arts, film, readings, lectures or workshops. The event kicked off on Nov. 1, with a free opening party at Tacoma Art Museum. The public came out to enjoy appetizers, dessert and a no-host bar amid music by Tacoma Youth Symphony and the museum’s current exhibits. Highlights of the opening party were the announcements of Tacoma Arts Commission’s 2012 funding recipients and Mayor Marilyn Strickland’s presentation of the AMOCAT Awards. “The awards come from nominations brought forward from Arts Commissioners throughout the year,” said Tacoma Arts Administrator Amy McBride. “I think it provides unexpected, yet well deserved, validation to the awardees.” This year’s recipients are: • KeyBank, winner of the “Arts Patron” award for its investment in the arts in Tacoma, which includes a gift from the KeyBank Foundation to make admission free to the Children’s Museum of Tacoma, contributions to extend programming at the Broadway Center for the Performing Arts, Tacoma Art Museum and Washington State History Museum to audiences that are traditionally underrepresented, and gifts to support ArtsFund as well as in-school programs operated by the Museum of Glass and Tacoma Symphony Orchestra. • The Grand Cinema, winner of the “Community Outreach by an Organization” award for their ongoing collabora-

PHOTO BY JASON GANWICH

STUDIO TOURS. Tacoma artist Jennevieve Schlemmer is just one of 55 Tacoma artists opening their studios to visitors during Art at Work Month.

tions with local artists, organizations and schools to bring unique and relevant films and film programming to Tacoma. • Katy Evans, winner of the “Community Outreach by an Individual” award. A writer, editor, civic advocate and fundraiser working to encourage engagement in local culture from citizens of all ages, abilities and means, Evans works in resource development for Metro Parks; edits and writes for the online magazine Post Defiance; and builds opportunities for neighborhood investment through Spaceworks Tacoma, Campus MLK and Tacoma Cash Mob. A graduate of the Evergreen State College, Evans’ efforts include completing hundreds of successful fundraising projects; writing and publishing articles highlighting Tacoma culture; developing a neighborhood communications plan to

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connect youth with creative opportunities; and organizing events that bring advocates together to improve and celebrate Tacoma’s creative civic landscape. “I feel blessed to have found a hometown where I can so easily invest my passion and energy,” Evans said. “Every day, Tacomans show me that they can do anything they set their mind to and I love ferreting out and showcasing that local inspiration any way I can.” Following the Nov. 1 kick-off, Art At Work Month officially began throughout the city and continues up to, and including, Nov. 30. Studio Tours are a very popular aspect and one of the signature events of Art at Work Month. This year, more than 55 artists and collaborative studios are participating, allowing the public in to see where and how local artists ply their

trade. During these free, self-guided tours the studios will hold demonstrations of the artistic process and have hands-on activities for visitors, who can also ask questions and purchase original artworks. There is more to do at the 30 classes and workshops on tap: learn Irish or ballroom dance, take a writer’s workshop or bookbinding class, learn the basics of glassblowing or jewelry making … and this is just a sample. There is also more than 70 art exhibits on view at Tacoma museums, galleries and local businesses and on top of all this, a wealth of shows and performances – Chelsea Peretti at Tacoma Comedy Club, Grammy nominated Nappy Roots at Jazzbones… See everything to do at www.artatworktacoma. com. All events are open to the public and many are free.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, November 2, 2012 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

DASH Center Local historian turns research into gripping novel presents ‘Dreamgirls’ By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

“Dreamgirls,” the latest incarnation of the 1981 Tony award-winning musical turned 2006 Oscar awardwinning film, will be the opening production of DASH Center’s 201213 season. “Dreamgirls” will run at the LAPAC Theatre on the campus of Charles Wright Academy from Nov. 24 through Dec. 9. With Music by Henry Krieger and lyrics and book by Tom Eyen, “Dreamgirls” tells the story of an up-and-coming 1960’s girls singing group “The Dreams.” DASH Center’s production of “Dreamgirls,” directed and choreographed by Jimmy Shields with assistance from Isiah Anderson Jr., features an amazing cast of phenomenal singers, dancers, actors and actresses: Candi Hall as Deena Jones, current Ms. Pierce County Alexandria Henderson as Lorrell Robinson, Carmen Brantley-Payne as Effie White, and Angelica Barksdale as Michelle Morris, with Charles Simmons as Curtis Taylor Jr. Come along for an exciting journey through the music industry, complete with trials and tribulations. Showtimes are Fridays at 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; and Sundays at 3 p.m. Tickets are $20/adults and $15/ under 21. Advance tickets are $15 when purchased online before Nov. 17. Tickets available at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/287535. After Nov. 17, tickets must be purchased in person at DASH Center (1504 Martin Luther King Jr Way) or at the door, day of show. For all who desire to help DASH grow and continue serving youth in the Tacoma/Pierce County community, mark your calendars and get your tickets to attend the Dreamgirls Gala and Fundraiser Show, Dec. 1 at 8 p.m. Gala begins at 6:30 p.m. During the catered reception, you will be entertained by some fine talent from the Tacoma area, enjoy a meet and greet with the cast, participate in a silent auction, and take home a gala gift bag. Tickets for this event are $40 and proceeds go directly to the Inspiring Artists Scholarship fund and the DASH Center Theatre Capital Fund.

Writing historical fiction is not an easy endeavor. Unlike penning a science fiction or fantasy story, the “historical” side of a historical fiction work has to be correct or face the wrath of history buffs who are always eager to call foul and point out timeline mistakes. They might just come up speechless in the latest work by M.M. Justus, “True Gold.” The 200-pager follows the adventures of Karin Myre, a teenaged assistant to a Seattle seamstress who gambles with her future after seeing the arrival of the Portland, a steamer filled with gold at the dawning of the Alaskan gold rush that would make “Klondike fever” a common phrase. Myre leaves her life of work and poverty to take her chances at a new life by sneaking onto a steamer bound for the ice and treasure of the Klondike and finds misery, adventure and love along the way. She travels with a photographer, modeled after real-life Eric Hegg, whose extensive photographic record of the gold rush is housed in part at the University of Washington and struggles in a “man’s world” with a strength that can best be described as Norwegian girl power. “I had dealt with men who looked askance at my attire, at my circumstances, and at my independence,” states a passage in the book. “I was who I was, and even now I am still proud of it. But Will was right. I had dealt with them without batting an eyelash. I had not been nervous around any of them and none of their opinions of me had made me feel small. Except for Captain Trelane. And now Mr. Lawson. Mr. Lawson did not eat supper with us the following evening. The only time I saw him that day was when I went out to care for the goats while he and Will were working at the sawpit. Even at that distance, I could see his gaze fastened upon me, and I hastened through the routine of feeding and watering them, using the mining shovel I had purchased in Dyea to scoop their frozen manure onto the heap beginning to rival Will’s logpile. Will saw him watching me, too, or perhaps noticed me watching them, and frowned as he pulled the saw down through the log perched on the scaffold. Or I suppose he could have been scowling at the sawdust landing on his head. He had ended up on the bottom somehow, although I knew if he truly minded he would be on top. Neither position seemed to be desirable, but after the first two or three planks they both seemed to have gotten the hang of it. I supposed if I stayed out of the way,

STOWAWAY. Heritage League of Pierce County member M.M. Justus

wrote “True Gold,” a story about a seamstress turned gold prospector, after researching the subject to get all the details right.

nothing untoward would happen. Mr. Lawson had no excuse to search me out.” The details of this romance-and-adventure story prove the historical research paid off and paint a word picture so vivid that readers can see the story play out in their minds as they endure the stares of the prospectors or the chill of the Klondike air through Myre’s telling of her tale. Justus has a bachelor’s degree in British and American literature and history, a master’s degree in library science and a certificate in museum studies, after all. She is also a member of the Heritage League of Pierce County, and all of that education pours out

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of this book. The $3.99 book is available for the Kindle through Amazon and in many other e-formats on Smashwords. It is not available in paper yet. “True Gold” is the second of three books in the series. “Repeating History” takes a science fiction turn when 20-year-old college dropout Chuck McManis is strolling the geyser boardwalks in Yellowstone National Park in 1959, when an earthquake plunges him more than 80 years back in time, into his own past – to become the great-grandfather he had idolized as a boy. The third book, “Finding Home,” is coming out next year.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, November 2, 2012

Goldfish Tavern closes

FILE PHOTO

FISH OUT OF WATER. The Goldfish Tavern may be Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest victim of the stagnant economy. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

It appears to be the end of the line for the venerable Goldfish Tavern. Longtime patrons gathered over the weekend for a potluck dinner and to bid adieu to one of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and most beloved watering holes. Owner Sandie Stevens shuttered her business after the last patron departed early on Thursday morning. All that is left to do is clean up and get rid of the last product on hand. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll probably be drinking some beer, because I still have a license,â&#x20AC;? Stevens said earlier this week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be charging any money. If they want to give me a donation, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be fine. But I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to leave them anything.â&#x20AC;? The â&#x20AC;&#x153;themâ&#x20AC;? in question are building owner Carol Gore and her son, property manager John Eberhardt. Officially, the Goldfish is done. But behind the scenes the parties have been haggling over past due rent and disagreeing on the terms under which the tavern could stay open under the same iconic name. Eberhardt said he preferred that to be the case, but he has launched tentative plans to open a new establishment at 5310 N. Pearl St. in Ruston, where the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fish has stood these last eight decades. Patrons are left to wonder if their favorite pub might still be saved. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been an extended family. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of like a home away from home â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cheersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; kind of deal,â&#x20AC;? said bar manager Laura Collins, also a 14-year patron who met her husband there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really know whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to happen to it after this,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just know as of Wednesday, the 31st, the bar will be closed as the Goldfish.â&#x20AC;? Stevens was awarded the Goldfish in a divorce settlement, but a lack of bar experience and her declining health often made the establishment difficult to run. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of left to the bartenders and the community to keep it going,â&#x20AC;? Collins said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and finances have always been an issue. So through a lot of volunteer work from our local customers weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had

rewiring and plumbing and all kinds of things just voluntarily done.â&#x20AC;? Stevens said a stagnant economy and the closure of the Ruston Way Tunnel earlier this year contributed to a downturn in business. She blamed the slump and mounting personal debt for making it impossible for her to keep up with lease payments for the first time in 19 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a basket case. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what to do,â&#x20AC;? she said earlier this week, her voice sometimes thick with emotion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My health isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t very well. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got so much work to do, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just non-functional because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m so upset.â&#x20AC;? Eberhardt said Stevens owed three months back rent and related fees â&#x20AC;&#x201C; about $3,800 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; when she was served with a notice to pay or vacate last week. On Monday, Stevens said she was able to borrow $2,000 to pay part of the debt, but was unable to come up with the remainder by Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deadline. Stevens said she found a buyer for her business, but accused Gore of raising the rent unreasonably. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going to be a settlement,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I own the name, and I own everything thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not nailed down, which I guess isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a lot.â&#x20AC;? Eberhardt said he and his mother were asking potential renters to pay $1,600 per month. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Basically, the rent hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been raised, except for cost of living, for about 25 years,â&#x20AC;? he said, also mentioning a clause in the lease that required tenants to do routine maintenance. But Eberhardt said Stevens has not been evicted and that the best possible outcome would be for her to finish out the lease, which expires in 2014. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to not have that building empty,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My mom got remarried about 12 years ago, and my stepdad passed away just last year. So she lost about $4,500 in income. Basically, she needs that income to support herself.â&#x20AC;? Eberhardt said his family would make improvements on the property and reopen under a different name in a worst-case scenario. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re unprepared to start a business there,â&#x20AC;? he added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got no business plan, nothing except an empty building that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re afraid to keep empty.â&#x20AC;?

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, November 2, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 5

CHELSEA PERETTI Ben Union goes hip-rock Quickly becoming one of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s busiest comics

PHOTO BY EVAN SUNG

PERETTI

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Ben Mira â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a.k.a. singer-songwriter Ben Union â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is fond of coming up with hyphenated descriptors for his catchy, genre-mashing sound. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s progressivefunk-rock for the songs collected on his last album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Blessed Union, vol. 1.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re messinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; with a little hiprock,â&#x20AC;? he said of the new sound he and his band â&#x20AC;&#x201C; guitarist Talon Carpenter, bassist Derek Brown and his brother, drummer Jared Mira â&#x20AC;&#x201C; will unveil Saturday, Nov. 3, at Jazzbones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love groove-driven music,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But my writing has been more rock and pop, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s groovy. But I want to write music that I myself want to dance to.â&#x20AC;? Based on his description, â&#x20AC;&#x153;hip-rockâ&#x20AC;? is a sound that floats somewhere between set staples, like â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lightâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paul Sartre,â&#x20AC;? and the sample-powered hits you hear on KISS-FM and KUBE 93. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are adding samples,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll play with my MIDI board live. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna try to mimic a lot of those sounds through my guitar. Some things we do are gonna just be off tracks. It is heavy tracks. But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to get to the point where we can perform it live.â&#x20AC;? Union said he plans to release a new CD in January, but he broke down a few fresh cuts fans may hear between now and then. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Troubleâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Troubleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is the song Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m most excited about. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of what

led the way with the hip-rock thing. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about people that ... kind of motivate me to be successful because of their naysaying and things like that. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also really fun sounding. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really dancey.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shake That Assâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is, as the title says, a song to shake your ass to. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not playing hip-hop music. But the beat would be like a Dr. Dre beat or (Outkastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ms. Jackson,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; something like that. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to get in the studio with (local guitarist) Rafael Tranquilino. I think heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to do a solo on â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Shake that Ass.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Angelizeâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve played that acoustic. Maybe once before we played it as a band before it was completely written. But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never played this version before that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be playinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Outputâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s completely instrumental, and it was a random name. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about as deep as it goes on that one. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like any other jam weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever done, though.â&#x20AC;? A remake of Jay-Z and Rihannaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Run this Townâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;I collaborated with (Seattle R&B artists) Tess Henley on that one. She is, in my opinion, the tops in Seattle as far as talent goes. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a powerful voice, and she does all of what Rihanna would sing. I completely rewrote the verses so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not rapping, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re using the chorus.â&#x20AC;? Whiskey Union and Des Reus fill out this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bill. Music starts at 8 p.m., and tickets are $7 in advance, $10 at the door; 253-396-9169 or www.jazzbones. com for further details.

By Ernest A. Jasmin

CP: [laughs] Well, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t walk around with a helicopter. I think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always been told all my life that people were too You may not be familiar with Chelsea intimidated to date me. But I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Perettiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s standup, but chances are she has just code for â&#x20AC;&#x153;youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pretty annoying.â&#x20AC;? done something that has made you laugh. TW: I guess you show your range (as From writing for NBC-TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parks & a writer) in that you have written for Amy Recreationâ&#x20AC;? and Comedy Centralâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Poehler, who is kind of wholesome, and Sarah Silverman ProSarah Silverman, who gram,â&#x20AC;? to helocopteris not so much. Who is Chelsea Peretti ing her way out of a easier to write for? lousy date with Louis CP: [Sigh] I like 7 p.m. Nov. 1 C.K., she has made writing for them both. 8 and 10:30 p.m. her mark on television. â&#x20AC;Ś They both have a And with appearances silliness to them, and Nov. 2 and 3 on various websites, I think I connect with Tacoma Comedy online videos and on that. her new podcast, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call Club, 933 Market St. TW: You are friends Chelsea Peretti,â&#x20AC;? she is with Sarah Silverman, $10 Nov. 1, quickly becoming one right? I imagine the of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s busiest two of you teaming up $15 Nov. 2 and 3 comics. and harassing people (253) 282-7203 or This week, she will with your sarcasm. emerge from behind www.tacomacomedyclub.com CP: [Laughs] Yeah, the scenes for five we do a little of that. big shows at Tacoma (But) Sarahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually Comedy Club, where she will headline one of the sweeter people I know. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not at 7 p.m. on Nov. 1 and 8 and 10:30 p.m. like sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sitting there in her standup Nov. 2 and 3. personae, like, 24-7. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty generIn anticipation, we caught up to recap ous with her friends and stuff like that. some of her adventures in comedy. TW: So what is a funny story about TW: You made that hilarious appearyou and Sarah? ance on the pilot episode for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Louie.â&#x20AC;? CP: She puts a couple stories in her CP: Yes. book that are pretty central to our vibe TW: Are people intimidated to date when I wrote there. One was I took a you now because they are afraid of your pregnancy test on my first day of work. reaction? u See PERETTI/ page B6 ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, November 2, 2012

New faces on Pacific Avenue: Keys on Main, 1003 Pacific Ave. www.keysonmain.com Chopstix may have closed on Sixth Avenue, but that piano bar’s successor is coming soon. Owner George Hasenohrl did not return calls seeking info, but expect something similar to the Keys on Main located at 11 Roy St., in Seattle. And the name is not the result of some Mapquest mishap; it stems from the Main Street address of the original Keys in Salt Lake City.

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

TIKI. Tacoma attorney Erik Bjornson works his magic while sipping a drink at the Tacoma Cabana on its first day of operation.

P Nightlife

From page B1

Hell’s Kitchen. Reed was the rock venue’s booking agent when it shut down last summer. He and Hell’s Kitchen co-owner Pat Dawson began plotting a new venture, called the Lochs, weeks later. “I was completely scared out of my mind, to tell you the truth,” Reed admitted. “Is attendance going to be there? Are the bar sales going to be there? I had every apprehension you

could possibly think of.” Several setbacks did little to assuage those fears. He and Dawson soon parted ways. Reed said another of Hell’s Kitchen’s former owners hired most of his staff, just days before the Lochs was scheduled to open. And delays in obtaining a liquor license forced him to halt shows for two weeks. But the Lochs is up and running now with an

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emphasis on all-ages shows. “I don’t really care about bar sales,” Reed said. “To me, it’s just a headache. I just care about the music. I just care about bands having shows. When Hell’s Kitchen left, there was no place to play metal and hardcore in Tacoma.” Recently, Club NRG and the Deltan Club have also opened within walking distance. And a new dueling piano bar, Keys on Main, is under construction at 1003 Pacific Ave., next door to Vinum Coffee & Wine Lounge. Check the sidebar to this story for more info on the newest kids on the block.

The Deltan Club, 734 Pacific Ave. www.thedeltanclub.com A new, multi-tiered dance club has taken over the building that housed Drake’s Pub until 2005 and, more recently, the short-lived Firwood Rock Lounge. On Oct. 26, a drag show went on upstairs while popular Tacoma DJ Omar spun high-octane dance cuts at ground level. The Lochs, 928 Pacific Ave. www.facebook.com/thelochs The old Hell’s Kitchen sign and décor remain, and that should tell you what to expect from the high-decibel live entertainment. Early on, there has been an emphasis on all-ages hardcore and metal shows as ownership has assembled its staff and the necessary liquor permits. Tacoma Cabana, 728 Pacific Ave. www.tacomacabana.com This new tiki-themed bar occupies half of what was previously Surreal Lounge. Owners Jason Alexander and Robin Lynn provide island-themed cocktails and tasty pu pu platters to help maintain a sunny outlook even as drizzle pours relentlessly from the heavens. Club NRG, 728 Pacific Ave. www.facebook.com/nrgtacoma The other half of the Surreal Lounge space presents an alcohol-free club environment where the 18-and-up set can dance to block-rockin’ beats. Cover was $15 on a recent weekend.

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A  proven leader. Executive  Pat  McCarthy  has  stabilized  the   county’s  budget,  trimmed  the  size  of   government,  consolidated  programs,  and   challenged  managers  to  find  operational   efficiencies  while  improving  the  quality   of  public  service.     Vote  to  re-­‐elect  Pat  McCarthy

P Peretti From page B5

... I had had sex with an ex-boyfriend. I was just concerned that I was going to die or something – or be pregnant. Then it turns out I was, and we all went and got an abortion together. [Cracks up] Just kidding. … But just in general, we hang out sometimes. Nothin’ crazy. TW: You are actually working on a project for Comedy Central called “Kroll Show” (starring comedian Nick Kroll.) What can you tell us about that? CP: Well, I worked on that for … two weeks or something like that. That was before the second season I was at “Parks,” so I had to go back to there. Now we’re just waiting for it to air. TW: What would you compare it to? CP: I just think it’s very unique to Nick and his voice. I don’t know if you’ve seen any of his characters, but it’s some that he’s done before, like Bobby Bottle Service and those kind of people; and then new characters we got to dream up when we were all in the writers room. TW: When did you realize you were funny, and did you always want to be a comic? CP: No, I didn’t. I still don’t. [Laughs] In junior high school when I started being mercilessly attacked for my appearance and other things, then I started to become funny to defend myself. Then in high school, I hung out with a lot of guys and they were all really funny. I did improv in college, and I started doing standup when I graduated. So, I’ve always kind of had a, “Let’s see how this goes” feeling. And I continue to feel that way. TW: Take me back to your worst heckling experience. CP: This one haunts me more, but it wasn’t even heckling, per se. I did a show at the Uptown Comedy Club and no one was looking at me. And then I got offstage and the emcee was like, “She wasn’t funny, but I’d (have sex with) her.” TW: That is terrible. CP: So I just took the subway home and cried. But, in retrospect, I should have taken the compliment. It’s always nice to feel attractive. Yeah, I don’t know. TW: I did not realize until I read the bio on your website that you are in Grand Theft Auto IV. What character did you play? CP: People always ask me that. I have never played Grand Theft Auto. But, yeah, you turn the radio on in the car, and I guess there’s a divorce court station, and I’m in there fighting. TW: So on some level do you worry that you are teaching some 12-yearold to assault hookers? CP: [Laughs] I can’t really take credit for Grand Theft Auto – the whole empire. I just agreed to go in and do a voice. [Sighs] So, no, I won’t feel responsible for future murders.

Listen to audio outtakes from our Chelsea Peretti interview online at www.tacomaweekly.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Singer-Songwriter John Leonard pays tribute to wounded veterans By Dave R. Davison

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN LEONARD

his “Wounded Warrior (Dream to be Free)” at Operation Fun Nov. 3.

“We went upstairs and by the time I got out of there I ended up playing this song eight separate times to eight separate individuals that were in there,” said Leonard. Since that day, Leonard has become increasingly involved with veterans groups and veterans causes. “I felt there was an empty place within me that I needed to fill,” said Leonard. “I took inventory of my skills and where I come from and what I’ve done and that big picture just all came together for me.” He was awarded a medallion when he played for the Warrior Transition Battalion, a Fort Lewis unit that works with wounded veterans to keep them productive in active military roles or to help them readjust to civilian life. He is also involved with the Veterans Family Fund of America and the National Alliance to End Veteran Suicide. He donates 50 percent of the proceeds from the sale of CDs to the American Lake Veterans Golf Course, which is trying to raise funds to build a Jack Nicklaus-designed back nine.

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Leonard’s next performance will be at an event called Operation Fun, a day for military families to enjoy themselves at the Narrows Plaza Bowl. The event is free to military and $10 for the general public. In addition to entertainment there will be bowling, skating and other games. Various service vendors offer information that is geared toward creating community awareness and supporting the mission to end veteran suicide. To hear Leonard’s “Wounded Warrior (Dream to be Free)” visit facebook. com/musicbyjohnleonard or youtube.com/johnlmusic. Further information on Operation Fun is at www. NA2EVS.org/operationfun.

John Leonard’s upcoming performances Nov. 3, 12-1 p.m Operation Fun Narrows Plaza Bowl 2200 Mildred St. W., University Place John Leonard along with Special guest and master on harmonica, Bob McCluskey

FRIDAY, NOV. 2

MONDAY, NOV. 5 SWISS: Nite Crew (Top 40) 9 p.m.

AMOCAT CAFÉ: (Singer/songwriters) C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz (Jazz) 8 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN: Groove City (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC HUNGRY GOOSE BISTRO: Ed Taylor (Jazz guitarist) 8 p.m. JAZZBONES: Nappy Roots, the Approach, Irukandji, 8 p.m., $10-15 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC NATIVE QUEST: Open mic night, 5 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Vida Vore, 9 p.m. STONEGATE: Jerry Miller (Classic rock jam) 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Crosswalk (Top 40) 9 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Michael Palhamus Band, 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Gary Cook (Jazz guitarist) 5:30 p.m. VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

Nov. 17, 7-9 p.m. Forza Coffee Company 1520 Wilmington Dr., DuPont “CHICKEN WITH PLUMS” 90 min., PG-13 11/2: 3:50, 6:15 11/3-11/4: 11:45 am, 3:50, 6:15 11/5-11/7: 3:50, 6:15, 11/8: 3:50 “DETROPIA” 90 min., NR 11/2-11/7: 1:50, 8:30 11/8: 1:50 “SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS” 110 min., R 11/2-11/8: 1:30, 4:00, 6:25, 8:55 “THE WELL DIGGER’S DAUGHTER” 107 min., NR 11/2-11/6: 2:05, 6:35, 8:45 11/7: 2:05, 8:45 11/8: 2:05, 6:35, 8:45 “SAMSARA” 102 min., PG-13 11/2: 4:15 11/3-11/4: 11:35 am, 4:15 11/5-11/8: 4:15

EMERALD QUEEN: Groove City (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke, 9 p.m. OPAL: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Acoustic couch jam, 8:30 p.m. SWISS: Dean Reickard (Blues) 7 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Billy Pease & Friends (Blues) 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, NOV. 6 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (Acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Jho Blenis, Shelly Ely (Blues jam) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7 C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz (Jazz) 8 p.m. JAZZBONES: Ben Union, Whisky Syndicate, Res Deus, 8 p.m., $7-10 NEW FRONTIER: Glass Elevator, Fabulous Downey, 8 p.m. SPAR: TBA (Reggae) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Moss Brothers, Taist of Iron, Tahoma Souls Alive, 9 p.m. STONEGATE: Crosswalk (Top 40) 9 p.m. SWISS: Spazmatics (‘80s covers) 9 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Generation Unknown, guest, 8 p.m. VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

SUNDAY, NOV. 4 DAWSONS: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m., NC

“THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER” 103 min., PG-13 11/2: 2:15, 4:30, 6:50, 9:05 11/3-11/4: 11:55 am, 2:15, 4:30, 6:50, 9:05 11/5-11/8: 2:15, 4:30, 6:50, 9:05

“DOCTOR FAUSTUS” 167 min., PG 11/8 only: 7:00

STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino Band (Classic rock/blues) 9 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, NOV. 3

Nov. 9, 7-9 p.m. Forza Coffee Company 4040 Orchard St. W., Fircrest

“THE INVISIBLE WAR” 93 min., NR 11/7 only: 7:00

www.KLAY1180.com

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

TROUBADOUR. John Leonard will perform

Planning a Getaway? Let your pets stay home.

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Live Music GUITARIST JERRY MILLER HAS A BLUES JAM AT DAVE’S OF MILTON. THE NEXT ONE TAKES PLACE AT 8 P.M. ON NOV. 7. COME HEAR THIS LEGENDARY MUSICIAN, WHO WAS A FOUNDING MEMBER OF MOBY GRAPE.

dave@tacomaweekly.com

Local singer-songwriter John Leonard has been honing his craft for a good, long-time now. He has been strumming his guitar and crooning his lyrics for going on four decades. Leonard also happens to be a veteran of the United States military, having served 10 years in the Air Force as well as a stint in the Army National Guard. It was not until relatively recently, however, that Leonard the musician and Leonard the veteran came together when he wrote his song “Wounded Warrior (Dream to be Free).” The song pays homage to wounded veterans that have been returning from Iraq and Afghanistan bearing scars and wounds both physical and mental. In seeking a way to commemorate these wounded soldiers, Leonard was able to seal a breach that he did not realize existed within his own self. “It’s a song I wrote with wounded warriors in mind,” said Leonard. “It’s my thank you and my tribute to them. It’s a shoutout to wounded warriors who may be troubled and may have given up. The message is don’t give up. There’s a place for you where you can get help.” The story does not end there. When “Wounded Warrior” was complete, Leonard wanted to test the song with wounded veterans to make sure that it rang true and did not offend the sensibilities of veterans. He therefore played the song for some of the vets that staff the American Lake Veterans Golf Course. As fate would have it, Leonard stopped by the golf course with his freshly finished song on his smart phone at exactly the moment that the Friends of American Lake Veterans Golf Course was having one of its meetings.

Friday, November 2, 2012 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 7

ANTHEM: Taxi Driver (Jazz) 7 p.m. NEW FRONTIER: (Bluegrass jam) 3 p.m. SPAR: Mark DuFresne Band (Blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Stonegaters (Classic rock jam), 8 p.m., NC

STONEGATE: Tatoosh (Classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (Blues jam) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Crazy Texas Gypsies (Jam session) 8 p.m. GIBSON’S (STADIUM DISTRICT): Ephraim Richardson (Open mic) 7 p.m.

THURSDAY, NOV. 8 JAZZBONES: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m., NC

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (Jam session) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Lozen, Owl, Blunt Force, 8 p.m., $5 PARADISE BOWL: (Rock jam) 9 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lafferty (Acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Roy Danger & the Rectifiers, 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (Blues) 7 p.m.

606 Fawcett, Tacoma, WA

253.593.4474 • grandcinema.com

Tacoma Weekly’s Music Calendar is always available online at www.TacomaWeekly.com GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Do you have a live show or music event coming up? Email makeascene@tacomaweekly.com for a free listing in the Live Music calendar!

VISIT US ON FACEBOOK facebook.com/tacomaweekly

Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, November 2, 2012

FRI. & SAT., NOV. 2, 3 FALL FESTIVAL AND BAZAAR HAPPENINGS – Summit United Methodist women are organizing a Fall Festival and Bazaar for Nov. 2 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Nov. 3 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Families are invited to enjoy crafts, vendors, garden art, apple dumplings and more! The bazaar supports the church’s Tacoma/Pierce County community outreach programs to help feed the hungry, care for the homeless and more; 5316 104th St. E. (104th Street and Canyon Road). Info: (253) 537-6560.

COMING EVENTS

MEEKER HOLIDAY BAZAAR ETC – Visit Meeker Middle School for its annual holiday bazaar, featuring an array of year-round gifts and holiday decorations created by many unique crafters and artisans. Find a fabulous selection of crafts, jewelry, holiday decorations and much more. The event takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the school, located at 4402 Nassau Ave. N.E. in Browns Point.

BULLETIN BOARD ‘NIGHT WATCH’ Tacoma Little presents “Night

THEATER –

Theatre

or calling (253) 759-5773.

form dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way.

SUPPORT GROUP ETC – Suffering from fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue? Attend this support group, which meets the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month from 4:15-5:15 p.m. at the Tacoma Area Coalition for Individuals with Disabilities building, located at 6315 S. 19th St. The group’s mission is to improve the morale of people coping with these challenges. Its activities include face-to-face encouragement, networking, sharing of resources as well as individual discoveries. CHARITY BOOT CAMP ETC – Jeff Jowers, owner and founder of Tacoma’s Ultimate Fitness Boot Camps, is hosting charity fitness boot camps every Saturday benefiting Mary Bridge Tree House. People who sign up for Ultimate Fitness Boot Camp can now donate pieces of clothing, which earns them a spot in a fast-paced, interval-style class free of charge. Info: www.tacomabootcamps.com.

HAPPENINGS –

SAT., NOV. 17

calendar@tacomaweekly.com

DRUM CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com.

OPERATION FUN

VIDEO GAMES LIVE! HAPPENINGS – This immersive concert event features music from the most popular video games of all time.Taking place at the Pantages Theater at 7:30 p.m., Tacoma Symphony Orchestra will perform along with exclusive video footage and music arrangements, synchronized lighting, solo performers, electronic percussionists, live action and unique interactive segments to create an explosive entertainment experience! It is not just a concert, but a celebration of the entire video game phenomenon that people of all ages will adore. Tickets: $39-$94, available at www. broadwaycenter.org.

production by e-mailing

LAST NOVEMBER, THE GET INVOLVED GALA ENERGIZED TACOMA ART MUSEUM, WHERE MORE THAN 300 GUESTS DANCED, DRANK AND LEARNED OF THE MANY VOLUNTEERING AND FUNDRAISING OPPORTUNITIES IN THEIR COMMUNITY. IN THE FIRST YEAR ALONE, THE GIG RAISED MORE THAN $14,000 FOR UNITED WAY OF PIERCE COUNTY. MIXING CELEBRATION WITH CIVIC-MINDEDNESS, THE GIG IS QUICKLY BECOMING ONE OF THE PREMIER EVENTS IN TACOMA. ON NOV. 10, THE EVENT IS RETURNING TO TACOMA ART MUSEUM FOR THE GIG 2012. IN ADDITION TO WEARING SWANKY OUTFITS, TAKING FUN PHOTOBOOTH PICS AND PACKING THE DJ-FUELED DANCE FLOOR, THE 500+ GUESTS WILL HAVE EXCLUSIVE ACCESS TO THE NEW ANDY WARHOL “FLOWERS FOR TACOMA” EXHIBIT. DRESSING UP, GETTING DOWN, HAVING FUN – ALL FOR A GOOD CAUSE. TICKETS: $50. INFO: WWW.GETINVOLVEDGALA.ORG.

GARFIELD BOOK CO. ETC – Do you desire to start a ministry or a community-based non-profit to serve those in need? Have you stalled in your plan to do something powerful for your community? Did you already create a non-profit organization, but do not really know what to do next? Are you looking for answers and want concrete steps to move from idea to reality? Then you will not want to miss this free workshop, taking place from 10-11:45 a.m. at the Garfield Book Co., located at 208 Garfield St. in Parkland. Preregistration is required. Visit www.purposefulprogress. com or e-mail milespurpose@ comcast.net to sign up. Space is limited.

FRI., NOV. 9

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater

TW PICK: GET INVOLVED GALA

SAT., NOV. 3

Help create a day of free fun for our service members, veterans & families. Create community awareness and support for the mission to end veteran suicide. There will be entertainment, food to purchase, free bowling, skating, networking, adaptive sports games, activities for kids and vendor booths. Operation Fun will take place at Narrows Plaza Bowl and Parking Lot, 2200 Mildred St. W.,10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. The event is free to military and families, $10 for general public. Info: www.NA2EVS.org/operationfun.

Promote your community event,

Watch” by Lucille Fletcher and directed by Randy Clark. Elaine Wheeler screams as she sees (or believes she sees) the body of a dead man in the window across the way. The police find nothing. Her husband, claiming that Elaine may be on the verge of a breakdown, calls in a lady psychiatrist who agrees with his suggestion that Elaine should commit herself to a sanitarium for treatment. The plot moves quickly and grippingly as those involved – Elaine’s old friend and house guest Blanch; the inquisitive and rather sinister man who lives next door; and the nosy German maid, Helga – all contribute to the deepening suspense and mystery of the play as it draws towards its riveting and chilling climax. Performances take place through Nov. 11 on Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. FLOWERS FOR TACOMA ART – Andy Warhol’s Flowers for Tacoma explores the context and development of flower imagery in Warhol’s career, focusing on his 1982 proposal for Tacoma Dome. Warhol’s extensive use of flowers throughout his career will be represented by early illustrations from the 1950s, series of flower prints, and numerous photographs made by Warhol and his circle that illustrate the artist’s fascination with the fragility and beauty of flowers. The exhibit opens Nov. 3 and runs through Feb. 10. Info: tacomaartmuseum.org.

‘SCAPES’ ART – Venetian artists Laura de Santillana and Alessandro Diaz de Santillana have joined forces to create “Scapes,” a dynamic and entirely new body of work at Museum of Glass. The exhibition comprises four rooms based on the Hindu belief that the universe is divided into separate spheres of existence: Earth, Space, Sun, and Moon and Constellations. The de Santillanas have interpreted elements of the Hindu cosmology in glass, creating spaces in which forms and colors correspond to physical phenomena, or the visible universe, and evoke an atmosphere of cosmic vibration. Each installation is composed of a limited, but strikingly vibrant, color palette. The exhibit runs until January. NORTHWEST ART ART – “Best of the Northwest: Selected Paintings from the Collection” is on display at Tacoma Art Museum. The works on view are some of the best from its collection of paintings by Northwest artists. It runs until March. GLASS ART MASTER ART – Museum of Glass is showcasing items created by a glass art master over the past 10 years in “Maestro: Recent Works by Lino Tagliapietra.” The Italian artist has invented numerous techniques and designs that are technically flawless and visually breathtaking, yet filled with complexity and difficulty. He is recognized around the world as the maestro of contem-

porary glass. The exhibition shows his evolution to larger works, bolder colors and patterns over his nearly 50 years as an artist. It runs through Jan. 6, 2013. ‘HOPE IN HARD TIMES’ ART – Washington State History Museum’s “Hope in Hard Times” exhibit showcases the 1929 Wall Street collapse as it plunged Americans into a period of great uncertainty as unemployment skyrocketed, banks failed and housing foreclosures hit record highs. President Herbert Hoover put it succinctly: “About the time we think we can make ends meet, somebody moves the ends.” “Hope in Hard Times” shares how ordinary people worked for change in their communities, pulling together to find ways to deal with the crisis. A billy club used during the 1934 “Battle of Smith Cove,” Works Progress Administration artifacts and everyday items are among some of the objects showcased in this exhibition. The paintings and sketches of Ronald Debs Ginther, also featured in the exhibition, comprise one of the more complete visual records of the Great Depression. The exhibit runs through Nov. 4. Info: www.washingtonhistory. org. HOT HULA FITNESS ETC – Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to per-

FREE FIRST WEEKENDS ETC – Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. Info: museums.bankofamerica.com. THE VALLEY CHORALE ETC – The Valley Chorale, a soprano-alto-tenor-bass singing group, meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Aylen Junior High School, located at 101 15th St. S.W. in Puyallup. If you like singing, contact Joy Heidal at (253) 848-1134 or Dixie Byrne at (253) 6775291 for more information and a personal invitation to join the group. MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT ETC – Caring for someone with memory loss? Alzheimer’s Association caregiver support groups provide a consistent and caring place for people to learn, share and gain emotional support from others who are also on a unique journey of providing care to a person with dementia. A free information and support group for care partners, family members and friends of individuals with dementia will be held the second Monday of each month from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. Contact group facilitator Chuck Benefiel at (253) 584-3267. UKULELE CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com.

Friday, November 2, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

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Mobile Home For Sale. 1 Bedroom Senior Park $7900. (253) 219-6523

Timeless,Classic Beauty APPROVED SHORTSALE 6925 Hillgrove Lane SW $335,000 Timeless, classic beauty w/ upgrades galore, sits on estate like lawn w/ lovely landscaping. W/ 4 bedrooms & 3.5 baths, this gorgeous home beckons you w/ charm & easy Ă RRUSODQ3LFN\RXU master bedroomone on the main Ă RRURUWDNHWKHRQH upstairs- the choice is yours. Huge 2 car garage w/ additional shop area- very appealing to some; spacious living room, dining room & sweet kitchen appeal to all. Newer windows, heat pump & A/C. Rumored to have once been owned by the Rockefellers... MLS# 224641 Shannon Agent Extraordinaire 253-691-1800 or shannonsells @hotmail.com Better Properties North Proctor

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2 Bed, 4-Plex 5021 S. Orchard Cable, New Carpet, Carport, Washer/Dryer $600 Deposit, $750/Mo. $100 Off 2nd Month. Available Now. (253) 565-7250 COMMERCIAL

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Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In Plastic. $380 (253) 537-3056

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three years young. A must see. Priced to sell at $50,000.00 nwmls # 407461 Call for details.

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Full or Twin Mattress Set New Factory Sealed. Delivery Available. $120 Will Take. (253) 539-1600 Black Iron Canopy Bed w/Orthopedic Mattress Set. New, Still in %R[ 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH  (253) 539-1600

New Adjustable Bed With Memory Foam Mattress. Wall Hugger with Warranty. $2800 :LOO6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FHIRU 253.539.1600 New Platform Bdrm Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand, H e a d b o a r d , Footboard, Rails. Still Boxed. Retails at $2600. Will Take $850. 253.539.1600 New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID Loveseat. Still in plastic Can have for $750 (253) 539-1600 Absolutely New! Memory Foam Mattress Set! Can Deliver. Worth $2,000 Asking $450 (253) 537-3056

Tacoma Weekly Classifieds 253-922-5317

SERVICE DIRECTORY LANDSCAPING

253.922.5317 www.tacomaweekly.com

SHRINKWRAP

Classic Victorian w/ the comfort of modern updates. Hardi plank siding, newer roof, plumbing & electrical. Beautiful hardwoods WKURXJKRXWPDLQĂ RRU Great size living room w/original built-ins Ă RZV LQWR VSDFLRXV dining room off of kitchen. 3 bdrms & gorgeous full bath on QG Ă RRU )LQLVKHG family room on 3rd Ă RRU PDNHV VSDFH for everyone! Roomy but maintainable Ă DW EDFN\DUG LV perfect for outdoor entertaining. Call Today

FURNITURE All New King Pillow Top Mattress Box Set 3 Pieces. New & Factory Sealed w/Warranty.. $249. Can Deliver (253) 537 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3056

FABULOUS FIRCREST COFFEE SHOP,

4 Sale with Owner Contract

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

FURNITURE NEW!!! 7 Piece Cherry Bedroom Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, 1 Nightstand, Headboard, Rails. Plus New Mattress Set still in plastic $499 (253) 539-1600 5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-5373056

COMMERCIAL

VERY SUCCESSFUL/PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR Business is For Sale for $390,000 Terms are avail. LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. Same location 15 years in Lakewood. Excellent lease with contract terms. $51,000 LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/ Lounge For Sale for $700,000 (R.E. $600K, Bus. $100K). Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill. DOWNTOWN TACOMA COFFEE SHOP CAFE 1,200 SF with excellent lease, $36,000, price terms available. reduced RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WA- Restr./Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, ice laundromat. prduced

FOR SALE

BUILDERS! 3 beautiful wooded building lots

SHRINKWRAP

BOAT & RV SHRINK WRAPPING

â&#x20AC;˘ Weather Proof â&#x20AC;˘ UV Resistant

â&#x20AC;˘ We Wrap Anything â&#x20AC;˘ We Come To You!

Shrink Wrapping is Economical and Reliable for Storing and Protecting Boats & Recreational Vehicles Outdoors.

We Wrap Anything on Land, Water or Marinas 206-931-6384 www.aceshrinkwrapping.com

PAINTING

FIREPLACE

FIREPLACE

*\Z[VT-PYLWSHJL:LY]PJL

Custom FirePlace Service provides Servicing & Repairs for your Fireplace needs. â&#x20AC;˘ Gas FirePlace Inserts â&#x20AC;˘ Glass FirePlace Doors â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Gas Logs â&#x20AC;˘ Lava Rock FirePlaces â&#x20AC;˘ Glass Shard Fires â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Outdoor Fire Pits â&#x20AC;˘ Service All Gas FirePlaces Family Owned Since 1958

www.hearthdesires.com â&#x20AC;˘ 253-474-2519 â&#x20AC;˘ 866-557-1626

PAINTING

Monica Scott 253-861-0449

LANDSCAPING

Senior Services Landscaping, etc. Painting, Weeding, Fall Clean-up, Pruning, Gutter Cleaning. Residential. Storm Clean-up Trees Contact Alex 253-564-5743 Free Estimates ELECTRICAL

CASH FOR CARS

Allied Electric Service

The Happy Hooker

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 www.alliedmarinecorp.com

Bonded & Licensed CUSTOFS9040A

NEW!!! 7 Piece

Cherry Bedroom

ALLIEE1963CQ

HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

253-606-1647 HAULING

Father AND Son Hauling

Owners say sell!!

43:  3504 N. Monroe 5VY[O,UK*SPURLY )YPJR-P_LY

DAV-Force Inc. is currently accepting resumes [VĂ&#x201E;SSPTTLKPH[LVWLUPUNZPU2\^HP[8\HSPĂ&#x201E;LK candidates must have a valid US Passport and be willing to leave immediately. Currently Z[HMĂ&#x201E;UN WVZP[PVUZ MVY 4LJOHUPJZ :\WWS` Logistics, Weapons Repair Specialists, and Truck Drivers. Please submit resumes to hr@ dav-force.com

FACING DIVORCE? WE UNDERSTAND YOUR PROBLEM. GUARANTEED OFFER ON YOUR HOME IN 24-48 HOURS. (855) 862-0399

Lakewood. $495/month 1 Bedroom Apts.. Laundry on site. Quiet Area. Good Parking. Most units, no stairs. Water, Sewer & Garbage included. Call Manager (253) 983-9383

Tacoma, WA 98403 $289,000

WANTED

CRESCENT PARK APARTMENTS

1513 N. 7th St,

Lovingly maintained Victorian on a large fully fenced lot. The charm is evident the minute you step into the entry and see the high ceilings, open staircase and EHDXWLIXO Ă&#x20AC;U Ă RRUV 0DLQ Ă RRU KDV OLYLQJ rm., dining rm., bedroom, full bath, kitchen and utility rm. Upstairs with 2 bedrooms, and a 3/4 bath. Large windows throughout the home provide tons of light! A great location...walk to 6th Ave. and enjoy all it has to offer! Call Pam @253 691-0461 for more details or for a private showing. Better Properties North Proctor PAM LINDGREN BETTER PROPERTIES NORTH PROCTOR plindgren@ betterproperties.com 253 691.0461

WATERFRONT

Food & Beverage Businesses 3 Bed, 2.5 Bath. Charming, turnkey home on the 18th hole in super quiet community- feels secluded, yet minutes from I-5. Enchanting details & warm, Tuscany colors throughout- this home is a gem. Move in & start relaxing- the work has already been done. Enjoy morning coffee on covered front porch, dine al fresco & listen to nature from your back deck. Granite slab counters, master on main, a den which could easily double as 4th bedroom, yummy media nook upstairsthis house has it all. Welcome home. Shannon Agent Extraordinaire 253-691-1800 or shannonsells @hotmail.com Better Properties North Proctor

EMPLOYMENT

REAL ESTATE

WATERFRONT North Salmon Beach Community on Tacoma Narrows, 35-feet overwater frontage leasehold property. Deck, davit & parking lot rights. $40,000. Contact Salmon Beach North: Sheri 253-879-1201 FOR RENT

CALL 253.922.5317

Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time.

43:    11321 148th Ave KPN IKIHZM .PN/HYIVY

NOW Free Junk Car Removal! 43:  6423 47th St Ct W IKIHZM <UP]7SHJL

43:  15421 Rose RD SW IKIHZM 3HRL^VVK

Call Mark Hulen today! 253.761.8888 )L[[LY7YVWLY[PLZ57YVJ[VY

OFFICE

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

CONTACT US

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES

Phone: Mail:

Classified Display - Mondays @ 12 noon Classified Line Ads - Tuesdays @ 12 noon

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

CELL

253-222-9181

Advertising Representatives: VISIT OUR WEBSITE www.tacomaweekly.com

â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Nicole Boote, nicole@tacomaweekly.com

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 10 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, November 2, 2012

NOTICES

NOTICES

TO: Wenona Thomas

TO: Wenona Thomas

In the Welfare of: V. B. JR., V. H. DOB: 10/20/2006 Case Number: PUY-TPR-06/12-006

In the Welfare of: B., A. M. DOB: 10/03/2005 Case Number: PUY-TPR-06/12-005

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on January 3, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS BEING TERMINATED.

TO: Moon Whitecloud Martin Jr. CASE NAME: GUTIERREZ, Kasandra Linda vs. MARTIN JR., Moon Whitecloud CASE NUMBER: PUY-CV-12/11-170 ;OL7L[P[PVULYOHZĂ&#x201E;SLKH*P]PS7L[P[PVUHNHPUZ[ the Respondent in this Court. Both the Petitioner and Respondent have the right to legal representation in this case. This Court has a list of attorneys and spokespersons who are admitted to practice in this Court. The Respondent must respond to this Civil Petition within twenty (20) days after being served. The Respondent must respond by serving a copy of a written answer on the 7L[P[PVULYHUKI`Ă&#x201E;SPUN[OPZ^YP[[LUHUZ^LY ^P[O[OPZ*V\Y[HSVUN^P[OHUHMĂ&#x201E;KH]P[VM service. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear in the Puyallup Tribal Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, in the matter of which is located at 1638 East 29th Street, Tacoma, Washington, and you are to stay until this Court may hear this matter. YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear on December 20, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. FAILURE TO APPEAR AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT.

Notice of Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 RCW Grantor: Favorite Real Property, LLC Successor Trustee: Philip S. Brooke III Beneficiary: AmericanWest Bank Abbreviated Legal: Lots 1 to 5 inclusive, Block 3, Wingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addition Full Legal on: Page 2 Assessorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parcel No.: 9710000160, 971000170, 9710000182, 9710000281 Prior Document Reference No.: 200902230411 TO: Favorite Real Property, LLC 3120 South Tacoma Way Tacoma, WA 99409 Brian Favorite 1929 Tacoma Avenue South Tacoma, WA 98402 Favorite Real Property, LLC 3514 S. Cedar Street Tacoma, WA 98409 Cascade Masonry Restoration, LLC 1929 Tacoma Avenue South Tacoma, WA 98402 Favorite Real Property, LLC 1929 Tacoma Avenue South Tacoma, WA 98402 Bank of the Northwest 155 108th Ave. NE, Suite 100 Bellevue, WA 98004 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will, on the 30th day of November 2012, at the hour of 10:00 A.M., at Pierce County Courthouse (County-City Building) 930 Tacoma Avenue South, inside the front entrance in the City of Tacoma, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following-described real property, situated in the County of Pierce, State of Washington, to-wit: Parcel A: Lots 1 to 5, inclusive, Block 3, Wingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addition to Tacoma, W.T., according to the plat thereof, recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 83, records of Pierce County Auditor. Except that portion thereof appropriated by the City of Tacoma for South Tacoma Way under Pierce County Superior Court Cause Number 75246. Situate in the City of Tacoma, County of Pierce, State of Washington. Parcel B: Parcels B & C, Boundary Line Adjustment 200810095001, according to the survey thereof recorded October 9, 2008, records of Pierce County Auditor. Situate in the City of Tacoma, County of Pierce, State of Washington. (Assessorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tax Parcel No. 9710000160, 9710000170, 9710000182, 9710000281) which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated February 12, 2009, and recorded on February 23, 2009, under Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s File No. 200902230411, records of Pierce County, Washington, from Favorite Real Property, LLC, as Grantor, to Chicago Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of AmericanWest Bank, as successor in interest to Bank of Tacoma, as )LULĂ&#x201E;JPHY` II.5VHJ[PVUJVTTLUJLKI`[OL)LULĂ&#x201E;JPHY`VM[OL Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligations in any Court by reason of the Borrowerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or Grantorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s default on the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts, which are now in arrears: DELINQUENT PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST: Delinquent unpaid payments: June 12, 2012, July 12, 2012 and August 12, 2012 in the amount of $5,161.65 each. $15,484.95 LATE CHARGES: Accrued Late Charges $516.16 REAL ESTATE TAXES: Real property taxes for all VMHUKĂ&#x201E;YZ[OHSMVM[VNL[OLY^P[OPU[LYLZ[ and penalties. $15,641.73 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal of $564,429.88 together with late charges, and real estate taxes shown above, together with accrued interest and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on January 3, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS BEING TERMINATED. TO: Victor Bolanos Acosta In the Welfare of: B., A. M. DOB: 10/03/2005 Case Number: PUY-TPR-06/12-005 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on January 3, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS BEING TERMINATED. statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on the 30th day of November 2012. The defaults referenced in Paragraph III must be cured by the 19th day of November 2012 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 19th day of November 2012 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults, as set forth in Paragraph III, are cured and the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 19th day of November 2012 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by [OL)LULĂ&#x201E;JPHY`VY;Y\Z[LL[V[OL)VYYV^LY.YHU[VY and Guarantors at the following addresses: Favorite Real Property, LLC 3120 South Tacoma Way Tacoma, WA 99409

VOLUNTEERS Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! The Business & Responsive Agency Council helps district leadership with business SODQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO sustainability decisions, revenue development and quality assurance. Monthly meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstacoma. org/business-volunteer to learn more or call Brett Freshwaters, Chief )LQDQFLDO 2IĂ&#x20AC;FHU DW 253.305.1081. Brettf@ tacomaparks.com. Metro Parks Tacoma

Special events bring the community together and provide families with affordable fun. Metro Parks Tacoma needs volunteers to help produce memorable events. Visit www. m e t ro p a r k s t a c o m a . org/volunteer and ZPNU\W[VILUV[PĂ&#x201E;LKVM special event service opportunities. To learn more, contact Roxanne Miles, Volunteer Manager, at 253.305.1068. R o x a n n e m @ tacomaparks.com.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www. metroparkstacoma.org/ nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@ tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025. Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me

Tutor, you can be that person who makes a difference. The Read2Me program at Tacoma Community House is looking for committed volunteer tutors for grades 1-3. Starting in October, we will have sessions at Roosevelt and McCarver Elementary Schools. Call Karen Thomas at (253) 3833951 or email kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse. org for more information. Literacy Tutor Tacoma Community House is looking for volunteers to help adults improve their reading, writing, and basic math skills. Training is provided. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer tutor, please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or at kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse.org. We need a Spanish speaking volunteer Tuesday & Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10:30-11:30 AM. Volunteer to help translate for our Latino senior population. Call Portland Ave Community Center 253-591-5391 Ask for Bonnie. Leave a message if she isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in she will call you back. Volunteer needed to teach beginning basic computers skills for seniors. One day a week for 1 hour class 7XHVGD\ RU 7KXUVGD\ Ă H[LEOH for class any time between 10-2 pm. Class will start in mid-September. Volunteers will need to pass background check. Please call Portland Ave Community Center@ 253-5915391. Ask for Bonnie or leave a message and she will call you back.

Volunteer needed to get seniors up and walking. We need an avid walker that will get seniors walking for a healthier lifestyle. Tuesday or Thursday 10-11. Volunteers will need to pass background check. Please call Portland Ave Community Center @ 253-591-5391. Ask for Bonnie or leave a message and she will call you back. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies, D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W RIIHUV HTXLQH assisted services to differentlyabled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and

BAZAARS Holiday Treasures

Favorite Real Property, LLC 1929 Tacoma Avenue South Tacoma, WA 98402 Favorite Real Property, LLC 3514 S. Cedar Street Tacoma, WA 98409 I`IV[OĂ&#x201E;YZ[JSHZZHUKJLY[PĂ&#x201E;LKTHPSVU[OL[O day of March 2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above on March 16, 2012 and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor, and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor, of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale. X. NOTICE TO GUARANTORS ;OLN\HYHU[VYTH`ILSPHISLMVYHKLĂ&#x201E;JPLUJ` judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust; (2) the guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the grantor in order to avoid the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale; (3) the guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale; (4) subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington Deed of Trust Act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale, or the last Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale under any Deed of Trust granted to secure the ZHTLKLI["HUKPUHU`HJ[PVUMVYHKLĂ&#x201E;JPLUJ` the guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to SPTP[P[ZSPHIPSP[`MVYHKLĂ&#x201E;JPLUJ`[V[OLKPMMLYLUJL between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale, plus interest and costs. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. DATED this ______ day of August 2012. Philip S. Brooke III, Successor Trustee 717 West Sprague Avenue, Suite 1200 Spokane, WA 99201-3505

adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old WRSDUWLFLSDWH+RUVHH[SHULHQFH helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Jacki Berreth at 253-961-7277 or volunteer@changingrein.org.

The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00 CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED Help adults learn to speak English! Mornings, no H[SHULHQFHRUIRUHLJQODQJXDJH skills needed. South Tacoma. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy, 253-571-1887. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS NEEDED If you enjoy helping toddlers learn, you can help us! 6HHNLQJ UHWLUHG RU H[SHULHQFHG volunteers to assist in H[SDQGLQJ RXU FDSDFLW\ DQG provide quality learning for busy little people. (No diaper changing!) Background check required. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy 253571-1887

Meals on Wheels at Federal Way Senior Center seeks morning volunteers: One Co-coordinator, Friday and Monday; two Callers, Monday; three Packers, Wednesday; two Drivers, Thursday. To learn more, call 206-727-6250. Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several SURJUDP RSWLRQV WR Ă&#x20AC;W \RXU schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 253.396.9630. INTERVIEWEES FOR A NONPROFIT PROJECT â&#x20AC;&#x153;MEMORY COMMUNITYâ&#x20AC;? What It Is: We are Memory &RPPXQLW\ D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W corporation). The Memory Community Project is a creative service to seniors. Our Goals

ld o s Cummins Diesel 360hp, Allison 6speed Trans, 9,100 miles. 4slides, auto Awnings w/wind sensor. Couch fold into Queen air bed, 2 euro recliners, 42in. Flat screen T.V. King size bed, 21in. T.V, in bedroom. 2A/C, stereo surround system. 8Kw Generator. Non-Smoker, super clean, $135,000, call 253-651-5056

ANTIQUES The Red Grand Piano Antique Mall at So. 23rd & Tacoma Ave, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Your Almost Everyday Estate Sale. Vintage clothes, furniture, glass/china, RedWing crocks, toys, taxidermy & MORE! W-Sat 10am-6pm/Sun noon-5pm (253) 627-8288

Donate time and receive free groceries. Volunteers needed with skills in management, organization, clerical, food handling, warehousing, maintenance etc. and receive free JURFHULHV IURP D 1RQ3URĂ&#x20AC;W Food Distribution Program. Older teens are welcomed to volunteer and gain valuable ZRUN H[SHULHQFH &RQWDFW Ms. Lee at (253) 677-7740 for further information. Knitters and Crocheters &RPH-RLQ8V/RYLQJ+HDUWV is a group of volunteers who crochet or knit: hats for chemo, baby items, and blankets for different QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W RUJDQL]DWLRQV with in the community. We meet twice a month. Once on the second Tuesday, from 1:00pm to 3:00pm and again on the fourth Thursday, from 7:00pm to 9:00pm. Please join us at the WayPoint Church, 12719 134th Ave KP N, Gig Harbor. We are also in need of donations of yarn. For more information please email: lovingheartsonkp@aol. com or call Virginia at 253884â&#x20AC;&#x201D;9619 Loving Hearts also meets 1pm to 3pm 3rd Thur. at Clubhouse Mobile Park Ardena Gale 4821 70th Ave. E., Fife 98424

Need safe farms or barns

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

REC. VEHICLE

& Objectives: To create an accessible resource that: â&#x20AC;˘ helps our senior citizens tell their stories â&#x20AC;˘ connects the young and the old â&#x20AC;˘ increases our understanding of those before us who help us be who we are â&#x20AC;˘ honors the generations before us and show our appreciation by preserving their memories â&#x20AC;˘ All seniors are welcome to YROXQWHHUIRUĂ&#x20AC;OPLQJWKHLUVWRU\Â&#x2021; At most two days of work during daytime â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Day 1: pre-production meeting, and Release Form VLJQLQJ  'D\  Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ LGHDOO\ wrapped within half a day What weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like you to talk about in WKHĂ&#x20AC;OP8VHPLQXWHVRUVRWR tell the most memorable story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/grandchildren. Compensation: a DVD in which you are the leading character, and a free upload to our website http://memorycommunity.org/ Contact: send your emails to deyung@memorycommunity. org Or call Deyung at 253858-2445 for scheduling a PHHWLQJ 7KH Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ LV IUHH but donations are appreciated to help the project continue.*

PETS

Visitation Church, S. 58th and S. Warner, Tacoma Nov 3rd 9 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 pm Nov 4th 9 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 pm Shop for all your holiday gifts.

Cascade Masonry Restoration, LLC 1929 Tacoma Avenue South Tacoma, WA 98402 Brian Favorite 1929 Tacoma Avenue South Tacoma, WA 98402

VOLUNTEERS

for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\ DUH Ă&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Anisa is as sweet Little Lil is an as candy! She is a older gal who is little timid but loves just waiting for a attention and is comfortable lap looking for a Forever to claim as her Family to build her own! She would confidence! She do great in a quiet home without too would love a home with a yard so that much activity.

she has room to run!

Currently available animals are featured on our website www.MetroAnimalServices.org

Pet of the Week

ANTIQUES WANTED â&#x20AC;&#x153;Floraâ&#x20AC;? Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105.

Our Featured Pet this week is Flora, a beautiful one year old torti and white longhaired cat. She came to the shelter with a litter of nursing kittens, and now that they have all found homes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s her turn! She is very affectionate, calm, and sweet. She would love to spend the winter as your lap-warmer! Come visit her and fall in love. Her number is 467391.

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

GET U GLY : November 2, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 11 Friday, LIST F REE W CODE ITH T mAx1 HIS C 79 GE ODE m T U Ax179 G LY : LI WITH GET U ST FR THIS GLY : EE WI CODE LIST F TH TH m A REE W x179 IS CO UGLY ITH T GET U DE m : LIST HIS C Ax179 GLY : FREE ODE m LIST WITH GET U FREE mAx1 Ax179 GLY : L THIS W 79 GE CODE I I GET U S T T H FREE THIS T UGL m GLY : A W x CODE Y : LIS 179 G I LIST F T H THIS THIS ET UG mAx1 T R F R E C CODE E WIT LY : LI 79 GE ODE m ST FR H THI mAx1 T A U x G 1 79 GE LY : LI S COD EE WI 79 GE T UGL ST FR FREE TH TH T UGL E mAx WITH EE W Y : LIS IS CO 179 G ITH T T FRE THIS DE m ET UG HIS C E WIT Ax179 CODE L Y : L ODE m GET U IST FR H THI mAx1 GET U S COD GLY : EE WI 79 GE GLY : L LIST F E mAx TH TH T UGL IST FR REE W I Y 1 S 7 E : 9 C E L IST F ODE m GET U CODE WITH ITH T REE W GLY : L mAx1 TH Ax179 HIS C ITH T IST FR 79 GE ODE m GET U HIS C T E G U A E L G x W Y 1 LY : LI WITH ODE m 79 GE ITH T : LIST S HIS C T UGL FRE T FRE THIS Ax179 ODE m E WIT Y : LIS CODE GET U H THI T FRE Ax179 mAx1 GLY : UGLY S E 7 G C W L 9 E O I S I T G DE m TH TH : LIST T FRE ET UG UGLY Ax179 FREE E WIT IS CO LY : LI WITH GET U DE m H THI ST FR mAx1 Ax179 GLY : L THIS S E E C O W DE m 79 GE CODE IST FR ITH T GET U Ax T UGL HIS C mAx1 EE WI GLY : Y : LIS ODE m 79 GE LIST F TH TH THIS T FRE T R I A S U E x G E C 1 CODE E WIT LY : LI WITH 79 GE ODE m ST FR H THI mAx1 T UGL THI Ax179 S COD EE WI 79 GE Y : LIS GET U FREE TH TH T UGL E mAx T FRE GLY : L WITH Y : LIS IS CO E 1 7 W I 9 S I T G T FRE TH TH THIS DE m FREE ET UG E WIT Ax179 CODE IS CO LY : LI GET U H THI ST FR mAx1 DE m GET U S COD GLY : A EE WI 79 GE G x L 1 Y 7 : LIST 9 GET E mAx TH TH LIST T UGL FREE FREE IS CO Y : LIS 179 G WITH WITH DE m ET UG WITH T FRE THIS A THIS L E x Y T 1 W : H 7 L IS CO 9 GET ITH T CODE IST FR CODE HIS C UGLY DE m EE WI mAx1 mAx1 ODE m : LIST Ax179 TH TH 79 G 79 G FREE Ax179 IS CO GET U ET U ET UG WITH DE m GET U GLY : GLY : LY : L Ax179 GLY : LIST LIST LIST IST F GET U LIST F FREE FREE FREE REE W G R L W Y W E WITH E WIT : LIST ITH T ITH T ITH T H THI HIS C THIS HIS C HIS C CODE S COD CODE ODE ODE ODE mAx1 m E m m m m A A A x A A x179 179 G x179 x179 79 G x179 GET ET UG GET U ET UG GET U UGLY UGLY GLY : LY : L LY : L GLY : : LIST : LIST I I L S S L I S T I T S T FREE T FRE FREE FREE FREE FREE E WI WITH WITH WITH WITH THIS TH T THIS THIS THIS THIS CODE HIS C C C C O O O C DE m DE m mAx1 ODE DE m ODE Ax179 mAx1 Ax179 79 G Ax179 ET UG 79 G GET U GET U GET U ET UG LY : L G G G L Y L L YHOMES HOMES FOR SALE HOMESISFOR HOMES FOR SALE LY : : LISTFOR SALE : LIST FOR SALE Y : LIHOMES T FRSALE ST FR FREE EE W FREE WITH Brick home IT T WITH DQ WITHZLWK VSDFH IRUEEĂ&#x20AC;QLVKLQJ Classic in 723 S. Tyler H $219,000 HIS C THIS THIS THIS CODE with 3 additional ODE condition rec/family room! C O mAx1amazing D mAbaths. bedrooms and 1.75 fenced x179 Private, fullyE m 79 G Ax179 back G E E T Living rm. pellet Tyard mature landscaping GET UGwith UGwith L : newer LY : L system! Really stove to keepYyou Lwarm IST Fin the and a sprinkler I REE W great house.ST FREE W winter months! Retro kitchen ITH w/newer appliances and ITH TH Come see! ISMLS# COD391728 eating nook, separate dining E mA x179 rm. and beautiful hardwoods! Call Pam Lindgren

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV

CALL 253.922.5317

GET UGLY ADVERTISE RENT OR SALE FOR

FREE

LOOK FOR HOMES

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

4717 Alameda Ave W, Univ. Place Fabulous University Place School District, 5 bdrm, 3 ba home. Deck & Yard backs to nothing but treesâ&#x20AC;Śgranite, stainless appl, brazillian cherry floors, upgrades galore. Exquisite and barely lived in. No disappointment here! Stephanie Lynch â&#x20AC;˘ 253.203.8985 www.stephanielynch.com John L. Scott â&#x20AC;˘ Tacoma North

 PDLQ Ă RRU EHGURRPV DQG a full bath. Basement has 1 bedroom and 3/4 bath

$429,000

253 691-0461 for more info or for a private showing! Better Properties N. Proctor

Big, Expensive & Gorgeous . . . You Deserve It! Unsurpassed View, Superior Craftsmanship, Stunning Details! 3125 N 33rd St, Tacoma $2,500,000 Enjoy the awe-inspiring view from nearly every room of this incredible home. Each of the 4 bedrooms includes a private bath. You will ORYHWKHFKHI¡VGUHDPNLWFKHQEULJKWDLU\OLYLQJ spaces and opulent master retreat. Family and friends feel right at home in the separate guest DSDUWPHQW ,QGRRU SRRO VDXQD FDU JDUDJH and too many other features to mention! Visit our website for more information.

Margo Hass Klein Coldwell Banker Bain

(253) 279-9949

www.potterypointviewhome.com

Custom-Built 3,600 sf Home on Park-like 2 Acres! 6121 44th Ave E, Tacoma Open Saturday & Sunday 12-3:00 pm!

margohassklein@cbbain.com

Tons of living space inside and out! This beautiful home is perfect for entertaining with the formal living DQG GLQLQJ URRPV JUDQLWH DQG VWDLQOHVV NLWFKHQ ZLWK EXLOWLQVHDWLQJDQGODUJHGHFNZLWKSHUVRQKRWWXE Your master suite is conveniently located on the main Ă RRUDQGOHDGVWRDVHSDUDWHEDOFRQ\RYHUORRNLQJWKH EDFN\DUG <RXU GD\OLJKW EDVHPHQW ZLWK ¡ FHLOLQJV is the envy of the neighborhood with the comfortable UHFURRPZLWKĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHDQGZHWEDUHQRUPRXVJDPH room and separate exercise room. The professionally ODQGVFDSHGJURXQGVLQFOXGHDIXOOVL]HOLJKWHGVSRUWV FRXUWZDWHUIDOOĂ&#x20AC;UHSLWUDLVHGYHJHWDEOHJDUGHQĂ RZHU gardens and mature orchard. Your four-legged friends ZLOOORYHWKHDFUHSDVWXUHZLWKVIEDUQLQFOXGLQJSRZHUZDWHULQGRRUDQGRXWGRRUVWDOOVDQGORIW

www.margohassklein.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I act in your best interest, not mine. You deserve respect from the first time we shake hands to the last.â&#x20AC;?

$575,000

www.REISinvest.com www.REIS4rentbyowner.com

REAL ESTATE I N V E S T M E N T

SERVICES

Property Management Receiverships Condo/Home Owners Association Management Bank REO Acquisitions Commercial Sales/Leasing

REIS

For Sale

For Rent

S&S Retail Center & Business Park $1,199,900 14113-14125 Pacific Ave Building SqFt: 22,578 253-752-9742

Discovery Place 6409 6th Ave,Tacoma $2,499,000 28,989 sq ft Mall. Majority Leased 253-752-9742

Chamber Bay Condo $900 4501 Grand Vie Dr W #107 2br 2 bath 253-752-9742

University Place Stratford Heights Apt with garage. 1, 2 or 3 bd Call 253-565-0343

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

6th Ave Commercial Space

Broadway Center 206 Broadway Ave E,Seattle $1,450,000 Small Center 199,881 NOI On Land lease 253 228 0444

Olalla Farm House

$640,000 4417 6th Ave, Tacoma 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

$1395 14637 Starr Rd SE 3br 3 bath 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

Tacoma (253) 752-9742 Kent

u

www.REISinvest.com

Downtown Tacoma Office 3000 to 16,200 Sq Ft. With Parking 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

6th Ave Office/Retail Space 4412 6th Ave Suite 5 600 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

3725 S Orchard St. #2

2br 1 3/4 bath 1100 sqft. 253-752-9742

Lakewood Office Gross Leases. 1290 to 1550 Sq Ft. Good Parking. Prestigious Gravelly Lake Dr. 253-752-9742

Office/Retail Space 3868 Center St 816 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

$875

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

(253) 981-4098

u

For Lease

u

DuPont (253) 207-5871

Seattle South Lake Union (206) 319-5981

CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA

LAKEWOOD

3228 S UNION AVE #310

8416 PHILLIPS RD SW #57

$575 1 BED, 1 BATH 450 SF. FANTASTIC 1 BED UNIT HAS ALL UTILITIES IN RENT W/S/G, ELECTRICITY AND CABLE.

$750 2 BED, 1 BATH 800 SF. GORGEOUS 2 BED CONDO HAS GRANITE COUNTERTOPS, SS APPLIANCES, HARDWOODS AND PETS WELCOME.

TACOMA

TACOMA

6601 S TYLER ST #14

6450 S MASON AVE #1

$565

$765

1 BED, 1 BATH 700 SF. LARGE 1 BEDROOM APT HAS ALL APPLIANCES, PLENTY OF STORAGE AND W/S/G IN RENT.

3 BED 2 BATH 1000 SF. CORNER 3 BED UNIT HAS ALL APPLIANCES, BALCONY, NEWER WINDOWS AND W/S/G INCLUDED IN RENT.

TACOMA

TACOMA

760 COMMERCE ST #505

2305 S 74TH ST #11

$1195

$625

2 BED, 2 BATH 1249 SF. IMMACULATE DOWNTOWN TACOMA 2 BED CONDO HAS HARDWOODS, WASHER/DRYER, ALL APPLIANCES AND MORE!

2 BED, 1 BATH 600 SF. WONDERFUL 2 BED UNIT HAS EAT IN KITCHEN, W/S/G INCLUDED IN RENT AND CLOSE TO I5 ACCESS.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

Doug Arbogast Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

(253) 307-4055 Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

4424 6th Ave Suite 1 Tacoma, WA 98406

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future! Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities. Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs. (253) 307-4055 Whether you are a first time home buyer, a distressed homeowner or a veteran investor, I have the tools and systems in place to help you achieve your real estate goals.

For qualifications contact Jenn: Jennifer Pacheco Mortgage Loan Officer

253-926-4131 www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com

Section B • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, November 2, 2012

Battle at the Boat 89

Sinbad

Alice Cooper

November 3, 7pm

November 10, 8pm

November 18, 7pm

I-5 Showroom, $25, $40, $100

I-5 Showroom, $25, $40, $60, $65

I-5 Showroom, $35, $50, $65, $70

CageSport MMA XXII

Willie K

Lyfe Jennings

December 1, 7pm

December 15, 8pm

January 18, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom, $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom, $20, $30, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom, $20, $30, $55, $60

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices.


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