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Seven Spark Grants will bolster community strengths By Kathleen Merryman

PHOTO COURTESY OF GREATER TACOMA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

RECIPIENTS. From left, front row: Alexa Folsom-Hill and

Benjamin Warner; second row: Anna Holcomb and Savannah Olsen; third row: Miri Sampson, Kathryn Weymiller and Renee Simms; back row: Lucas Smiraldo and Mitch Kinne.

funded in part by George Russell’s One Nation. They’re comparatively small – $1,500. They’re focused on one idea. They go to ordinary people instead of organizations. Each one of them gives an existing strength a new way to shine in Pierce County. Now we have a new batch of transformative goodness on the way. GTCF announced the seven

Each round of Spark Grants makes me want to switch the words around in the Greater Tacoma Community Foundation’s name. Greater Community. Community Foundation. Tacoma, Greater. The grants are a genius idea,

newest Spark Grants, and they’re starting soon, with all the energy of a new year – and a big Super Bowl. * The 5th Annual Soberbowl - Mitch Kinne has been clean and sober for five years. That’s a rocking accomplishment – with one guaranteed annual awkward moment: The Super Bowl. If you’re looking for a public place X See SPARKS / page A4

Locals craft legislative wish list

MAP COURTESY OF WSDOT

STALLED. State Route

167’s last leg has remained a “top priority” for decades without full funding. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

With the short legislative session now underway in Olympia, local governments are working on their lists of projects and laws they hope will be added to lawmakers’ agendas.

STATE ROUTE 167

PHOTOS BY MATT NAGLE

ARTIST AT WORK. Artist Anthony Duenas (on left) and his brother David, both members of the Puyallup Indian Tribe, stand in front of the mural Anthony painted in cooperation with the Eastside Neighborhood Advisory Council. The photo above left shows the considerable length of the mural, while the photo above right shows its focal point, a bear totem.

NEW EASTSIDE MURAL DOUBLES AS HISTORIC REPRESENTATION RETAINING WALL TRANSFORMED By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

M

cKinley Park on Tacoma’s Eastside is enjoying a new attraction these days with the completion of a beautiful new mural painted on what was a gray and overgrown retaining wall at the McKinley Terrace Apartments. Located at E. 32nd Street and McKinley Avenue, the mural is a snapshot of the way life used to be for Native American people centuries ago in the very location where the mural is situated – two Native American hunters moving in on a bear while a third acts as a lookout from behind a tree. Artist and Puyallup Tribal member Andrew Duenas chose this theme to honor our region’s rich tribal history, as the McKinley Park area was once a fertile hunting ground for the Native American families that lived there centuries ago. Duenas said he consulted with the Puyallup Tribe’s Historic Preservation Department to learn about the area and develop the mural theme. He said when he discovered that the area around the Tacoma Dome was once a main

SITE IS HISTORIC TRIBAL LOCATION

Puyallup village site hundreds of years ago, he knew he was onto something. “Basically, when you were a teenager and becoming a man you were told to climb this hill and come up here and train to hunt. We live up here on top of this hill and this is where we trained on a day-today basis. That’s where this whole mural came from,” he said. “I went home immediately and started just drawing nonstop. I came to realize I should do an interpretation of a hunt.” It took Duenas one full day to complete the mural, with help from his brother, Daniel (Puyallup Tribe), and nine-year-old daughter. The Eastside Neighborhood Advisory Council was instrumental in making the mural happen, namely its president Lynette Scheidt and vicepresident Tara Scheidt, who is also secretary of the Dometop Neighborhood Alliance. The mother-daughter team had seen Duenas’ work on the side of Friesenburgers restaurant at East 26th and ‘D’ Street and went in search of the artist. “After months of asking and searching for the artist we finally came in contact with Anthony Duenas,” said Lynette Scheidt, who is also president of the Dometop Neighborhood Alliance. “We told him we really would

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

Falcons outlast T-Birds A6

‘Shout’ delivers energy without much soul B2

ARIES March 21 – April 19 Arguments are possible so make sure you choose your words wisely and are in tune with those around you. A sudden change may be in store for you at work. This is a year you will be doing a lot of reassessment and selfexamination. TAURUS April 20 - May 20 It’s time to balance work with play. Relax more and cozy up to loved ones or spend some quality alone time. Be cautious yet productive. Reflect on your potential and understand your priorities. GEMINI May 21 – June 20 Concentrate on your most important money, property and relationship issues at this time. Focus daily on the power to widen your horizons and bring the world to you. The details are everything. Be in the moment. CANCER June 21 – July 22 Those that rely on your good sense and sound advice may need you. Stabilize your love life and creative drive. Understand your heart and retune your strings. This year will show how your hard work will pay off. LEO July 23 – August 22 Your royal and noble nature rubs off as you show others how to be their own king or queen. Creativity and generosity are heightened. Expect to receive your due recognition and applause for a job well done. VIRGO August 23 – September 22 Do you feel like you are being watched? You may have a secret admirer that will reveal themselves. Notice the subtle changes in your outlook. Your motto is ‘The harder you work, the luckier you will be.’ Keep it up!

KEEPING LOVE ALIVE: Tacoma Weekly is prepping for Valentine’s Day and wants to know your romantic tricks of the trade. Enter the contest and win some great prizes. PAGE A2

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

MORE MURALS ON THE WAY

like to incorporate some Native American artwork into the Eastside.” With Tara Scheidt’s husband and children being members of the Quinault Tribe, it seemed like serendipity for the Scheidts to hook up with Duenas and his artistic skills. An Eastside resident his entire life, Duenas said he has been interested in art ever since he was small child with a box of crayons. Duenas’ bear hunting scene is actually the second piece of public artwork he’s completed. The first piece is on the walls of the storage building at Dometop Community Garden – two hummingbirds, chosen for their animal totem symbols of life and joy. The larger mural, however, came with more obstacles to overcome during the process, particularly in securing the necessary paint and supplies. Tara and Lynnette Scheidt said they went to many businesses and got donations of paint, rollers, brushes, spray paint and buckets so the brothers could do the artwork. They also relied on donations from the community for paint especially, which can get quite expensive when used for large mural projects. Lynette and Tara Scheidt hope that the X See MURAL / page A4

LIBRA September 23 – October 22 Are you where you want to be? Being reliable and stable gives you tremendous staying power. Exercise good judgment. The slightest imbalance could set your scales swinging. Ask a wise elder for important advise. SCORPIO October 23 – November 21 Your good nature may be tested with friends and family. Set right any misunderstandings with siblings. Respect yourself and your personal space.

WORD SEARCH Q R Q H X V R V G Z T Z F C H D

N O P M A C S S E L E M O H X G

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E M E R A L D Q U E E N T L V Y

SAGITTARIUS November 22 – December 21 Don’t stretch yourself too thin. Your fear of not being able to do or give enough to a partner may leave you anxious. Eliminate wastes and inefficiencies. Throw out what you don’t need, donate the rest to charity. CAPRICORN December 22 – January 19 Try to balance good diet and exercise habits yet allow yourself little daily pleasures or treats. This will help to keep your morale and selfmotivation high. You are in the gradual process of re-inventing yourself. Think happy thoughts. AQUARIUS January 20 – February 18 Be prepared to put a lot of effort into your plans for worthwhile results. You value your independence have a flair for the unconventional. You are urged to express yourself through blogging, social media or other inspiration. PISCES February 19 – March 20 Look to get your financial and employment affairs in order this year. Important investment opportunities may prove beneficial. Get in touch with old classmates or childhood friends. Someone you forgot about is thinking about you.

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Top of the list for local cities, as it has been for decades, is for state lawmakers to find funding to finish State Route 167. Doing so would provide a more streamlined route between the warehouse and distribution centers in the Puyallup Valley with shipping operations at the Port of Tacoma. “Fife, along with other communities in the Puyallup and Kent valleys, is part of the second largest warehouse distribution hub on the West Coast,” Fife’s legislative agenda states. “It is critical to the economic health of the Central Puget Sound and the state, to the future competitiveness of the Port of Tacoma, and to jobs creation and freight mobility, to ‘finish what was started’ and complete this X See FUNDING / page A4

DATES TO WATCH FOR: February 7: First bill cutoff February 20: Second bill cutoff March 13: Legislature adjourns

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KEEPING LOVE ALIVE

,U[LY[OLJVU[LZ[HUK^PUZVTLNYLH[WYPaLZ Tacoma Weekly is prepping for Valentine’s Day and wants to know your romantic tricks of the trade. Send us a paragraph description of your fail-safe way of keeping love alive in your relationships. We will post them and let readers vote on the

best tip. Winners of the contest will receive a dinner for two at the Adriatic Grill and a dozen roses from Fife Flowers. Submissions must be submitted by noon on Feb. 4. The submissions will be posted at Tacomaweekly.com

City News :,,205.6<;:;(5+05.7,(*,4(2,9: -697,(*,790A, The Greater Tacoma Peace Prize Committee has announced the opening of nominations for the 10th annual Greater Tacoma Peace Prize (GTPP). The purpose of this award is to recognize, honor and encourage peace building in our community. The committee invites you to nominate an individual, group, or organization to receive the 2014 award. Return the nomination form at http://www.tacomapeaceprize.org/howyoucanparticipate.html to the GTPP. Nominations must be postmarked no later than March 31, 2014. The name of the 2014 Greater Tacoma Peace Prize recipient will be announced in April, and the prize will be formally presented in May at the GTPP 10th Anniversary Banquet (date and place to be announced in February). For further information, contact any of the committee members or visit the GTPP website www.tacomapeaceprize. org.

35th and Steele Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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tacomagoodwill.org Must present coupon at time of purchase. Free item must be of equal or lesser value. One free item per coupon. One coupon per customer, per transaction. Cannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Not valid at blue, Online or Outlet locations. Excludes special purchase items, candy, snacks, beverages and mattresses.

-69<4(:2:Âş+6,:790=(*@4(;;,9&Âť Can our democracy survive massive NSA surveillance? This question and more will be explored at a public forum featuring Thomas Drake and Jesselyn Radack, Feb. 8, 7:30 p.m. at Washington State History Museum. Drake is a former senior executive of the National Security Agency as well as a decorated veteran of the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy. When Drake turned whistleblower, the U.S. government threw the Espionage Act at him and threatened him with 30 years in prison. Drake rejected several deals because he refused to â&#x20AC;&#x153;plea bargain with the truth,â&#x20AC;? and the U.S. Dept. of Justice eventually dropped all ten of its original charges. Radack is a former ethics adviser to the U.S. Dept. of Justice who turned whistleblower when she disclosed the FBIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ethics violations in the investigation of John Walker Lindh, denied an attorney in the aftermath of his capture during the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan. An honors graduate of Brown University and Yale Law School, Radack is now director of national security and human rights at the Government Accountability Project. Come and listen. There will be ample time for questions. Then decide for yourself. Seating limited, so reserve your seat(s) now at: http://whistleblowers.brownpapertickets.com/ Sponsored by People for Peace Justice & Healing, co-sponsored by ACLU of Washington, Fellowship of ReconciliationTacoma, United for Peace of Pierce County, and Veterans for Peace-Tacoma. C6620,*647(5@.0=,:36=,;6()<:,+>64,5 Only Oatmeal Cookie Creations is partnering with the YWCA of Pierce County this Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day to comfort women and children transitioning from domestic violence into healthy and safe environments. For most, the season of giving is over, but small business owner Karina Blasco shares her gift of sweet, buttery and rich homemade cookies with the women and children fleeing abusive situations and now residing in the YWCA shelter and transitional homes throughout Pierce County. On Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, each family will receive a trendy Valentine Take-Out Box filled with fresh baked Cookie Creations made with love. Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day is the national day of love, but for many it can be a lonely and vulnerable day. Only Oatmeal Cookie Creations hopes that their Oatmeal Chocolate-Covered Strawberry Cookies will bring a warm smile to many women and their children healing from abuse. Several hurting and confused women will know they are loved and not forgotten this Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my prayer that one bite into my Addictively Delicious cookies will bring all the love and comfort one desires on Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day,â&#x20AC;? said Blasco. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every woman deserves love; these women in particular.â&#x20AC;? Only Oatmeal Cookie Creations is an online cookie boutique based in Tacoma. Their cookies offer endless creation possibilities that use a sweet and buttery cookie base of natural whole grain rolled oats. The company is solely operated and considered to be in the ground floor stages of a small start-up business. The owner spends her time operating and fulfilling the current business demands while working toward opening a retail establishment where her creative offerings can be expanded to an array of wholesome sweet treats. Only Oatmeal Cookies can be found at local specialty food establishments, Farmers Markets and online at www.onlyoatmealcookie.com. The company is also on Facebook and Twitter @OnlyOat-

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that afternoon as well as in the Feb. 7 edition. Votes will be collected online through Feb. 10, with the winner being announced in the Feb. 14 edition and online that day. Send your tips to Stevedunkel@ Tacomaweekly.com.

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4(5*/(9.,+>0;/4<9+,996)),9@,3<+05. Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist has charged Chase Devyver, 29, with murder in the second degree, attempted murder in the first degree, robbery in the first degree and attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle. He attacked his girlfriend with a knife and stabbed a man to death for intervening. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is another unfortunate example of the havoc wreaked by domestic violence,â&#x20AC;? said Lindquist. In the early morning hours of Jan. 19, 2014, the defendant and his girlfriend were sitting in a parked car in front of their residence in South Hill. They were arguing about their relationship. When the victim exited the vehicle and walked toward the house, the defendant followed and stabbed her from behind. The victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s screams woke up a friend that was sleeping in another room. He intervened and the defendant stabbed him as well. The defendant then retrieved a gun from another room and demanded the female victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s debit/credit card. He hit her in the head with the gun, took her keys, and stole her car. Pierce County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deputies spotted the vehicle on 176th Street East. The defendant led police on a pursuit that reached speeds in excess of 90 miles per hour towards Canyon Road. The defendant lost control of his vehicle and crashed into a power pole. After he climbed out of the vehicle, he told deputies to shoot him. He was tased and arrested. 4,;967(92:,?,*<;0=,+09,*;69 73(5:-69/0:9,;<95 Metro Parks Tacoma staff ended the week with good news from Executive Director Jack C. Wilson, who had shared with employees over the summer that he would be taking an extended leave of absence to focus on a personal health matter. Via a message from his assistant Jennifer Bowman, Wilson shared the good news that he is home recovering following his second phase of treatment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jack remains optimistic and is planning on returning to work in a limited capacity within just a few weeks,â&#x20AC;? Bowmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement to employees shared. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He sends his gratitude to all of you for the cards, e-mails and well wishes you all have sent his way. Park Board President Aaron Pointer expressed his excitement about the news. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although Jack has missed some time this year because of health issues, he ensured that the District didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss a beat,â&#x20AC;? he said. Adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My 2014 Work Plan for him is to get healthy and continue his leadership in moving Metro Parks forward.â&#x20AC;? 4<:,<46-.3(::>,3*64,::,(;;3,(9;0:; Seattle-based artist Joseph Gregory Rossano will be in the Hot Shop at Museum of Glass from Wednesday, Jan. 29 through Sunday, Feb. 2 as part of the 2014 Visiting Artist Residency program. This residency concludes with a lecture on Sunday, Feb. 2 at 2 p.m., which will be streamed live on the Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rossanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work is captivating and beautiful,â&#x20AC;? notes Susan Warner, executive director of Museum of Glass. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His unique perspective on the intersection of art and nature contributes to larger and more complex questions about the impact of humanity on our planet.â&#x20AC;? Joseph Gregory Rossano earned a BFA in studio arts at Louisiana State University in 1987. He has worked as both the artistic director for Waterford Crystal in Ireland and the studio manager and lead gaffer for Chihuly Studio in Seattle. Rossano has been an integral team member for a number of established artists including Lino Tagliapietra, Benjamin Moore, Richard Royal, Martin Blank and William Morris. He currently lives and works in Arlington, WA. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As an artist, I am interested in studying and abstracting form, texture and materials, drawing inspiration from both historical and natural sources,â&#x20AC;? states Rossano. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through the use of varied media, I seek to express the ephemeral and sometimes fragmented quality of our human experience and our relationship to the natural world.â&#x20AC;? Rossanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work has been featured at Museum of Glass on several occasions including â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mirrored Murrelets,â&#x20AC;? an installation of a flock of glass birds on the Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mid-level reflecting pool in 2007 and in the exhibition Northwest Artists Collect, which was on display from January 19 through October 27, 2013. In addition, Rossano has exhibited at the San Diego Natural History Museum, Pacific Science Center, Bainbridge Island Museum of Art and Museum of Northwest Art and was awarded the Ford Motor Company Fellowship with Earthwatch Institute.

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.0-;*(9+;/0,=,:*(5Âť;:;67 CHRISTMAS FOR ONE FAMILY By David Rose Correspondent

Finders keepers, losers weepers, right? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what two men thought when they picked up an envelope full of gift cards DAVID ROSE they knew belonged to someone else four days before Christmas. Last week, a young mother to four kids in Duvall reached out to me for help identifying the suspects after she accidentally left the cards on the checkout counter at Target. They were donated to her by her church to buy gifts for her kids. Right after the surveillance video aired on Q13 FOX News, the two men, who turned out to be brothers, called 911 and surrendered. They even apologized and told deputies they used the cards to buy gas and gifts. That could

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ROSE

HOLIDAY HERO. Seen here with Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted host David Rose (on left), Provost Marshal George Hight from American Veterans Post 1 in Tacoma and his wife Donna saved Christmas for one family targeted by thieves.

have been the end of the story if not for Provost Marshal George Hight from American Veterans Post 1 in Tacoma and his wife

Donna. Thanks to their generosity, Christmas for the womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family was saved. Last Friday, George and I delivered two new

boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bicycles, Barbie dolls, an Easy Bake Oven and numerous other stocking stuffers and toys to her kids. The Hights purchased the toys that were wrapped by trustees from the Purdy Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prison. Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County donated the two bicycles. Hight says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every child deserves toys from Santa. When David called us and told us how the grinches had stolen the gift cards, it gave Donna and I the opportunity to make things right for this family and continue spreading the joy of Christmas.â&#x20AC;? The woman, who we are not identifying for her safety, says she believes the thieves were sincere in their apology and if they repay the money, she will not press charges. And for the record, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe in â&#x20AC;&#x153;finders keepers, losers weepersâ&#x20AC;? and neither does George. Happy Ending!!

Tacoma Weekly is interested in caught shoplifting at the 38th what Aisman happening in our community. street send Goodwill Jan.and 15story learned that Please your on news ideas everyone can have Jason Bournetonot news@tacomaweekly.com.

LOG 1: Unfunded Mandates By Paul Pastor Pierce County Sheriff

Government seems to attract more than its share of idealists. This is a positive thing. We want our elected officials to aim high and strive to accomplish positive PAUL PASTOR results for all of us. But idealism alone doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cut it. There are certain real world limitations which idealism must confront. There is one that is pretty much universal: â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no such thing as a free lunch.â&#x20AC;? I have the privilege of serving as your Sheriff. And that privilege brings obligations and responsibilities. I see it as my responsibility to respect and uphold the law, to the best of my ability. In the United States and the State of Washington, the law is defined by legislation and by court rulings. Legislation can and often does direct that my department takes on new programs or adopts specific procedures or practices. There are times when these directives make good sense to me and there are times when they do not. But it is my responsibility to implement what the legislature and, ultimately, what Court decisions direct.

I often support the intent of legislation aimed at improving public safety and I want to see them succeed. The difficult part comes in implementing the laws that the legislature passes. Laws do not implement or enforce themselves. When a directive comes with no resources, it falls to us to re-prioritize what we are already doing. I am often required to cut back on things the Department is already doing in order to do the new, legally-required things the legislature wants us to do. What is wrong with this picture? You and I can figure it out in a heartbeat. More things to do with no more resources means something has to give. Even while working smarter, with reduced staffing over the past several years, a specific legislative directive to do one thing usually means that we will need to stop doing something else. Examples of unfunded mandates include increased monitoring of serious sex offenders, requiring the collection of DNA samples for serious violent offenders and mandatory jail booking for drunk drivers on the repeat offenses. Are these good ideas? You bet. I like these ideas. They represent a willingness to support community safety and I applaud this mindset. But there is just one problem: they came

with no funding. In a rush to implement good and worthy ideas, legislators can forget that all these things involve costs. And meeting the costs of these unfunded mandates has caused our existing resources to be spread thinner and thinner. All the while, the public wonders why we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do more of â&#x20AC;&#x153;the basicsâ&#x20AC;? that they expect from law enforcement. Specific unfunded mandates can get in the way of our overall general obligation to provide public safety services. What is the fix for this? First we need to recognize that anything worth doing is worth doing right. Any law worth passing is worth paying for. There is no such thing as a free sex offender registration program or a free approach to jailing drunk drivers. We need to remind legislators that translating legislation into action takes time and resources. Decisions to write checks on my Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s account means fewer resources to do other things including things like day-today property crime enforcement. There are some basic truths that apply universally in the real world. Foremost among them is this: there is no such thing as a free lunch. It is a simple caution that should guide our state legislators as they go to Olympia this month. Lunch is certainly not free when local law enforcement is forced to foot the bill.

esque aliases. When caught stealing clothes, the man was confronted by the manager, who called the police. When the officer arrived, the manager claimed he wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t press charges, as long as the thief identified himself. Thinking he found an easy way out, the thief decided to give a fake name. The officer, suspicious of the way the answer was given, ran the name given and found that it did not exist. When informed of this, the thief claimed that the officer had misheard him, and gave another fake name. This name did exist in a database....as a fake alias used by the thief previously. When confronted with this information, the Goodwill manager decided to press charges. The shoplifter was then transferred to the Pierce County Jail for outstanding warrants, shoplifting and obstruction. After a woman pulled over on South Tyler Street was informed she was being placed under arrest for DUI without incident on Jan. 12, she decided personal shots were the way to go. After repeatedly calling the officer a â&#x20AC;&#x153;sell outâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;snitchâ&#x20AC;? on the way to Tacoma Police headquarters, the woman became quiet and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak at all while being informed of the breathalyzer test. After refusing to take the test, the driver spoke up again, this time saying negative things about both the officerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother and wife. The womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t persuade the officer to let her go, and she was transferred to Fife county jail for driving under the influence. Compiled by Derek Shuck

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#1 BEST OF TACOMA 2014 BALLOT #2 DAVE MATTHEWS BAND CARAVAN WILL RETURN TO THE GORGE LABOR DAY WEEKEND #3 STUPID CRIMINAL OF THE WEEK #4 WILSON CLOSES OUT FOSS TO STAY PERFECT

CHARLES WRIGHT GETS NONLEAGUE WIN OVER TACOMA BAPTIST

#5 TACOMA CELEBRATES THE LEGACY OF REV. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

-)33).' 0%23/. Tacoma Police detectives need your help to locate Mardelle Carmickle, who has been missing under unusual circumstances since June of 2013.

female, 59 years old, 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;7â&#x20AC;? tall, 115 lbs., with brown hair and hazel eyes. She does not drive, and is not known to have a vehicle or a cell phone.

Mardelle Carmickleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family reported her missing in late August of 2013 after failing to see or hear from her in two months. Carmickleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family members have visited her apartment in downtown Tacoma several times and found no indications she has been there since she disappeared.

Carmickle suffers from several medical conditions requiring medication. She has no previous disappearances and it is unusual for her to not be in contact with her children. Detectives are looking for any information regarding Mardelle Carmickleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disappearance and/or her whereabouts.

At the time of her disappearance Mardelle Ann Carmickle was a white

-!2$%,,% #!2-)#+,% Fridays at 10:30pm on

1,000

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Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case.

Call 253-591-5959 www.TPCrimestoppers.com

All Callers will remain anonymous

1-800-222-TIPS (8477)

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WFunding From page A1

corridor.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not likely this year. Construction of the road started in the 1960s but has largely been stalled since the 1980â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with lack of funding for the final section of the roadway that now abruptly stops in Fife. Its completion is expected to improve safety and reduce congestion along local roads and freeways in the surrounding area but comes at a cost of about $2.4 billion, and lawmakers are shy about increasing taxes to fund it. That is especially true this session since it is an election year, and lawmakers have a long roster of other projects and programs that are demanding taxpayer dollars. Lawmakers, for example, have to find ways to funnel more dollars to public education under a Supreme Court decision that stated legislators were violating the state Constitutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;paramount dutyâ&#x20AC;? of properly funding schools. The economy continues to lag in most of the state so added taxes arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t likely either. Policy makers are also increasingly shy about funding massive transportation projects in light of the Seattle tunneling delays and projected cost overruns associated with those delays. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All those stars have to alignâ&#x20AC;? to get SR-167 funding, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Government Relations Officer Randy Lewis said. Even with those troubles, the completion of the freight corridor remains a top priority for lawmakers around the state, at least in theory. Lewis blames â&#x20AC;&#x153;legislative inertia.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;An object at rest remains at rest and it is hard to get the legislature to get out of rest,â&#x20AC;? he said. Other common legislative agendas for local cities include state funding, or more local authority for funding, city street and transportation improvements and economic development projects. Cities also want a higher percentage of liquor and sales taxes that would go to local projects instead of to the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s General Fund. Local governments further want state lawmakers to stop passing new laws and regulations without funding ways for governments to enforce the new laws, commonly known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;unfunded mandates.â&#x20AC;?

MARIJUANA

Local governments have their eyes on Olympia as lawmakers continue to figure out the rules and oversight of

recreational uses of marijuana. Several bills involve the folding of medical cannabis and recreational marijuana under one set of laws as a way to streamline regulations and change the taxing formula. The recreational marijuana initiative that passed state voters last year allowing for recreational marijuana, for example, stated that 50 percent of the tax would go toward Washington Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Basic Health program, but the federal Affordable Care Act eliminated that program by expanding other health options. That means the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax formula will shuffle and local governments want a larger slice of that pie. House Bill 2149 boosts that percentage from 25 percent of the retail sales tax to 30 percent flowing to local governments. Cities have been given the green light to ban marijuana shops outright after the Attorney General issued a legal opinion that stated Initiative 502 does not prevent cities and counties from banning marijuana businesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Under Washington law, there is a strong presumption against finding that state law preempts local ordinances,â&#x20AC;? the opinion stated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although Initiative 502 establishes a licensing and regulatory system for marijuana producers, processors, and retailers in Washington State, it includes no clear indication that it was intended to preempt local authority to regulate such businesses. We therefore conclude that I-502 left in place the normal powers of local governments to regulate within their jurisdictions.â&#x20AC;? Pierce County has enacted a ban on pot shops by stating all businesses have to follow local, state and federal laws. That essentially bans marijuana shops because pot is still an illegal drug in the eyes of federal law enforcement agencies. Tacoma will allow pot shops, while many smaller cities have enacted moratoria on issuing business licenses until the legal issues have been resolved. Adding to the general roster of city agendas are local projects. Fife, for example, would like $1 million to complete Brookville Gardens Park, an 11-acre park that will be located just off Valley Avenue and serve as a regional recreational facility. The park would have play equipment, internal pathways, trail connections, â&#x20AC;&#x153;greenâ&#x20AC;? roofs for the restrooms and picnic shelter and a pedestrian bridge from the parking lot over Wapato Creek. This project is time sensitive because the pedestrian bridge must be built concurrently with wetlands mitigation, stream enhancement and culvert removal work Fife is already doing.

WSparks From page A1

to cheer, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be beer. Kinneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offering an alternative: A family-friendly party with a big screen TV, snacks, memorabilia and prizes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and no alcohol. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oftentimes people relapse when they cannot replace old habits. Staying clean and sober during a big sporting event is one of those occasions where drinking is often a part of the festivities,â&#x20AC;? Kinne said. Soberbowl offers a big, fun alternative, with attendance between 200 and 300 people of all ages. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funded with donations and gifts, Kinne said, and the $1,500 will help pay for equipment. This year, the party will be at The Bridge, a ministry of the United Methodist Church at 5601 S. Puget Sound Ave. * â&#x20AC;&#x153;Literacy for Lifeâ&#x20AC;? doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite capture the fun going on at Ford Middle School in Midland. The Franklin Pierce School District bought a copy of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lightning Thief â&#x20AC;? by Rick Riordan for each of Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 900 students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to build a culture of reading,â&#x20AC;? said Dietrich Baker. Again, that underestimates the fun. Being Percy Jackson in your imagination is more exciting than taking a quiz on a reading assignment, and the students are into it. The school

WMural From page A1

mural will help attract more Native American families to the Eastside to get involved in the community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A good portion of the Eastside is on tribal property and we feel this is a first step in bridging the gap between the Neighborhood Council and the tribe,â&#x20AC;? Lynette said, referring to the Puyallups. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We would like to get more input from the tribe. We have an open seat on the board that we have hopes to fill with a tribal member.â&#x20AC;? She said that

If you work in the City of Tacoma and believe you have been discriminated against, call Frank

253-565-6179 (No Charge for Services)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Olympia Optometrist Helps Legally Blind to See Againâ&#x20AC;? Dr. Ross Cusic of Low Vision Optometry Northwest answers your questions. 1. Can low vision glasses help if I have wet or dry macular degeneration? Yes. As your Low Vision doctor what is more important is how much vision you have remaining. The telescope, microscope, E-Scoop & prismatic glasses will work for both wet and dry ARMD. 2. Are the glasses expensive? Not anymore than hearing aids are expensive. Both low vision glasses and hearing aids allow for a better quality of life and are well worth the investment. No LQWHUHVWĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLQJLVDYDLODEOH 3. What do I do next? Call to discuss your situation with me personally. Then come see for yourself what low vision treatment can do.

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has held read-ins, stolen Zeusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lightning bolt and brought in prizes. It has formed persuasive alliances with parents, community groups and foundations, including Little Caesarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, which funds reading programs. Thursday, Feb. 6, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. it will host a Family Reading and Writing Night, complete with Ford studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; book projects and their version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Camp Half-Blood. *Alchemy Indoor Skate Park & Education Center Community Outreach â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Skater culture is weird, said Benjamin Warner and Brandon Jacobsen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve embraced our weirdness,â&#x20AC;? Warner said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These kids approach problems in such a beautiful way.â&#x20AC;? They fly through physics. They navigate the complex hierarchy at skate parks. By building ramps and taking them to community events, Warner said, they aim to break down negative stereotypes of skating, and give young skaters an outlet to talk. * Student Kitchenette Project tackles one of the scariest areas of Tacoma School of The Arts: The student kitchenette. Anna Holcomb and Savannah Olsen are enlisting students with disabilities to manage the place, and, in so doing, build relationships with traditional students and learn skills theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to live on their own. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll identify the supplies they need, and the grant will pay for them. *Gig Harbor/Key Peninsula Suicide Prevention Coalition.

The area has had 10 youth suicides in the past 10 years. Miri Sampson and Kathryn Weymiller will provide workshops to train 200 teachers, coaches, parents and student leaders to recognize the signs that a person may be considering suicide. *The LAZ: Hilltopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest odes, lyrics, verses and tales â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Necashaw Montgomery and Renee Simms plan a literary arts zine that will bridge the gap between the academic and underground writers based in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most storied neighborhood. They are searching blogs, posts and open mics for writers with whom they intend to publish the first zine in midsummer. *The Laureate Listening Anthology â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poet laureate, Lucas Smiraldo, will create an online audio anthology. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My desire is to reflect a wider range of voices as they create and share works that express a spirit of place in Tacoma and Pierce County,â&#x20AC;? Smiraldo said. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll locate them on a Google map, so anyone can click on an area and hear a voice from that neighborhood. This is a good mix, running from Gig Harbor to Midland, representing arts and involving young people. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a collection of sparks to ignite small fires that can be used to forge great chances. A skill, a snapshot, a chat with a point. All of them add to this communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foundation. All of them make this community greater.

while the Eastside Neighborhood Advisory Council has nine areas of Tacoma represented by council members, one of those areas is on tribal property and it is not represented at this time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artwork is needed in every neighborhood,â&#x20AC;? Lynette Scheidt said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It makes people proud of where they live. The (Dometop) Community Garden would like to have a story pole someday to tell the history of our neighborhood and to bring awareness to the neighbors about the history of where they live.â&#x20AC;? Duenas said he has his sights set on painting a future mural at East Portland Avenue and East

32nd Street. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For that one I have drawn up a thunderbird, an eagle and a raven and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all looking up at the sky toward the sunrise. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just waiting for more paint.â&#x20AC;? Duenas, and the Scheidts, said any and all donations of useable paint are welcome whether it be roll-on/brush-on paint or spray paint, so those who may have cans of unused paint stored in the garage or any paint left over from a recent project are asked to contact the Eastside Neighborhood Advisory Council via their website at www. eastsidetacoma.net.

-YPKH`1HU\HY`Â&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

Our View

Stop kicking the can on school, roads funding

EDITORIAL CARTOON BY CHRIS BRITT s CBRITTOON@GMAIL.COM s 7774!#/-!7%%+,9#/-%$)4/2)!,#!24//.3 FIND CARTOONS, THE ART OF FREE SPEECH: CHRIS BRITT AT TEDXTACOMA ON YOUTUBE.COM

Guest Editorials

Good relationships donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just happen By Billy Frank Jr. Good relationships donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just happen. We have to work together to build and maintain a strong foundation of trust and commitment to keep a relationship healthy and strong. As we mark the 40th anniversary of the Boldt decision this year, the tribal and state natural resources co-managers met recently to re-dedicate ourselves to the principles of co-management. At the core of co-management is a pledge to seek cooperation first and avoid litigation. The approach is based on a government-to-government relationship that respects the decisionmaking authority of both the tribes and state. Its success depends on jointly planning and developing clear objectives with agreed-upon data to support consistent, coordinated natural resources management programs. Trust and cooperation go hand in hand. In the first decade following the 1974 Boldt decision, the tribes and state did not trust each other as co-managers. We spent hundreds, perhaps thousands of hours arguing

before a federal court about whose data was more accurate and whether this fishery or that fishery should be allowed at this place or time. All that time and money spent in court was wasted. It could have been better spent protecting and rebuilding the resource. After a difficult first decade, we found a way to work together built on mutual respect and consideration for each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs. Co-management took giant steps forward. In 1984 the tribes and state started the annual joint season-setting process called North of Falcon. In 1985 the tribes and state worked together to develop the Pacific Salmon Treaty that governs shared U.S. and Canadian salmon fisheries. In 1986 came the Timber/Fish/Wildlife Agreement that provided protection for fish and wildlife on private timberlands while also ensuring a healthy timber industry. Next came the 1989 Centennial Accord that further cemented the government-togovernment relationship between the tribes and state. All of these accomplishments

clearly show the great things that can be done when we choose to work together. We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to lose that. That doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean we agree on everything. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Sometimes, no matter how hard we try, we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come to an agreement. The case of fishblocking culverts is a good example. After many months of negotiations failed, the tribes were forced as a last resort in 2001 to file a lawsuit against the state to fix fish-blocking culverts under state roads that closed access to hundreds of miles of good salmon habitat. The federal court agreed that culverts blocking fish passage violate tribal treaty fishing rights and gave the state 17 years to fix the problem. While we are disappointed that the state has appealed the ruling, we will continue to work together for the health of the salmon and all of our natural resources. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because we know cooperation is the way forward. It always has been and always will be. Billy Frank Jr. is the chairman of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission.

Highway 167 - Eliminate our transportation bottlenecks before the new Panama Canal opens By Don C. Brunell Improving Highway 167 could help change the face of global commerce and the future of Washington State. Really. Traffic congestion is causing bottlenecks at our ports, creating costly delays for the shippers that use Puget Sound ports. Failing to eliminate that congestion will make our ports less competitive, costing us jobs, business and tax revenues. That is true now more than ever. This legislative session, the transportation improvements to be voted on by legislators in Olympia are linked to world trade and events in Panama, 3,600 miles away. What lawmakers decide could determine the fate of our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy for generations. Here is a little background. On any given day in Panama, there are as many as 150 ships waiting in line to pass through the Panama Canal, which links the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Transiting the 48-mile canal can take 20 to 30 hours. Growing delays and the canalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inability to handle todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s larger ships cost the Panamanian government billions in lost tolls. To address the situation, the Panamanian people voted overwhelmingly in 2006 to add a third set of locks. The expansion is nearly 75 percent complete, but currently has hit a snag because it is over budget. Originally projected to cost $5.2 billion, the final price tag could exceed $7 billion.

The pause in the canal project is temporary, but it gives Washington State lawmakers an opportunity to greatly improve our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trade prospects by reducing the highway and rail congestion that is making our ports less competitive. Currently, our state benefits greatly from U.S. trade with Japan, Korea, Taiwan and China. One reason is our proximity to Asian ports. A second is that our ports can handle the supersized ships that canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get through the Panama Canal. Because those massive ships canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fit through the canal, they load and unload their cargo at West Coast ports such as Seattle and Tacoma. The cargo is then transferred to trucks and trains headed east and south. But when the expansion project is completed, the Panama Canal will be able to handle more â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and bigger â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ships, meaning super freighters will be able to travel more efficiently and economically through the canal to ports on the East Coast and the Gulf of Mexico. Ports on the Eastern Seaboard are spending an estimated $46 billion by 2017 to prepare for these larger ships. Nationally, the major railroads spent $14 billion last year on equipment and track and bridge improvements. In Washington, BNSF spent $125 million during 2013 for railway maintenance, capacity improvements and expansion projects to be ready for the increased trade. So, we will soon lose our historic advantage. If we are to remain competitive, we must invest because

,4(03<:@6<96705065: Tacoma Weekly welcomes your opinions, viewpoints and letters to the editor. You can e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly. com. Please include your name, address and phone number when submitting your letter.

currently, Seattle and Tacoma ports are mired in gridlock. Time is money, and without completing projects such as Highway 167, shipping companies may have to look elsewhere where transportation to and from seaports is quicker and cheaper. Those are dollars and jobs lost. According to Association of Washington Business data, international trade supports an estimated 846,000 jobs in Washington and generated $65 billion in exports in 2012. Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trade-related employment grew three and a half times faster than total employment from 2004 to 2011 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and state exports have grown 50 percent faster than the state GDP since 2002. Trade is also crucial to small employers in Washington, the source of most of our job growth. Ninety-one percent of Washington exporters are small- and medium-sized companies with fewer than 500 workers. It is vital that legislators creatively address highway gridlock and approve transportation improvements this year so we can begin eliminating transportation bottlenecks before the expanded Panama Canal opens in two years. Don Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at TheBrunells@msn.com.

The stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legislative session is well underway in Olympia, and lawmakers have a full slate of issues to address even though they have a â&#x20AC;&#x153;short sessionâ&#x20AC;? meant for biennial budget adjustments and tweaks. And it is an election year so few lawmakers want to make dramatic steps that would rock potential voters. Something needs to be done at key issues. But nothing likely will. Lawmakers first have to solve the state funding formula for public education. The State Supreme Court issued a recent order in its landmark McCleary decision stating that lawmakers are â&#x20AC;&#x153;not on targetâ&#x20AC;? with fully funding public education in the state. That means lawmakers are in violation of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Constitution. The order pointed out that the 2013 sessionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $982 million budget for education only increased school funding by 6.7 percent. That increase â&#x20AC;&#x153;falls well short of the needs estimated by the legislatureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Joint Task Force on Education Funding,â&#x20AC;? the court wrote, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the pace of progress must quicken.â&#x20AC;? The price tag to reach the goal required by the courtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s order has been estimated at about $5 billion during the next few years. But no solutions are being realistically considered. That fact is setting the stage for a constitutional crisis between the state Supreme Court and lawmakers about the â&#x20AC;&#x153;paramount dutyâ&#x20AC;? of the legislature to fund public education. Ponder that for a minute. The stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highest court has ruled lawmakers are not doing their duty for the residents they are sworn to serve, and lawmakers remain largely silent about that failure. Additionally, the state has yet to pass a comprehensive transportation package that would address the funding of key improvement projects as well as the ongoing costs of maintaining the roads and infrastructure the state has already built. Needed projects like State Route 167 and costly repairs to bridges and roadways are going unfunded without needed dollars. But yet, nothing gets done. Still. The current gas tax for transportation projects simply pays the debt of roads already built. In the mean time, more efficient cars are demanding less gas. Electric cars donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay a gas tax at all, further eroding that funding source. Car tabs, albeit on the rise, help the back fill. But those added registration fees arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keeping up with demand, either. Few residents, lawmakers and policy makers would argue that state and local roads are in great shape and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need repair and that new roads arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t needed. Yet lawmakers continue to kick the can down the proverbial road but failing to fund the roads that are already built let alone the new roads that are needed to promote trade and economic development around Washington. Granted, projects and programs are expensive. Higher, and more, taxes are needed to fund everything on â&#x20AC;&#x153;wish lists,â&#x20AC;? or even things everyone agrees taxpayers should fund. Taxes are always painful. But either â&#x20AC;&#x153;priority projectsâ&#x20AC;? like roads and â&#x20AC;&#x153;paramount dutiesâ&#x20AC;? like public education should get fully funded or everyone should simply redefine those terms as â&#x20AC;&#x153;optional only if money allows.â&#x20AC;? Lawmakers canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t continue to say road building and educating students are important and still do nothing about them. The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

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Sports

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

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STADIUM STAYS ATOP NARROWS 4A WITH SWEEP OF BELLARMINE

Lincoln tops 4A power Jackson at King Holiday Hoopfest

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

TOP UPCOMING MATCHUPS BOYS SWIMMING

Jan. 31 – Narrows League Championships 4 p.m. – Mount Tahoma High School Local 3A, 4A swimmers look to advance to district meets.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Jan. 31 – Wilson @ Lincoln – 7 p.m. Rams look to stay on top after beating the Abes by 10 in first matchup.

BOYS BASKETBALL

Jan. 31 – Lincoln @ Wilson – 7 p.m. Another big rematch, after Wilson edged Lincoln by one point earlier.

GIRLS BOWLING

Feb. 1 – District Tournament 9 a.m. – Pacific Lanes Top bowlers converge on Tacoma to earn bid to state the following weekend.

FALCONS TOP T-BIRDS IN CLASH OF YOUNG SQUADS

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

TAKEDOWN. (Top) Foss’ Hien Ly (right)

tries to escape the grab of Daniel Edison during his win at 195 pounds. (Bottom) Mount Tahoma 160-pounder Gerardo Cuevas (left) takes down the Falcons’ Clayton Nichols during his win. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

S

tadium is taking some big steps in pursuing its first league title since 1991. Led by senior forward Lucious Brown – who scored 15 of his game-high 24 points in the second half – the Tigers overwhelmed Bellarmine Prep in the fourth quarter to claim a 53-46 win over the Lions on Jan. 17 to improve to 7-0 in the Narrows 4A. The Tigers also claimed a sweep of the Lions after winning at Bellarmine Prep on Dec. 13. “It’s a huge step,” said Stadium head coach Doug Cocke’. “It feels good. It’s been a long time, and to beat Bellarmine twice is unbelievable. They’ve been dominating Stadium…I knew that if we could just outlast them and work a little harder in the end, then we could beat them.” Trailing 39-34 heading into the fourth, the Tigers held the Lions scoreless for over five minutes as they went on a 12-0 run to take control. Brown regained a 40-39 lead with two free throws with 6:33 to go, moments after he dazzled the Lions’ defense with two behind-the-back crossovers and nearly converted a jumper before being fouled. The Tigers continued drawing contact and getting to the free-throw line in the fourth quarter, converting 15 of 18 attempts to help secure the win. “We kind of came out really nonchalant in the first half,” Brown said. “We felt like they were just going to bow down because we beat them the first time. Coming into the fourth quarter I told them ‘We have to step it up. We have to play harder, we have to go harder because they’re not going to back down from us. They want to beat us as

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

IN CONTROL. (Top) Stadium senior Lucious Brown (35) tries to drive to

the basket as he draws contact from Bellarmine Prep’s Drew Griffin. (Bottom) The Lions’ Mar’kese Jackson (3) tries to get a shot up over the Tigers’ Bobby Moorehead (24).

much as we want to beat them.’” Bellarmine Prep jumped out to a 16-7 lead early in the second quarter on a three-pointer by Malachi Flynn, who led the Lions with 15 points. But Stadium senior guard Mark Galanesi came off the bench to hit three threepointers in the period to help pull the Tigers even. Brown kept the Tigers close in the third quarter with six points, but Flynn fed Will Wolf for an open layup with a second left in the period to give Bellarmine Prep a 39-34 lead. The Tigers’ defense then stood firm, flustering the

Lions into forced shots and turnovers. And the 6-foot-6 Brown took command of the offense, showing masterful ball control in driving in the lane and drawing contact. He converted nine of his 10 free throws in the fourth quarter. “He’s a unique player,” said Cocke’ of Brown. “It’s like having a second coach on the floor. He reads the floor, he reads the situations…He’s got great instincts. It’s not just he knows what to run, but he can handle the ball. He goes north to south, and he’s hard to slow down once he gets going.” X See STADIUM / page A9

In the midst of a trying season, the Foss wrestlers responded well against Mount Tahoma. The Falcons, who currently feature no seniors on their squad, won six of eight matches over the Thunderbirds to claim a 45-15 win at home on Jan. 16. “We were moving around, we were staying active and pushing the pace,” said Foss junior 195-pounder Hien Ly. “We were staying controlled on top and working it.” Ly earned a pin 19 seconds into the second round over Mount Tahoma’s Daniel Edison, after getting a key reversal toward the end of the first round to gain a 5-0 lead. The Falcons came up with four other pins on the night, as junior Joseph Wurtz began the match by pinning David Pressley just 55 seconds into the 132-pound bout. Sophomore Hung Mai followed at 138 pounds by pinning the Thunderbirds’ Zach Dean 30 seconds into the third round, after rolling to a 16-6 lead. Falcons junior 145-pounder Isaiah Smith was impressive in topping up-and-coming sophomore Garrett Owen-Bisson, gaining a 7-0 advantage before getting a pin midway through the second round. But the Thunderbirds got some good work from two experienced seniors. Gerardo Cuevas controlled much of his match at 160 pounds against the Falcons’ Clayton Nichols, building a 5-1 lead in the first round before eventually getting an 8-4 win. Thunderbirds senior Nehemiah Barr later pinned Foss freshman Cedric Havea 20 seconds into the second round at 285 pounds. Freshman Romeo Pathammavong outlasted Mount Tahoma junior James Pippin 7-3 at 152 pounds, and senior Jenny Dittell pinned the Thunderbirds’ Amiya Webster 50 seconds into the 113-pound girls match. Despite being short on experience, Ly and fellow junior 106-pounder Wascar Carpio have taken it on themselves to lead the way for the Falcons. And they still have their sights set on the postseason. “We’re going to bust our butts,” said Ly. “Taking state, that’s the goal.”

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YOUNG LADY RAMS HUMBLED )@;679(52,+*3,=,3(5+ WILSON SITS ATOP NARROWS 3A, AIMS TO LEARN FROM LOSS

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

;6<./;(:2(Left) Wilson freshman point guard Josie Matz (3) puts up a shot in the midst of the Cleveland defense. (Right) The Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kiara Knox goes up for a layup as teammate Violet Morrow looks on. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

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with an 11-0 run, as freshman point guard Josie Matz gained a 5-4 lead with a three-point play, and sophomore Kiara Knox fed Desiree Ayler for a layup to make it 11-4 with 3:20 left in the first quarter. Knox finished with a team-high 14 points for Wilson, while Matz added 11 points and showcased her playmaking ability in driving to the hoop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an amazing young lady,â&#x20AC;? Birge said of Matz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an introvert trying to play an extrovert position. She hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yet found her

HOT DEALS

voice to be our floor general, but she does some amazing things on the court for us.â&#x20AC;? But Cleveland quickly responded, as Joyce Harrell capped a quick 10-2 run with a layup with 5:35 to go in the second quarter. The Eagles outscored the Rams 26-8 in the second quarter to take control, as senior Makayla Roper â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who scored a game-high 21 points for Cleveland â&#x20AC;&#x201C; hit back-to-back three-pointers late in the second quarter to make it 32-18. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was the glass that

killed us tonight, as well as open three-point shooters in the corner,â&#x20AC;? Birge said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to get better at those. Nothing against Clevelandâ&#x20AC;Śbut I thought we can compete more than what the score showed.â&#x20AC;? Junior forward Violet Morrow finished with seven points and a team-high 13 rebounds for Wilson, which dropped to 11-3 overall on the season. But the Rams â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who still sit in first in the Narrows 3A with a 6-0 mark â&#x20AC;&#x201C; still have high hopes for the postseason.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come state time, I hope that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re right down there in that mix,â&#x20AC;? Birge said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This will obviously get us ready for that.â&#x20AC;?

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Wilson has become very familiar with Cleveland over the past couple years. And while the Rams are breaking in several young players, the Eagles are a veteran squad that returns several starters from their state champion squad last year. Cleveland used that experience to overwhelm the Lady Rams from the second quarter on, and cruised to a 70-37 win over Wilson on Jan. 20 at the King Holiday Hoopfest at

Bellevue College. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think at times we played very composed, as if we were a veteran group,â&#x20AC;? said Wilson head coach Michelle Birge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were other times where you saw our (youth) surface up on the court, and we let the emotions control our bodies. I think this will obviously open our eyes to a lot of things.â&#x20AC;? Wilson fell behind 4-0 just 10 seconds into the game on a steal and layup by Myzhanique Ladd. But the Rams calmly responded

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PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

+6<)3,-,(;<9,(Left) Puget Sound guard Emily Sheldon tries to get a shot up over Pacific Lutheranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kara Sherman in the Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; blowout win. (Right) The Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rex Nelson, who scored 13 points, puts up a shot against the defense of Seth Anderson (left) and Johnny Tveter (right). By Jeremy Helling

The Loggers were lost on offense at the start, struggling to find open looks. When they did, they couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find the net, starting 0-for-8 from the field. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we were kind of flustered a little bit at first,â&#x20AC;? said Puget Sound point guard Erin Barber, who finished with 13 points, seven rebounds and three assists. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really sure how to guard them or how to attack them. But I think we kind of gathered ourselves, we relaxed and then started playing the way we do.â&#x20AC;?

jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t looking good for Puget Sound in the early going. The Loggers were held without a field goal nearly eight minutes into their crosstown showdown against Pacific Lutheran, and trailed 11-2. But sophomore guard Keith Shattuck came off the bench to help jumpstart the offense, and the Loggers found their energy late as they held off the Lutes for a 77-70 win on Jan. 15.

Shattuck, who hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t scored in the previous four games, scored all 13 of his points in the first half to provide the spark the Loggers needed. His three-pointer with 5:02 left in the half pulled Puget Sound within 24-23, and the teams went to the break tied 35-35. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our guys did a really good job of feeding him with some sets and some looks, and got him going,â&#x20AC;? said Loggers head coach Justin Lunt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I said in the huddle, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;feed the well â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;til the water runs dry.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; He was able to knock down

shots.â&#x20AC;? The Lutesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Daniel Landram â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who scored all of his team-high 12 points in the second half â&#x20AC;&#x201C; nailed a three-pointer with 5:16 to go in the game to tie it 64-64, and Bryce Miller came up with a huge rebound and put-back with 2:22 to go to knot it at 70. But Dan Cheledinas responded with a three-point play after a nice pass from Rex Nelson, and Barber hit two free throws with a minute remaining to create a 75-70 cushion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t giving our best

effort for the first, I would say, 30 minutes of the game,â&#x20AC;? Lunt said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then I thought the last 10 minutes, for the most part, we changed it up. Our mentality changed, there was a higher sense of urgency. I thought we were able to get some stops down the stretch and execute offensively.â&#x20AC;? A.J. Maw led the Loggers with 15 points, while Miller and Arvid Isaksen had 11 points apiece for the Lutes. The Loggers topped Willamette X See LOGGERS / page A9

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The Country Rose Cafe, located in Spanaway, is celebrating its 20year anniversary by giving back to the community. The homestyle restaurant has been a mainstay of the Spanaway area since Jan. 24, 1994. The restaurant has struck a chord with the community due to general manager Gary Wartterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s standard for quality and portioning. The restaurant is known for traditional homemade breakfast foods like omelets and pancakes, as well as burgers cooked to order and dinner foods like steak and pasta. The cafe is celebrating all month with several

special offers. For starters, 20 cent coffee is EXWDVHFRQGDU\UDIĂ HWDNLQJSODFHRQO\RQ being offered all throughout January, though that day. When someone buys a ticket for getting it to go will set you back $1. The WKH PDLQ UDIĂ H WKH\ UHFHLYH D WLFNHW IRU restaurant is also gearing up for several big WKH VHFRQGDU\ UDIĂ H DW QR FKDUJH 7KLV UDIĂ HV WKURXJKRXW WKH PRQWK$OO -DQXDU\ VHFRQGDU\UDIĂ HZLOOFRQWDLQLWVRZQXQLTXH WKHUHVWDXUDQWKDVEHHQVHOOLQJUDIĂ HWLFNHWV prizes, like a 37-inch TV and free movie passes. as a way to give back to the community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a way to say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;thank you for your ´$OOWKHPRQH\IURP>WKHUDIĂ HWLFNHWV@ JRHV WR PRUH LWHPV WR EX\ IRU WKH UDIĂ HÂľ EXVLQHVV IRU WKH ODVW  \HDUV¡¾ :DUWWHU said. Wartter said. The Country Rose Cafe is located at The dedication to putting all the money EDFNLQWRWKHUDIĂ HKDVOHGWRDYDULHW\RI  3DFLĂ&#x20AC;F $YH 6 DQG LV RSHQ VHYHQ prizes, including a 50-inch JVC TV, a 3D days a week, starting from 7 a.m. Learn DVD player and a swath of Seahawks jerseys. more on their website at www.country-rose7KHZLQQHURIWKHUDIĂ HZLOOEHDQQRXQFHG cafĂŠ.com. on Jan. 27, which LV WKH RIĂ&#x20AC;FLDO celebration of the cafeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 20 year SERVING anniversary. That BREAKFAST same day, cake 9am-1pm will be served for Saturday & Sunday free all throughout business hours. *Happy Hour Everyday 2p-6pm The day will *Late Night Happy Hour 9p-12am culminate with not Tuesday through Thursday only the monthORQJUDIĂ HZLQQHU www.psptacoma.com being announced on South 7th & St. Helens Ave.

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WLoggers

previous weekend, the Loggers got a big lift from their bench to create a comfortable halftime cushion, and cruised to a 70-51 win over the Lutes at home on Jan. 15. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They knew they needed to buckle down and toughen up,â&#x20AC;? said Puget Sound head coach Loree Payne. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got outworked this past weekendâ&#x20AC;ŚI think we came in tonight and proved we have the toughness to compete.â&#x20AC;? Pacific Lutheran forward Samantha Potter, who tallied a game-high 19 points and 13 rebounds, scored six early points to help give the Lutes an 8-0 lead less than four minutes into the game. But the

From page A8

64-45 on Jan. 17 to move to 8-7 overall, with a 4-2 mark in the Northwest Conference. The Lutes fell 72-69 at Pacific (Ore.) to drop to 4-11 overall, with a 1-5 record in the NWC.

LADY LOGGERS CRUISE OVER LUTES

Puget Sound got the message loud and clear before its matchup against Pacific Lutheran. Rebounding from two tough road losses the

WStadium Moorehead and Malik Mayeax finished with 10 points apiece for Stadium, while Rex Bodoia had 11 points and 10 rebounds for Bellarmine Prep. The Lions dropped to 2-5 in the Narrows 4A, tied for fifth place with Olympia.

ABES HAND JACKSON ITS FIRST LOSS

Even against the toughest of opponents, Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defense found a way. The Abes rallied late behind freshman point guard Londrell Hamilton and held off Jackson for a 62-55 win at the King Holiday Hoopfest on Jan. 20 at Bellevue College. Lincoln also handed the Timberwolves â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who came in ranked No. 1 in the state in 4A â&#x20AC;&#x201C; their first loss of the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So far this is the best team Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever had, in terms of defensive scoring,â&#x20AC;? said Lincoln head coach Aubrey Shelton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We looked at stats. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re averaging 70 (points a game) and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re averaging 45 (points) on us. So something has got to give. It looked like it was more in our favor. So our defense really carried us down the stretch.â&#x20AC;? The Abes trailed 41-37 heading into the final quarter, but Hamilton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who finished with a team-high 12 points â&#x20AC;&#x201C; drilled a threepointer that leveled the

From page A6

score at 49-49 with 3:41 remaining. Hamilton scored six points in the final two minutes, and his layup with 1:55 remaining gave the Abes the lead for good, at 56-55. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a gamer,â&#x20AC;? Shelton said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a freshman, we feel total confidence with the ball in his hands at the end of the game, because he usually makes the right decision.â&#x20AC;? Justice Martion came up with a monster block of the Timberwolvesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jason Todd â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who finished with a game-high 22 points and 13 rebounds â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with a minute remaining and the Abes clinging to a 58-55 lead. Martion â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who finished with nine points and five rebounds â&#x20AC;&#x201C; corralled a steal in the final seconds to emphasize the defensive effort. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just stuck together,â&#x20AC;? Hamilton said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our team is good. We have good chemistry. When we play togeth-

Loggers responded with an 18-3 run in just over seven minutes, as Amanda Forshay gave Puget Sound a 14-11 lead with a three-pointer with 12:25 left in the half. The Loggers wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trail again. Alexis Noren came off the bench to score all seven of her points in the first half, and Erin Stumbaugh came in to score eight points in the final four minutes to help give Puget Sound a 37-26 lead at the break. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just went in with the mindset that I was going to do everything I could to stop them,â&#x20AC;? said Stumbaugh, who scored a season-high 15 points while adding five rebounds

er, nobody can beat us.â&#x20AC;? Lincoln shot out to a 20-10 lead in the first quarter, as Trevion Brown came off the bench to score six points to lead the way. But Todd scored 10 points in the second quarter, and his tipin with five seconds until halftime tied it 27-27. Jackson kept the momentum throughout the third quarter, getting their largest lead of the game when Dan Kingma nailed a three-pointer to make it 40-32 with 1:36 left in the period. Lincoln charged back to tie it 42-42 on a three-pointer by Dionte Simon with 6:07 left in the game, setting up a frenetic finish that featured seven lead changes. Brown finished with 10 points for the Abes and Cameron Collins added nine points. Kingma finished with 15 points for Jackson, and Brian Zehr scored all 12 of his points in the second half for the Timberwolves. The win put the Abes at 13-1 overall on the season, as they sit in second in the Narrows 3A with a 5-1 mark.

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and a team-high four steals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We knew that we needed to step it up on defenseâ&#x20AC;Śthatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how I like to play. Let my defense fuel my offense.â&#x20AC;? After the Lutesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Katelyn Smith converted a three-point play with 17:58 left in the game, the Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense locked down to hold Pacific Lutheran scoreless for just over eight minutes. Pacific Lutheran was 0-for-6 with eight turnovers during the stretch. Forshay created a 20-point advantage, at 51-31, with a layup with 9:12 remaining. Potter, who had 13 points in the first half, scored her first points of the second period on a jumper with 7:10 remaining as PLU trailed 57-37.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think Sam Potter is one of the best post players in the conference,â&#x20AC;? said Payne. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so hard to box outâ&#x20AC;Śsheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strong, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skilled and just has a knack for the ball.â&#x20AC;? Emily Sheldon finished with 13 points for the Loggers, while Forshay added 11 points and Katy Ainslie had nine points and 12 rebounds. The Loggers cruised to an 80-52 win over Willamette on Jan. 17 to improve to 10-5 overall, with a 3-3 record in the Northwest Conference. Pacific Lutheran won 63-46 at Pacific (Ore.) to move to 6-9 overall, with a 2-4 mark in conference play.

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Four years ago, Kim Thompson was spending $10 a day on cigarettes, trying to quit through the use of smoking alternatives like e-cigarettes. With no local e-cigarette stores in town, she was relying on ground mail to order â&#x20AC;&#x153;vapingâ&#x20AC;? equipment she had to Ă&#x20AC;JXUHRXWKRZWRXVHRQKHURZQ â&#x20AC;&#x153;I realized that I would never quit smoking without a constant supply of product, better support and more education,â&#x20AC;? Thompson said. Rather than just sitting back, Thompson took action. Using the money she was saving from not smoking, Thompson opened up her own dedicated vape shop, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Vaporiumâ&#x20AC;?

in Lakewood, with a second location in Fife being opened just a few months ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am still waiting on vape mail but not with a ciggie clenched in my teeth,â&#x20AC;? Thompson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m waiting on supplies to help support the needs of not just myself, but an ever-growing population of Vapers.â&#x20AC;? The Vaporium specializes in the selling and education of â&#x20AC;&#x153;PVs,â&#x20AC;? or Personal Vaporizers, like e-cigarettes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These devices use lithium ion batteries to provide users with an alternative to smoking ZLWKRXWDQ\VRUWRIĂ&#x20AC;UHWDUDVKFDUERQPRQoxide or odor found in traditional tobacco cigarettes,â&#x20AC;? Thompson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The vaper is still able to simulate smoking without any of the 4,065 chemicals present in a normal tobacco cigarette.â&#x20AC;? 1LFFRWLQH VWUHQJWK DQG HFLJDUHWWH Ă DYRUings are both optional for PV use. E-cigarette kits can range anywhere between $30-$300, though a more expensive kit is not required to try and transition to vaping. PVs normally consist of a battery and some kind of cartridge containing an internal heatLQJFRLO:KHQWKHFDUWULGJHLVĂ&#x20AC;OOHGZLWKH juice, the coil heats it and it becomes a vapor, which the user inhales and exhales. The main component in PVs is propyl-

ene glycol, a chemical also used in fog machines, asthma inhalers and air disinfectants. Propylene glycol is generally recognized as safe for human consumption by the FDA. The Vaporium itself offers more than 150 HMXLFHĂ DYRUVWKDWFDQEHVDPSOHGGLIIHUHQW batteries to experiment with and a group of self-proclaimed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vape Geeksâ&#x20AC;? who have all been down the road of a smoking addiction. The Vaporium is a place dedicated to helping its customers kick their tobacco addictions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our joke is that our best customers quit us altogether,â&#x20AC;? Thompson said. Vaping has come a long way since Thompson was relying on mail orders. With Vaping stores opening up all around the country, the product has exploded in recent years, becoming both an alternative to cigarette smoking and the focus of a tight knit community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vaping has really become a community of people supporting one another and the cause,â&#x20AC;? Thompson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cigarettes never brought people together except in the smoking section.â&#x20AC;? Thompson and The Va-

poriumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main goal is to use this community and knowledge to help smokers take a safer route. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are here to help people make the switch,â&#x20AC;? Thompson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It takes a lot more than just selling quality supplies, it even takes more than knowing your product inside and out; we believe it takes knowing the heart of the smoker, the addiction and having had traveled that road to success.â&#x20AC;? The Vaporium in Fife is located at 1406 54th Ave. E. and is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday. To learn more, visit www. thevaporium.com, call (253) 973-VAPE or email TheVaporiumVapeMail@yahoo.com.

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Yes!

I would like you to enter my name into the totally random drawing for one of the fabulous prizes. And even if I am not incredibly lucky enough to win a fabulous prize I know you will enter each of my nominations into the Best of Tacoma contest. What a THRILL!! My Name ______________________________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________________________ City______________________________

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Send your completed ballots to: Pierce County Community Newspapers 2588 Pacific Highway Fife, WA 98424

City Life

Q-Dot’s New CD

B5

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

TACOMA LOVES YOU,

Sir Mix-A-Lot!

BUT PLEASE DON’T WATCH THE SUPER BOWL Rap legend returns on Feb. 1, hopefully avoids his TV the next day

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

A

nthony Ray – a guy you know better as Seattle rap legend Sir Mix-A-Lot – will return to Jazzbones on Feb. 1, his first Tacoma show in half a decade. Needless to say, there was plenty to catch up on when Tacoma Weekly rang Monday. For example, when will he drop his first album since “Daddy’s Home” in 2003? How did he wind up pitching for the Washington State Lottery? And has a sense of ennui dampened his youthful passion for gluteus maximus? The people want to know these things. But first, he brought up a secret superstition, one that’s related to that thing that happened last weekend. TACOMA WEEKLY: So did you celebrate after the game? I assume you’re a Seahawks fan. MIX-A-LOT: Yeah, big Seahawks fan. (But) when I watch, they always lose. What I do is I intentionally don’t watch, and I record it and watch it later. TW: So Sir Mix-A-Lot has a sports superstition. MIX-A-LOT: Well, I tell you what. I’ll give you an example. I watched Atlanta last year. Loss. I watched Indianapolis this year. Loss. I watched Arizona this year. Loss. I watched the second half of San Francisco. Loss. I watched the first half of Tampa Bay. They were down 21 - 0. I walked away, said the hell with it, and they won. That’s when I realized, OK, that’s it. TW: Like they say in that commercial: It’s only superstitious if it doesn’t work. MIX-A-LOT: Exactly, and right now it’s working. TW: If I can totally switch gears, I was looking at your Twitter feed and one of the first things that came up was a woman giving you a buttshaped cake in Montana. MIX-A-LOT: Yes. TW: I imagine you’ve got strangers’ butts coming at you all the time. Do you ever get tired of it? Or do you wish you wrote a song about legs or something? MIX-A-LOT: No, I don’t get tired of it. Some women didn’t quite get the memo on the song, though. I’ve met women my size who think that’s what I’m talkin’ about. I’m like, no no no. I said “Baby Got Back,” not butt, not gut. TW: And you have to politely deflect. MIX-A-LOT: Other than that I love it. I signed a lot of butts this weekend. I was out

in Bellingham. We did two sold-out shows. I was signing butts all over the place. TW: Lately, whenever I play Words with Friends, you’ve got that lottery song (“Happy Fa La La La Lottery”) popping up. How did that come about? MIX-A-LOT: They said they wanted to do something with me for the lottery, which I thought was a little weird, initially. Oddly enough, they didn’t hit me with a lot of rules. ... They pretty much let me loose, which is why I’d do it. I turn a lot of ads down because one thing I don’t want to be guilty of selling my soul. But I also understand the importance of leveraging your brand and publishing against something; or it’s not worth anything, right? So it was a pretty cool deal. TW: And it’s not your typical jingle. MIX-A-LOT: Yeah, it was kind of strange. When people heard it they kept calling me, like “what the hell are you talkin’ about?” They thought it was a joke. ... I said, “No, it’s actually a lottery ad.” Go out and buy some tickets. (He laughs.) TW: On your Twitter feed, you also mention you’re doing an updated “Posse on Broadway.” What’s up with that? MIX-A-LOT: It’s a video game coming up, and I’m not allowed to say who, what, when and where. … They wanted a new version of “Posse on Broadway.” They wanted a new version of “My Hooptie.” The thing about it is most people are gonna play this on a television. I wonder if they’re gonna feel the bass. TW: I’ve heard the metal version of

I want to make sure, when I release this record ... that people know he’s not just hard up for money. He’s just doing music because he loves doing music. “Baby Got Back” (as performed at Jazzbones when Mix-A-Lot supported rapper Outtasite in 2008). Are you doing something along those lines? MIX-A-LOT: Noooooo. I got in trouble for that one. A lot of my fans were pissed off at me. They wanted me to leave the song alone. In retrospect, I guess they were right.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST

TO SIR WITH LOVE. Sir Mix-A-Lot’s Feb. 1 appearance at

Jazzbones has been listed as “sold out.” Visit www.jazzbones.com for further details.

TW: “Posse on Broadway” and your debut album, “Swass,” quietly turned 25 last year. Did you do anything special to celebrate? MIX-A-LOT: Other than look in the mirror and pinch myself to make sure that it has been that long, nah. TW: What stands out in your mind about when you made that first batch of songs? MIX-A-LOT: When I wrote “Posse on Broadway” success wasn’t on my mind. Literally, I’m mentioning streets and stuff only we would know: 23rd and Jackson and Union. I’m gonna make a song about where I grew up. That’s all I was thinkin’. The simplicity and innocence in that song kind of blows my mind to this day, even when I perform it. I can’t believe I said this about where I grew up, and people in New Jersey listened to it. It’s weird. TW: You had success, but it took a while for another guy to break through; and now you’ve got your buddy Macklemore. Compare and contrast the climate for hip-hop artists in the Northwest now versus then. MIX-A-LOT: Well, the better comparison would be the business in general. When I came up … no matter how talented you were, you needed a lot of luck. So you had to have a major label. You had to have a publicist. You had to have all these things. We did a million records on an indie in that era, which was really hard to do. But, even though I felt I had arrived financially, I hadn’t arrived on the national scene like I thought I would, and that’s when Rick Rubin called. Fast forward to now, the reason I’m so proud of Macklemore is he personifies the new business model that gives you the ability to circumvent the system, and he’s completely done it. He uses the system like they used to use us. He goes, “Hey, I need some help working my song to radio” … and he hires Warner Brothers to do it. I think that’s awesome. TW: But he still owns all his publishing, right? MIX-A-LOT: Yeah, as do I. But, at the same time, I was makin’ 18 percent of retail.

He’s makin’ 70 percent of retail. TW: That’s some serious points. MIX-A-LOT: You gotta love it, and I’m really proud of him. It’s funny, because people want me to be mad. I’m like, “about what?” The guy’s only putting all eyes on Seattle, and if you can’t capitalize on that, then you’re the problem. TW: You’re kind of friends with him, right? MIX-A-LOT: Oh, definitely. TW: Do you hang out? Or do you give him pointers as the new guy comin’ up? MIX-A-LOT: No, we don’t hang out; and, honestly, there’s no way I could give him pointers because, at this model, he’s the master. If anything, he needs to give me pointers. ... They shoot their own videos. They edit their own videos, and (are) up for seven Grammys. Come on. That’s incredible. TW: What about new Sir Mix-A-Lot material. I heard the single, “Carz,” (in 2010) and there was mention of a full-length. But I don’t think that has come out yet. MIX-A-LOT: It’s not out yet, but I can tell you that it is ready. When you’re my age and you do rap music, perception is you’re desperate. I never have understood that. Nobody calls Mick Jagger desperate. Nobody calls Bruce Springsteen desperate. I want to make sure, when I release this record … that people know he’s not just hard up for money. He’s just doing music because he loves doing music. So I’ve got to think of a creative way of doing this that basically makes that statement. TW: Can you give me song titles? MIX-A-LOT: The album’s gonna be called “Dun 4got About Mix.” That’s probably the only serious song on the record. It has nothing to do with Seattle, but on the national scene I had a little bit of a debate with a guy who said he was the first one to monetize real ringtones, which he wasn’t. I was. He’s just basically sayin’ a lot of little stuff and – hmm – your

‹ See MIX-A-LOT / page B2

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE SEAHAWKS! How could we list this week’s “Things We Like” without including the Seahawks winning the NFC Championship last weekend? With the big game just a couple weeks away, expect ‘Hawk mania to continue running hot and heavy. Way to go, 12th Man! The Seahawks meet the Broncos on Feb. 2 at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, NJ. GO HAWKS!

Salish Sea Early Music Festival at Trinity Lutheran Church (12115 Park Ave. S. in Parkland) at 7 p.m. to hear this music of France along with a flute sonata by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, written most likely for Frederick the Great in Potsdam during Louis XIV’s reign in celebration of the composer’s 300th birthday. Featuring Jeffrey Cohan on baroque flute and John Lenti on theorbo and baroque guitar. Suggested donation (a free will offering) is $15 or $20, and youth 18 and under are free.

FOUR MASTERS OF SCOTTISH ARTS

THREE TACOMA SINGING SOCIETY

TWO EARLY MUSIC FEST Musical style evolved considerably during the reign of Louis XV, who became king in 1715 at the age of five upon the death of his grandfather Louis XIV. On LOUIS XV, 1710-1774 Jan. 25 come to the

2280 or moberfield@harbornet.com. First rehearsal will be Jan. 28 and first performance will be June 21 at Mason United Methodist Church. “Like” on Facebook to learn more.

Auditions are being held this month for the choral group Tacoma Singing Society, which is gearing up for a third season. Interested? Contact Megan Oberfield to schedule your audition at (253) 678-

The Pantages Theater comes to life with the sound of pipes and drums during this evening of colorful and exciting music and dance. In this historic venue, you’ll hear piping, drumming and fiddling in a way that you just can’t imagine – flying fingers and tunes being played with unbelievable precision. The Scottish people have a reputation for fun and celebration, and this concert is exactly that. Show starts at 7:30 p.m. Get tickets at www.broadwaycenter.org.

FIVE CELLO AND PIANO One of today’s most promising young cellists, David Requiro, a University of Puget Sound artist in residence with a string of prestigious cello performances and prizes to his name, will give a faculty recital on Feb. 2. “Virtuosic Masterworks for Cello and Piano” will take place at 2 p.m. in Schneebeck Concert Hall. New York-based pianist and guest artist Solon Gordon will accompany him. The afternoon performance will include Pierre Jalbert’s “Sonata for Cello and Piano,” Frédéric Chopin’s “Sonata in G minor, Op. 65” and Zoltán Kodály’s “Sonata for Cello and Piano, Op. 4.” Order tickets online at tickets.pugetsound.edu or call Wheelock Information Center at (253) 879.6013.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, January 24, 2014

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;SHOUTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; DELIVERS ENERGY WITHOUT MUCH SOUL

ASK THE HERBALIST

By Kerri Bailey

Could you recommend herbs that may help with headaches? Thanks, Danielle B., Tacoma There are several herbs that help ease headaches. For pain relief, Witch Hazel and Meadowsweet are herbs that you can take as teas, or in capsule form for fast, short-term relief. If you suffer from migraines, Feverfew is a well-known remedy found in teas, tinctures and capsules. PHOTO BY KAT DOLLARHIDE, PHOTOGRAPHER/TACOMA MUSICAL PLAYHOUSE

SHOUT. The swinging 60s come alive in what was Britain in the age of the Beatles.

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

T

o be clear, Tacoma Musical Playhouseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staging of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shout! The Mod Musicalâ&#x20AC;? was pretty much as the script was written by Phillip George and David Lowenstein. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more of a revue than a scripted show, with the loose plotline following the advice columns from a British magazine, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shout,â&#x20AC;? as the five-female cast struggles to find its way in a world clashing between cultures. They battle the moral questions of free love and unhappy marriages and careers and passions. But none of those struggles are well defined or fully resolved. And that was by design because at the core, the show is about the music. To that end, the actors excel. Elise Campello, as always, rocks with her highenergy power ballads, while Brynn Garrett, Brynne Geiszler, Allyson JacobsLake and Lauren Nance hold their own. They all give everything to the act, and maybe that was the trouble. When every song is an â&#x20AC;&#x153;A,â&#x20AC;? it is hard to find a standout in the parade of classics that included

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Sleep in the Subway,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;These Boots Are Made for Walkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;To Sir, With Loveâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Downtown.â&#x20AC;? There were a few missed opportunities in the script that would have seemingly made it more than a walk down memory lane for those who lived through it. Rather than a slate of white actresses, an actress of color powering a ballad about race relations would have deepened the script for example, since certainly race relations were headline news even for those across the pond. There is no mention of Vietnam either during a play that was set between 1960 and 1970. While England officially opted not to send troops, there were Brit boots on the ground in Southeast Asia that was a controversy at the time. Instead, the play just took on â&#x20AC;&#x153;the pillâ&#x20AC;? and fashion. Granted, director Chris Serface did well with what was on the page, but lost opportunities to â&#x20AC;&#x153;grit upâ&#x20AC;? the show seen to mark much of the two-hour production. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shout! The Mod Musicalâ&#x20AC;? runs at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and at 2 p.m. on Sundays through Feb. 9. Tickets are $20 to $29 and available at TMP.org. The theater is located at 7116 Sixth Ave.

I get a lot of colds in the winter and feel run down. Are there herbs that can help me prevent with this? Steven W., University Place Sounds like you may want to try immune enhancing herbs, especially during the colder, damp months in winter. Get plenty of rest, stay hydrated and eat your chicken soup â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it really does work! Herbs like Echinacea can be taken for

P Mix-A-Lot

short-term periods â&#x20AC;&#x201C; two weeks or so â&#x20AC;&#x201C; while you are fighting a cold. To help prevent colds (along with taking proper care of oneself), herbs like Astragalus are long-term, nutritious and immune building. Drink it as a great tasting tea or take in a capsule formula. Ask your question! Submit them to: HerbalElements@comcast.net. The above information is for educational purposes and not intended for self-diagnosis. Always consult with your physician when necessary. Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and works at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. To learn more about herbs, visit her there or consider taking one of her classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW. com). Be sure and check out her new â&#x20AC;&#x153;Herb Goddess Horoscopeâ&#x20AC;? on pg. B6.

From page B1

memory must be eludinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; you a little bit. So I dropped this song for him. (He laughs.) TW: Can you name names? Mix-A-Lot: Nah, no names. I never do that. Let him get his own fame. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll know who Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m talkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; about. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big dude, though. Not a small rapper, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for damn sure. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got one called â&#x20AC;&#x153;False Faceâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;Ś about guys who play the role, like theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re something that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not on records lyinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ass rappers, basically. I have a song called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Banginâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in My Ride.â&#x20AC;? ... Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Posse on Broawayâ&#x20AC;?-esque, about 88 BPMs and bass for days. And the rap style is really strange. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of like Mix-A-Lot meets Tech N9ne.

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mexicoâ&#x20AC;? that I really like a lot. If there were one song on there that would be close to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Baby Got Back,â&#x20AC;? it would be that one. My managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite is a song called â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Buddy.â&#x20AC;? He says that oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more like that, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t agree. But â&#x20AC;Ś when it comes to that (stuff) Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m usually way off. TW: Just put â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em out there and let the people decide. Mix-A-Lot: Yup, there ya go. I always tell people what you think you are, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great. But theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tell you what they think you are, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all that matters. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m havinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fun with music again; and, to be honest, I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t for a long time. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what it is, either. But something has kind of awakened that spirit.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, January 24, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

Local business owner films TV pilot By Derek Shuck

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA Museum of the Week: LeMay Car Museum

derek@tacomaweekly.com

L

ocal business owner Teresa Springer is all about preparing others for success. From workshops at Southcenter Mall to a web-series, Springer has found ways to share the secrets of her own success with others. Now, she is ready to take it to the next level. Springer, a business owner since 1999, recently filmed the television pilot episode of “The Teresa Springer Show” in Tacoma. The half-hour pilot is formatted as a business and lifestyle show, filmed at the William Factory Small Business Incubator in east Tacoma. “We wanted to really be able to bring what’s done in L.A. and New York here to Tacoma,” Springer said. The show uses eight separate segments to focus on the personal and professional development of small business owners. These segments range from interviews with small business experts to business profiles from around the area to the Trifecta Bootcamp Challenge, where 12 small business owners are put through the ringer in a reality-show like contest to improve themselves in the golden trifecta of mind, body and spirit. “The Teresa Springer Show” is described as a mix of “The View,” “The Biggest Loser” and even “The Apprentice.” “[The pilot] has all these elements that we’ve kind of combined all together to create a very entertaining, and very educational show,” Springer said. Springer started her career as a kiosk owner at the Sea-Tac Mall in Federal Way. After establishing success there she moved on to many other ventures, including opening an Emerald City Smoothie in Seattle, starting a non-profit organization and finally starting up her own production company in 2009. The production company was used to digitally host Springer’s increasingly popular workshops on how to both start and grow a professional business. From there, the seeds for a talk show were planted in her mind. “I wanted to not only have a platform for myself, but a platform for experts in their field,” Springer said. In 2012, with the help of the William Factory Small Business Incubator in Tacoma, Springer began to host and produce the original “Teresa Springer Show,” a video-to-web interview with various business experts. The show was successful enough to capture the interest of Chris Surrey, a digital media strategist from New York who is now partnering with Springer to produce the rebooted TV pilot. The two formed PaintBox Labs Media Group, a digital media group with its first project being Springer’s show. “When I first launched out, I had never

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Ongoing Exhibits: PHOTO BY DEREK SHUCK

SPRING FORWARD. Teresa

Springer (left) and Chris Surrey on the set of “The Teresa Springer Show.” Springer is the host while Surrey serves as director and executive producer.

been in production before. I [was] going from the experts in their field, going to try it out, test it out,” Springer said. “Because of that I was spotted by Chris in New York, because I put myself out there.” With Surrey’s help, Springer was able to land a deal pilot with Dish Network’s “Afashionmind” to air the pilot in February. Surrey also helped with the grand redesign of the show, as well as serving as director and executive producer. “This is a great idea for a concept, a small business talk show,” Surrey said. “I love the concept of doing it.” With the introduction of the separate segments and added weight of being a TV pilot, the show has gone from a five-man project to a team of 104 cast and crew members preparing for the debut. “There’s so much talent here in Tacoma, and that’s one reason we wanted to kick it off here,” Springer said. The show is quickly taking advantage of that talent, with local singer/songwriter Kim Archer performing on the pilot. Three songs off “Music for Planet Cool.” “Honestly this is a really amazing opportunity and something that’s very, very different that hasn’t been in Tacoma before,” Archer said about the pilot. “The Teresa Springer Show” will air on the Dish Network in February, and Springer hopes to be picked up by an even bigger network in March. The end goal is to turn each individual segment into its own show, turning “The Teresa Springer Show” into a multi-series conglomerate. For more information on “The Teresa Springer Show,” visit www.teresaspringer.com.

Vee Dub: Bohemian Beauties Exhibit:

Take a trip this year with ACM’s newest exhibit: a tribute to Volkswagen. Take a trip down memory lane and see classic bohemian beauties in this psychedelic new exhibit.

Harold E. LeMay: The Grand Gallery features 45 cars originally from Harold and Nancy LeMay’s vast car collection.

Ferrari In America: 60+ years of the Ferrari brand in America. British Invasion: See the British cars and the culture that invaded America after WWII, and through the 1960s.

Legends of Motorsports, The NASCAR Story: From farmers and moonshiners racing “strictly stock” family sedans on treacherous dirt tracks, to a high-tech, high-stakes sport. Master Collector: Meet the Master Collectors. Classics and Custom Coachwork: Exhibit highlighting amazing cars from the 1930s.

Alternative Propulsion: Showcasing over 100 years of automobiles powered by various combinations of steam, electric, gasoline, and solar.

Tacoma’s Museums: Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave. Wed.-Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: www.tacomaartmuseum.org

Buffalo Soldier Museum 1940 S. Wilkeson St. Wed. and Sat., 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Info: www.buffalosoldierstacoma.org

Museum of Glass, 1801 Dock St. Wed.–Sat. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun. noon to 5 p.m. Info: museumofglass.org

Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum 407 S. G St. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Info: www.rain.org/~karpeles/taqfrm.html

Washington State History Museum

Fort Nisqually Living History Museum Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St. Wed.-Sun., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Info: FortNisqually.org

1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402 Wed.-Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: http://www.washingtonhistory.org/

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, January 24, 2014

The Official Blues Brothers Revue comes to Pantages Theater Jan. 24 By Ernest A. Jasmin

ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

C

hances are you know John Landisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1980 comedy classic, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Blues Brothersâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the mission from God; bottles exploding against chicken wire; the most deranged car chase ever committed to celluloid. But the Blues Brothers are much more than a movie, as the Official Blues Brothers Revue will remind local fans on Jan. 24 at the Pantages Theater. John Belushi and Dan Akroyd debuted â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jolietâ&#x20AC;? Jake and Elwood Blues on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturday Night Liveâ&#x20AC;? in 1976, initially in bee outfits before they donned their iconic black suits and shades. Drawing inspiration from Northwest soul man Curtis Salgado â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who Belushi met while filming â&#x20AC;&#x153;Animal Houseâ&#x20AC;? in Eugene, Ore., in 1977 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the duo became â&#x20AC;&#x153;SNLâ&#x20AC;? fan favorites and built a top-notch band that they took on the road. The Blues Brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; live album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Briefcase Full of Blues,â&#x20AC;? even topped the charts in 1978, powered by hit remakes of Sam and Daveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Soul Manâ&#x20AC;? and the Chipsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rubber Biscuit.â&#x20AC;? What started as a goofy comedy bit had grown into a loving tribute to some of the most infectious blues, jazz and soul tunes of the 20th century. Wayne Catania and Kieron Lafferty will take on the roles of Jake and Elwood during this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show, which they

PHOTO BY MICHAEL EUDENBACH

ON A MISSION. Kieron Lafferty (left) and Wayne Catania will bring the Blues Brothers to life on Jan. 24 at the Pantages Theater.

developed with Akroyd, Belushiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s widow, Judy Belushi Pisano and musical director Paul Shaffer.

  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The evening really is all about recreating Jake and Elwood as you would have seen them in their concert appearances at Universal Amphitheatre and on â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;SNLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; during their

opening and closing bits,â&#x20AC;? Lafferty explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also carrying on in the Blues Brothers tradition of respecting the music for its wonderful depth â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all of those great, great tunes.â&#x20AC;?

Fans can expect to hear most of the music they loved from the movie, he said, along with lesser known cuts from the live albums, like Mel Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Messinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; with the Kidâ&#x20AC;?

and Delbert McClintonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;B Movie Boxcar Blues.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We cover four decades, from the 30s up to the 70s, really,â&#x20AC;? Lafferty said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bit of an encyclopedia of American music, in blues and R&B, for those decades. We go from (Cab Callowayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Minnie the Moocherâ&#x20AC;? right up to â&#x20AC;&#x201C; probably the most recent thing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wayne Cochranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Going Back to Miami.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; We really cover a wide spectrum musically.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been growing, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mainly because of the music and the characters of Jake and Elwood are so strong,â&#x20AC;? Catania said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The band really rocks and the audiences have always had such a good energy to it.â&#x20AC;? The Blues Brothers Revue will be selling a new live CD recorded at Joliet Correctional Facility with a cast that included Shaffer, Matt â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Murphy, Tom â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bonesâ&#x20AC;? Malone and Blue Lou Marini. They may also be coming to a TV screen near you. Catania and Lafferty revealed they have been developing a series about the further adventures of Jake and Elwood Blues with Judy Belushi Pisano and former â&#x20AC;&#x153;SNLâ&#x20AC;? writer Anne Beatts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve written a pilot, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not shooting at this point,â&#x20AC;? Catania said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a lot of fun to do and write, and it makes us laugh, and the music is great.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say much about it,â&#x20AC;? Lafferty added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the spirit of those characters as would have played out after they had spent considerable time incarcerated,â&#x20AC;? Lafferty said.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Q-DOT READIES TO UNLEASH NEW ALBUM

Friday, January 24, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

LADY JUSTICE WILL HEADLINE AN ALL-AGES SHOW AT LOUIE G’S PIZZA IN FIFE ON JAN. 24. KITT BENDER AND VIVIDAL WILL JOIN THE BAND ON THAT BILL WITH MUSIC STARTING AT 8 P.M.; WWW.LOUIEGSPIZZA.COM FOR FURTHER DETAILS.

FRIDAY, JAN. 24 PHOTO BY GALVIN MILLOY

DON’T CALL IT A COMEBACK. Rapper Q Dot returns with a vengeance on new album, “The Darkness.” By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

F

ederal Way rapper Quincy “Q Dot” Henry describes the soul-crushing times that informed his new CD, “The Darkness,” as it opens. “I wrote this entire album during the darkest part of my life – ever,” he muses over a melancholy piano track. “Broke, battling with demons, coming off of bad relationships; and you’re talking about somebody who’s seen the success. Now I’m coming from the standpoint of somebody who’s at the lowest point.” Henry has bounced back and will celebrate the release of his new album with a performance on Feb. 1 at Louie G’s Pizza in Fife. But recently, over latte at Tacoma’s Anthem coffeehouse, he pinpointed the start of his downward spiral to a previous disc, “Declaration of Dopeness,” flopping in 2012. Henry had briefly flirted with Interscope Records a decade earlier as a student at Central Washington University, but a promised record deal was the casualty of his A&R rep being fired. He felt “Dopeness” was his most polished, ambitious project yet and maybe his ticket back to the brink of stardom. “It didn’t get received the way that I had hoped,” Henry said. “The video (for single “Indivisible”) didn’t get picked up anywhere, and I didn’t know what to do after that. I was working down here doing events, and that’s when things started to snowball.” He subsequently lost two promotion gigs, with Tacoma’s Art on the Ave festival and the TacomaPierce Sports Commission. “Then a bad relation-

ship with a girlfriend ended kind of ugly, and I’d failed a couple of classes at school,” he recalled. “I’m just broke at that point, in every way. I wasn’t making any music. I was kind of trying to figure out how I could still push ‘Declaration.’ I’m trying to go on the road. I couldn’t book a show. I couldn’t do anything. “Nothing was working, and it was almost to the point I truly felt there was an outside force that was holding me back. I don’t know what it was. I’ve got cousins and uncles who are pastors, and I’m callin’ ‘em and e-mailin’: ‘Please pray because I don’t know what’s goin’ on, because absolutely anything I put up gets shot down without fail.’” Enter: Karrie Carroll, a.k.a. Atlanta-based hiphop and pop producer Kuddie Fresh. Carroll has produced tracks for the likes of Busta Rhymes, Musiq Soulchild and J. Pinder, but Henry remembered him as a member of their old Federal Way hip-hop crew, Knockout Kings. Olympic speed skater Apolo Ohno would breakdance, Henry recalled, marveling at the stream of talent flowing out of his hometown in recent years. In the midst of a hot streak, Carroll contacted Henry asking if he wanted to collaborate. “I’ve always looked up to Kuddie, even though we’ve had kind of a good relationship as friends,” Henry said. The beats the producer sent Henry’s way were stark and stripped down, in sharp contrast with the lush layering of his own compositions. They were just what he needed to break out of his creative funk. “They would strike something in me to be honest,” Henry said. “Not that I hadn’t been before,

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but it was almost forcing it out of me. “The ‘Kill it’ song was probably the only thing that was remotely dancey,” he said, alluding to one of the earliest “Darkness” tracks. “Everything else was like I needed to tell a story, so that’s kind of what happened. I went into it thinking that this whole thing needs to feel like I’m completely alone, ‘cause that’s how I was feeling. Even overdubs or hypes; to overproduce it would cheapen the authenticity of it to me.” Henry plans on an especially busy 2014, as he pushes the new album and hopes to take advantage of an opportunity from last year. In May, he was invited to New York to record a performance for B.E.T.’s “Music Matters” program, through which the cable showcases promising, young acts. The program has been a springboard for the likes of Kendrick Lamar and J. Cole. At one time, the program would showcase performers that were virtually unknown. These days, said Henry, producers tend to wait until artists gain traction in their own markets. “They want you to do the work, then they put the icing on the cake,” he said. Fans can listen to Henry’s music online at www. iamqdot.com. The CD release party will kick off at 8 p.m. on Feb. 1 at Louie G’s, which is located at 5219 Pacific Highway E., in Fife. The show is open to all ages. More details are available by calling (253) 926-9700 or visiting www.louiegspizza.com. THE INVISIBLE WOMAN (111 MIN, R)

Fri 1/24: 2:20, 6:00, 8:30 Sat 1/25-Sun 1/26: 11:55am, 2:20, 6:00, 8:30 Mon 1/27-Thu 1/30: 2:20, 6:00, 8:30

NEBRASKA (115 MIN, R)

Fri 1/24: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 Sat 1/25-Sun 1/26: 12:10, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 Mon 1/27: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 Tue 1/28: 5:30, 8:15 Wed 1/29-Thu 1/30: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15

PHILOMENA (98 MIN, PG-13)

Fri 1/24: 1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50 Sat 1/25-Sun 1/26: 11:35am, 1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50 Mon 1/27: 1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50 Tue 1/28: 1:50, 4:10, 8:50 Wed 1/29-Thu 1/30: 1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50

SAVING MR. BANKS (125 MIN, PG-13)

Fri 1/24: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 Sat 1/25-Sun 1/26: 11:45am, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 Mon 1/27-Thu 1/30: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00

GOD LOVES UGANDA (83 MIN, NR)

Tue 1/28: 2:00, 6:45

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SWISS: Bowie Vision (David Bowie tribute) 9 p.m., $5-$10

SWISS: Music for Youth Association (teen jam) 2 p.m., NC, AA UNCLE SAM’S: Benefit for Patti Nelson, 2 p.m. UPS – SCHNEEBECK HALL: Fiddler on the Hoof featuring Tacoma Symphony Orchestra String Quartet (classical) 2:30 p.m., $7-$10

MONDAY, JAN. 27 BLEACH: Rockwell Powers, Xperience (hip-hop) 7 p.m., $5, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Grinder (rock) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Tommy Savitt (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Aquarius Party with Junkyard Jane, Hamilton Loomis (blues) 7:30 p.m., $12 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Buffalo Tongue, Back From Hiatus (rock) 9 p.m., $5 PANTAGES: Official Blues Brothers Revue (blues, soul) 7:30 p.m., $26-$59, AA TACOMA COMEDY: Gilbert Gottfried (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $20-$25 UNCLE SAM’S: Hambone Blues Band (blue) 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Urban Rhapsody (funk, jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

SWISS: Mojo Groove (blues) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & beyond (live jam) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Blues jam, 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, JAN. 28 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, JAN. 25 NEW FRONTIER: Lozen, Hungry Ghost (alt-metal) 9 p.m., $5

B SHARP COFFEE: Acoustic music, 8 p.m., NC, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Dave Anderson, Patrick Higgins, Douglas Gayle (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $10 DOYLE’S: Aaron Daniel’s One Man Banned (rock) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Grinder (rock) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Tommy Savitt (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Donald Glaude (DJ dance) 9 p.m., $10 LOUIE G’S: Tin Man, Late September Dogs (rock, alt-country) 8 p.m., $10, AA SPAR: Tumblin’ Dice (Rolling Stones tribute) 8 p.m., NC SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Gilbert Gottfried (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $20-$25 UNCLE SAM’S: Lit End (classic rock) 8 p.m.

SUNDAY, JAN. 26 TACOMA COMEDY: Celebrity Roast of Bigfoot (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m. SPAR: Alice Stuart (blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman Allstars (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 29 JAZZBONES: Riot in Rhythm, Shades of Memories, Digital Chemistry, Fallen Kings (Hempfest tryouts, hard rock) 8 p.m., $5

DAVE’S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, JAN. 30

SWISS: Barley Wine Revue (country, bluegrass) 9 p.m., NC 502 MARTINI: Kim Archer (singer-songwriter) 5 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Switch and Wiggles (DJ, ladies night) 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: John Novosad, a.k.a. Hippieman (comedy) 8 p.m., $10 UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 24, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: JUDY COLLINS WITH PASSENGER STRING QUARTET

duces the instruments from the violin family: the violin, viola, cello and double bass. Perfect for kids – baby/toddlers get in free. Info: www. broadwaycenter.com DRUNKEN TELEGRAPH LIVE STORYTELLING WORKSHOP Sun., Jan. 26, 2 p.m. Kings Books Megan Sukys and Tad Monroe, co-producers of Tacoma’s real-life storytelling show Drunken Telegraph, will share techniques and tips that can help you craft a stage-worthy story from memorable events of your life.

Fri., Jan. 31, 7:30 p.m. Pantages Theater See this living legend who, for more than 50 years, has inspired audiences with sublime vocals, boldly vulnerable songwriting, personal life triumphs, and a firm commitment to social activism. Info: www. broadwaycenter.org

ROCKAROKE! Mon., Jan. 27, 9 p.m. Jazzbones Rockaraoke is the best way to experience being a rock star without actually being one. Karaoke with a live band, onstage, in front of a large crowd.

BLUES BROTHERS REVUE Fri., Jan. 24, 7:30 p.m. Pantages Theater The characters of Jake and Elwood Blues live again to jump, jive and entertain you with American blues and soul music. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org

COMICS AND PIZZA CLUB Tues., Jan. 28, 7 p.m. Harmon Tap Room Join this book club adapted to mutants, aliens, technogeeks and puny humans who like to read comics.

PHOTO: CAMERA PRESS/JAMES VEYSEY

FAMILY NATURE WALK Sat., Jan. 25, 10 a.m. Wapato Park Explore Tacoma’s parks during this free naturalist-led walk. Discover amazing plants and animals and how they adapt to the seasons. Info: www.tacomanaturecenter.com 2014 RESOLUTION RUN Sat., Jan. 25, 9 a.m. Steilacoom High School, 54 Sentinel Dr., Steilacoom This 10 Mile/10 K Race is sec-

ond in the 40th annual Resolution Run Series with Fort Steilacoom Running Club. Run one or run the series. All courses are USATF certified. Info: www.runfsrc.com MATTY PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS Sat., Jan 25, 9 a.m. Get ready to jump into a whole other world of photography, ’cause you are going to start taking pictures you can’t see with your eyes. Info: mattyworkshops.com MINI MAESTROS: FIDDLER ON THE HOOF Sun. Jan. 26, 2:30 p.m. Schneebeck Hall, University of Puget Sound The Tacoma Symphony Orchestra String Quintet intro-

CAR SEAT SAFETY INSPECTIONS Tues., Jan. 28, 9-10:30 a.m. Mary Bridge Center for Childhood Safety, 1112 S. 5th St., Tacoma Have your child’s car seat inspected by the experts. Info: www.multicare.org/marybridge/center-childhood-safety MUSEUM OF GLASS VISITING ARTIST Wed., Jan. 29, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visiting Artist Joseph Ros-

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

sano works with the Hot Shop team Jan 29 through Feb. 2.

exhibition of her newest work in collaboration with painter Meg Holgate and poet T.s. Flock. Info: www.museumofglass.org

SATURDAY 5K TACOMA RUNNERS Sat., Feb 1, 8 a.m. Five Mile Drive With one month of 2014 already gone, how’s your New Year’s running resolution doing? Keep up the good work (or get back to it…) with this weekly free 5k. Fast, slow or somewhere in between, all are welcome, so bring a friend. Info: www. TacomaRunners.com

SCHOLAR SEARCH WEEKEND Fri., Feb. 7, 12 p.m. The Great Hall of Annie Wright School Girls entering grades 9-11, bring your brain, sense of humor and open mind for Scholar Search Weekend and compete for a partial merit scholarship. Info: (253)-2722215

PIER PEER IN TACOMA Sat. Feb. 1, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Pt Defiance Marina Bring your family and join Foss Waterway Seaport and Metro Parks Tacoma for a “Pier Peer” aquatic nighttime adventure. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/pier-peer

CHRIS PERONDI’S STUNT DOG EXPERIENCE Sat., Feb. 8, 3 p.m. Pantages Theater Chris Perondi is the Stunt Dog Guy and his famous stunt dogs are out of this world! With star performances on “The Tonight Show,” “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” and Animal Planet’s “Pet Stars,” these canine daredevils will thrill your entire family with doggone amazing tricks. Info: www.stuntdog.com

A CANDLE LIT SHOW Sat., Feb. 1, 8 p.m. Broadway Center for the Performing Arts An intimate evening featuring musical artists Star Anna, Josiah Johnson (of The Head and the Heart) with Carleigh Aikins, and Bryan John Appleby with minimal instrumentation in an beautiful setting lit only by candles at Immanuel Presbyterian Church. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org

RANDY HANSEN – TRIBUTE TO JIMI HENDRIX Fri., Feb. 21, 8 p.m. Jazzbones - $120 Born Dec. 8, 1954 in Seattle, Randy Hansen is a guitarist best known for his emulation of Jimi Hendrix. He clearly has a bit of physical resemblance to Hendrix in his facial features, and carries that resemblance further by emulating such signatures of Hendrix’s style as playing a guitar with his teeth or behind his back. Info: www.jazzbones. com/events

COASTAL ALCHEMY: ANNA SKIBSKA AND ASSOCIATES Feb. 2-Sept. 28, 10 a.m. Museum of Glass Known for her large-scale glass installations, Seattlebased artist Anna Skibska continues to explore the ways in which artworks are viewed with Coastal Alchemy, an

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and works at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www.AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES March 21 – April 19 Arguments are possible so make sure you choose your words wisely and are in tune with those around you. A sudden change may be in store for you at work. This is a year you will be doing a lot of reassessment and selfexamination. TAURUS April 20 - May 20 It’s time to balance work with play. Relax more and cozy up to loved ones or spend some quality alone time. Be cautious yet productive. Reflect on your potential and understand your priorities. GEMINI May 21 – June 20 Concentrate on your most important money, property and relationship issues at this time. Focus daily on the power to widen your horizons and bring the world to you. The details are everything. Be in the moment. CANCER June 21 – July 22 Those that rely on your good sense and sound advice may need you. Stabilize your love life and creative drive. Understand your heart and retune your strings. This year will show how your hard work will pay off. LEO July 23 – August 22 Your royal and noble nature rubs off as you show others how to be their own king or queen. Creativity and generosity are heightened. Expect to receive your due recognition and applause for a job well done. VIRGO August 23 – September 22 Do you feel like you are being watched? You may have a secret admirer that will reveal themselves. Notice the subtle changes in your outlook. Your motto is ‘The harder you work, the luckier you will be.’ Keep it up!

LIBRA September 23 – October 22 Are you where you want to be? Being reliable and stable gives you tremendous staying power. Exercise good judgment. The slightest imbalance could set your scales swinging. Ask a wise elder for important advise. SCORPIO October 23 – November 21 Your good nature may be tested with friends and family. Set right any misunderstandings with siblings. Respect yourself and your personal space.

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SAGITTARIUS November 22 – December 21 Don’t stretch yourself too thin. Your fear of not being able to do or give enough to a partner may leave you anxious. Eliminate wastes and inefficiencies. Throw out what you don’t need, donate the rest to charity. CAPRICORN December 22 – January 19 Try to balance good diet and exercise habits yet allow yourself little daily pleasures or treats. This will help to keep your morale and selfmotivation high. You are in the gradual process of re-inventing yourself. Think happy thoughts. AQUARIUS January 20 – February 18 Be prepared to put a lot of effort into your plans for worthwhile results. You value your independence have a flair for the unconventional. You are urged to express yourself through blogging, social media or other inspiration. PISCES February 19 – March 20 Look to get your financial and employment affairs in order this year. Important investment opportunities may prove beneficial. Get in touch with old classmates or childhood friends. Someone you forgot about is thinking about you.

ANAGRAM

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THEATER

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NOTICES TO: Charles B. Satiacum DOB: 08/24/1982 Case Name: Puyallup Tribe vs. Charles B. Satiacum &DVH1XPEHU38<)+),6+ <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRU an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

PUBLIC NOTICE Rich Harris, Port Landing, LLC, P.O. Box 44625, Tacoma, WA 98448, is seeking coverage under the Washington State Department of Ecologyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Construction Stormwater NPDES and State Waste Discharge General Permit. The proposed project, Port Landing, is located at 2715 62nd Ave South in Fife, WA, in Pierce County. This project involves 7Âą acres of soil disturbance for construction activities related to the construction of 152 multi-family apartments, parking, and access driveways. Construction activity will include construction of 14 buildings, swimming pool, 271 new parking stalls, miscellaneous landscaping and public open space areas. During construction temporary best management practices used to control sediment during construction will include interceptor ditches with check dams, silt fencing and a catch basin protection. In addition, there is an existing, fully functioning, onsite stormwater detention and water quality treatment system throughout the site. No major demolition will be required. Stormwater will be discharged to a City of Fife stormwater system within 62nd Avenue South of which ultimately discharges to the Hylebos Waterway. Any persons desiring to present their views to the Washington State Department of Ecology regarding this application, or interested in Ecologyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s action on this application, may notify Ecology in writing no later than 30 days of the last date of publication of this notice. Ecology reviews public comments and considers whether discharges from this project would cause a measurable change in receiving water quality, and, if so, whether the project is necessary and in the overriding public interest according to Tier II antidegradation requirements under WAC 173-201A-320. Comments can be submitted to: Department of Ecology Attn: Water Quality Program, Construction Stormwater P.O. Box 47696, Olympia, WA 98504-7696

EMPLOYMENT

You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday the 4th day of March, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. )$,/85(72$33($53/($'25 27+(5:,6('()(1'0$<5(68/7,1$ '()$8/7-8'*0(17 TO: Frederick Satiacum In the Matter of: Puyallup Nation Housing vs 6$7,$&80)UHGHULFN

Full/Part-time work from your home. Social Media Marketing Assistant to promote our Christian teaching books via YouTube, blogging, FaceBook, Google. Mail rĂŠsumĂŠ to IGO Inc. PO Box 1396, Tacoma, WA 98401

&DVH1XPEHU38<&9(97 <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRU an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 5th day of March, 2014 at 1:30pm If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. )$,/85(72$33($53/($'25 27+(5:,6('()(1'0$<5(68/7,1$ '()$8/7-8'*(0(17 TO: Candice C. BaldEagle Case Name: WSFC vs, BALDEAGLE, Candice C. &DVH1XPEHU38<&6)& <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRUD Show Cause Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Show Cause Hearing on the 5th day of March, 2014 at 9:00 p.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. )$,/85(72$33($53/($'25 27+(5:,6('()(1'0$<5(68/7,1$ '()$8/7-8'*(0(17 TO: Eugene Jerry Thomas In the Welfare of: S.J.O. DOB: 6/23/2008 &DVH1XPEHU38<&:735 <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRU an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Guardianship Hearing on the Monday the 14th day of April, 2014 at 2:30 PM. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. 127,&(38568$177275,%$/&2'( 6(&7,217+(&28570$<),1' 7+(3$5(17*8$5',$125&8672',$1 ,1'()$8/7)25)$,/85(725(6321' 25$33($5$7$&2857+($5,1*7+,6 0$<5(68/7,1<285&+,/' 5(1 %(,1* PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS

Exp. Breakfast Cook Needed. Part/Full Time. Flexable Schedule. Come in and fill out application. Tower Lanes 6323 6th Ave., Tacoma. 564-8853

FOR SALE CAMPER

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New 5 Piece Bedroom Set Full or Queen set includes: Headboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, & mirror. BRAND NEW! Only $400 253-539-1600

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5 Piece Dining Room Set Table & 4 Chairs. New in box. Only $300 253-539-1600 Microfiber Sectional Brand New REVERSIBLE sectional with chaise lounge. NEW! Only $500 253-539-1600 All New Pillow Top Mattress Queen Size with warranty. Still in original plastic. Can deliver. $120. 253537-3056 Solid Wood Bunk Beds Available in 2 colors. Brand new in box. Can break down to two separate twin beds. Delivery available. $250 253-539-1600 Low Profile Leather Bed Frame Still in box. Available in Full or Queen. Very nice. Can deliver. $250 253-539-1600

Adjustable Power Bed Brand New with memory foam mattress. Wall hugger with warranty. Delivery available. $995 253-537-3056 New Mission Style Bedroom Suite Solid wood Mission bedroom set. $699. Includes: headboard, footboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, and mirror. 253-539-1600 New Overstuffed Microfiber sofa & Love Seat Still in plastic with manufactures warranty. Can have for $700. Lifetime warranty on frame. 253-539-1600 BRAND NEW! Queen Memory foam mattress set with 20 year warranty. Can Deliver. $400. 253-537-3056 New Pillow Top Full Mattress Only $99. Never used! Comes with manufactures warranty. Delivery available. 253537-3056

VOLUNTEERS

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

VOLUNTEERS PAWS NEEDS WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERS PAWS in Lynnwood is looking for volunteers to help care for wildlife this spring. Every year, PAWS cares for more than 3,000 injured, orphaned or abandoned wildlife. Join the team and you can help feed and care for these remarkable animals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a remarkable H[SHULHQFH\RXZRQ¡WĂ&#x20AC;QG anywhere else! For any questions please contact Mark Coleman, Communications Manager, at 206.419.6646. Citizenship Volunteers Looking for a rewarding experience? Help immigrants prepare to become citizens. You will help to provide instruction to legal permanent residents who need practice with the written and oral. Training will be offered the Ă&#x20AC;UVW ZHHN RI -DQXDU\ DQG classes will start in mid-January. Please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor for Tacoma Community House, you can be that person who makes a difference. We are on the lookout for committed tutors for grades 1-3. There are sessions at Manitou Park, Mann, McCarver, and Roosevelt Elementary Schools. The next orientations will be held in January. Call 253.383.3951 for more information. These are exciting times and you can make a difference! South Sound Outreach Services invites you to be trained as an In Person Assister Volunteer to help Pierce County residents enroll online for health insurance in the Washington Health Plan Finder. Open Enrollment is October 1 until March 31st. Coverage begins January 1st, 2014 for those enrolled by December 15th. Interested trainees may call Heather at SSOS 253-593-2111. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be glad you did!

Meals on Wheels Office Volunteer Do you want to put your RIĂ&#x20AC;FH VNLOOV WR ZRUN LQ D rewarding volunteer opportunity? We are seeking a volunteer with strong customer service and computer skills to assist in our Meals RQ :KHHOV 7DFRPD RIĂ&#x20AC;FH one morning a week. Must enjoy working with seniors, using the telephone and computer, inputting data DQG VHWWLQJ XS Ă&#x20AC;OHV  )RRG handlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s card required. For more information call Linda at Lutheran Community Services: 253-272-8433. Become a Senior Companion today! Volunteers help frail or disabled seniors stay in their own home and maintain their independence. Activities include running errands, providing transportation or simply being a friend. Hourly stipend and mileage reimbursement provided. Requirements: must be 55+, serve at least 15 hours a week and be low-income. Drivers are especially needed currently. For more info call Julie Kerrigan, Program Director: 1(800) 335-8433, ext. 5686 Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.â&#x20AC;? Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at volunteer@ nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868.

Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs We need a volunteer to host programs Tuesday & Thursday 9:30-12, & 1-2:30 pm at Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs. Volunteer will be calling Bingo and doing some extreme crafting, gardening during spring & summer and into fall. If interested call Bonnie @ 253-278-1475 MondayFriday 8:30-4PM. Ayusa International SeeksTacoma Host Parents for High School Exchange Students Ayusa International, a \HDUROGQRQSURĂ&#x20AC;WWKDW promotes global learning through the hosting of high school foreign exchange students, is seeking parents/ families in Tacoma to host for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. Ayusa students are 15-18 years old and come from more than 60 countries around the world including Brazil, Japan, Germany, Ecuador, France, Peru, Morocco, China and 6SDLQWKH\DUHDOOSURĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW in English. For more information, please visit our website: www.ayusa.org

CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED Help adults learn to speak English! Mornings, no experience or foreign language skills needed. South Tacoma. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy, 253-571-1887. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS NEEDED If you enjoy helping toddlers learn, you can help us! Seeking retired or experienced volunteers to assist in expanding our capacity and provide quality learning for busy little people. (No diaper changing!) Background check required. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy 253-5711887 Meals on Wheels at Federal Way Senior Center seeks morning volunteers: One Co-coordinator, Friday and Monday; two Callers, Monday; three Packers, Wednesday; two Drivers, Thursday. To learn more, call 206-727-6250.

Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are sevHUDO SURJUDP RSWLRQV WR Ă&#x20AC;W your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 253.396.9630. INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT â&#x20AC;&#x153;MEMORY COMMUNITYâ&#x20AC;? What It Is: We are Memory &RPPXQLW\ D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W FRUporation). The Memory Community Project is a creative service to seniors. Our Goals & Objectives: To create an accessible resource that: â&#x20AC;˘ helps our senior citizens tell their stories â&#x20AC;˘ connects the young and the old â&#x20AC;˘ increases our un-

South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www. southsoundoutreach.org. Project Homeless Connect is an annual event where homeless individuals can receive free services. The next event will be held at Tacoma Dome on Oct 23rd. For more information visit www. pchomelessconnect.com or call 253.593.2111. Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! The Business & Responsive Agency Council helps district leadership with busiQHVVSODQQLQJĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDOVXVtainability decisions, revenue development and quality assurance. Monthly meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/business-volunteer to learn more or call Brett Freshwaters, Chief FinanFLDO2IĂ&#x20AC;FHUDW Brettf@tacomaparks.com. Metro Parks Tacoma Special events bring the community together and provide families with affordable fun. Metro Parks Tacoma needs volunteers to help produce memorable events. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/volunteer and signup to be notiĂ&#x20AC;HGRIVSHFLDOHYHQWVHUYLFH opportunities. To learn more, contact Roxanne Miles, Volunteer Manager, at 253.305.1068. Roxannem@tacomaparks.com.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and TherDSLHV D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W RIIHUV equine assisted services to differently-abled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253370-1429 or volunteer@ changingrein.org.

derstanding of those before us who help us be who we are â&#x20AC;˘ honors the generations before us and show our appreciation by preserving their memories â&#x20AC;˘ All seniors are welcome WR YROXQWHHU IRU Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ WKHLU story! â&#x20AC;˘ At most two days of work during daytime â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Day 1: pre-production meeting, and Release Form signing Day  Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ LGHDOO\ ZUDSSHG within half a day What weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like you to talk about in the Ă&#x20AC;OP 8VH  PLQXWHV RU VR WR tell the most memorable story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/grandchildren. Compensation: a DVD in which you are the leading character, and a free upload to our website http://memorycommunity.org/ Contact: send your emails to deyung@ memorycommunity.org Or call Deyung at 253-858-2445 for scheduling a meeting. 7KHĂ&#x20AC;OPLQJLVIUHHEXWGRQDtions are appreciated to help the project continue.

Donate time and receive free groceries. Volunteers needed with skills in management, organization, clerical, food handling, warehousing, maintenance etc. and receive free grocerLHV IURP D 1RQ3URĂ&#x20AC;W )RRG Distribution Program. Older teens are welcomed to volunteer and gain valuable work experience. Contact Ms. Lee at (253) 677-7740 for further information. Knitters and Crocheters &RPH-RLQ8V/RYLQJ+HDUWV is a group of volunteers who crochet or knit: hats for chemo, baby items, and blankets for GLIIHUHQW QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W RUJDQL]Dtions with in the community. We meet twice a month. Once on the second Tuesday, from 1:00pm to 3:00pm and again on the fourth Thursday, from 7:00pm to 9:00pm. Please join us at the WayPoint Church, 12719 134th Ave KP N, Gig Harbor. We are also in need of donations of yarn. For more information please email: lovingheartsonkp@aol.com or call Virginia at 253-884â&#x20AC;&#x201D;9619 Loving Hearts also meets 1pm to 3pm 3rd Thur. at Clubhouse Mobile Park Ardena Gale 4821 70th Ave. E., Fife 98424

PETS Need safe farms or barns

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

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Pet of the Week

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Legoâ&#x20AC;? 6RPHWLPHVORRNLQJIRUWKHSHUIHFWGRJFDQEHGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOW'R \RXZDQWDSXSZKRLVDELWROGHUDQGZHOOWUDLQHG"2U PD\EHD\RXQJHUGRJZKRLVVRFLDODQGORYHVWRSOD\",I \RXĂ&#x20AC;QG\RXUVHOIIDFLQJWKHVHTXHVWLRQVWKHQLW¡V\RXUOXFN\ GD\/HJRLVDQ\HDUROG\HOORZODEZKRLVDZRQGHUIXO EDODQFHRIPDWXULW\DQGVSLULW7KLVGHOLJKWIXOJX\PD\ QRWEHLQKLVSXSS\GRJ\HDUVDQ\PRUHEXWKHVXUHFDQ JLYHKLV\RXQJHUFRPUDGHVDUXQIRUWKHLU0LON%RQHV1RW RQO\GRHVKLVIDFHVWLOOKDYHLWVDGRUDEOH\RXWKIXOQHVV /HJR LVDERXQF\DQGHQHUJHWLFER\'XHWRWKHIDFWWKDW KHLVHDVLO\H[FLWHGKHZRXOGEHEHVWLQDKRXVHKROGZLWK ROGHUFKLOGUHQ7KHUH¡VQRGRXEWWKDW/HJRZRXOGPDNH DIDQWDVWLFDGGLWLRQWRDQ\IDPLO\ORRNLQJWRJLYHDQROGHU SXSKLVIRUHYHUKRPH'RQ¡WZDLWVWRSE\DQGPHHW/HJR WRGD\ 5HIHUHQFH$

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Doodle is looking to charm his way into your life. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a lovable personality that is aiming to please, and has tons of pent-up affection that he is eager to share. Pay him a visit, and see if he can complete your Forever Family. Energetic, happy, and excited are the first words that come to mind when you think of Fonzy. He is a young boy on the hunt for a Forever Family that will stick by his side. Company is what he wants. Are you his Forever Family?

Friday, January 24, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

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253-203-8985

www.StephanieLynch.com

Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, KDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWH UDLOV SHULRGVW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKH ambience, while newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer ZLULQJSOXPELQJ JDVĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKH ahhhh factor. Spacious living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and FXWHUHPRGHOHGEDWKURRPJUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVW Ă RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJZHOFRPH home. Move in and make it yours. $219,950

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

1950 S G St Tacoma Information deemed liable but not guaranteed.

HOMES FOR SALE

RENTALS

HOMES FOR SALE

33 N Salmon Beach Open House

N. Lakewood. Single Unit Apt.

(253) 381-8344 Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood EXUQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQ all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout WKHODVW\HDUVLQFOXGLQJURRIVLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZV doors, decking, boat hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000 Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties

Stadium District

All utilities paid including heat. Nicely furnished clean, cozy and warm, one room studio for single responsible adult. Strictly non smoking. No drugs. Tacoma Stadium historical district in old mansion. Close to everything. On bus line. Private secured entrance. Kitchen privileges. Private common shared bath facilities. Owner family on premises. $435. Available February 1st. 253-572-7128

This beautiful craftsman home has been remodeled with all new appliances and updated in the heart of downtown Tacoma. It is located only 2 blocks up the street from UW Tacoma Campus with a city, mountain and water view. This home is a 3 bedroom 2 bath with a large yard. The 2nd parcel is included with the purchase and has a single car garage in the backyard. This home KDVQHZĂ RRULQJZDOOVFDELQHWVTXDUW]WRSV appliances, furnace, and mill work and comes with a 1 year warranty! $249,000.

Eric Paffenroth Keller Williams PS 253-777-9062

(253) 222-8480

1388 N Lenore St. Fantastic mid century modern centrally located near stores, schools, parks and easy commuting to freeways, yet house feels secluded and private due to professionally landscaped, lovely yard with zen paths and sustainable GHVLJQ)DQWDVWLFNLWFKHQKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDVWHURQ main, great patio for entertaining- this is a wonderful home with lots of space. Move in ready and awaiting new owners. $282,000

CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA

GIG HARBOR 318 POINT FOSDICK PL NW

$695

$1650

2 BED, 1 BATH 650 SF. RENOVATED 2 BED APT INCLUDES W/S/G, EAT IN KITCHEN, NEW BATHROOM AND COVERED PATIO.

3 BED 1.75 BATH 1650 SF. RAMBLER HAS NEW FLOORS, NEWER PAINT, FAMILY ROOM, WASHER/DRYER & PETS OK W/APPROVAL

BONNEY LAKE

TACOMA

8403 LOCUST AVE E #H-3

4314 N PEARL

$875

$1395

2 BED 2 BATH 1100 SF. BEAUTIFUL CONDO HAS EAT IN KITCHEN, WASHER/DRYER, RESERVED PARKING & COVERED PATIO W/STORAGE

4 BED 2 BATH 1662 SF. NORTH END HOME INCLUDES FAMILY ROOM, NEW CARPETS, SPACIOUS ROOMS AND FORMAL DINING.

PUYALLUP

PUYALLUP

4008 7TH ST SW #E

13902 172ND ST CT E

$1150 2 BED 1.75 BATH 1165 SF. BRIGHT CONDO HAS ALL APPLIANCES, HARDWOODS, FORMAL DINING, GARAGE SPACE AND EXTRA STORAGE.

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

$1395 3 BED 2.5 BATH 1832 SF. PERFECT HOME HAS HUGE KITCHEN, FORMAL DINING, 5 PIECE MASTERS & $500 OFF FIRST MONTH RENT.

936 S Sheridan $229,000

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

HOMES FOR SALE

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back \DUGWRR+DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $204,950

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000 Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peek-a-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique Old Town property! City has given Ă&#x20AC;QDOSODWDSSURYDOIRUORWVRQWKLVSULPH acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747 FOR LEASE

Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO

With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price. Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage

www.jeanbonter.com

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

PROPERTY

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

HOMES FOR SALE

$399,000 A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High Ceilings, gas ÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG&DOOIRUSULYDWH VKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689

PROPERTY

Sat. 25th 10-2pm

1 Bed Above Laundry Room. RV Court. No Pets. No Smoking. Screen $45, $600 Rent. $500 Deposit.

2305 S 74TH ST #18

CALL 253.922.5317

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, GRZQWRZQSDUNV0DLQĂ RRUXQLWKDVRQHEHGURRPSOXV attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920

Green Page Alternative Medicine

GIG HARBOR CHINESE RESTR., same owner 25 years. $100,000 w/terms. $50,000 Down Payment Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Gil Rigell Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

805 N Steele St

â&#x20AC;˘HIGHEST GRADE MEDICINEâ&#x20AC;˘

To Advertise Call 253-922-5317

RURAL LIVING: Restaurant/ price reduced Lounge in Ashford, WA Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space

Collective Hours Mon-Sat 10:30-8 â&#x20AC;˘ Sun 10:30-7

253-226-5973

price

LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? reduced Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $510,000 (R.E. $485K) Bus. $25K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill.

HIGH GROSSING, VERY price PROFITABLE COFFEE reduced SHOP CAFE FOR SALE $95,000 High trafic Count location, owner will accept $25,000 down payment.

T Town Alternative Medicine 4823 S. 66 St. â&#x20AC;˘ Tacoma

NORTH END GAS STATION/MINI MART High gross sales, excellent profit, positive cash flow, Price is $1,100,000 (Bus. & Prop.), possible terms

Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer at your old houseWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQGĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG Welcome! $368,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at o cost to buyer.

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 24, 2014

CageSport MMA XXIX

Brian McKnight

Air Supply

February 8, 7pm

February 14, 8:30pm

February 15, 8pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $40, $55, $85, $90

I-5 Showroom $30, $40, $60, $65

Smokey Robinson Merle Haggard Battle at the Boat 95

February 21, 8:30pm

March 1, 8pm

March 22, 7pm

I-5 Showroom $50, $70, $95, $100

I-5 Showroom $35, $50, $65, $70

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $100

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


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