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Products by Rita Catinella Orrell We present a roundup of the latest products for hospitality projects both big and small, including a heated outdoor seating collection made of high-performance cast concrete. Heated Outdoor Furniture Galanter & Jones Designed and handmade in California, Galanter & Jones’ radiant-heated furniture offers an alternative to traditional outdoor heating options for residential and high-end hospitality projects. The Helios Lounge, which seats four, and the Evia, which seats three, are made of 3/4"-thick fiber-reinforced, high-performance cast concrete and metalpowder-coated steel tube legs. An internal thermostat heats the seat to the desired temperature and shuts off automatically when the temperature has been reached. Starting at $3,800, the high-end benches draw only 12.5 amps, about as much power as a hair dryer. 24 Texas Architect 7/8 2014 Elan Vital Faucet Watermark Designs Houndstooth Tile Collection New Ravenna Mosaics A continuation of New Ravenna Mosaics founder and creative director Sara Baldwin’s explorations in designing mosaics inspired by textiles, the Houndstooth mosaic tile collection is handmade in Virginia in four colorways, including a classic black and white, a luxe gold and red, an iridescent purple and pink, and a pastel aquamarine and white combination. Houndstooth is available in jewel glass or natural stone. In glass, it is suitable for vertical interior installations, and in stone the mosaics can be installed indoors or outside on both floors and walls. With lever handles reminiscent of commercial ball valves, the Elan Vital Faucet collection from Brooklyn-based Watermark Designs looks as though it might have been salvaged from an early 20th-century factory. Elan Vital is available as a bridge, wallmount, deck-mount, floor-mount, and thermostatic shower, and is completely customizable, from the handles, height, width, and length, to the choice of 39 finishes. Modern features include 1/4" turn washerless ceramic disc cartridges, a lowflow aerator (finished with intricate knurled metal), and the industry’s smallest exposed thermostatic valve.

(Preview) Texas Architect July/August 2014: Art & Architecture

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