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Portfolio: Office Interiors The Buttrey Building’s Transformation for Peddle Project Peddle Office, Austin Client Peddle Architect Alterstudio Architecture Design Team Kevin Alter, Assoc. AIA; Ernesto Cragnolino, AIA; Tim Whitehill, Assoc. AIA; Matt Slusarek; Daniel Shumaker Photographer Casey Dunn Photography 86 Texas Architect 9/10 2013 The 19th-century Buttrey Building on 6th Street in Austin has served a variety of uses. Originally built as a general store, an entirely new facade and a third story were added in the 1940s. The building subsequently housed a variety of offices and eventually fell into disrepair. Its raw condition provided a fresh slate for Alterstudio Architecture and Joel Mozersky of One Eleven Design to create the new headquarters for the Internet company Peddle. The 7,800-sf office occupies the building’s top floor and looks more like a space intended for entertaining friends than a typical workplace. Alterstudio’s design embraces both the Buttrey Building’s age and the client’s creative ethos. Structural brick walls, concrete columns, and steel beams are exposed in areas. A new ceiling was installed to separate a service plenum from the open workspaces. Two conference rooms and a kitchen are segregated from the rest of the office, and work areas flow through the space carved by these three rooms. For added flexibility, the Peddle office also features a 16-ft sliding wall to allow rearrangement as needed. was used to craft Peddle’s office floors and walls. Other materials include glass, stainless steel, plaster, and even synthetic grass. Synthetic grass covers the walls and ceiling of a room that holds a pool table, adding to the feeling of a space designed for casual conversation rather than the nine-tofive grind. Lighting is also used as a means to enhance the uniqueness of the office’s character. In the open spaces, distinct lighting arrays help differentiate specific work, conference, and gathering areas. A custom fixture fabricated from joist hangers, 30 linear fluorescent lights hung at an angle, and repurposed industrial fixtures all contribute to the character of the space. Repurposed wood from local barns

Texas Architect September/October 2013: Design Awards

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