Issuu on Google+

News ArCh Hosts Inaugural Texas Student Biennial Exhibition The Architecture Center Houston (ArCH) held an opening reception July 26 for its first “Texas Student Biennial Exhibition.” The exhibit features work from the eight accredited schools of architecture in Texas and includes project boards, slide shows, and architectural models. At press time, the exhibit was scheduled to close Sept. 7, but the boards will be on display during the Texas Architects Convention in Austin, Oct. 18-20. “The idea for the exhibit had been kicked around for some time by our Exhibitions Committee,” said AIA Houston Executive Director Rusty Bienvenue. “Rice University and the University of Houston were champions for all of the schools being included.” Letters were sent to the deans, who were responsible for selecting the projects for display. Some of the schools’ boards featured as many as 50 projects. “The high quality of design submitted by all eight schools is quite remarkable,” said Bienvenue. “This bodes well for the future of architecture in Texas.” A deans’ roundtable discussion moderated by Texas Society of Architects President-elect and former University of Texas School of Architec- The high quality of design submitted by all eight schools is quite remarkable. This bodes well for the future of architecture in Texas. ture Dean Larry Speck, FAIA, was planned — along with AIA Houston and ArCH’s annual Back to School Bash — as the culmination of the exhibit. See the November/December edition of Texas Architect for a roundtable recap. Texas Architects’ 73rd convention offers 90 Continuing Education opportunities, including tours (such as the new Federal Courthouse, shown at left) and Early-Bird Workshops. 73rd Annual Convention Features Revamped CE Lineup The Texas Society of Architects Continuing Education Committee has spent the past year reviewing and selecting educational programs for the Society’s 73rd Convention in Austin, Oct. 18-20. The revamped lineup includes six tracks of Continuing Education opportunities for those seeking credit in the following areas: Sustainable Design; Design; Historic Preservation and Renovation Practice; Codes and Standards; Practice; and Emerging Professionals. A few sessions from these tracks are highlighted below. Visit www. for a full list of classes, schedules, and details. Architectural and Building Code Influences for Preserving Historic Buildings: Case Study San Antonio’s Bexar County Courthouse dates back to 1896 and features Romanesque Revival design. What goes into renovating such a structure? Lewis Fisher, AIA, will use Texas’ largest and oldest historic courthouse as a case study. Practice Rethinking Historic Buildings through a Green Lens Measure Twice and Cut Once: A Fresh Approach to Noted architect, planner, and historian Barbara Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP, will share her experience and work developing national sustainability policies, integrating cultural and preservation metrics into the LEED rating systems, and will discuss past and current sustainable preservation projects. Integrated Project Delivery Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) is emerging as the preferred way to organize project teams to achieve well-planned and efficient projects. Richard Markel, AIA, and David Weinberg, AIA, will discuss this method. Emerging Professionals Codes and Standards Scoping Provisions of the New 2012 Texas Accessibility Design Independent for Life: Homes and Neighborhoods for an Aging America America is undergoing a seismic demographic shift, and families and individuals are expected The Emerging Professionals track includes sessions such as “Tips and Tricks for using the NCARB Practice Software”; “NCARB and You: IDP, ARE, and Certification”; “Fireside Chats with Texas Architects,” which will feature roundtable discussions with some of Texas’ well-known and influential architects: Ted Flato, FAIA, Max Levy, FAIA, Val Glitsch, FAIA, Larry Speck, FAIA, and Frank Welch, FAIA; and a Friday evening “Emerging Professionals’ Gathering,” featuring complimentary food and drinks on the rooftop deck of AMOA–Arthouse at the Jones Center in downtown Austin. Courthouse photo by Dror Baldinger, AIA; Exhibit photo Courtesy ARCH The 2012 Texas Accessibility Standards (TAS) came into effect in March 2012 with several key differences from the 1994 TAS. Gaila Barnett, AIA, will analyze the differences. 9/10 2012 Historic Preservation and Renovation Practice Sustainable Design Standards 12 Texas Architect to shoulder much responsibility with little coordinated help. But designers and planners can think ahead, planning safer households and adapted communities and neighborhoods. Former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros and Jane Hickie of the Stanford Center on Longevity will share some key insights about how to get this started.

Texas Architect Sept/Oct 2012: Design Awards

More from this publisher