Issuu on Google+

Contributors Bryce Weigand, FAIA  Dror Baldinger, AIA  Joe Self, AIA  and partner Tracy Self host “Design Talk,” a monthly program at the Fort Worth Center for Architecture, where professionals present and discuss design topics in laymen’s terms for the general public. They welcome speaker proposals to promote lively, face-to-face discussion about design with members of the community. See his article on the Tarrant County College East Campus, page 40. 8 Texas Architect is a partner at the San Antonio firm Marmon Mok. When not contemplating the brickness of the brick, he may be found photographing great architecture and delicate flowers, serving as vice president of the Baldinger family, or anguishing over the brilliance of the Arsenal Football Club. Read his residential feature on page 32. practices architecture in Dallas,  cowboying at the Zephyr Bar W at Buffalo Ranch outside of Oakwood, and drawing anytime, everywhere.  He and his wife Trish will be drawing big, granite boulders on the coast of Maine this summer.  Weigand helps lead the institutional work at Good Fulton & Farrell. See “Backpage,” page 80. Michael Friebele, Assoc. AIA is Canan Yetmen  is an enthusiastic architectural marketer and nocturnal novelist, when she’s not writing about stellar buildings such as Austin’s new Heywood Hotel (page 60). Her first book of fiction is a World War II mystery that features art thieves, Nazis, and an architect, of course. 5/6 2012 Filo Castore, AIA has a graduate of Kansas State University and practices with Merriman Associates Architects in Dallas. His passion for his hometown of St. Louis drives his architectural mandate for thorough conceptual thought and intervention in the urban context. He is currently working on an international competition for redeveloping the site of Pruitt Igoe. Friebele writes about the Omni Dallas Convention Center Hotel beginning on page 54. roots that sprout from the hilly landscape of Tuscany, Italy, from which he hails. Although downtown Florence is devoid of innovative high-rises like the BG Group Place featured on page 48, the Renaissance Masters have made an indelible mark on his professional career. Since he moved to Houston 16 years ago, he has been striving to create an interdisciplinary and collaborative mindset to reaffirm the central role of the architect as a master builder and community leader to create effective places and sustainable communities. Nowadays, in lieu of the rolling Chianti landscape, Filo seeks inspiration in the vast majesty of the American West.  

Texas Architect May/June 2012: Urban Design

More from this publisher