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D e s i g n A w a r d s Design two thousand J u r y Awards ten b y La w r e n c e C o n n o l l y , A I A C i n c o C a m p  Rhotenberry Wellen G r a u w y l e r Pa r k B r a n c h L i b r a r y  Oglesby Greene La n c e A r m s t r o n g F o u n da t i o n  Lake/Flato Architectes in collaboration with the Bommarito Group La L o m i t a M i s s i o n C h a p e l  Kell Muñoz M o d C o t t: G u e s t H o u s e  Mell Lawrence Architects O v e r l o o k Pa v i l i o n   Overland Partners Architects P e a r l S t ab l e R e s t o r a t i o n  Ford Powell & Carson Architects and Planners S i d W . R i c h a r d s o n V i s u a l A r t s C e n t e r  Gideon Toal Illustration BY Betsy Cooper S t o n e C r e e k C a m p  Andersson-Wise Architects GS A R e g i o n a l F i e l d Off i c e  Leo A. Daly/LAN + PageSoutherlandPage, A Joint Venture Ea s t W i n d s o r alterstudio architects 9 / 1 0 2 0 1 0 Af ter seven hours of uninterrupted work on May 21, this year’s TSA Design Awards jury finalized its selections. The jury began with 200 entries, keeping 61 from that total in the first round, and finished a second round with 21 before ultimately choosing the 11 projects featured on the following pages. The jurors were Tom Phifer, FAIA, of Thomas Phifer and Partners in New York; Edward Bosley, an art historian on the faculty of the University of Southern California’s School of Architecture and director of the Gamble House in Pasadena; and Adèle Naudé Santos, FAIA, dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning and a principal of Santos Prescott and Associates in San Francisco. During the first round, there was an easy consensus among the trio about which projects were to be eliminated. In the second round, individual preferences began to emerge as jurors looked more closely at the remaining entries. There were deciding factors besides excellence in architectural design that swayed the jurors. For instance, after they wrapped up their work in the mid-afternoon, Bosley and Santos suggested that better photography and more rigorous editing of slide shows might have improved the chances of some entries: “In spite of our sometimes brutal and flippant remarks, there are a lot of beautiful projects in this contest.” Bosley said, adding, “There’s a tremendous amount of talent and effort that’s gone into all these projects. [However] it’s quite possible that there are some things that we missed about the projects that rose almost to the top, that didn’t get communicated for whatever reason in the material.” Such thoughtful observations from jurors attest to the seriousness with which they approached their task. R e s i d e n c e  Lawrence Connolly, AIA, is a Texas Architect contributing editor. t e x a s a r c h i t e c t 35

Texas Architect Sept/Oct 2010: Design Awards

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