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AIA Fort Worth Awards Nine Projects w o r t h The jur y for AIA Fort Worth’s 2008 Design Awards convened Oct. 14 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth where they sifted through 40 projects before selecting nine for distinction. The jurors were Larry Speck, FAIA, of Page Southerland Page in Austin; Emily Summers, ASID, of Emily Summers Associates in Dallas; and Ray A rmstrong of A rmstrong Garden Studio in Fort Worth. Honor Awards, the highest level of recognition given in the chapter’s annual competition, were presented to the Bird Residence by Norman Ward Architect; Fischer Dining Pavilion by Gideon Toal; Acme Brick Headquarters by Gideon Toal; and Lift:Home by Bart Shaw, AIA. The design of the Bird Residence began with the preservation of existing mature trees. The low profile roof design provides protection for the house, with broad overhangs allowing indirect sunlight to filter into the interior through large expanses of window wall. Raised wood decks and concrete walks extend outward into the landscape as thresholds from garden to house. The Fischer Dining Pavilion is a new dining facility and kitchen serving a small private school in Fort Worth. The use of limestone and wood creates a warm and inviting environment that promotes social gathering in and around the structure. The connection between indoors and out contributes to the connectivity of the campus community and highlights the social nature of the building. The site of the Acme Brick Headquarters is the first development on the historic Edwards Ranch planned development. The goal was to respond to the wooded site and river location while setting a standard for future development. The building has a concrete frame with brick/ stone veneer and concrete masonry backup, a composition that allows Acme to show it’s products and construction techniques. Lift:Home is a concept for hurricane relief housing that would fulfill the need for rapidly deployable residential units in the wake of a natural disaster. Developed as an alternative to FEMA trailers, which are by their nature temporary and by their character demoralizing, Lift:Home is seen as a permanent solution to help people retain their community spirit. Merit Awards were presented to Fort Worth Academy by Hahnfeld Hoffer Stanford; Fort Worth Water Gardens Modifications by Freese and Nichols; The Cottage at Brown’s Landing by Home Architecture Interiors, LP; Woodhaven Neighborhood Redevelopment Plan by Gideon Toal; and Latitude by Norman Ward Architect. Fort Worth Academy is a private education facility for kindergarten through eighth grade. This library and classroom addition is perched on a precipice, siting that provides children in the library a grand “window to the world” as it overlooks a valley to the north. In 2004, four deaths occurred in the Fort Worth Water Gardens. The challenge of this project was to modify the park to address safety concerns while retaining the original design intents of Philip Johnson. T he Cot tage at Brow n’s L a nd i n g is a 563-square-foot stone cottage on Lake Palestine in Chandler, Texas. The owner was seeking an Old World focal point to be used as a guest house and meeting place. Woodhaven Redevelopment is a comprehensive study, analysis, and action plan that combines creative visions from the community with current market information. It sets forth a plan to redevelop a depressed area into a sustainable and livable community with a balance of mixed-use, retail, office, and single-family homes. Latitude, a house designed for a yachtsman, features lines of latitude that mark its navigational position. The project includes a series of stone veneered containers separated by glass wall planes. A porch cantilevered above the ground plane is the datum for the house composition set at slightly above the 32nd parallel north. Bird Residence Fischer Dining Pavilion Acme Brick Headquarters Lift:Home Fort Worth Academy Fort Worth Water Gardens The Cottage Woodhaven Development Latitude f o r t 20 t e x a s a r c h i t e c t B a r t S h a w , 1 / 2 AIA 2 0 0 9

Texas Architect Jan/ Feb 2009: Campus Communities

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