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FORGING AHEAD A New President, 100 Days & a Lot of Work As a boy, Scott Wyatt thought his father was a genius. Child to a rocket scientist (literally) and college professor, he remembers a dad who eagerly returned to his research and writing most nights after the family’s dinner. Even in his free time — of which there was little — Dr. Clair L. Wyatt was anxiously engaged, rebuilding a World War II-era Willys Jeep alongside his son in the family’s garage, with nothing but the original owner’s manual and a floor full of old parts. As he grew, however, the young law student began to see his father’s genius less as prototype and more as good, old-fashioned hard work. It was a realization that has fundamentally shaped Scott’s approach to career and, indeed, life. In what some may call a meteoric rise in higher education, Wyatt left an auspicious career as Cache County prosecutor and two-term legislative representative for Cache County, Utah, to become president of Snow College. He quickly made his mark, leading Snow to a 40-percent increase in enrollment. Under his tenure, Snow earned rank among the top 10 junior colleges in the country, completed the most successful fundraising campaign in the college’s history, and opened its first four-year degree program. Though some may consider his time at Snow as the beginning of Wyatt’s career in education, he says everything that had come before was simply his pathway back to college, explaining, “I started my university studies wanting to spend my life in law and politics; I left with a complete, 100-percent focus on finding my way back into higher education.” Be it his upbringing on a college campus, his time as an undergraduate student body president and student member of the Utah State Board of Regents, or simply the innate satisfaction in learning something new, the further along in his law studies Wyatt advanced, the more he found he preferred the campus to the courtroom. He began studying educational leadership while continuing work toward a law degree and, upon graduation, “There have been lots and lots and lots of times when I've felt like I was not the smartest person in the room. But I knew I could outwork everybody.” immediately started looking for opportunities to remain involved in higher education. SUU ALUMNI MAGAZINE SPRING 2014 7

SUU In View Spring 2014

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