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001 //

Parameters On Human Experience

002 //

Convergence

003 //

CAP Redesign

004 //

CMR Spa

005 //

(dis/re)Covering The Pan Am Plaza

006 //

VoroSCAPE

Curriculum Vitae

Dedicated to everyone who made this possible. Thank you.

001 // Parameters On Human Experience Instructor // Course //

Janice Shimizu ARCH 401 / Fall 2012

Program //

Outdoor Classroom, Meditative Space

Location //

West Coast, California

How can we challenge our expectations of physical existence? In a bay off the coast of California, the disintegration of a cliff into seascape acts as the catalyst to existential recollection. The expectation of large concrete forms in water would be that they would quickly rest on the ocean floor. When those forms are observed floating on the surface of the tide, however, the user becomes engaged in site. This experience might result in a user’s apprehension, surprise, glee, etc. Whatever the result, the user is rooted in experience. A single experience. The importance of such an event is only measured by a unit specially created by each individual. When a user makes the connection between the transformation of cliff into sea, their sudden realization of being in the middle of it all stops time and space. The concrete forms reflect the night sky by emitting lights from their tessellated surface. When a user stares out into the field of concrete forms, they recognize the disappearance of the horizon and their sensory perception in space is engaged beyond that of every day life. The intention is that the site’s physical qualities can become metaphysical. The experience is polymorphic and unique to every user. The success of the space is judged in the unit of measure developed by the user. The catalyst to humans’ recognition of existence is brought on by pure nature and calculated architectural moments. Is it not the architect’s responsibility to make a person experience novel sensations… whatever they may be? Our pursuit of new experientially challenging spaces should keep pace with our rapid advancements in technology. The hope is that someday, our built environments might compete with the experiences of pure nature that are so hard to find today.

Radial organization (above), Aerial view (spread)

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Genome series (top), Genome evolution (above), Site center (spread)

Underwater perspective detailing surface lighting and anchoring cables.

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concrete form water line air-filled volume anchoring cables generator

As the water moves up and down with the current the concrete form pulls on the anchoring cables. In turn, the cables pull on a magnet making it spin inside a coil of copper wires. Electricity is then generated to power the star-like lights on the concrete form’s surface.

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Sleep Tide, Spring 2012

Bridges connecting a divided site

002 // Convergence The Indiana Cultural Museum seeks to converge the many factors of the design into one unified architectural moment. The site chosen for the museum included a street that cut through the center making it necessary to bridge the building across in order to maintain a non=segregated space. Users of the building experience a vast collection of Hoosier artifacts while journeying through the building. The major constraint on the project was to implement concrete masonry units (CMUs) into either structural or aesthetic aspects of the design. The building does both by using load-bearing CMU walls and also CMU veneers for the building’s facade. The highlight of the design is the CMU veneer which uses CNC technology to create a moire relief pattern. This gives new light to a material that is used so often in buildings, but has had little innovation since it was first used in architecture.

Instructor // Course //

Antonieta Angulo ARCH 202 / Spring 2011 2011 ICMA Competition Finalist

Program //

Indiana Cultural Museum

Location //

Indianapolis, IN

How can digital fabrication rejuvenate the aesthetic potential of widely used materials such as CMUs?

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Structural and connection diagram (above), Site diagram (left)

View from amphitheater looking south

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open web steel joist air duct autoclaved aerated CMU rigid foam insulation moire CMU veneer CMU load bearing wall load supporting steel truss channel glass concrete slab + footing

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Wall section (left) Passive lighting diagram (above)

Physical model

Amplified, Spring 2012

003 // CAP Redesign Instructor // Course //

Pam Harwood ARCH 302 / Spring 2012

Program //

College of Architecture + Planning

Location //

Muncie, IN

What would a renovated CAP have that would better serve its students and majors of study?

The new College of Architecture and Planning building has been reprogrammed and renovated from its former self. Additions to the building extend from a once isolated footprint in order to interconnect movement across the university green. The essence of the sloped envelope on the south facade is captured by its reinvention through a vertical glass curtain wall with a layered louver and wire scrim skin. The energy of the building that can be captured through design build space and review galleries is now in prime locations for visitors to experience as they move through the college. The College of Architecture and Planning is given a new identity that exemplifies the quality education it offers.

Perspective looking north

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South facade (top), East facade (above)

Sectional diagram showing passive cooling and lighting

Hallway connecting CAP and business building

Untitled, Fall 2012

004 // CMR Spa Instructor // Course //

Ana de Brea ARCH 301 / Fall 2012

Program //

Spa, Simulation Center

Location //

Futuretown, USA

What are the limits/roles of architecture when space is simulated rather than physical?

Since its beginning, architecture has been defined by the rules of physical space. In history books we observe the way cultures across the world abstract their surroundings into built form. Today we face a new challenge that changes the face of architecture: non-physical space. Architecture is at the helm of a rebirth where physical and non-physical space coexists as one and in collaboration with one another. The CMR Spa exemplifies the extremes of physical and nonphysical space coexisting. The spa functions much like those of today - a place to escape our everyday reality. Users of the spa experience virtual environments of their choosing in Computer Mediated Reality modules. The environments simulated are designed as highly meditative spaces meant to help regain a user’s grasp on spirituality. Questions are raised on the morality of experiencing spirit - much less possibility - in simulated sub-realities. Regardless of its moral correctiveness, this architecture seeks to explore the unknown.

Facade of CMR Spa

Diagram showing connection of Modules to master computer for environment simulation

Simulation environment: Chapel

Simulation environment: Holyhedron

Plan (top), Three stages of CMR Spa experience (above)

Axon (top), Facade (left)

Simulation environment: Moonship

Studio Panorama, Fall 2012

Perspective looking at south facade from Georgia Street

005 // (dis/re)Covering The Pan Am Plaza Instructor //

Pam Harwood

Course //

ARCH 302 / Spring 2012 2012 Estopinal Competition Finalist

Program //

Culinary Institute, Boutique Hotel, + Restaurant

Location //

Georgia Street, Indianapolis

In what ways can one building set the tempo for the future of architecture in Indianapolis?

This design celebrates discovery. The new culinary institute and boutique hotel extends the public space of the new Georgia Street renovation and engages pedestrian interaction. The first level accommodates public use and provides storefronts along the plaza. A galleria cuts through the building to provide greater storefront space and access to the plaza, while also separating the building’s culinary institute and boutique hotel functions. The remaining nonpublic programs rest above the plaza level and are identified from Georgia Street by an iconic perforated metal facade, which extends beyond the building, creating an overhang that invites people to inhabit space directly outside the building. The building form romanticizes brutalism, thus recovering an older architectural style. In an effort to conform to context and new sustainable motives, native Indiana limestone and hardwoods are used for the majority of the material palette. On top of this, solar chimneys work to passively remove the heat produced from teaching kitchens and site is designed to collect rainwater and filter graywater. Pedestrians are encouraged to discover the building and the site by faceted planes directing them inside restaurants and into the plaza. A series of steel structures are inspired by the steel structures along Georgia street and can be used as an enclosure element for concerts, art exhibits, and farmer’s markets.

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Pan Am Plaza Lucas Oil Stadium Convention Center Capitol Building Mall Monument Circle Conseco Fieldhouse

// Build to site extents

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Form diagram

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Mechanical Food Storage Receiving Laundry

5/ Auditorium + Lecture Hall 6/ Wine Tasting Room 7/ Restaurant Kitchen 8/ Restaurant 9/ Mechanical 10/ Reception + Office 11/ Hotel Lobby 12/ Bake Shop 13/ 14/ 15/ 16/ 17/ 18/

Teaching Kitchen Refrigerator + Storage Library Culinary Institute Office Meeting Room Pantry

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Student Commons Staff Room Break Room Classroom 1 Classroom 2 Employee Lounge Business Center Fitness Center

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Rooftop Garden Wine + Tapas Bar Rooftop Pool Spa Room

31/ Large Guest Room 32/ Regular Guest Room

Interior of hotel room looking north

Ornamental garden Food garden Rainwater collection pond

Site diagram (above), Perspective looking at south facade

Passively cooling solar chimneys (above), North facade along Georgia Street

Curtain, Winter 2012

006 // VoroSCAPE VoroSCAPE serves to critique both the process and the fabrication of architecture. The implementation of digital design and fabricating strategies makes VoroSCAPE an architectural installation that matches the innovation found in automobile and aerospace manufacturing. It attempts to bridge between art and commodity in a contextual and experimental approach in an effort to reprogram Castle Pinckney. VoroSCAPE does this, first, by understanding the Charleston, South Carolina island of Shute’s Folly – home to Castle Pinckney. Because the island is underwater during high tide, it was vital to create an installation that moved with the tide to expand its use. The project considered the threatening rising sea levels and responded in a way that would protect the integrity of the land the castle sits on. The infrastructural landscape is composed of individual cells of a precedent floating concrete material. A voronoi tessellation was used as an ordering system for a series of cells that make up the floating landscape. The voronoi was significant in that it spoke to the bubbling produced by currents in the water. The cells that made up the ordering system were constrained to a 16-foot diameter to allow a seven-axis mill to shape the mold for each cell. To maximize the efficiency of the delivery method, cells are casted on a barge on-site and delivered to their designated location via the barge’s crane. With Gramazio & Kohler’s Procedural Landscapes as a precedent, the cells could be cast in such a way that allowed for morphed forms and surface textures that programmed walkability on the landscape. When connected on-site the cells form a landscape that morphs into a belvedere, produces pockets of ecology habitats, creates docks, and stretches out into the ocean to create a Wind Field. The Wind Field is a select number of cells on southern most part of the landscape that harvests wind to produce electricity. Light columns composed of a composite fabric and a structural piezoelectric membrane stand inside the cells that make up the field. Gusts of wind deform the membrane, thus producing energy that lights up an LED array that fluctuates with the velocity of the wind. As people move between the columns they relate the breeze to the columns filling with light. This creates a phenomenal learning experience that captivates the senses of the user. The journey through VoroSCAPE ends in a celebration inside Castle Pinckney. Here, a canopy composed that speaks to the language of the light columns hovers overhead and directs light into the space. What was previously filled high with dirt is now a formal gathering space with gardens and a structure to house a maintenance-free restroom and transformer room for the Wind Field. VoroSCAPE finds its identity in its effort to recreate Shute’s Folly and Castle Pinckney into a space that serves the people of Charleston as both art and commodity. In its efforts to be efficient and progressive in its construction, VoroSCAPE serves as the foundation to a new architectural methodology.

Instructor // Course //

Janice Shimizu ARCH 402 / Fall 2012 2012 Cripe Competition Honor Award Winner

Program //

Welcome Center, Energy Exhibit, + Island reclamation

Location //

Schute’s Folley Island, Charleston, SC

What makes architecture both art and commodity?

Physical model made of mylar , acrylic, and milled plaster + MDF

Site plan (spread), Castle plan (right)

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3/ Site is populated with program-specific points

2/ Circles emit from points creating a region

4/ Voronoi cells emerge from points

5/ Select cells are offset and trimmed per function

Interior perspective of renovated castle space

The major premise behind VoroSCAPE’s design was that it would be possible for the cells to be manufactured offshore on a crane vessel. From there the cells would easily be lifted off the vessel and put into place on site by the crane. This method of production and delivery would maximize efficiency and minimize construction time.

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Cell fabrication is based on a concrete forming method created by Gramazio + Kohler. A seven-axis robot is used to shape sand into the desired form. A layer of wax is layed over the form and after drying is used as the formwork for the concrete. This process reduces the cost of creating formwork because the wax and sand can be reused. This is necessary for the concrete cells that vary in form and have individual characteristics.

Perspective of the belvedere looking north towards Charleston

Perspective of eco-cells

Perspective of light columns at night

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light rail translucent composite fabric piezoelectric structural membrane lightweight aerated concrete casted air pocket

As wind pushes the composite fabric, the piezoelectric structural membrane deforms, thus creating electricity to light up the column. The cell floats on top of the water’s surface by being composed of a lightweight concrete and having air pockets casted into the mass.

Light column + cell section

Aerial perspective

Bust, Spring 2010

Steven T. Putt 2118 W. Euclid Ave. Muncie, IN 47304 steventputt@gmail.com 260.229.7989

Education

Skills

Ball State University - College of Architecture and Planning Bachelor of Architecture Muncie, IN: 2009 - 2013 (expected)

Visualization Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, VRay

Work Experience Ball State University - Architecture Library Student Assistant Muncie, IN: 2010 - Present ExecuTrain Administrave Assistant Fort Wayne, IN: Summer 2009 80/20 Inc. Panel Shop Technician Columbia City, IN: 2007-2009

Recognition Cripe Competition Honor Award, 2012 Estopinal Group Competition Finalist, 2012 Indiana Concrete Masonry Assoc. Competition Finalist, 2011

Modeling + Drafting AutoCAD, Grasshopper 3D, Revit, Rhino 3D Digital Fabrication Laser cutting, 3D printing, CNC milling

Qualifications Broad understanding of architectural concepts and design Strong desire to learn and determined work ethic Eager to be a team player and collectively achieve goals Excellent representational skills Great communication skiills

References Available upon request


Undergrad Portfolio