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CommonVoice Fall/Winter 2010

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The Sterling College Community Newsletter

A look at what’s inside...

Year in Fund-Raising—3 CommonVoice

President’s Report—4

For the latest news check CommonVoice online  voice.sterlingcollege.edu

Incoming Class Profile—6

Wild Classroom—10

Houston House—12

One Last Time?—23

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The CommonVoice is published by Sterling College in Craftsbury Common, Vermont.

Fix-up / Catch-up

W

Editors: Will Wootton Tim Patterson

Photo: Liz Chehayl in front of new student dorm.

ith a year-round schedule summer is now many things at Sterling, but some traditions

just roll on, including the short season’s intensified attack with hammers and nails, paint

and paint brushes, work crews and volunteers.

Converting the former Inn on the Common to College use was a major preoccupation and expense. Adding another 150 year old structure to Sterling’s collection tells you right off something of the

dimensions of the job. The ancient spiral (some would say death spiral) staircase was replaced

Design & Layout: Ethan H. Darling Proofreaders: Micki Martin Barbara Morrow Contributing Writers: Barbara Morrow, Corie Pierce, David Gilligan Pavel Cenkl

with a fire certified egress; the entire electrical system had to be bypassed and a new one created

Contributing Photographers: David Gilligan

Those were the big, costly items. It was the ten thousand less costly bits and pieces and the ten thousand questions and answers they required that threatened to overwhelm. So it was

Contributing Artists: Mary Azarian

Pete Chehayl) called in April and asked if there was some small part-time volunteer task she

Front Cover Autumn, Craftsbury Common, Vermont

and installed; and various plumbing issues had to be addressed… and quickly.

extraordinary luck when Liz Chehayl (mother of Daniel Chehayl ’06, and wife of Board Treasurer might engage in over summer as a service to the College.

In the winter in Sarasota, Florida, Liz serves as head of volunteers at the Sarasota Botanical Gardens. The Gardens are huge. The volunteers many. It was suggested she think about volunteering to do

something around the Inn. What part? She asked. The Inn part. And that’s what Liz accomplished, the Inn part, meaning the whole place, attic to cellar, kitchen to gardens, inventory to the auction that sold what was unneeded and replaced it with cash…all the bits and pieces. A job so large and

complicated that within weeks of her beginning it became embarrassingly evident that without her the College would have stood no chance of having the place ready by August 29th. None.

Her reward? Gratitude and praise, mixed with awe and appreciation, a Sterling College table lamp, and a note from the President, ending, “Call anytime.”

As the Inn got patched up, North House received a major exterior face-lift in paint and a new

front porch. The Brown Library also underwent exterior renovations, mostly new clapboards and paint. The interior of Madison was painted, the decades-old bunk beds removed and replaced with furniture rescued from Norwich University that was supposed to end up in a new residency and was not needed at the Inn.

While all that was going on, another crew has been at work converting Simpson V, one of Sterling’s larger academic spaces, into the new Writing & Communications Center—thanks to a two-year

$97,000 Davis Educational Foundation grant. Equipped with 14 computer terminals, smart boards and overhead projectors, a seminar table and a separate writing tutor’s room, Simpson V will be

the center of new curricular initiatives, including support for faculty release time to learn and practice applications of the new electronic tools across the curriculum, especially in writing.  2

Back Cover In celebration of the global 350.org Work Party event Sterling students and community members raised awareness about climate change by forming the number 350 in fallen leaves. 350 is a measurement of the maximum safe level of atmospheric carbon. See more: www.sterlingcollege.edu/350

Letters, comments, and submission of articles, poetry, fiction, and photographs are welcome and should be e-mailed to tpatterson@sterlingcollege.edu

Mission Statement The Sterling College community combines structured academic study with experiential challenges and plain hard work to build responsible problem solvers who become stewards of the environment as they pursue productive lives.

CommonVoice

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Fiscal Year 2009:

The Year in Fund-Raising

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he Sustainable Sterling Campaign, now as practiced as any in the art

“Campaigns are about building institutional strength,” said Will. “They

short of its $500,000 FY ’10 goal and at the same time posted a remark-

think about them as a combination of gifts at many levels and how

of fundraising in the contrarian seas of an economic recession, fell

ably successful year.

Thus are the counter intuitive realities of philanthropic giving nation-

wide (down), Sterling’s own mid-Campaign goals and initiatives (met), our institutional plans for the near future (intact), and the clear determination of Sterling’s alumni and friends to stay with the old place, especially in difficult times.

Total unrestricted giving came to $325,389, short of the $400,000 goal established two years ago but just over the $325,000 goal in the College’s

budget. Probably the single most impressive figure is this: unrestricted giving to Sterling accounted for 11.5 percent of the College’s operating

are about the future in ways that annual fund-raising is not. So, you changes in giving impact the institutional goals of a campaign.” Will sees strength in a number of areas: • The number of President’s Circle members – couples and individuals who contribute at least $1,000 to Sterling – jumped from 32 and 36 the previous two years to 49 in FY ’10.

• The number of contributors of $250 or more rose equally dramatically, from 84 and 85 in the two previous years, to 120 last year. One

hundred and ten of those received the official Sterling College knife as an appreciation.

funds. “You can imagine the effect on the College,” said President Will

• The number of past donors who, having not contributed for any-

success had we had to manage a budget 11.5 percent smaller than our

heartening: 11 gave after being off the lists since 2000 or even ear-

friends make. It’s tremendous.”

contributors from 2005-2009 chose FY 2010 as the year to rejoin the

Wootton, “and on its faculty and the rate of student engagement and

where from one to 10 years, decided to give was surprising and

already lean operating budget. That’s the difference the alumni and

lier; 15 had contributed last between 2001 and 2004; and 64 former

In addition, Sterling was awarded a $97,000 Davis Educational Foundation grant, $70,000 of which was paid last year. Thus, with a few other bits and pieces, the College’s total fund-raising came to $401,702.

A total of 437 couples and individuals contributed last year, well

philanthropic community that supports Sterling.

• 204 donors increased their gift from the previous year and thus qualified for the special matching provision offered by John Frey, a friend of the College from Michigan.

above the 371 count from the previous year. Some of that increase was

“I believe we are moving in the right direction,” said Will in a note to

and friends to give to Sterling instead of to her. Of the more traditional

give to Sterling because they believe in the place, its philosophy and

because Trustee Gail Henry turned 60 years old and urged her family

board members. “And doing so against a stiff current. I believe people

Sterling friends and alumni, 58 gave for the first time last year.

practice, and its role in higher education today and tomorrow.” 

wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

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President’s Report:

The Twisting Path T

Photo: Sterling students hike a local trail.

ime is short and seems to be getting shorter…that is one of dozens

draw on unrestricted endowment and only limited use of our short-

completed the first summer semester in our new year-round schedule.

There are still many unanswered questions, including the most perti-

of impressions, or realities, that have emerged at the College as we

As the faculty assembled for the “final faculty meeting” in May, we

realized that too had lost its meaning—the next meeting was just three weeks away.

term borrowing capacity.

nent – is the year-round model marketable? Will it actually draw students, or just entice those already at Sterling to attend year-round? And

somewhat further afield, when will the rest of higher education catch

When you operate year-round, in fact, everything is tweaked, every

on? A September University Business magazine article noted that about

ule. And some things change dramatically. First, the academic lives of

reducing or condensing a four year degree into three years, and predicts

52 students have now attended school for three, four, and more rarely

*****************

function, every plan, every administrative process, every class sched-

50 colleges are already playing with various models and programs of

those students. Whether they took a half or the full summer semester,

in a year’s time the number will increase to 100.

five semesters in a row. That adds some intensity, to put it mildly—yet they live, and indeed thrive by their own reports.

The lives of the faculty, too, are undergoing significant change. They are

paid, of course, for their additional work. But as teachers the summer semester opens up the curriculum in dramatic ways; it’s summer, after

all, and in a college where about half of all academics takes place outside the traditional classroom, the warmer months deliver an abundance of intellectual and experiential opportunities.

From the financial perspective, the addition of the summer semester, in which more than 50 students participated, has two immediate impacts. One, coming now after more than two years of planning and a series

of modest initiatives, is the first demonstrative evidence that the model and the idea of a year-round curriculum for Sterling is working, and in fact working better than projections.

However absorbing the twisting path to a year-round college is, it has not diminished concentration on other equally vital initiatives.

Hiring Carol Dickson last year to the new faculty position of director of

writing programs was the first and critical step in the College’s plan to

strengthen the liberal arts, an effort focused specifically on improving

writing across the curriculum. In addition, learning, understanding,

and employing electronic forms of communication and information management are equally important in a liberal arts curriculum.

Over the past year Carol has proved she can handle the director’s position as it applies to writing, and writing programming, but for the

“electronic forms of communication and information management” she and Dean of Academics Pavel Cenkl were lacking at least four things: a

space in which to build a new program center and classroom, the ability to provide faculty release time to develop new curricula, all the wired

The second is confirmation that by generating additional income, even

electronic hardware and software, and of course the tens of thousands

issues are ameliorated or even eliminated. Although the College closed

So there was considerable rejoicing when the Davis Educational Foun-

with additional expenses, the College’s annual mid-summer cash flow

of dollars all this would cost.

FY ‘10 with an operating deficit of more than $100,000, there was no

dation awarded the College a two year $97,000 grant to accomplish all

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CommonVoice

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those things: the renovation of Simpson V to house the new Writing &

Still, Sterling prevailed while awaiting the new results: a feature section

new teaching technologies; and the equipment, including 14 computer

Sterling’s Hannah McHardy, ’10, pictured driving the College tractor,

Communications Center; the faculty release time to learn and employ terminals, smart boards and overhead projectors, a seminar table and a separate writing tutor’s room.

of the report called “Class Acts” profiles four students, among them

and quoted talking about her research on fungal species that break down asbestos.

**************

*************

But what good is it all if no one has ever heard of Sterling College?

It is not coincidental that I report on these three subjects – the effects and

tion, how far under the radar screen is it safe to fly? In fact, over the

center and curricula; our efforts to increase Sterling’s recognition and

In the jumbled and competitive firmament of American higher educa-

past several months the College has been the beneficiary of an almost disproportionate volume of regional and national press. Sterling’s not been splashed across the front pages of the New York Times (we’ll

know that when it happens), but stories and mentions of the College in a variety of media do seem to be having the effect of increasing recognition generally and increasing Sterling’s academic reputation.

In spring, Vermont Public Radio ran a four minute profile of Sterling

and concluded with a (presidential) quote about the importance, ul-

timately, of the role of endowment in closing the economic loop of a college that is determined to remain small. Although no listener rushed to the phone with the $10 million figure, it felt good to get it out there.

results of our year-round program; the establishment of a new writing reputation. Each is one of the seven initiatives of the Sustainable Sterling Campaign, now beginning its third year, with one to go after that.

Although we are down somewhat in our unrestricted Campaign fund-

raising goal – not altogether surprising given the shaken economy – progress on the other Initiatives has been very satisfying, given the

combination of money, vision, plain hard work, and serendipity each

requires to move forward. The best example of that might be Initiative

#2: “Construct a new 20-24 bed student residency.” As we all know now, that died in the storm water of Vermont’s environmental regula-

tions. The Inn suddenly became an opportunity not to be missed. Al-

though providing only a dozen beds, we gain a second kitchen, greatly

Some weeks later, the Burlington Free Press ran a long exclusive on

increased food storage capacity, and a dining/lecture/work area just

Except for a copy editor’s unfortunate but hardly unique insertion of

and the culinary arts. That the beautiful grounds are contiguous to the

Sterling under a wonderful photograph of a student holding a lamb.

as we are preparing new academic programs in farm/kitchen/table

experimental for experiential, it was a story the College itself couldn’t

Sterling farm just adds to the convenience and value of the soon to be

have written better.

renamed Inn.

The new website has provoked a greater marketing emphasis on using

I can, finally, report on what over the past year has become the MFAQ

electronic avenues of expression and comment. Electronic or web-based

forms but boils down to: “How do you keep such a small college going

institutional marketing, in fact often blurring two formerly distinct

Difficult short answer, but at a gathering of Sterling friends and sup-

social media through the Sterling blog, Facebook, twitter and other

directed at me – the Most Frequently Asked Question. It has various

marketing will play an increased part in both admissions efforts and

in this day and age?”

areas of outreach. Thus far, the undeniable effect is as hard to measure as the medium is to grasp in its entirety, at least from the president’s

office, where new information and developments usually arrive via old

fashioned voice mail from down the hall, a shouted, “Haven’t you seen this yet?”

In mid-August, without any direct effort on the College’s part, Sterling

and the other six Work-Learning-Service colleges were heavily featured

in the on-line Parade Magazine’s spread on ways to reduce the cost of college. Parade’s total readership is in the millions; that can’t but help.

At the same time, Sierra Magazine published its 2010 list of “Cool Colleges,” meaning green or environmentally focused colleges and universities. Sterling was ranked 64th among the 165 institutions

that submitted the detailed survey, and was given a full-count 10 on “Academics” and another 10 on “Food.” Then, a day or so after the

porters at the Craftsbury home of Joan Bok in early August, I gave a not-so-short first try at an answer, the frequency of the MFAQ starting

to demand I come up with something. I chose four very broad decisions Sterling has either made in the recent past, or reconfirmed its commitment to – each contained within the overarching philosophy of the College and the Campaign.

1. We are small: and the difference between being small and choosing to be small is tremendous and liberating.

2. We are year-round: it is economically and educationally the right choice for Sterling, and perhaps for other colleges as well.

3. We are place-based: that is, we are committed to experiential

academics, knowing that lessons rooted in specific experience inform comprehensive understanding.

list’s loudly-announced web publication, it disappeared, replaced by a

4. We are academically focused: instead of offering the full panoply of

the result of the storm of protest that ensued from institutions even

tra breadth, and combined that focus with new models of self-designed

message saying the rankings were going to be recalculated…probably further down the list, or not on it at all. wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

liberal arts subject areas, Sterling instead has chosen expertise over exconcentrations and majors. 

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Fall 2010 Incoming Class Profile:

A “YOU ARE” Celebration E

ach year on the first evening after new students arrive for fall semester, an All College Meeting is held in Simpson III where, among introductions and scheduling notes, an informal ceremony is held. For lack of a better name, it might be called the “YOU ARE” celebration. The idea

is that the director of admissions and her crew hand over to the faculty and community the prospective students they have been working with

for months, or in rare cases weeks. In preparing to do so, they glean their charges’ applications for information, assemble it, and then take turns reading the results. The 31 students who arrived this September sugared off thusly: You are 31 Students. • 42 % Female • 58 % Male

You are from...

• Vermont: 22%

• Other New England States: 31%

• California, Florida, Georgia, Michigan, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania: 47%

You are...

• First time college students: 50%

• Transfers from other colleges: 50% You have attended...

• SUNY at New Paltz • Orange County CC • Unity College

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• CC of Vermont

• University of Vermont • Greenfield CC

• Cazenovia College • Lesley University

• Massachusetts College of Art & Design • Grinnell College • Shimer College

• Evergreen State College • Schoolcraft College • Miami Ad School • Earlham College

• Hampshire College

• Eastern University (PA) • Seminole CC

• Ulster County CC

• Borough of Manhattan CC

• Johnson and Wales University CommonVoice

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You...

• engage in cross-country running, cross-country skiing, ultimate frisbee, field hockey and rugby.

• are Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts and at least one of you is an Eagle Scout. • enjoy fly-fishing, working in the woods and collecting firewood.

• are cyclists, skateboarders, and enjoy working on Harley motorcycles.

• enjoy wilderness survival and plant and animal identification. • are woodworkers and blacksmiths.

• teach at the Farm School and co-manage the woodlot.

• hold leadership positions and are championship winners in 4H.

• are members of the Ecology Club, Foreign Language Honor Society

and National Honor Society, Book Club, Drama Club, Debate Club

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• led an alternative spring break on Midwest Food systems. • volunteered as a teacher for the PRION program and as a citizen scientist for stream monitoring. • crochet blankets for NH veterans and participate in Relay for Life. • helped home-school your siblings. • volunteer for your church and care for children. • work with the Norfolk Bee Keeper Association, the Urban Forestry Club and with CSAs. • are on the Board of and raised significant funds for the Jewish Community Teen Foundation. • are community organizers for ACORN, volunteers with the Christian Service Program and work with adults with bipolar disorder.

and Students Against Drunk Driving.

• are leaders of Neighborhood Watch teams and volunteers at Rogue

goats, ducks and rabbits, helped coordinate a local foods buying

• taught English in Beijing.

• have worked on organic farms all over the United States, raised co-op and started a sugaring operation.

• are musicians—you sing, play violin and ukulele and enjoy African drumming.

• are poets and writers.

• dance and participate extensively in theater.

• are painters and sculptors, and enjoy making beads, hot glass flowers and ornaments.

• crochet, paint and draw and belong to the Art Student League. • sew and create collages with natural materials.

• collect, study and identify wild mushrooms, medicinal plants and herbs.

• are cooks and chefs, gardeners, gardening consultants and landscapers.

River Rescue and Nantucket Conservation Foundation. • worked with children at a harvest festival. • are volunteers at animals shelters, with recycling projects, with Greenpeace, the Student Environmental Action Coalition and the Rainforest Action Network, soup kitchens and shelters and worked with Youth Against Complacency and Homelessness Today (YACHT). • have done service work in Mexico, Outward Bound in North Carolina, an Ecuador semester through Kroka and student exchange in China. You are travelers... • to Israel and other parts of the Middle East.

• are hikers, rock-climbers, campers and canoeists, kayakers, back-

• to Europe and parts of Eastern Europe, including France, England,

• have participated in NOLS Southwest Semester and NOLS in New

• to Bolivia, Uruguay, Ecuador, Costa Rica, Panama and Peru.

• have traveled to Tanzania with World Challenge Expeditions and

• to Morocco, Philippines and India.

packers, windsurfers, sailors, mountain bikers and yogis.

Holland, Sweden, Norway, Iceland and Poland.

Zealand.

• in the US and Canada, including Alaska and Hawaii.

to Costa Rica with Outward Bound.

• to the Bahamas.

• are Co-Founder/Co-Editor of Publicus Magazine. • were a nighttime moth survey bioneer.

• owned your own business, High Flying Loft Dove Release. You also...

• are volunteers with the Red Cross, did Hurricane Katrina Relief work and worked with deaf polio victims in India.

• are leaders and members of Students Against Violating the Earth

(SAVE), Earth Support, Free the Planet, Fighting the Good Fight and Earth Watch.

• are counselors at MA Audubon Society Habitat Center, the Outdoor School, Farm and Wilderness, Natural Science Camp, Sprout Creek Farm and Hazen’s Notch Association.

• are Outdoor Experience instructors and participated in a SCAP Expedition to the Mississippi River.

wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

• to Vietnam, China and Hong Kong. • to New Zealand and Australia. • to Puerto Rico. • to Mexico. You are... • seeking ways to reconcile human practices with the realities of the limits of nature, to learn how to treat nature with respect while still relying on her gifts. • consciously looking for and participating in communities; those that reflect your hearts and souls. • aiming to study and practice sustainable lifestyles and be part of a community that embraces sustainability, with a goal towards leaving a positive legacy for the future.  7

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Photo: Joseph Torrey, ‘11, Brown Library.

Outdoor Education & Leadership:

Exploring New Boundaries J

oseph Torrey, ‘11, is pursuing a self-designed major focused in Out-

his own fears of college by making new friends and working hard in

Joe shared some learning experiences from his Sterling career with cam-

“The prospective students voiced challenges like living away from

door Education and Leadership. At the Summer 2010 Open House,

pus visitors. Through discussion, questions, and interactive activities,

Joe helped visitors understand the principles of Outdoor Education,

and described what life is like as a student at the smallest four-year, residential college in the United States.

On a warm afternoon at the challenge course, Joe brought the visitors together in a circle to introduce the idea of the comfort zone. The “Com-

fort Zone” model is widely used by outdoor educators to encourage

positive risk-taking. By incorporating the model into an experiential activity, facilitators can help participants reach an “A-HA” moment—the spark of clarity and inspiration that comes from experiential learning.

“I invited participants to discuss what makes them feel comfortable and how we can temporarily leave our comfort zone to take on a positive challenge,” Joe explained.

class.

home for the first time, taking on a college workload, and hiking with forty classmates across the Lowell Mountains in winter sans tent or

stove. I explained that each challenge we take on, and each mistake we make, only helps us learn and grow.”

Joe told the visitors that a student’s first semester at Sterling is not the typical college experience. The first year core curriculum blends out-

door living skills with classes that are designed to foster a sense of place. The lines are blurred between resident life and class, as faculty

and staff eat meals in the dining hall and attend on-campus events alongside students.

“As a transfer student from a larger city, I appreciated the classes de-

signed to help me get to know Craftsbury Common,” said Joe. “For me,

it was more intimidating to enter a small college community than to ad-

In order to demonstrate how he learned to safely expand his own skill-

just to a large university. But Sterling classes focused on interpersonal

tion—What is inside your comfort zone? As visitors answered, they

tools to cope with living and learning in a small place.”

set and knowledge through experiential education, Joe posed the ques-

dependence, consensus, and community living, which gave me some

threw an object representing an activity in their comfort zone into the

Joe’s work in the Outdoor Education and Leadership field has given

center of a coiled rope. Being in a crowd, was one response; driving in

traffic and rock climbing were others. Next, objects representing experi-

ences beyond one’s comfort zone were tossed outside the coiled rope. Prospective students listed things like living in a dorm and college level

classes. Joe used this opportunity to tell the visitors how he overcame 8

him the necessary experience and skills to lead and teach in group settings. While explaining these opportunities to our visitors, he outlined

his future plans. Joe sees many possibilities awaiting him after graduation, and looks forward to moving back to Portland, Oregon to work as an environmental educator and challenge course facilitator. 

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Photo: Students tending the mobile chicken coop.

Sustainable Agriculture:

Small-Farm Entrepreneurial Skills F

by Corie Pierce

resh vegetables from the Sterling Farm found their way into kitchens across Craftsbury this year as summer semester students launched the College’s first Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program. The CSA gave students an opportunity to manage a highly successful

small-farm marketing model, and was open to faculty, staff and local folks in Craftsbury. Community Supported Agriculture CSA programs enable customers to eat seasonally and support local

farm walk where they assess the needs of all the crops – are there pest

shares of produce in advance helps farmers at a time when money

to be seeded, planted, watered, weeded, harvested or trellised?

farms by paying upfront for a weekly share of mixed produce. Selling

is tightest, and allows them to focus on farming during the growing season. Each week, happy CSA members come to the farm to receive their share of the seasonal crops available. CSA programs are the fastest growing marketing model in the sustainable agriculture movement.

At Sterling, our small CSA membership – 10 families – helped us launch the pilot program this year. The food has received rave reviews. Craftsbury resident Elena Gustavson was a bit skeptical at first, but the quality food and professional presentation soon won her over:

“I am not sure what I expected from a student-run CSA, but the moment I walked into Dunbar Hall and took in the baskets filled with greens, herbs and vegetables, all arranged as if waiting to be photographed, I was hooked. From the beautifully written newsletter to the generous shares of heirloom, organic

issues, or weed issues? What crops are ready for harvest? What needs When bringing food into the dining hall, we cultivate a professional

farmer/chef relationship so that students can learn about all aspects

of communicating with chefs. Students explain which vegetables are

coming on, and how much produce is available. The chef then orders vegetables and the students harvest, wash/pack, deliver, and give the chef an invoice. More and more restaurants and kitchens are buying

local food, and our dining hall is a great environment in which to train students about interacting with chefs.

This summer, we have exclusively eaten our own vegetables and the

dining hall did not need to purchase any other produce. We hope to carry this bounty for the remainder of the fall semester.

vegetables, the thoughtfulness put into every week of food went well beyond

Small Contracts with General Store and Craftsbury Outdoor Center

my expectations.”

With all the extra food we are growing in 2010, we wanted to see if other

Contract with the Dining Hall The Sterling Farm’s largest contract, with our very own dining hall, was the top priority. The majority of food grown at Sterling is consumed by students, faculty, staff, and visitors. Farm students learn about

harvesting and working with chefs and food service providers in one of their Practicum rotations. Each week, students do a comprehensive wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

local businesses were interested in buying some of the surplus. Summer Farm intern Ben Uris took the initiative to discuss contracts with the owner of the Craftsbury General Store and the chefs at the Craftsbury

Outdoor Center. Both businesses were excited to purchase our food. The General Store has sold several hundred pounds of our cucumbers as well as lettuce and other crops, and received great feedback from their customers on our produce. 

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Photo: David Gilligan, Natural History faculty, teaching in Alaska.

Natural History:

The Wilderness is our Classroom W

e emerge from a mist that has enshrouded us for four days. Granite towers and thick fifty-foot high spires are all around

us, fading in and out of the shifting clouds. We hike upward along a small rivulet of cold water, tumbling through a rich green sward of tundra vegetation. Suddenly everyone in the group stops. From out of the

by David Gilligan

of a thirty-five day wilderness backpacking expedition, attracting students with a variety of academic backgrounds and interests including Outdoor Education and Leadership, Natural History, and Conservation Ecology.

bushes a black bear appears and casually ambles by. We stand still and

In Summer of 2009 we ventured to the Sierra Nevada of California,

noise the bear seems unperturbed. I wonder, as I watch flowers shake

tory of high mountain landscapes while traversing the backcountry of

get to experience this? How many of us ever truly experience the wild?

eled to Alaska, by far the wildest corner of the country, and explored

try to be quiet, but even though we shuffle about and make too much

hailed by John Muir as the Range of Light. Here we studied natural his-

and jiggle with each of the bear’s steps, how many people ever really

Sequoia National Park and the John Muir Wilderness. In 2010 we trav-

How many people ever actually get to live in the wild?

If Henry David Thoreau’s notion that “in wildness is the preservation of

the world” is to be taken to heart, then it is to wilderness, the place of the wild, that we must venture from time to time in order to understand

where we come from, what it means for ecosystems to be intact and healthy, and what it means to be a simple, functional human being on

tundra and taiga ecology while hiking in the Kenai Peninsula, Denali region and Gates of the Arctic. We are currently planning our program for the coming summer of 2011, likely to go to a remote wilderness area of the American West. In 2012 will be back in the Sierra Nevada amongst the alpine wildflowers and glacially sculpted granite.

the planet. With these aims in mind Sterling College has offered a series

Aldo Leopold stated that “Wilderness is the raw material out of which hu-

the years. Our wilderness field programs integrate investigation of the

gin, our lifeline, without which civilization has no source. As John Muir

of extended wilderness field programs to a variety of locations over

mankind has hammered the artifact called civilization.” It is, then, our ori-

landscape with study and practice of expedition skills in the context

is known to have said, “going to the wilderness is going home.” 

Discovering the Dans

Four weeks into the Wilderness Field Program in Alaska, we walked out

from the Alaskan bush. Minutes later we encountered Dan Chehayl,

tuvuk Pass. Walking down the street towards us, past old crumbling

tous and spontaneous Sterling College reunion two hundred miles

of Gates of the Arctic and into the remote Nunamuit village of Anak-

sod houses, brightly painted dumpsters and assorted ATVs, was Dan Schieffelin, ’06, looking wild and wooly, himself having just emerged

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‘06. We shared stories, realizing we were experiencing a serendipi-

above the Arctic Circle. At first my students were stunned, but I as-

sured them that this was quite normal. Sterling people get around. 

CommonVoice

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Photo: Dan Schieffelin ’06, (left) & Dan Chehayl ‘06, (right).

Alumni Profile:

Alaska Backcountry Action D

an Cheyahl, ’06, spent his summer leading a 45-day backpacking expedition in northern Alaska for Camp Manito-wish. CommonVoice caught up with Dan to talk about the highs and lows of the trip, and to see if he had any advice for current students at Sterling.

Q: Tell us about Manito-wish. 

Q: How did students respond to the challenges of 45 days in the back-

Camp Manito-wish is located in northern Wisconsin and was founded

country?  What were the learning outcomes for the group?

in 1919. It is the largest independently funded YMCA in the country

These trips are all about growing through challenge. The goal is to

and each summer we serve thousands of youth and families through the Summer Camp Program, the Leadership Program, and the Outpost Program. Q: How did you get involved with their Alaska program? I started working at Manito-wish at age 18. After leading two successful month-long trips, I co-led Manito-wish’s first Expeditionary Pacific, a 45-day sea-kayaking trip up the Inside Passage in Alaska in 2008. In 2009 and 2010 I returned to lead the Expo Alaska, a 45-day backpacking trip in the Gates of the Arctic National Park in the Brooks Range of Alaska. Leading these longer trips for Manito-wish was just a natural progression influenced by an inner passion for wilderness and adventure. Q:  What were the highs and lows of this year’s expedition?

bring our participants a little out of their comfort zones and expand

their horizons and confidence. The Arctic wilderness is set up perfectly for this, as everything about the environment is challenging—from the mosquitoes to the weather to the terrain. Some of the biggest

challenges involve being a member of a small group. You really have to work to take care of yourself while also being concerned with the

other members of the group. Communication is key out there, and the participants need to learn to express their needs and desires while also

accommodating and accepting everyone else’s. In the end we send our participants home as proud, confident, and experienced leaders with

a heightened appreciation of wilderness and the natural environment. As individuals they know what their abilities are and that it is good to challenge these abilities.

Q: How did your experience at Sterling prepare you to lead this sort of program?  Do you have any advice for students who want to pursue

This summer, I was fortunate to have Dan Schieffelin, ’06, a good friend

a career in Outdoor Education?

and Sterling classmate, as my co-leader, so from the start things went

I’d say the biggest thing I took from Sterling and apply on these trips

pretty smoothly. A low point would be on Day 14 when a participant was injured by a falling boulder. We had to evacuate him by helicopter. While he made it out safely, it was definitely hard to see him go; losing one of the six members of our group made us all feel very vulnerable. High points range from finding a patch of blueberries on the tundra to reaching the top of a pass. For me, a favorite was watching a wolf stalk a group of caribou one morning as I got out of the tent. wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

is curricular design and implementation. Sterling also gave me a

philosophical viewpoint on wilderness tripping, group dynamics, and the benefits of small-group travel. To those at Sterling who are interested in leading trips, my suggestion would be to find an organization that has what you are looking for and start working for them this summer.

You’re not going to start at the top—you need experience—but if you are committed, you will get there. Manito-wish is always hiring for the summers! 

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Around Campus

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President Will Wootton made the announcement first at a Wednesday Community Meeting, where the heavy bronze plaque was passed from hand to hand and Ned spoke of the College and how, like a bee, some things apparently not meant to fly actually fly pretty well. A second dedication followed, on the Friday night before the fall trustees meeting, with board members, friends and family of Ned’s, and some staff and faculty. President Wootton spoke of all the other contributors to the College’s acquisition and renovation of the former Inn. The Canaday Family Trust gave $65,000 12

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Photo: Edward R. (Ned) Houston, Vice President and Faculty.

The Dedication of Houston House The Inn on the Common was purchased by the College in March, extensively renovated as a student residence and teaching facility over the summer, and has now been formally renamed “Houston House” in honor and appreciation of Ned’s 33 years of service (so far) to Sterling.

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for a class and the original design work for a new residency, starting off the journey. Vermont State Senator Vince Illuzzi was instrumental in the political process that resulted in the unique $350,000 appropriation that paid the greater portion of the cost. Trustee Penny Schmitt, former owner of the Inn, put the College over the top when code related renovations were threatening a September opening.

not be standing here tonight, honoring Ned and all he has done and continues to do for Sterling.” 

And of course Ned who took the lead first in the design of a new residency then in converting the Inn; and Steve Smith, director of facilities who was on the job daily over the summer coordinating plumbers, carpenters, electricians, and with his son Craig did all the heavy lifting. And Liz Chehayl, friend of the College and wife of Pete Chehayl, who did everything else all summer long, from gardens, to carpets and curtains, to the giant auction that brought in $6,000 in much needed funds. Without all these people, Will said, “we would CommonVoice

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Diverse Showcase of Talents Margaret Gibson’s beautifully detailed zoological and botanical art and illustrations were on display in early spring. Ms. Gibson is a young and accomplished artist with an exceptional eye for detail and grace. She is a certified science illustrator, graphic designer, photographer, musician and writer with a degree from Vassar College and a certificate from the Scientific Illustration Program at University of California, Santa Cruz. The College’s Brown Library hosted an art exhibit by Mary Azarian and Family in late summer. All the Azarians and Phonjans (children, grandchildren, in-laws) live together in Calais, Vermont where they garden, make art, and play music together. Family members represented in the exhibit included Mary Azarian, Ethan Azarian and his partner Melissa Knight, Jesse and Tim Azarian, Wilaiwan Phonjan Azarian, and 8 year old Aranja Azarian. Their artwork included woodcuts, batik and collage, acrylics and low-relief carving. 

Democratic Candidates Debate

Three of the five Democratic candidates for Vermont governor debated in June at the College to a full crowd from around the county. State Senators Susan Bartlett, Peter Shumlin, and Doug Racine participated in the evening’s discussion, moderated by Jon Margolis, a former national political correspondent for the Chicago Tribune and current contributor to Vermont Digger, an on-line news service. A final question, “As Governor, what personal characteristic will you have to be careful of?” elicited wholly uncanned responses. Bartlett said she had a tendency to be impatient when patience was called for; Racine dove into his answer, seemed to get lost, and said he’d have to try again later; and Shumlin said if anything got him in trouble it would be his big mouth.  wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

Hair for Oil Spills Sterling students sharpened their scissors in late spring for a campuswide hair cut. Taking their cue from the Matter of Trust organization, students and faculty joined groups and individuals across the U.S., Canada, and Europe who donated their hair to help clean up the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The idea was to stuff human hair into giant sleeves that would be used to soak up oil on Gulf beaches. In the dining hall foyer amateur barbers snipped and hacked, sometimes to rather alarming proportions as long braids dropped to the floor. Crew cuts were suddenly back in fashion. A number of the more daring faculty, Farley Brown and Charlotte Rosendahl among them, contributed significantly but retained enough hair for more professional stylists to have something to work with afterwards. 

Jeff Kubina

Empty Bowls Event

Joining their peers across the nation, Sterling College students hosted an Empty Bowls dinner in Dunbar Hall. The event was a grassroots effort to raise money and generate awareness to alleviate hunger. Local community members purchased tickets for the fundraising dinner, which included delicious food and a handmade pottery bowl. All proceeds benefitted the Vermont Foodbank. Sterling alumna and Salvation Farms founder Theresa Snow, ‘01, spoke on the topic of hunger in Vermont. The event was made possible by the Vermont Campus Compact, TD Bank, Heather Stearns and Muddy Creek Pottery, Elmore Mountain Bread, the Sterling College Kitchen, and many volunteers.  13

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2010 Baccalaureate Commencement

ommencement 2010 featured a large graduating class of 24 students. Student commencement speakers Hannah Morgan and Jake VanGorder reminisced fondly about their time at Sterling, and local poet Leland Kinsey shared an inspiring poem about an African farmer, and the wealth he cultivated over time. All three speeches are reproduced on the following pages. Congratulations to the Class of 2010!

Hannah Morgan’s 2010 Baccalaureate Commencement Speech

My first day of school, ever, was the day I arrived at Sterling College four years ago. I remember moving into upstairs Madison; I had my paddle, pack-basket, sleeping bag, axe, and newly acquired hard hat and steel-toed boots. I stood in the driveway, waving goodbye to my family, and wondering what I had done, when my dad put the van in reverse and rolled down the window to ask if I had brought any paper or pens…since this was college after all. I shook my head, so he rummaged through his glove compartment and managed to scrape together a handful of pencil stubs and a few ballpoint pens. I clutched the tools that would soon launch me into my academic career and felt that I was in the right place after all. Having been un-schooled (sometimes called home-schooled), people often worried that I would be socially awkward and unprepared for the “real world.” I thought those worries would have subsided when I was accepted to college. I came to find, however, that in most people’s eyes, Sterling does not really constitute the “real world” any more than my unusual education growing up did. There is a lot of pressure on us to become independent thinkers; we are told that the world needs young innovators relying on their brains to solve the many crises we are facing. Sterling College does not have the reputation of spitting out chemists, or engineers or people who go on to work for large companies in the “real world”. And all of this leads me to the big question which I continually come back to: what is this “real world” I keep hearing about? Is it the place where people spend more time communicating with machines than other blinking, breathing human beings, where corporations are given human rights, and animals are grown in factories, where consumption is equated with love, and where profit—monetary gain—is the ultimate goal? And next, why are people so worried that we may not fit into that bleak existence when we leave this place? For me the real world is Sterling’s version of a vending machine, which consists of fresh bread that Paul has just baked, sitting on the counter in the kitchen ready for butter and eating. It is living in a place where cell phones still don’t work but everybody owns their own axe, and the cool kids drive draft horses instead of a Mercedes. 14

The real world is the smell of moist new earth that has just been turned by hand, where in only a few months Corie and Katie will dig up big golden potatoes and sweet shiny carrots. To me the real world is lying across a bale of hay above the pig stall where Jody and Armone are kneeling in the bedding. The hay smells sweet mingled with animal manure and the scent of blood and birth. The flashlight is cold in my hand and the early spring-night-air is damp. Everything is soft and quiet and half-lit. We are breathing gently, coaxing, and waiting…And then the sow grunts and Armone is there with both hands on a slimy little body as it slips out, dark and surprising, we whisper and gasp as the wet mass wriggles to life, squirming and squealing and finding its feet, and then Armone is carefully placing it on a teat and it is sucking with tiny closed eyes. The real world is flying on your bicycle down the dirt road riddled with potholes, past the stand of maples with their blue plastic veins, past the yellow patches of daffodils and coltsfoot flowers pushing up through sandy soil, past the bright green of pin-cherry and alder leaves uncurling. And finally down to the bridge where the otters play, and the Black River valley spreads out and down until it is swallowed into cedar swamps and gentle pink hills, folded in like an old blanket, unraveling at the edges and spilling into beaver ponds and greening the fields. It is sitting in a dining-hall full of familiar faces, knowing you could name every person, and knowing that somehow, you fit perfectly into this tapestry of river and fields and family. I believe that we have had the rare gift of living in the real world, and we leave Sterling with the knowledge that the planet is in serious trouble. There is no better example of this than the oil that is pouring into the Gulf of Mexico right now, and we carry this weight with us. But we are prepared to carry it, and to work for change because we have learned to think, and work hard, not only with our brains, but also with our hands and hearts. In order to care, and to fight for what we love, and for what we are trying to protect, we have to start at the beginning. The great Che Guevara once said: “At the risk of sounding ridiculous, let me say that the true revolution is guided by feelings of great love.” We are about to leave each other and enter a fragmented world with the ability to live fully, to grow our own food, to raise animals and spin wool, to monitor water quality and write poetry, to nurture children and land, to sharpen axes, fell trees, chop firewood, and to love with hearts that have known strong roots and good soil. If I could better express myself this would have sounded like a hermit-thrush singing from my throat, the fluting song of the wet gray in-between times piercing the beginnings and the endings. Crying through the trees it is the sound of laying on the saturated pine needles and moss, feeling immense love until it becomes an ache and you inhale sharply, waiting to break open. I will leave you with these words first spoken by someone else: “Your heart is a muscle the size of your fist. Keep loving & keep fighting.”  CommonVoice

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Jake VanGorder’s 2010 Baccalaureate Commencement Speech Today we are here to acknowledge the academic study, experiential challenges, and plain hard work of our freshest crop of graduates. There is one outstanding member of this exclusive group that I would like to talk about specifically. Me. In the words of the great American writer and transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau: “I should not talk so much about myself, were there anyone else whom I knew so well.” I find that as a Sterling College student I have a lot in common with Henry David Thoreau. I have sought a reprieve from the chaos and confusion of the “civilized” world, as have most of the students here. The Northeast Kingdom of Vermont is to us like Concord, Massachusetts was to Thoreau in 1845, and Sterling College is our shack at Walden Pond. Here in the ivory tower of our wilderness sanctuary, we have pondered the meaning of life and the benefits of a simplified lifestyle. The similarities do not end there. Thoreau would often go home on the weekends so that his mother could do his laundry. Every year, as part of the Sense of Place new student orientation, the admissions team reads off a list of statistics about the incoming class— which states they come from, and the percentage of them who are from Vermont. Well, now the class of 2010 has come full circle. There are 24 students graduating today. All together we’ve taken 2,880 credits worth of classes, gone to school for 192 semesters, worked 15,360 hours for the Work Program, and accumulated hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt. We are from: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and Washington; and now 100% of us can say we’ve been from Vermont. The past four years may have been challenging in many ways. But when things seemed rough we persevered. Now we can take a moment to enjoy the feeling of satisfaction that goes along with completing a significant task, which not everyone can say they’ve done. This is not the first time we’ve felt this way. There is another block of four evenly measured increments of time that almost everyone at Sterling has conquered. Much like the four years of college, the four days of winter expedition were fraught with toil, struggle, and of course moments of pain and suffering that now make amusing stories. On the first night of winter expedition I huddled close to the unsatisfactory warmth radiating pathetically from the small pale fire in the middle of the charred and warped metal cookie sheet we used wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

as a fire pan. My camping group consisted of two other students in their first year at Sterling: Matt and Mike. After a dinner of rice and rehydrated chili, we set up the thin blue tarp, hung between three trees, which would be the only thing to protect us from the elements as we slept. Later that night it had gotten colder. We couldn’t stay asleep, even in our winter sleeping bags rated to twenty below. As we lay there staring up at the clear night sky Mike asked “what do those stars make you realize?” Matt answered “the stars make me realize a lot. I realize there are millions of galaxies with potentially billions of planets. I can see the constellation Gemini directly above us, so it must be about two in the morning. It makes me think that on the grand scale of the universe we are small and insignificant. I know that the temperature is going down because on a clear night, there is no insulating cloud cover to keep in heat.” There was a moment of silence, and then I said: “Matt, our tarp blew away.” When I first started as a student at Sterling College in the fall of 2006, the day when I would no longer be a student here seemed far off in the unimaginably distant future. Today that moment is frighteningly close. In many ways Sterling College is made what it is by its people—faculty, staff, and students. When I first got to school, I felt like the students are the very essence of what makes Sterling College what it is. I couldn’t possibly imagine a Sterling College without them. Over the course of my time here I’ve seen three classes of those students graduate. I’ve also seen the arrival of four incoming classes of new students, including my own. I’ve also seen people who didn’t make it, who for one reason or another dropped out of school. Despite the fact that the students who make Sterling what it is eventually leave (the people who only three and a half years ago my nineteenyear-old self could not imagine Sterling College without), new people come and take their place. I wonder if there are any younger students here now who can’t imagine a Sterling College without me. I even find it a stretch of the mind to imagine myself without Sterling College. Let me conclude by saying that four years is far too short a time to live amongst such excellent people. I don’t know half of you half as well as I should like. And I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve. I bid you all a very fond farewell. I regret to announce that this is the end. I’m going now.  15

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The Golden Farmer

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by Leland Kinsey

A farmer was honored today,

dirt floors and set out in rows

five hundred miles of terracing

on the promontory common.

in thirty-five years of labor

Wattle-and-daub houses with thick thatch roofs

for his village. He is shy.

surround the common,

His wife asked her company in to eat

as do the tops of surrounding hills.

before my cousin and his wife drove

A double line of women marched

the couple to the ceremony. They offered us

from the church, their voices raised

boiled goat, plantains, lushoro,

in multi-parted exaltation.

a variety of sodas safer

Large beaded rings around their necks

and easier than tea or coffee

moved in sinewy rhythm

for which water would be carted long.

as they shrugged their shoulders in unison

His daughter circled the table

to the chanted hymns.

to pour a fine stream of water

A speech from the sector agricultural chief,

over our hands. She caught it

then one in English and Swahili

in a basin held under our hands

from my cousin, who had taught

as we quickly scrubbed. Out of the common pot

the farmer new surveying methods

we each drew pieces recognizable

better and faster than chain and rod.

or not, and ate it down to skeleton.

The farmer was given a goat as prize.

When all were done, the daughter

My cousin was given a stool

circled once again, this time with soap.

carved from a single block of ebony,

They took us to the kitchen garden

a bark-cloth vest,

that the grey water waters, a small bottle

and an elder’s staff smoothed

inverted by each plant.

by hand with shards of glass.

He showed us his fruit orchard

Depending on how presented,

for the family and for sale,

narrow or bulbous end foremost,

and his stand of legume trees

the knobkerrie signals peace, or war.

to feed his cattle constantly penned so they cannot ruin the ground

Returning the farmer and wife home

with their hooves and browsing.

we saw hoopoes by the hedgerows,

The trip to the village was up

striped mongooses in the margins.

from his high farm. The hills are ringed

The farmer’s children had hung a cutting cane

like topographic lines, lines of trees,

large rat named as verb not noun,

shrubs, elephant grass hold the taller

for sale on a stick by the road.

outer part of each great step

The children protect the pearl millet,

the gold farmer has helped devise.

thatch is made from the long fat stems, cattail-like heads hulled for grain.

Every church pew, every school desk

The rat harvest also pays as local protein.

had been taken from the tamped

In a poor land, wealth lies in these details.

Reprinted: Kinsey, Leland. “The Golden Farmer.” Sledding on Hospital Hill: Poems. 1st ed. new york: David R Godine, 2003. 27-29. Print.

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Faculty Profile:

Four Questions for Anne Obelnicki

Q

: What was it that compelled you to first apply and then accept

the newly-created position of Sterling’s Director of Sustainable

Food Systems?

I’m passionate about cooking and being a member of a strong, vibrant

community. Cooking for my community combines those two activities in a way that makes them both more rewarding. Also, I’ve spent

years thinking about sustainable food issues and working towards incorporating my beliefs into how I live my own life and into the changes I work towards on a local and national level. I love sharing what I know, but it’s even more exciting to engage with a thoughtful

community of people who want to share what they know, too, while working together to come up with new ideas and taking positive

action. When I saw this position advertised, I realized immediately that it was a unique opportunity to be a member of a great community while filling the roles I enjoy and do well.

Q: The position is part cooking, part kitchen management, part curriculum design and part teaching, most intensely during the new summer semester farm to table program. How’s all that going?

This position definitely has a lot of parts—some might say it’s a job for two or three people! To manage my transition into so many exciting roles, I try to grasp one role before I start to add the next. Cooking and

kitchen management had to come first because the community needed

raising and cooking ducks. I’m starting to work on – and get excited

about – curriculum for classes I’ll be teaching in the spring and next

summer. There’s a lot left to do, and I definitely see this position being busy, challenging, ever-evolving and fun for a long time to come.

Q: As you have gotten to know more and more Sterling students, how would you describe their interest in or attitude about food in general, food at Sterling, and concepts around rural food systems?

I feel like I’m just starting to get to know the Sterling students, but

so far I’ve been really excited to cook for them and work with them.

They share a lot of my values prioritizing the consumption of fresh, local food. Of course, each of them holds different opinions, but I think

universally they know a lot more about food than the average college student and have much more mature palates. They are generally open to trying many new foods and their demand for—and appreciation of—

meals based on seasonally appropriate, environmentally sustainable and nutritionally balanced foods is gratifying because that’s the way I want to cook. I’m looking forward to getting to know them—and their ideas and ideals—better as the year progresses.

Q: Finally, as you’ve networked among your colleagues outside Vermont, how do they perceive your new position? Do they think it’s an odd career move, or a very cool thing?

to eat on day one. I think those are going well. I consider myself really

Everyone I know thinks my new job is awesome. Frankly, I think a lot of

the Sterling kitchen, and together we’re making the kind of healthy,

more to it. Ten or fifteen years ago sustainable food was still a minority

lucky to have arrived to find such a great team of cooks already in delicious food I’m proud to share.

them are jealous! And who wouldn’t be? Food is fun! But I think there is movement. It’s moved through many stages since then including

I’ve begun engaging in smatterings of “incidental teaching,” as

awareness among the general public, followed by waves of individual

explain something to them, or when they stop me in the stairwell to

stages of redefining systems on a larger scale. Positions like mine and

structured way by sharing my knowledge of sausage-making in Jody’s

the growth and dispersal of an ideological canon of sustainability with

in Ag Tech by teaching the break-down and use of a whole hog and

and what Sterling is doing, and look forward to other institutions

students spend time in the kitchen and I have an opportunity to

action. I think people “in the movement” feel we’re in the beginning

ask questions. I’ve also gotten a taste of teaching at Sterling in a more

many others at Sterling legitimize sustainability studies and combine

Farmstead Arts class over the summer. This semester I’ll be helping

concrete institutional action. My colleagues are excited to see my job,

overseeing an independent study with Clark Gaudry focused on

following suit. 

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The Year in Giving

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s surely as if you nailed up the clapboards, you—friends, alumni,

We were delighted to have more alumni and parents participating as

year you contributed $325,389 in unrestricted support. Foundations

combined gifts. You know the Sterling experience from an important

parents and admirers have made Sterling what it is. Over the past

and other friends gave another $76,313 in restricted support for specific projects. You carried us through a difficult economy, helped us imple-

donors this past year. In fact, you were responsible for over $43,000 of

perspective and are among our best advocates and sustainers. In addition to your financial gifts, we have also valued your feedback,

ment a year-round curriculum, and assisted our students who have

volunteer efforts, and student referrals.

increased financial need.

Faculty, staff and trustees also increased their giving by 67% over the

Four hundred and thirty seven of you made Sterling College a philanthropic priority, with gifts ranging from $5 to $50,000; all needed and appreciated. Each gift went right to work for students through scholarships, improved curricula, faculty development, library acquisitions and other elements integral to a quality Sterling education. And yes, you bought hay for the horses, and ropes for mountain climbing, and seeds that supply the food we grow, prepare and eat.

previous year. Thank you, colleagues, for stepping to the plate for Sterling. Your generosity and hard work are essential to our mission.

We never forget how important your partnership is with the College,

and how you have traveled with us to this point in the Sustainable Sterling Campaign. It doesn’t happen without you there. Thank you from all of us, Barbara Morrow, Development/Alumni

Donors by Club Membership ~ Giving List Trustees

Pete Chehayl Katherine Clark John Elder Rian Fried Linda Friehling Richard Gaffney Amy Golodetz Ann Guyer Christina Hayward Gail Henry Wendy Koenig Greg Leech David McLean Ed Nef Penny Schmitt Robert Shelton David Stoner James Walton Will Wootton

President’s Circle

David & Dona Behrend Joan Bok Carleton & Sue Bryant Reid & Kim Bryant Pete & Liz Chehayl Marion Christoph Deborah Clark & Harvey Dunbar Kim Clark Creighton & Anne Condon Dr. George Drew Francis Farwell Abigail Faulkner & Hobie Guion Nancy & Kim Faulkner Rian Fried & Rachel Hexter Fried

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Ted & Linda Friehling Richard & Susan Gaffney Judy Geer & Richard Dreissigacker Arnold & Virginia Golodetz Robert & Suzanne Griffiths Gail Henry Ned & Susan Houston Jeff & Anna Hutchins Daniel & Tina Kopp Emily Kunreuther Jon Larsen Greg Leech & Amy Golodetz Howard Manosh Ed & Liz Nef Liz Poulsen & John Barlow Robert Rheault & Susan St. John Leon Robinette Tim Rumbinas Penny Schmitt Mark & Sukey Schroeder Robert Shelton William & Nancy Sluys Russell & Janet Spring Ellen Starr & Geoffrey Fitzgerald Dave & Jenny Stoner Andrew & Elizabeth Szymczak E. Perry Thomas - In memory of Philip Edgerton Barth & Elizabeth Vander Els James & Jacqueline Walton Ted & Mary Wendell Nathan & Jessica Wilson Will & Lulu Wootton Charlevoix County Community Foundation Cushman Design Group Davis Educational Foundation Georgiana Ducas Charitable Trust

Margaret A. Cargill Foundation University of Vermont Anonymous

Sterling Club

Richard & Charlotte Alexander Diana Allen William & Patricia Alley Robert & Elizabeth Almeter G. Clifford & Mary Ellen Anderson John Ashworth & Victor Carrion John Bagley Delmar & Linda Barrows Mark Baudenistel & Ann Makley Jessica Berry Mr. & Mrs. Theodore Bickart - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart Stark Biddle Bruce Bjornlund Heather Blackie Jim Blair Dean Bloch & Valerie Wilkins Nathaniel Budington & Megan Morey Lucile Brink Marvin & Linda Brown Dave Brown Tena Bunnell Pavel Cenkl Winston Churchill Katherine Clark Becca Conklin Lee & Katherine Davidson Virginia Day Sarah Deck Mary Jane Dexter Carol Dickson John & Anne Donaghy

John & Rita Elder Eric & Deidre Ellis Anne Faulkner Charles Faulkner Robert & Elizabeth Fetter Daniel & Melissa Fisher Doug Fischer & Robert Haines William & Lynne Fitzhugh Patricia Fletcher Brian & Susan Flynn Laura Ford Maria Gaffney - In memory of George Gardner Kenneth & Janet Gibbons Robert & Susan Goodby Robert & Susan Goodwin Keith Gorges Peter Gould Clive Gray Philip Gray Virginia Hagen Lyman & Beverly Hamilton William & Mary Hamilton Ronald Haselnus - In honor of Brian Haselnus Timothy & Susan Hayward Zachary & Christina Hayward Kimberly Nichols Heiselman Rita Hennessy & Sean Palmer Jan & Heloisa Herder Bruce & Doris Hering Sarabelle Hitchner Wendy & Steve Hofmann Theodore & Margot Hubbard Adam Hubel & Cathryn Sundeen Kenneth & Janis Hubel Lukas & Susanne Hyder

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Seth & Sarah James Brandon Jellison Kenneth & Susan Johnson Richard & Amy Jones Robert Keir Anne Kelly Warren & Barry King Wendy Koenig Jackson Kytle John & Jane Labbe Philip Leech Neil Lehrman Samuel & Bonnie Lesko Judith Lieberman & Richard Kesseli Mary Paul Loomis - In honor of Lucy Hankinson Alyssa Lovell Donald Mackie Eleanor Inouye Macleod - In memory of Emery Katzenbach Carolyn Markson - In honor of Katie Hobart C. Austin & Betty McDonnell Mark McGrath Kimberly McIntyre George & Lauren McKnight David & Justine McLean Clifton McPherson & Elizabeth Freedman Jeffrey & Robin Meek George Messenger - In honor of Andy Messenger John Miller Richard & Evva Mintz - In honor of Amy Record’s birthday Barbara & Michael Morrow Tony & Dorothy Morse Natalie Moses & Douglas Klaucke Jeanne Muisse Kristie Nelson Kapp Jill Norton Nancy O’Neill Charles & Lynn Parker Barbara Paterson & James Whitby John Paterson John & Melinda Patterson James Peale William & Kathleen Perreault Bruce & Mary Pinto Laurel Potts Carl & Hilary Poulsen Lori Pulis Jane Ramsay - In memory of Christopher Moulton - In memory of Sherburn Ramsay Franz Reichsman Jay & Gail Reuben Dr. & Mrs. Albert Romano Richard C. Rose Geoffrey Rossano & Joan Baldwin Joseph & Susan Rothstein Lewis & Charlotte Russell James Sandison Bettina Sawhill Espe Edward & Joan Sayre Dr. Herbert Schaumburg - In honor of Kristin Schaumburg John & Shelly Schieffelin Dan Schlichtmann Robert & Jean Schoen

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Anthony & Janet Scialdone Mary Semon Frank & Carolyn Sepe Leon & Beverly Shank Edward & Diann Shope - In honor of Scott Shope Erin Small Roger Smith Mary Jo Smyth - In honor of Richard T. Smyth Ann Spearing - In memory of Tina Ray - In memory of K. Stephen Williams - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart - In memory of George Gardner Richard & Gwendolyn Spencer - In memory of Jennifer H. Spencer Marc & Nancy Stretch James Struver James & Emily Sullivan - In memory of Frank H. White Leonard Sussman Jay Swainbank Joseph Szeliga Scott & Colleen Taliaferro Nicholas & Roberta Tessler Sheldon Thompson Robert & Joan Twiss Katherine Vernay & Arden Zipp - In honor of Jessica & Nate Wilson Rex Walden Paul Walker Philip Warren Wendyl Wason - In honor of Chester Elliott William Waters Charles Watts & Helen Haynes Joan Webster Llyd Wells Michael & Janet Westling - In honor of J.D. Westling Frank & Jean White Mary Jo White Timmee Whitmore S. Donald & Sandra Kay Williams - In honor of Shawn & Jen Williams Cheryl Williams - In memory of K. Stephen Williams Jed & Perry Williamson Julie Wormser Constance Young John Zaber & Farley Brown Bourne’s Energy Concept II Exxon Mobil Foundation High Mowing Seeds Karl Decker Photography Maine Community Foundation - JoD Saffeir Family Fund New Hampshire Charitable Foundation - Advised by Doug Viles Norfolk Southern Foundation Patagonia, Inc. Stillmeadow Gardens The Guide Foundation - Advised by Ralph Bosworth Dewey & Liz Barrett-Brown The Oregon Community Foundation Vermont Campus Compact

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Simon & Sarah Alexander - In memory of Polly Russell Caroline Alves Hannah Arps & Blythe Dyson Elizabeth Barnard Robert Benson D. Lee & Don Berry Lynne Birdsall & Ryk Loske Steven Brock Errett Brown David Burnham Caleb Butler & Erica Young Sam Card - In memory of Bill Whiting Brian Carter & Leah Keller John Cassidy Richard & Audrey Cherin - In honor of Jonathan Cherin Tanya Childs - In honor of Sasha Childs Paul Clifford Charles & Fay Cole James Cole Andrew Conroy David Cyr & Amy Peterson Cyr - In memory of Clare Peterson Robert & Cheryl Dewees Karen Didricksen Matthew Dolski Elizabeth Edgerton - In memory of Philip Edgerton Manfred & Judy Edling Mr. & Mrs. J. Edward Eliades - In memory of Cheryl Eliades Judy Elson & Nicholas Patch Bruce & Joan Erickson Christina Erickson Trevor Evans Rachel Farrar Andrew & Melissa Fiori Noah & Julie Fleischmann Amelia Fritz Joseph Gaglioti & Jane Hazen Liam & Ann Gannon - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart William & Sandra Garcia Jeanne Gelwicks Margaret Gerritsen Margaret Gibson Dean & Sarah Gilbreath Robert & Jean Gilpin James Goetz Jennifer Goldstein Christina Goodwin Erik Hansen Jennifer Hargrave Matthew Harper Kristi Harper Furtado Robert & Craigen Healy - In honor of Rachel Healy Kennedy Sue Ann Heilman - In honor of Hannah Andersson John Helfinstine Deborah Hensley John & Dorothy Herzog Ashley Heye Watson Susan Highley & Alan Tate Drs. George & Lanie Hill

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Brewster & Alyssa Holmes Sally Hughey - In memory of Margaret Field Darrell & Elizabeth Hyder Marian & Gordon Inskeep Kenneth Johnson Ariana Johnson Peter & Sandra Kaynor Elizabeth Kepes & Thomas Vandewater Paul & Patricia Killigrew Sandra King Aura LaBarre & Greg Montgomery Jamie Labbe & Jennifer Cohun Susan Laity - In honor of Bill Laity Merrill Leffler & Ann Slayton Richard & Nancy Levine Louisa Levine Duane Lighthall James & Beverly Lowe Holly & Mark Manley William Manning Michele & Randy Martin Elizabeth & Wesley Martin MaryAnn & Frank Mastro Noel & Sean McCann Ian & Tayler McEwen Frank & Joan McGuigan Sylvia McKean Barrie & Margaret McMath Dean & Angie Miller John & Susan Monaghan Ross & Diane Morgan Robert & Celia Morris Martha Moyer & Michael Lenart - In honor of Keith Doerfler Charles & Grace Mullen C. Twiggs Myers - In memory of Doug Field Jessica Naylor Dianna Noyes Julianna Olson - In memory of Walter Malinowski Clifford & Audrey O’Neill - In honor of Gregory Johnson James Paolino Anne Pass Karen & Thomas Perry Leland Peterson Ken Pick & Virginia Scholl Annegret Pollard David Prentice Marijke Riddering Norman Rioux Brier Roberts Matt & Anna Roberts Kenneth & Laurel Ross Will Roush - In honor of Steve Young Mary Anthony Cox Rowell Lisa Sammet Peggy Sapphire & Robert Feinberg Peter Schoen & Leslie Pelch Amy Schwartz Emily Seifert Mrs. Russell Shaw - In honor of Matthew Breuer Nancy Shea J’mae Shemroske Lee Shuer

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Marion Sikora Bruce & Mary Sloat Meredith Snodgrass Charles Steinbrecher Peter Stevens & Diana McFarland John & Jody Stoddard Horace & Shirley Strong Rebecca Tatel Rev. & Mrs. Arnold Taylor Diana Taylor Susan Ticehurst

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George & Sarah Troutman Asa Twombley - In memory of George Gardner Neil & Barbara Ulman Dr. & Mrs. Richard Vanden Heuvel Barbara Vigour Christine Vogel John Wagner Nathan Wallace-Gusakov Anne Wallace - In honor of Nathan Wallace-Gusakov

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Rodney Walter Patrick & Alexis Watson William Whipple Patricia Wild Anna (Heidorn) Wilkins Jaime Winans Cupit Mary Witherbee A. Joseph Wyse Tracy & Kurt Zschau AIG Matching Grants Program Osherenko Foundation

Radiant Hen Publishing Anonymous

G. Clifford & Mary Ellen Anderson John Bagley Elizabeth Barnard D. Lee & Don Berry Tena Bunnell John Cassidy Tanya Childs - In honor of Sasha Childs Kim Clark Paul Clifford Charles & Fay Cole Creighton & Anne Condon David Cyr & Amy Peterson Cyr - In memory of Clare Peterson Lee & Katherine Davidson Virginia Day Karen Didricksen John & Anne Donaghy Manfred & Judy Edling Mr. & Mrs. J. Edward Eliades - In memory of Cheryl Eliades Robert & Elizabeth Fetter Laura Ford Joseph Gaglioti & Jane Hazen Jeanne Gelwicks Dean & Sarah Gilbreath Arnold & Virginia Golodetz Robert & Susan Goodwin William & Mary Hamilton Ronald Haselnus - In honor of Brian Haselnus Robert & Craigen Healy - In honor of Rachel Healy Kennedy Sue Ann Heilman - In honor of Hannah Andersson John Helfinstine Deborah Hensley Bruce & Doris Hering Theodore & Margot Hubbard Kenneth & Janis Hubel Darrell & Elizabeth Hyder Marian & Gordon Inskeep Kenneth & Susan Johnson Richard & Amy Jones Robert Keir Anne Kelly Paul & Patricia Killigrew Sandra King Daniel & Tina Kopp John & Jane Labbe Susan Laity - In honor of Bill Laity Philip Leech Samuel & Bonnie Lesko

Richard & Nancy Levine James & Beverly Lowe Donald Mackie Carolyn Markson - In honor of Katie Hobart MaryAnn & Frank Mastro George & Lauren McKnight Barrie & Margaret McMath Jeffrey & Robin Meek George Messenger - In honor of Andy Messenger Dean & Angie Miller Richard & Evva Mintz - In honor of Amy Record’s birthday Natalie Moses & Douglas Klaucke Martha Moyer & Michael Lenart - In honor of Keith Doerfler Jeanne Muisse Charles & Grace Mullen Clifford & Audrey O’Neill - In honor of Gregory Johnson Nancy O’Neill James Paolino Charles & Lynn Parker Anne Pass William & Kathleen Perreault Karen & Thomas Perry Ken Pick & Virginia Scholl Annegret Pollard Carl & Hilary Poulsen Jane Ramsay - In memory of Christopher Moulton & Sherburn Ramsay Brier Roberts Dr. & Mrs. Albert Romano Richard C. Rose Kenneth & Laurel Ross Geoffrey Rossano & Joan Baldwin Joseph & Susan Rothstein Dr. Herbert Schaumburg - In honor of Kristin Schaumburg John & Shelly Schieffelin Dan Schlichtmann Robert & Jean Schoen Anthony & Janet Scialdone Mary Semon Leon & Beverly Shank Mrs. Russell Shaw - In honor of Matthew Breuer Nancy Shea Edward & Diann Shope - In honor of Scott Shope Richard & Gwendolyn Spencer - In memory of Jennifer H. Spencer

To inform, to inspire, and to indicate the breadth and depth of Sterling’s philanthropic community we’ve added giving clubs to the associative lists of annual donors. • Expedition Club ~ $1 - $99 • Sterling Club ~ $100 - $999 • President’s Circle ~ $1,000 or >

Donors by Category ~ Giving List Alumni

John & Jody Stoddard ‘10 Jennifer Goldstein ‘08 Ariana Johnson ‘07 Julianna Olson ‘07 - In memory of Walter Malinowski Tayler ‘07 & Ian McEwen ‘06 Nathan Wallace-Gusakov ‘06 Caleb Butler ‘05 & Erica Young ‘04 Ashley Heye Watson ‘04 Kimberly McIntyre ‘04 Anna ‘04 & Matt Roberts ‘04 Sarah Deck ‘03 Kristi Harper Furtado ‘03 Brewster & Alyssa Holmes ‘03 Jennifer Cohun ‘02 & Jamie Labb ‘02 Maria Gaffney ‘02 - In memory of George Gardner Elizabeth ‘02 & Wesley Martin ‘00 Asa Twombley ‘02 - In memory of George Gardner Anna (Heidorn) Wilkins ‘02 Matthew Dolski ‘01 Christina Goodwin ‘01 Sarah & Seth James ‘01 J’mae Shemroske ‘01 Daniel & Melissa Fisher ‘00 Brandon Jellison ‘00 Marijke Riddering ‘00 Erin Small ‘00 Jessica ‘00 & Nate Wilson ‘97 Jaime Winans Cupit ‘00 Emily Seifert ‘99 Melissa & Andrew Fiori ‘98 Simon & Sarah Alexander ‘97 - In memory of Polly Russell Jessica Berry ‘97 Jill Norton ‘97 Marion Sikora ‘97 Matthew Harper ‘96 Jessica Naylor ‘96 Aura LaBarre ‘95 & Greg Montgomery Lee Shuer ‘95 Christine Vogel ‘95 Sandra & William Garcia ‘94 Jennifer Hargrave ‘94 Blythe Dyson & Hannah Arps ‘93 Noel & Sean McCann ‘93 Tracy & Kurt Zschau ‘93 Becca Conklin ‘92 Susan & John Monaghan ‘92 Alyssa Lovell ‘90 James Struver ‘90 Patrick & Alexis Watson ‘90

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Timmee Whitmore ‘90 Meredith Snodgrass ‘89 James Cole ‘88 Susanne & Lukas Hyder ‘88 Diana McFarland & Peter Stevens ‘88 Rebecca Tatel ‘88 Cathryn Sundeen & Adam Hubel ‘86 Leslie Pelch & Peter Schoen ‘86 Julie Wormser ‘86 Nicholas Patch & Judy Elson ‘85 Keith Gorges ‘85 Lori Pulis ‘85 John Zaber ‘85 & Farley Brown ‘85 Heather Blackie ‘84 Deidre & Eric Ellis ‘84 Errett Brown ‘83 Alan Tate & Susan Highley ‘83 Amy Schwartz ‘83 James & Emily Sullivan ‘83 - In memory of Frank White William Whipple ‘83 Kenneth Johnson ‘82 JoD Saffeir ‘82 Helen Haynes & Charles Watts ‘82 Diana Allen ‘81 Valerie Wilkins & Dean Bloch ‘81 Marion Christoph ‘81 James Goetz ‘81 Kimberly Nichols Heiselman ‘81 Sean Palmer & Rita Hennessey ‘81 Elizabeth Freedman & Clifton McPherson ‘81 Laurel Potts ‘81 Kristie Nelson Kapp ‘80 Paul Walker ‘80 Rodney Walter ‘80 Sam Card ‘79 - In memory of Bill Whiting Sandra & Peter Kaynor ‘79 Barbara Vigour ‘79 Caroline Alves ‘78 Ann Makley & Mark Baudendistel ‘78 Mark & Holly Manley ‘78 Steve & Wendy Hofmann ‘76 Richard Kessell & Judith Lieberman ‘76 Megan Morey & Nathaniel Budington ‘75 William & Nancy Sluys ‘75 John Wagner ‘69 Dr. George Drew ‘67 Mary & Bruce Pinto ‘67 Rex Walden ‘66

Parents & Family Robert & Elizabeth Almeter

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Charles Steinbrecher Marc & Nancy Stretch Joseph Szeliga Andrew & Elizabeth Szymczak Scott & Colleen Taliaferro Rev. & Mrs. Arnold Taylor Diana Taylor Nicholas & Roberta Tessler Sheldon Thompson Susan Ticehurst George & Sarah Troutman Dr. & Mrs. Richard Vanden Heuvel Barth & Elizabeth Vander Els Katherine Vernay & Arden Zipp - In honor of Jessica & Nate Wilson Anne Wallace - In honor of Nathan Wallace-Gusakov Philip Warren Wendyl Wason - In honor of Chester Elliott William Waters Joan Webster Michael & Janet Westling - In honor of J.D. Westling Frank & Jean White Patricia Wild S. Donald & Sandra Kay Williams - In honor of Shawn & Jen Williams

Business

AIG Matching Grants Program Bourne’s Energy Concept II Cushman Design Group Karl Decker Photography High Mowing Seeds Patagonia, Inc. Radiant Hen Publishing Stillmeadow Gardens University of Vermont

CNS Alumni & Friends Richard & Charlotte Alexander Ralph Boswouth Dewey & Liz Barrett-Brown Steven Brock David Burnham Anne Faulkner Doug Fischer & Robert Haines William & Lynne Fitzhugh Margaret Gerritsen Warren & Barry King Will Roush - In honor of Steve Young Ellen Starr & Geoffrey Fitzgerald

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Employees

Lynne Birdsall & Ryk Loske Pavel Cenkl Deborah Clark & Harvey Dunbar Carol Dickson Erik Hansen John & Jody Stoddard ‘10 Ned & Susan Houston Michele & Randy Martin Barbara & Michael Morrow Leland Peterson E. Perry Thomas - In memory of Philip Edgerton John Zaber ‘85 & Farley Brown ‘85

Former Trustee

William & Patricia Alley David & Dona Behrend Marvin & Linda Brown Reid & Kim Bryant Susan & Carleton Bryant Richard & Audrey Cherin - In honor of Jonathan Cherin Nancy & Kim Faulkner Noah & Julie Fleischmann Lyman & Beverly Hamilton Timothy & Susan Hayward Drs. George & Lanie Hill Dr. Jackson Kytle Elizabeth Poulsen & John Barlow Robert Rheault & Susan St. John Mark & Sukey Schroeder Jed & Perry Williamson Mary Witherbee

Foundations

Charlevoix County Community Foundation Davis Educational Foundation Exxon Mobil Foundation Maine Community Foundation - JoD Saffeir Family Fund New Hampshire Charitable Foundation - Advised by Doug Viles Norfolk Southern Foundation Osherenko Foundation The Guide Foundation - Advised by Ralph Bosworth Dewey & Liz Barrett Brown The Margaret A. Cargill Foundation The Oregon Community Foundation Vermont Campus Compact

Friends

John Ashworth & Victor Carrion

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Paul & Maria Giorioso Mary Hirsh & David Montenegro Paul Hynes Sara Jones Irene Kimball Pamela King Mary Lamenzo Fletcher Lokey & Susan Dyment David Manyan

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Delmar & Linda Barrows Robert Benson Theodore & Fran Bickart - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart Stark Biddle Bruce Bjornlund Jim Blair Joan Bok Lucile Brink Dave Brown Brian Carter & Leah Keller Winston Churchill Andrew Conroy Robert & Cheryl Dewees Mary Jane Dexter Elizabeth Edgerton - In memory of Philip Edgerton Bruce & Joan Erickson Christina Erickson Trevor Evans Rachel Farrar Francis Farwell Charles Faulkner Patricia Fletcher Susan & Brian Flynn Amelia Fritz Liam & Ann Gannon - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart Judy Geer & Richard Dreissigacker Kenneth & Janet Gibbons Margaret Gibson Robert & Jean Gilpin Susan & Robert Goodby Peter Gould Philip Gray Clive Gray Robert & Suzanne Griffiths Virginia Hagen Jan & Heloisa Herder John & Dorothy Herzog Sarabelle Hitchner Sally Hughey - In memory of Margaret Field Jeff & Anna Hutchins Elizabeth Kepes & Thomas Vandewater Emily Kunreuther Jon Larsen Merrill Leffler & Ann Slayton Neil Lehrman Louisa Levine Duane Lighthall Mary Paul Loomis - In honor of Lucy Hankinson Eleanor Inouye Macleod - In memory of Emery Katzenbach William Manning Howard Manosh

In Honor of Gail Henry’s 60th Birthday D. Michael Bogdanowicz W. Malcolm & Arline Bownes Kenneth & Diana Celmer Dana Dakin Elisabeth & Morgan Densley Elaine Economides Joost David & Victoria Gallagher Alice Garabedian Anne Flaxman Geisser

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George Manyan Jessica Manyan Charles Motta Martin & Alix Mugar Richard & Marguery Navaroli K. Robert & Agorita Norling John & Mary Phillips Beth & Stanley Robinson J. Michael Rogers

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C. Austin & Betty McDonnell Mark McGrath Frank & Joan McGuigan Sylvia McKean John Miller Ross & Diane Morgan Robert & Celia Morris Tony & Dorothy Morse C. Twiggs Myers - In memory of Doug Field Dianna Noyes Barbara Paterson & James Whitby John Paterson John & Melinda Patterson James Peale David Prentice Franz Reichsman Jay & Gail Reuben Norman Rioux Leon Robinette Mary Anthony Cox Rowell Tim Rumbinas Lewis & Charlotte Russell Lisa Sammet James Sandison Peggy Sapphire & Robert Feinberg Bettina Sawhill Espe Edward & Joan Sayre Frank & Carolyn Sepe Bruce & Mary Sloat Roger Smith Mary Jo Smyth - In honor of Richard T. Smyth Ann Spearing - In memory of Tina Ray - In memory of K. Stephen Williams - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart - In memory of George Gardner Russell & Janet Spring Horace & Shirley Strong Leonard Sussman Jay Swainbank Robert & Joan Twiss Neil & Barbara Ulman Doug Viles Llyd Wells Ted & Mary Wendell Mary Jo White Cheryl Williams - In memory of K. Stephen Williams A. Joseph Wyse Constance Young Anonymous

Bequests

Georgiana Ducas Charitable Trust

Carol Ann Saul Constance Shapiro Frederick & Edwina Shaw Bruce & Marjorie Teele Will & Lulu Wootton Sawyer Orchards Miscellaneous Friends - New Hampshire Miscellaneous Friends - New York City

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Third Annual Rural Heritage Institute:

Promises and Limits of Local Action

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by Pavel Cenkl

hat do a hand drill, a canoe paddle, a wheelbarrow, beer cans,

versity of New Hampshire led the keynote presentation and discussed

by hand, contributing to a community garden, sharing an experience

England. During the question and answer section of the presentation

and fireworks have in common? Whether building planters

with peers, or facing the challenges of community living, these objects

each represent a personal connection to place that slowly became the

roots of a larger conversation about community. On the final morning of the Third Annual Rural Heritage Institute at Sterling College,

Ariana McBride of the Orton Family Foundation led a session in which participants were given just one minute to describe how their object

represents their community. She then explained how the Foundation

uses stories and local knowledge as an essential part of the planning and zoning process. Ariana’s presentation was one in a series at the

Institute that asked participants to look at the way we can incorporate local thinking into a larger framework so that we can better shape local and regional planning decisions and improve our future relationship with the world in which we live.

More than forty participants – some from just down the road in Crafts-

bury and some from as far away as the Netherlands made their way to

their Vision for Healthy Food Culture and Sustainable Farming in New the panel was asked outright whether local is enough. Brian and Mateo answered with a resounding ‘no’. Mateo pointed out that if his Jasper

Hill Creamery cheese were not for sale in Los Angeles, it would not be for sale at local stores and farmers’ markets. The problem, according to Mateo, is that selling a few pounds of cheese in a morning barely covers the cost of paying someone to be at a market.

Saturday night included a showing of Under the Cloak of Darkness:

Vermont’s Mexican Farm Workers a film by Bjorn Jackson, followed by a discussion about the film led by Chris Urban, one of the leading participants in the documentary project. The film pointed out that as much

as Vermont would like to see itself as a small agricultural community, we increasingly depend upon a largely unseen labor force from beyond our borders.

The conference ended with an interactive session led by recent Sterling

Sterling College the weekend of June 18-20 for Is Local Enough? The

graduate and adjunct faculty member Jody Stoddard about Local Fiber,

sored symposium. This year’s conference followed up on past topics

to feel freshly shorn wool full of lanolin and burrs, to see the various

Farms and Community in 2009. Over the three days of the Institute

tion participants had the opportunity to card wool and try drop-spindle

The Discovery of Place; New Technologies for Mapping Culture and

land dress or arasaid, was on display and included wools dyed with

and Telling Stories about Place; Local Fiber, Dyeing and Clothing;

The question remains, Is Local Enough? The conclusion that many

Promises and Limits of Local Action, Sterling’s second ASLE spon-

Dyeing and Clothing. Jody’s hands-on session allowed participants

including The Place of Work in Rural Communities in 2008 and Food,

stages of washing, and to extract dye from lichen. After the presenta-

participants engaged in topics such as Farmers, Policy, and Identity;

spinning. Jody’s senior project, the manufacture of a traditional High-

Heritage; Philosophies and Politics of the Local and Global; Writing

lichens and walnut husks.

Nature and Culture in the Northern Forest; and Secession as a Path to Sustainability.

participants came to is no, local is not enough, but it is an essential piece of a larger solution. What we came to understand is the need for a

Friday evening Brian Donahue, Director of Environmental Studies at

network of locally minded communities that communicate and cooper-

bek from the University of Vermont Department of Nutrition and Food

where local ideas and thinking are part of a larger global community

Brandeis University; Mateo Kehler of Jasper Hill Creamery; Amy Tru-

ate. We need to turn our eyes outward and look forward to a future

Sciences; and John Carroll, Professor of Natural Resources at the Uni-

and economy. 

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One Last Time on the Lowells? I

t hurts as much as anything. It’s a good but bitter lesson in… in what?

Capitalism vs. community? Necessity over nature? A moral imperative

vs. the Hippocratic Oath?

What it is is 20 to 27 443-foot tall wind turbines to be planted along three miles and over five flattened peaks of the Lowell Range ridgeline, to stare

down, red warning lights flashing, on Albany, Craftsbury, Lowell, and adjacent towns and villages.

It is also the end of more than 33 years of Expedition. At least Expedition as we’ve known it.

Along with the academic and experiential goals of Sterling’s three-night

four-day mid-December trek – no stoves, remember, and no tents – the physical goal was to hike that ridgeline through the brush and timber, up

and down, ice, snow, rain and whatever else, everyone together. No one

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by Will Wootton

deed look like a train getting going, powered by money and persistence, virtually unstoppable by its mass.

At Sterling—where sustainability is viewed as a balance of environment,

community, economy, and wellness – the ironically named Kingdom Community Wind project strikes many, if not most, as considerably out of balance. Take those concepts in any way you wish: in the classroom or in the

field; individually or as a whole; site-specific or state-wide; weighed against alternatives, or not. But in Albany, Craftsbury and other villages groups are forming, money is being raised, opposition is being organized. Still, there is a sense that the permitting process, less rigorous than the respected and be-

grudged Act 250 Vermonters are accustomed to, is too costly and too utility-

friendly to overcome. Indeed lacking either a national or state sustainable energy policy, much less vision, the ten or so ridgeline wind turbine projects

knows the full tally, but at least 1,000 Sterling alumni have trekked that

underway or proposed in Vermont can resemble a greenish version of the

December will mark Vice-President Ned Houston’s 34th Expedition.

For Sterling and Expedition the flattening of the ridgeline and the con-

ridge, and certainly more than 100 members of the faculty and staff. This

wildcat days of oil exploration.

The access road will approach from Rt 100 on the west flank of the Range,

struction of the towers will be a loss of place. Probably nowhere else can

feet. The clearings and concrete pads for the individual towers will measure

on the Common hours or minutes before Expedition dinner. For others, a

approximate north and south terminals of the project; a year from now if

away. But losing the ridgeline is also a loss of concept, of definition. The 12

secured, the road will be built and Expedition’s path will have been cleared,

of the Northeast Kingdom. They’ve always been there. You can see them in

and then travel the ridgeline for three miles, cleared to widths up to 170

Expedition begin 20 miles up range and walk all the way home, arriving

475 feet across, about half an acre. Already, two flashing red lights mark the

lit up ridgeline is a loss of hunting camps and property values, even miles

Green Mountain Power’s construction plans are on schedule and permit

or so peaks of the Lowell Range rolling gently northward define this part

widened, leveled, and gone even before the towers are built.

your mind exactly as they were in the minds of generations of Vermonters,

Such expressions as “Vermont’s version of mountain top leveling” and “de-

Colonial settlers, and Native Americans. Soon, in the middle of the Range,

struction of 10,000 years of ecological and geological history,” hint at the

there will be a hole, an irrevocable distortion, up close uncomfortably loud

meetings and newspaper stories over the past year.

Expedition will go on, of course; already faculty member and Expedition

despair and even anger many feel and have expressed in numerous public

when the wind blows; from a distance toy-like spires against the horizon.

Whenever rural landscapes are exploited, whether it be wind farms or

leader Adrian Owens and others are planning exploratory routes. In the

grinds on. The town of Lowell is getting $400,000 a year for 20 years – not

and faculty, their heads bent to the weather, will undoubtedly feel as exhila-

towns are being offered $10,000 grants for ten years just for being there,

complishment and their stories and exaggerations at Expedition dinner will

massive trash dumps, money oils the gears even as the regulatory process

near future on some mid-December mountainside, the long line of students

bad for a town with a limited tax base and almost no industry. Surrounding

rated or miserable as they would have on the Lowells. Their sense of ac-

for being a good neighbor however vehemently opposed their collective

be well within the traditions and lore of Expedition. They will be members

opinion might be.

of the same club, deservedly so.

In rural areas the back yards are big enough, the economies thin enough,

But place lost is place lost forever, and especially for the witnesses, it hurts

and the politics dispersed wide enough that the permitting process can in-

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as much as anything. 

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Alumni News 2000s Newlyweds Chester Elliott, ’09, and Sarah Carson, ’10, live in Pennsylvania where Chester is a Solar Energy Specialist at a local green design and build firm. Sarah is considering becoming an organic inspector, which will more deeply connect her with the agricultural scene in Pennsylvania. She also plans to work with young people and continue with her crafts work. Brandon Hill, ’09, is an instructor at the Gardner School in Virginia. Jenn Goldstein, ’09, is an apprentice instructor at Chewonki Foundation in Maine. Lucy Donaghy, ’09, and Robert Linck,’98, were married and had a baby boy, Stig Bickart Linck, earlier this summer. Matt Lisk, ’09, is attending Prescott for his M.A. Tony Dalisio, ’08, is working on his M.S. in Biology at Emporia State University in Emporia, KS. “My research here is focused on investigating dialect existence among alpine songbirds.” Kathy Fournier, ’08, is with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and has obtained an M.S. in Environmental Studies, Writing and Communications from Green Mountain College. Lucy Parker, ‘08, travelled around Scotland and Ireland after graduating from Sterling, and then hiked the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine in 2010. She writes, “I thought this six month adventure had nothing to do with what I had spent four years studying (Eco-tourism), but one day, I realized that they were related and I was actually doing research. While hiking, I stayed in hostels that are

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Photo: Andy Messenger, ‘10, kissing his bride Abigail Bline.

close to the trail to take a shower, wash my clothes, and sleep in a bed. I have been taking notes on what I like and dislike about each place in hopes that someday I can create the perfect place where tourists, hikers and families can come to relax.” Hannah Vollmer, ’07, says she is “still living in a school bus in Thornton, NH, making pickles and wine. Working at Lahout’s Country Clothing and Ski Shop in Lincoln, NH, where it’s quiet all summer and a party all winter. Hoping to someday build a home with hot, running water.” Michelle Connair, ’06, visited Vermont this summer, and says she “just graduated with a Masters in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine at ASAOM in Tucson, AZ. I am working at a community acupuncture clinic in Brattleboro and also starting a private practice of acupuncture and herbal medicine in the surrounding area.” Dan Schieffelin, ’06, and Dan Chehayl, ’06, spent 45 days hiking the Brooks Range and leading a group of teens on a leadership expedition for Camp Manito-wish, a YMCA organization. Dan Schieffelin hopes to get a job in Antarctica this winter. Andy Mollohan, ’06, recently graduated from Shenandoah University where he focused on international business and trade. He’s seeking positions in international trade between the US and North, Central and South America, focusing on green energy production and correlating technologies. Andy Webster, ’06, is returning to East High School in Rochester NY to teach earth science. He received his M.Ed. at Union College in ’10. Andy is married to Maggie Leasure, ’04. Vanessa Petro,’06, tells us she is entering graduate school in the fall.

Ian McEwen, ’06, and Tayler Knopf,’07, are still in Denali Park, Alaska. Ian is in his fourth season at Denali National Park. In the fall, he works as a mechanic at the United States Antarctic Programs South Pole Station. Tayler spends her summers working for Denali National Park Wilderness Centers as a naturalist guide.  In the off season, she is taking nursing program prerequisites at the University of Alaska.     Adam Lewandowski, ’04, says, “I bought a house with my wife, Gretchen, on the Nevada side of Lake Tahoe. We’ve been fixing it up and enjoy playing with our son who will be 2 in December. I’m still managing river and wetland restoration projects with the Tahoe Conservancy, and enjoying everything the Sierras have to offer.” Marijke Riddering, ’00, works as house manager for Harry’s Mother Runaway Youth Shelter. She says, “It’s all about urban expeditions now.” Jaime Winans,’00, is “keeping plenty busy pursuing a Ph.D. in curriculum studies at Texas A&M University--Corpus Christi and working as the executive director of the Odyssey After School Enrichment Program. The organization provides after school learning opportunities for students in grades 1 through 6, and service-learning is one of our main strands. For my research I’m planning a qualitative case study to explore students’ experience of service-learning, although I’m still looking for a research site.” Ryuichi “Lu” Kuwagaki, ’00, was married recently and sent a photographic post card. Maggie Leasure, ‘04, writes, “Andy (Webster, ‘06) and I have been reconnecting with Scott Shope,’00! We love hanging out with him, Jocelyn and their sons Carter and Owen. It’s great to have Sterling

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folks around. Dorothy and Ernie are 2 and six months. Andy is teaching Earth Science in the city of Rochester and we are busily building our farm. This year we raised some meat birds and a big garden, and have some sheep and hens too. Come visit lovely Hemlock, NY! We always have room for guests!

1990s Jennifer Trombley, ’98, is a registered nurse in Austin, TX, and had a baby girl, Stella, last May. She hopes to come to Vermont in October and would like to be in touch with more Sterling ‘98ers. Find her on our Facebook alumni page. David Stolpe, ’94, just completed his Wisconsin Principal Licensure program at Marquette University, and started his new job as dean of students at Frank Lloyd Wright Intermediate School in the West Allis/West Milwaukee School District. He says life at home is great with his son Sam who is starting 3rd grade, his daughter Elizabeth who is beginning K3, his fantastic wife Rachel, and the pets. thestolpes@att.net. Katherine (Kat) Yoxall, ‘94 & ‘95, is “living in Connecticut, divorced, 4 kids, working as a Recreation Specialist with the mentally handicapped, and coaching soccer.” Fellow alumni can reach her at stakkat@hotmail.com

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Julie Wormser,’86, is “living in an 1800s Irish potato famine refugee house in North Cambridge, MA with her husband, Fred Small, a UU minister, and their Chinese-American daughter, Lucy Dao Lin Emerson. I balance my work on fisheries management for the Environmental Defense Fund by coming home to our urban ‘micro-farm,’ with veggies, fruit and even some chickens in our postage stamp (but south-facing) backyard. Three cheers to Sterling for setting me on this path--all of it.” Tucker Mitchell, ‘86, has worked for the Shaw Group  for over 20 years. “Great job, company and people.  I got lucky. The concept of community instilled in my bones from Sterling is still going strong.  I’ve recently started a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) in my town to train residents in case of large scale emergency.  I was recently interviewed about the program on local cable.  If you want to watch, you can view it on YouTube.  Crappy production, but the subject matter was well covered.  I’ll be doing regular TV spots including hazardous materials at home, how to use a fire extinguisher and other similar topics.   It’s exciting.  Another gem picked up at Sterling from Dave Brown was bird watching.  I’ve really gotten into it and do it around the country as I travel.  Interested parties can view and/or join my blog @ www.johnhmitchell.blogspot.com  or search Birdman of Bridgewater.  I’m a BIRD NERD.  Will always cherish the times,

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life-long friends and memories from Sterling.  Can still taste the mud!!  Jethro McClellen,’89, updates us saying that after graduation, he “moved around a lot, and then spent the ‘90s in Boulder, Colorado. I spent five years (‘02 to ‘07) in Taos, New Mexico (very beautiful part of the planet!), with my longtime partner Shelley, then came back to Boulder with her and started working for four-star, green/eco-friendly hotel, the St. Julien. Lynn Atkins,’88, says, “Not much new happening here. Still gardening and landscaping on the South Shore. I walk the beaches and forests in my spare time and pick up trash... so much of it. I write essays about what I see and how people relate to the environment here. I have 2 Facebook profiles; #1 ‘Lynn Atkins’ is personal and #2 ‘Bearfoot Joanne’ is about picking up trash and connecting with the landscape. Would love to hear from folks. Richard Smith, ’84/’94, is working on a 2.5 acre homestead in S.E. Ohio, part of a 58 acre parcel for which he is caretaker. Amy Schwartz, ’83, writes, “Let’s see -- rather staid and boring life I lead.  I teach history and coach girls’ JV lacrosse at Phillips Exeter Academy in NH.  In the summers I live in Trenton, ME near Acadia National Park and Mount Desert Island.  I’d love to connect with folks from my class.  My Sterling connections are limited these days to Amy Golodetz, ‘84 and Greg Leech, ’86, (not bad choices, I know!).  I spent the past week building a boardwalk with the

Angie Revallo, ‘09, and Ben Mackie, ‘09, were married September 11, 2010. They chose a perfect day to be at the Northwoods Lodge, in Orange, a 1,500 acre former hunting lodge property with a stunning short view, trout-filled pond, and hiking trails up into the Green Mountains. Numerous Sterling alumni camped out for two or three days to enjoy the site. Besides Angie and Ben’s family and friends, the Sterling crowd included Lucy Donaghy, her husband Robert Linck and their new son Stig, Hannah McHardy and Andy Szymczak, Adam McCullough, Pat Ploof, Will Skinner, Max Constant, Beth Mullen, Eric Scarbaci, Jenny Carlson, Armone Persing and Jonathan Kline (fresh in from Myanmar) with his wife Jessie, son River, and their newborn son, Ash. Will and Lulu Wootton were also there, but they didn’t camp out.

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help of an axe Ross Morgan gave me about fifteen years ago.  I think of Sterling mostly when I’m using tools.  It’s impossible to quantify its value -- it was one of the best experiences I’ve had, especially in education.” Rick Webster, ’83, tells us, “Life has been a wild ride since I left Sterling.  I have experienced much heartache, tragedy, and God’s blessings over the 25+ years since I was at Sterling. After serving eight years in the Army, I left the service in 1997 to focus on my family.  However, in January 2003 I lost my wife and my two children in an auto accident.  About 18 months later the Lord led me to Colorado where I was able to be a ski bum for four years, working as a ski patroller at Breckenridge Ski Resort.  The Lord then led me back into the Army after 10+ years away.  I rejoined the Army in February 2008 and was recently promoted to Major. The Lord also brought an amazing woman into my life and we were married in June 2009.  Although we do not have a family yet, we do plan one in the near future.  I am also finishing up a Masters of Divinity this semester

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with Liberty University on-line in hopes of transferring into the Army Chaplain Corps so I might serve Soldiers in Iraq or Afghanistan.” Deborah Segal,’83, says “I am a toxicologist with the U.S. EPA in DC. Have 2 daughters, 11 & 8, and husband Norm Boyle who also works for EPA. We live in Falls Church, Virginia, but spend much time out west as Norm is from Idaho.  I’d love to hear from Sterling ‘83 class: segal.deborah@epa.gov Jeff Levine, ‘82, sends “Greetings from the great white north.  I’m still working for the state of Alaska as a weights and measures inspector.  I am responsible for the northern arctic region and enjoy the challenges of the position and working with the great folks up here. Anyone who wants to contact me can at saunas@mosquitonet.com.   Hope all is well on The Common.” Beverly “BJ” Casserly, ‘82, says she has three sons. David is a sergeant in the USMC Reconnaissance Division; John is in his freshman college year; and Daniel is a high school junior in the top 10 of his

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class of 400. Beverly has been an administrative assistant (Business & Special Education) for 20 plus years in NJ schools and is on the Township Human Relations Committee. She is also Timber Creek High School Home and School President. Her husband ‘Glenn’ conceived and runs the recycling and composting facility in their community of 60,000 plus citizens (saves town  $2MM+ a year). “Still enjoy camping and birding. Hard here in NJ but fighting for as much open space and farmland as possible.” Nan Marshall, ’82, wrote us with “the latest. Just over a year ago we completed our move to rural, SW Viroqua,Wisconsin. It’s a small town, and we have 24 acres a mile away for which we are designing a passive solar house—hope to build next year. This is my second year of gardening, canning, and preserving food.  I have to admit that I do smile when I go into the basement and return with food that I put away myself.  My husband works at Organic Valley, a very laid-back organization.  You don’t even have to wear shoes! My 5-year-old boy is in kindergarten at the local Waldorf school.  We are really enjoying

Alumni Voyager Trip, July 2010 — Ash River Visitor Center, Minnesota Left to right in back: Bob Weinert, Jennifer Crow Weinert ‘88, Mack Weinert, Liz Poulsen ‘85, Chrisopher Barlow, John Barlow, Eli Barlow, Zach Weinert Left to right in front: Ruth Leech, Greg Leech ‘86, Amy Golodetz ‘86.

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this small town that is full of a very diverse and artistic population. I’m still amazed that I can hop on my bike and be out in farming country in about 5 minutes. Real wilderness is a bit farther away.  Email: tuamotu@aol.com John Gelwicks, ’81, writes: “Our first  investor has given the company I started www.egenindustries. com the funds to construct our first pyrolysis machine up, operational and generating renewable energy and biochar in S. California by Christmas.  I’ll send pictures when I’m sitting next to it running. Ross (Morgan) and I were chuckling that it  only took 30 years for me to finally get my environmental dream to come to reality and a full time career. Working in entertainment over the last 20 plus years, I’ve been able to donate time and money to environmental groups. I did have my own French Intensive Biodynamic Gardening business just after Sterling, and sold Solar Energy just after graduating, but never have I been able to realize my true passion—to help develop a new technology for renewable energy. I found one and started a company that helps forestry and agriculture have a real, long lasting and profound environmental impact. Ross and I have started a little communication on biochar, and he made some himself for his garden this year. He recently attended the Vermont Biochar Initiative—a tiny get-together that is growing in Vermont. I hope one day soon we can find a way to get a Genesis Machine there, make it mobile and have it available for Sterling students to use and help the local community. Hope all is well, that is the latest.   Give Ross a call and find out more about what is going on in Vermont with biochar.”   Marion Christoph, ’81, tells us that she had a busy, fit and healthy summer in SE Wisconsin. “A very green summer…bees aren’t doing well, however. All six kids were home during June, creating blissful chaos and lots of yard/home improvement projects.” Heather Allore, ‘80, has been on the faculty of Yale School of Medicine and Director of Biostatistics for the Program on Aging for about 11 years. She writes, “I’m active in my local community as chair of the East River Preserve, Guilford’s newest 624 acre coastal estuarine and upland forest preserve, as a director of the Guilford Land Conservation Trust protecting more than 3200 acres, and as the Town’s representative to the New England National Scenic Trail, the country’s new NST which has a terminus in Guilford and 16 miles of trail the length of Guilford.  I continue to protect land serving on the Town’s Land Acquisition Commission and maintain trails and habitat on the Land Stewardship Committee.  I also have traveled to the Himalayas, South Africa, Central America and throughout North America hiking and paddling.”

1970s Sam Card, ’79, is a substitute teacher for the Clarke County  public school system in Berryville, Virginia.   “I  worked most everyday during the 2009-2010 school year, and taught mostly at the high school and middle school.  During the winter, I enjoyed teaching a few days of elementary school classes.  I also do a lot of special education

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at the Johnson Williams Middle School in academic support and accelerating literacy.   In the spring, I thought of Sterling when I taught two days of high school vocational agriculture and a day of horticulture for high school girls, where students are involved in experiential education.  In all my classes, such as art, economics, English, history and science, I promote environmental awareness.   I help coach middle school cross country running and spring track.  I look forward to more classroom teaching and enjoy giving tennis lessons.” samcard60@hotmail.com  Geoffrey Schmidt,‘79, says he is “married for 25 years in October; three kids – Billy (24) just got out of the Marines, Pat (23) just got out of HamptonSydney College and is looking for  a job, Kathleen (17) will be a high school senior. I’m an optician, going on 13 years. Email schmidtgeoffrey@aol.com John Molina,’79, writes that his “youngest graduated high school and is off to college for music education. Spend as much time as possible at cottage on Camp Ellis Beach in Saco, Maine. Continuing work on a book about the first professional womens’ basketball team—the All American Red Heads.  These are women that shattered stereotypes by playing against men only and winning 75% from 1936-86.  Just got back from reunion with them where they played alumni of the NBA Portland Trailblazers in Eugene, Oregon.  I also helped save 60 acres of open space along the CT River by having it designated as passive recreation, away from industrial. My website is www.allamericanredheads.com” Mark Seltzer,’79, is starting another year as a mathematics teacher (9th and 10th grade) in Waterbury, CT.  Anne is busy baking high caloric products for Stop N Shop. Traveling around South Deerfield, MA in early August we found Dave Jackson’s, (’79) farm.  He was on vacation, so we did not get to see him. Anne and Mark have a new Cairn Terrier puppy.  Our dog Mitzi passed away.  Our youngest daughter recently got engaged.  We have another daughter and two boys.  They are working hard (chips off the old blocks). Finally, Mark continues to play violin.  He used to go up the stairway (forgot the building name) lecture hall at Sterling and tap on the piano. Lew Trumble, ‘78, writes, “I was just going through some books and paperwork and came across my completion certificate from Sterling along with some other Sterling related things.  I would get a kick out of hearing from other alumni from ‘78.  I am working for Penn State for the Cooperative Extension branch.  I work with the Pennsylvania 4-H horse program, developing and delivering educational programs for 29 counties in the western portion of PA.  I also coach 2 intercollegiate equestrian teams and still teach riding lessons and go horse showing.  As far as free time, I don’t have any...Hi to all and shoot me an email!” lewtrumble@aol.com   Bob “Woody” Hidding, ‘77, writes, “Things have been going quite well. At this point getting ready to get our son Robert off to Eastern Michigan University (junior year). Been traveling a lot lately, mostly in Africa—Botswana, Zimbabwe and South Africa. Mostly safari hunts, some photographic. Trying not to be eaten by lions. Still enjoying the outdoors.”

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at Colby College and Devon still in high school. Judy runs a community farm outside Boston: www. brookwoodcommunityfarm.org Mark Brunner, ’76, is “Working a lot; still have two kids in college. Still doing the mapling in the spring. Doing a little tree work, urban forestry. Taking down the trees planted on Arbor Day back in the 50’s. It seems the new owners put in a pool and the leaves fill it up in the fall. So it’s climbing and roping as you can’t fell them, too crowded. Still doing the physician recruiting work. Working for the NYS Thruway. I may take your toll money or hand out a ticket. If you’re going through Buffalo on Interstate 90, I may see ya. Still wanting to get up to Sterling, just have to find the time.” Daniel Einstein,’76, writes that “All’s well here in Madison, where I’ve been for the past 20 years. Still working for UW-Madison, but my position recently evolved from work at the campus Lakeshore Nature Preserve to a new role as the campus cultural and historic resources manager. This semester I’m also co-teaching a little seminar on John Muir, Aldo Leopold and the Effigy Mound Builders.  So 35 years after Steve Wright first introduced me to the Sand County Almanac, I’m re-reading the Almanac (again) with the students and we’ll be visiting the famous ‘Shack.’  My favorite chapter is still the ‘Good Oak’…timeless.” Eric Heller, ’75, writes, “My two teenage boys, dogs, rats, cat and I live in Stony Creek, NY in the southern Adirondacks.   We have an old summer camp on a large field in a big woodlot. It is very beautiful and benign here.  All are welcome to visit. I am a math instructor at Hudson Valley Community College and a perpetual grad student in the math department at SUNY Albany. It turns out that teaching math is what I do best. Since Sterling, I have continued to indulge my love of the wilderness and the skills it requires as well as basketball which has kept me fit and sane. I have developed new interests (an eclectic set) and new skills, but I am basically the same guy I was then… with less hair and more mass. I guess I won’t grow up.” 

In Memoriam Laurie Marie Brown, ’83, passed away on June 27, 2010, from pancreatic cancer. Our condolences to her husband Robert Fox, her children Duncan and Ericka, and her extended family. Laurie went on to work with the University of Minnesota Extension Service and the Soil Conservation Service. She was a “strong-willed adventurer all of her life.” Charles Woodard died in July 2010 after a long battle with lung cancer. He was an adjunct at Sterling College and a local artist who exhibited at the Brown Library. Our condolences to his family.

Judy Lieberman, ’76, says she has two kids, Aurora

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P.O. Box 72 Craftsbury Common, VT 05827

CommonVoice

Fall/Winter 2010

Photo: Sterling community raises awareness about climate change. 350 is the maximum safe level of atmospheric carbon. Video: www.sterlingcollege.edu/350

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CommonVoice: Fall/Winter 2010