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STEFANA SIMIC Architecture Portfolio 2013

BANJA

Thermal Spa Design Fulbright Fellowship | Ovcar Banja, Serbia | Spring 2012

4

AGING WALL Curtain Wall

Adv. Curtain Wall| Manhattan, NY | Spring 2010

12

COMMUTE IS PROCESSION Mixed Use Housing

Core III Studio | Queens, NYC | Fall 2009

16

A WOMEN’S GARDEN Meditation Space

Adv. V Studio | Amman, Jordan | Fall 2010

22 [ Page 2 ]

The building features a three layer southern facade: 1) single pane triangulated exterior. 2) intermediate solar scrim. 3) IGU interior curtain wall. The triangulated glass is framed within a system of tensioned mullions that support structural ducts. The panelization is held in place by a secondary system of cables and spider clamps. The north facade renders Warehouse LoftaRenovation the three dimentional southern skin into two dimentional diagrid surface (diagnol stick curtain wall Living Architecture | Bronx, NY | Fall 2010 system). The building inhales through the southern atrium via structural ducts which incorporate both active and passive HVAC systems. Alternatively, it exhales through an east-west exhaust system.

BRONX BUTTERFLY 30

PATCHWORK TENT Emergency Relief

Adv. IV Studio | Port-au-Prince, Haiti | Spring 2010

40 duct to slab detail

SIGH WALL Living Architecture

Living Architecture | Manhattan, NY | Spring 2010

46

PLASTIC RUSH Pioneer Living

Adv. VI Studio | Pacific Ocean | Spring 2011

48 [ Page 3 ]

This proposal capitalizes on the rich potential for Serbian spas (banja) to generate explosive health-tourism revenue. Of over 350 natural banjas, all of which are located at the crossroads of countless geothermal springs, Ovcar Banja in Central Serbia will be used as a case study. This proposal will identify how it can provide a potential model for sustainable national economic development. Not only is Serbia one of the richest geothermal regions in all of Europe, it is among the most opulent hydrological regions in the world. Its innumerable mineral and thermal springs are often accompanied by vast underground reservoirs of the purist waters on earth. These medicinal waters have been utilized by every civilization that has traversed or inhabited the Balkans since time immemorial. From early prehistoric ages through Roman and Turkish occupation, the ancient banja tradition continues to play a critical role in contemporary Serbian society. But despite their rich heritage and long history, Serbian spas are currently in crisis. Many of them are in total disrepair with inadequate infrastructure for long-term usage. Municipalities thus perceive their banjas to be financial burdens rather than the incredible social and economic opportunities that they are. This research compares the historic functions of the banja with its role in modern Serbian society, revealing the limitless potential for Serbia to expand, and even lead, Europe’s growing health tourism industry.

BANJA

Thermal Spa Design Architecture of Health Tourism Fulbright Fellowship | U.S. Department of State Fall 2011 - Spring 2012 [ Page 4 ]

Proposed Program of Ovcar Spa Wellness 350 beds 1500 m2

Sports/Recreation 8 Sports Terrains 3 Restaurants Bicycle Path 20620 m2

Hotels **, ***, **** 23110 m2

Apartments 10 Units *** 10 Units ** 20 Units ** 5150 m2

Youth Village Central Hall Dining Hall Sleeping Sports Field 3930 m2

Camping a 50 3500 m2

e

 T

 

L h T

E m

L

 

h R V

L E

L E m

 

G T T

  

Landscape Elemants Landscape Elements

Peeling Up Earth Layers

Lavender & Wildflower Field

Riverbank Walk

Bird Habitat

Thermal and Mineral Springs

Monastic Vegetable Garden [ Page 5 ]

[ Page 6 ]

Hydro-Geological Spa Zone The organizational pattern capitalizes on the existing hydro-geological parameters so that the spa complex exists in aesthetic and functional harmony with geological dynamics underneath the surface.

Substrate Pattern Major Underlying Geological Fault Lines

Blocking In Water Pockets Into the Pattern

1

Bath House 1

2

Mineral Water Pools 2 3

Spring Water Pools 3

Outline Major Compositional Elements [ Page 7 ]

Monastery Garden + Campground The site of the garden + campground is centrally located in the spa area and is currently owned by one of the local monasteries. This proposal would replace the existing asphalted site (currently a car camp) with a lush vegetable garden and camping structures reminiscent of the local architectural heritage of the region. Interaction on this site enables communication with a deeply spiritual group of the Serbian population, thus creating a site of both physical and spiritual rejuvenation.

[ Page 10 ]

The Banja Hotel The banja is composed of natural environments and structures that are made from locally harvested natural materials. The character of the spa is defined by a collective landscape derived from local flora and fauna and the vernacular architectural styles of the region, providing a critical role in the identity of the community.

[ Page 11 ]

2 A 1.01

14’-0”

12’-0”

TRAVERTINE

INSUL. VISION GLASS

3 A 1.01

3 A 1.01

2 A 1.01 4’-0”

1 A 1.01

This curtain wall, designed for a NYC town house, is composed of two module units with the following dimensions: 14’ x 4’ and 12’ x 4’. The substrate pattern of rectangular stones offer visual variety and depth, while the regularized and modular unit frames underneath offer simplicity of construction and assembly. The travertine slabs are offset from the unit at varying distances (either 1” or 3”) and enhance the perceived irregularity as the depth of the curtain wall is not constant across the entire curtain wall area. In addition, the units themselves alternate positions in relation to the floor slab. Therefore the stack joint has two positions – either at the floor line, or three feet above it. Sandwiched in between the two layers of travertine stone is a deep insulation layer that is punched through at random heights with an IGU unit. Due to the large depth (up to 18”) of the curtain wall, the mullion must be constructed in parts. The exterior frame of the mullion are snapped on after the travertine panels or IGUs are put in place. All interior parts of the mullions, the snap on frame as well as a structural component, are additive and are bolted or snapped on during the final phases of construction.

PARTIAL ELEVATION 3/4”=1’-0”

8

A 1.04

3 A 1.01

PLAN 3/4”=1’-0”

AGING WALL Stone Curtain Wall

Curtain Wall Design Adv. Curtain Wall | Manhattan, NY | Spring 2011

[ Page 12 ]

EDGE OF CONC. SLAB

Rendering of Curtain Wall The multi-layered and doubled cladded substrate pattern assumes a thick monolithic quality and stability. Natural erosion patterns due to oxidations of iron on stone is allowed to form.

Axonometric of Curtain Wall Unit 1. Frame 2. Travertine 3. Aluminum Spacer 4. Aluminum Mullion 5. Stack Joint 6. Extension 7. Aluminum Spacer 8. Travertine 9. Frame

5

STACK JOINT

3

ALUM MULLION

2

6

7

8

9

FRAME

TRAVERTINE

ALUM SPACER

EXTENSION

4

ALUM SPACER

TRAVERTINE

1

FRAME

AXON

AXON

NOT TO SCALE

NOT TO SCALE

[ Page 13 ]

5 A 1.02

4'-10"

4'-10"

9 A 1.04

7

7

A 1.03

A 1.03

TYPICAL STACK JOINT TYPICAL SECTION OF HORIZONTAL MEMBER AT GLASS 6 A 1.03

1”=1”

7

TYPICAL SECTION OF HORIZONTAL MEMBER AT STONE 1”=1”

2'-6 "

2'-6 "

A 1.03

1”=1”

6

6

A 1.03

A 1.03

ALUM. MULLION ALUM. MULLION

INSUL. UNIT: INSUL. UNIT: 1/2” AIR 1/2” SPACE, AIR SPACE, 1/4 I.L 1/4 I.L 6

A 1.03

TYPICAL SECTION OF HORIZONTAL MEMBER AT GLASS 1”=1”

Typical Sections of Horizontal Members

4'-6"

4'-6"

14’-0”

5 A 1.02

10’-9”

9 A 1.04

14’-0”

9 A 1.04

TYPICAL MULLION 1”=1”

10’-9”

8 A 1.04

The units themselves alternate positions in relation to the floor slab. Therefore the stack joint has two positions – either at the floor line, or three feet above it. Sandwiched in between the two layers of travertine 7

TRAVERTINE TRAVERTINE

stone is a deep insulation layer that is punched through

TYPICAL SECTION OF HORIZONTAL MEMBER AT STONE 1”=1”

at random heights with an IGU unit.

2'-0"

2'-0"

A 1.03

4

4

A 1.02

A 1.02

CAST-INCAST-IN EMBED EMBED

FIRE SAFING FIRE SAFING AND SMOKE AND SMOKE BARRIER BARRIER

[ Page 14 ]

2

SECTION SECTION 2

1

1

2

2

3

3

4 5 6

4 5 6

TRAVERTINE

TRAVERTINE

ALUM. SPACER

ALUM. SPACER

SMOKE STOPE SCREWED TO CONC. SLAB

SMOKE STOPE SCREWED TO CONC. SLAB

CAST IN EMBED

MINERAL FIBRE INSULATION

MINERAL FIBRE FIRESAFING

4

TYPICAL SECTION OF STACK JOINT AT ANCHOR

Typical Section of Stack Joint

A 1.02

3”=1’-0”

1. Travertine 2. Aluminum Spacer 3. Smoke Stop Screwed to Conc. Slab 4. Cast in Embed 5. Mineral Fibre Insulation 6. Mineral Fibre Fire Safing

5

CAST IN EMBED

MINERAL FIBRE INSULATION

MINERAL FIBRE FIRESAFING

TYPICAL SECTION AT ANCHOR

Typical Section at Anchor

A 1.02

3”=1’-0”

1. Travertine 2. Aluminum Spacer 3. Smoke Stop Screwed to Conc. Slab 4. Cast in Embed 5. Mineral Fibre Insulation 6. Mineral Fibre Fire Safing

STEFANA SIMIC ADVANCED CURTAIN WALL PROF. BOB HEINGTES

A 1.02

1

CAST-IN EMBED

2

EDGE OF CONC. SLAB

3

ALUM. MULLION

4

TRAVERTINE

Typical Mullion Plan at Anchor

10

A 1.05

TYPICAL MULLION PLAN AT ANCHOR 1”=1”

1. Cast in Embed 2. Edge of Concrete Slab 3. Aluminum Mullion 4. Travertine

STEFANA SIMIC ADVANCED CURTAIN WALL PROF. BOB HEINGTES

A 1.05

[ Page 15 ]

The site is a mediation between Manhattan and Long Island City; providing the amenities of a city with the atmosphere of a locality. The development has an adaptive building strategy that establishes a framework for an environmentally symbiotic society; one that fortifies the equilibrium between the individual and the global community. Addressing the needs of the social housing crisis in Manhattan, this topology mandates a flux between the individual and social-scape. Inhabitants interface through community activity, following an ideology based on the optimization of a lifestyle attuned with culture, environment, and human awareness.

COMMUTE IS PROCESSION Social Flux

Mixed Use Housing Core Studio III | Long Island City, NY | Spring 2009

[ Page 16 ]

BIKE BUS CAR

South Elevation

Section

1 Promenade 2 Transit Hub 3 Elevated Field 4 Glass Tower 5 Central Underpass 6 Hanging Gardens

Plan Diagram of Transportation Hubs The building is a member of the NYC transit system (due to location) and is designed to decelerate incoming residents and accelerate out- going ones. [ Page 17 ]

Grade changes in and around the building marshal traffic flows. The perpetually shifting programs of the building mimic the constant programmatic changes during one’s commute home. Passing through the library, winding around the day care, and arriving at ones apartment moves each inhabitant through different ‘barrios’ of the building

[ Page 18 ]

Hanging Gardens, Hanging Stairs

[ Page 19 ]

Transit Hub Region Narratives converge and divide like the spaces themselves.

Transit Hub Region Brownstone type unit, forking ramp leads to an individual stoop. [ Page 20 ]

Hanging Garden 1 Bedroom Unit (Split Level), hung terrace and exterior stairs.

Central Underpass At the Central Underpass, where varied forms of traffic converge, the resident’s velocities decrease as they rise into the building.

Transit Hub Unit

Central Underpass Unit

Hanging Garden Unit [ Page 21 ]

Jordan has a tradition of using earth to create space and architecture. Within the steep slopes of Amman’s hills, one may find tiny caves – housing carved out of the not-so-far-away past. This proposal for a women’s garden in downtown Amman interfaces with the existing site by negotiating between passive and active responses to the site’s steep and crumbling topography – sometimes excavating, sometimes extruding, and sometimes letting it be. The strict Islamic garden typology of axial walkways and central pavilions is well suited for flat terrain but in this proposal it is parametrically adapted and re-conceptualized to make compromises between public pathways and private walkways, what is shielded and what is exposed, what is wall and what is pavilion, what is reinforced and what will soon become hill-side once again.

A WOMEN’S GARDEN Meditation Space in a Wounded City Parametric Design Adv. V Studio | Amman, Jordan | Fall 2010

[ Page 22 ]

The site is the location of landslide in the 1980’s that resulted in a visible gap been in the urban landscape of the city and maintained by a geological collapse in the rocks beneath--- a loose strata of flint and soft limestone. The site now remains as scar, a wound that refuses to heal, and for this reason it remains as a gap in a very dense fabric, and in the minds of Ammanites yet an immense opportunity for redevelopment in the midst of high architectural density. The proposal envisions a monolithic stone structure, a Women’s Garden, that will allow fo the culture and lives of all Jordanian women to overflow in this safe and peaceful sanctuary.

[ Page 23 ]

Typology

Walls

Area

Interior Exterior

Pavilion

Occupation

Corridors

Circulation

Privacy

Depth

Seperation

Slope

Accesibility

Case Study of Sacred Space

Islamic Garden Typology

This ancient Ethiopian Orthodox Church uses the earth as

Strict system of axial walkways, intersecting in the center to

space for architecture and capitalized on the exchanges be-

form a pavilion. Ideologically there would be an extension of

tween positive and negative, void and mass. Process of exca-

space radiating outwards from the pavilion, but due to the ur-

vation is studied in terms of what is revealed over time – soil

ban density of Islamic cities, typology of walls as buffers, and

conditions, the surface of the church, and subjective experi-

depth of garden as privacy becomes the driving metric of the

ence of that space after it is realized (the direct response to hu-

garden type and design process.

man scale).

[ Page 24 ]

Inward Outward

Public Private

Sound Visual

Sound Visual

Gender and Generational Circulation Public traverses the site along areas of least slope, women break off this path to enter the garden spaces, and children transgress both boundaries.

[ Page 25 ]

GH definition diverts grid away from public path and toward private spaces. Impractical Grid

GH definition application to site and new grid. Grid Adaptation

New grid as it interacts with the existing geological environment. Circulation and Type [ Page 26 ]

N

Site Plan

Pavilion Extrusions from Adapted Grid

Dense Urban Context

Meditation Space

Section Central Galleries [ Page 27 ]

[ Page 28 ]

[ Page 29 ]

The building features a three layer southern facade: 1) single pane triangulated exterior. 2) intermediate solar scrim. 3) IGU interior curtain wall. The triangulated glass is framed within a system of tensioned mullions that support structural ducts. The panelization is held in place by a secondary system of cables and spider clam ps. The north facade renders the three dimensional southern skin into a two dimensional diagrid surface (diagonal stick curtain wall system). The building inhales through the southern atrium via structural ducts which incorporate both active and passive HVAC systems. Alternatively, it exhales through an east-west exhaust system.

BRONX BUTTERFLY Greenhouse

Loft Renovation Advanced Studio V | Bronx, NY | Fall 2010

[ Page 30 ]

1

2

3 Triple Layer Elevations 1 2 3

single pane triangulated exterior intermediate solar scrim IGU interior curtain wall

Partial Elevation

Vision: Structural ducts support an undulating atrium facade. Strategy: Integrated passive and active HVAC, ducts and roof respectively Solution: Triple skin with spider clamps, perforated metal and vapor barrier:

[ Page 31 ]

270’

2

1 20.5’

35’

27’

3

4

35’

35’

5

6

7 35’

35’

35’

14.00

28’

14’ 7'

7'

1"

14’

1"

2.5'

116’ 14’

14’

14’

18’

CORE

CORE

20.5’

12’

12’

12’

12’

12’

12’

12’

47’

Elevation Of Metal Scrim

Metal Scrim Panels

270’

2

1 20.5’

35’

27’

3 35’

4 35���

5

6

7 35’

35’

35’

14.00

28’

14.00

14’

7'

7'

14’ 7'

7'

116’

1"

1" 5"

5"

2.5'

14’

2.5' 6"

6"

14’

14’

18’

CORE

CORE

20.5’

12’

12’

12’

12’

12’

12’

12’

47’

Elevation Of Glass Curtain Wall

[ Page 32 ]

Curtain Wall Panels

261.75’

2

1 20.5’

35’

35’

5

35’

6 35’

35’

15’

7 35’

C

27’

3.25’

4

3

24’

B

51.5’

MECH.

ELEV.

24’

A

MECH.

3.25’

15’

Building Plan

2

1 28.5’

12’

35’

12’

3 35’

12’

4 35’

12’

5 35’

12’

6 35’

7 35’

12’

12’

C

12’

24’

B

60’

12’

A

24’

REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMN

12’

1’ REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL

1’ REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL

Foundation Plan

[ Page 33 ]

1. Neoprene Water Seal 2. Silicon Bead 3. Glass Setting Bead (Rubber) 4. Aluminum Extrusion 5. Halfen Anchor 6. Fireproof Block 7. Insulated Spandrel Panel 8. Steel Beyond 9. Cable Anchor 10. Plastic Shim 11. Column Beyond

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11

Curtain WallCurtain to Slab Wall Detailto Slab Detail 3” = 1’ The curtain wall unit is suspended from a steel spandrel panel that connects to the slab edge with a halfen anchor. Every other spandrel panel is perforated to allow for a curtain wall anchor or a duct to penetrate it. A stack joint at the top of the spandrel holds the unit to the one above and serves as a weather barrier. Firestop behind this prevents fire from spreading between floors. From within the building a viewer sees only glass between the bench on top of the upturned beam and the floor above.

1insulated louvers 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11

Duct to Slab Detail

Duct to Slab Detail 3”=1’

[ Page 34 ]

Ducts from the outer curtain wall imbricate the slab edge beneath the continuous upturned beam. Insulation, including operable insulated louvers, surrounds all of the duct work. A

8

Duct toLouvers Slab Detail 3”=1’ 1. Insulated Ducts from the outer curtain imbricate the slab edge be2. Aluminum Duct towall AHU neath the continuous upturned beam. Insulation, including operable insulated louvers, surrounds all of the duct work. A 3. Walnut Bench (Duct Cover) fabreeka pad serves as insulation where the steel is bolted to the slab. The louvers are opened into the room for natural 4. 2ventilation hr Shaftwall Construction or closed to route air to the Air Handling Unit. A walnut bench encloses the duct to the AHU, which is continu5. Triple 1/2” Gypsum Layers ous inside the upturned beam. A gypsum wall serves as fire protection around this duct. 6. Aluminum I Stud 7. 2” Gypsum Insulation 8. Reinforced Concrete 9. Bolt Plate 10. Anchor Bolt 11. Fabreeka Pad

261.5’

2

1 27’

35’

35’

3.5’

4 35’

5 35’

6

15’

7 35’

35’

C

20.5’

3

24’

B

51.5’

MECH

MECH

ELEV

A

24’

3.5’

15’

Mechanical Plan

HVAC - Passive & Active During temperate climates (through the spring and fall) the building inhales outside air through the southern atrium via the structural ducts. These ducts have one end embedded in the floor slabs and the other exposed to the exterior. They also feature independent, insulated VAV systems. Insulated louvers control whether the grill is open (allowing outside air to flow through the space) or closed (pushing outside air to the conditioning units).

Mechanical System Axonometric Return Vent Exhaust Conditioned Air Heat Recovery Unit Air Handling Unit Duct/Outside Supply [ Page 35 ]

28.00

14.00 FEET

LEVEL 6

LEVEL 5

14.00 FEET

Partial Elevation Showing Spider Clamps SPIDER CLAMP

SPIDER CLAMP

TIE-ROD CONNECTOR RUBBER SLEEVE AIR VENT

Section of Triangulated Curtain Wall [ Page 36 ]

LEVEL 4

Detail of Glass and Cable Connection to Structural Duct

Detail of Spider Clamp [ Page 37 ]

2’X2’ REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMN

IGU UNITIZED CURTAIN WALL

INT.

5’

CATWALK 5’

12” REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB

SUPPLY AIR DUCT SUPPLY AIR DUCT

7’ 7’ 14’ 14’

IGU UNITIZED CURTAIN WALL

INT.

CATWALK

SUPPLY AIR DUCT 4’

15.5’

SUPPLY AIR DUCT

IGU UNITIZED CURTAIN WALL 8” STEEL MULLION 14’

METALSCRIM PERFORATED CURTAIN WALL 9’’

INT.

CATWALK SUPPLY AIR DUCT SUPPLY AIR DUCT

1’ 2.5’

GREEN ATRIUM SPACE

EXT.

3.5’ 11’ 18.5’

Axonometric Of Curtain Wall And Atrium Space

[ Page 38 ]

1. Reinforced Concrete Roof 2. 1” Steel Rebard 3. 2” Embedded Steel Plate 4. Field Weld 5. 8” Steel Mullion 6. 1” Thick Aluminum Scrim

REINFORCED CO 1

1”2 STEEL REBAR

REINFORCED CONCR

2”3EMBEDDED S

1” STEEL REBAR

2” EMBEDDED STEEL

4 FIELD WELD FIELD WELD

8” STEEL MULLION5

1”6THICK ALUMINUM SCRIM

8” STEEL MULLION

1” THICK ALUMINUM SCRIM

Detail Of Metal Scrim Connection To Roof

1” THICK ALUMINUM SCRIM 1” THICK SCRIM 1 ALUMINUM

CONCRETE SLAB

2

CONCRETE SLAB

3

1” STEEL REBAR

1” STEEL REBAR

4

2” THICK STEEL CATWALK

2” THICK STEEL CATWALK

5

DUCT

DUCT

6

STEEL L-BRACKET

STEEL L-BRACKET 3.5’

3.5’

7

STEEL BRACKET

1. 1” Thick Aluminum Scrim 2. Conrete Slab 3. 1” Steel Rebard 4. 2” Thick Steel Catwalk 5. Duct 6. Steel L-Bracket 7. Steel Bracket 8. Frabrikaa Insulation 9. Steel Bracket

8 STEEL BRACKET 9 BRACKET STEEL

FABRIKAA INSULATION

FABRIKAA INSULATION STEEL BRACKET

Detail Of Metal Scrim Connection To Slab [ Page 39 ]

sugar cane mud cakes

ousting of Presid water wells

Rejete, anti-Vodu worship agriculture Tap Tap

communal cookin tyre garden tyre bails roots soil erosion deforestation urban collapse tent city death

buildings collapse

buckling columns

limestone quarry limestone vodou quilts christianity karnaval color & naive art

1804 independen

mass communica

recharge stations mapou tree toxic waste garbage tyre dumping fear of the dark militarization political protest

Haiti has a long and tortured history and has struggled to maintain and nourish its cultural pride, resourc and memory of when they were once truly free. Now they are facing deforestation, lack of industry and mountain of rubble and death. This project maintains the fundamental aspects of Haitian culture, pays hommage to its history and paves the way to its positive projected future. Rubble is the foundation of the project. The proposal reuses waste, scraps and patches together things that are of potential value.

PATCHWORK TENT Emergency Relief Housing

Third Skin Advanced Studio IV | Port-au-Prince, Haiti | Spring 2010

[ Page 40 ]

[A]

[B]

[E] [C]

[F]

[D]

[I]

[G]

[J] [K]

[H]

[Q]

[L]

[N]

[R]

[M]

[P]

[O]

[S]

[T]

[U]

[Y]

[V]

[W]

[X]

[Z]

[ Page 41 ]

Patchwork Quilt Color, Expression and Craft Given Haitian love of color, expression, and craft, quilting seemed like a natural method to incorporate in the creation of the tent. At a scale of mass production , this would enable the introduction of a new type of craft that the Haitians are more than ready to adopt.

[ Page 42 ]

Patchwork Tent Assembly System of assembly using pvc to make additional support for the inflated water and concrete pouches. Assembly diagram shows

1

water capture system within the pouches of the doubly curved form.

2

3

Assembly Materials

4

1. Bicycle Inner Tube 2. Fiber 3. Bamboo 4. Filter Fabric [ Page 43 ]

Circle Pocket Prototype Old bicycle ties are placed inside pockets and filled with air. The quilted surfaces are

1

then resined and left to dry. The bicycle tubing is taken out and used for the creation of the next pocket.

2

3

1. Quilt 2. Inner Tubing 3. Concrete

[ Page 44 ]

Physical Model Depicting Integration of Tents into the Landscape

[ Page 45 ]

Embedding digital technology in analog building systems we can complicate and enrich the classic relationship between man and his/her architectural surroundings - a one-directional physical interaction between the kinetic body and the static architecture. With the integration of technology we can achieve a beyondreal, where architecture comes alive in its actual, haptic response. We are interested in an architecture that senses your physical and tactile self and, likewise, responds in a physical and tactile way. Through responsive digital technologies we can attempt to create a physical manifestation of “the Leibnizian fold, as an interior mechanism which at once reflects the outside and represents the forces of the inside [it] is more of a mediating device, a spatial instrument, than an object acted on from one side or another. Here the nature of Leibnizian space is crucial: thick and full, container and contained, it recognizes no distinctions between the solid and the void and thence no real division between the inside of a fold and its outside; the matter out of which a fold is constituted is after all the same matter as forms the space in the pleat, under the pleat and between the pleat.� (Vidler, Warped Space 225) complicating and blurring the boundaries of space and object with attention and communication.

SIGH WALL Responsive Fabric

Living Architecture Living Architecture | Manhattan, NY | Spring 2010

[ Page 46 ]

Time This intervention extends the responsive period of architectural design into the time of occupation. The reaction of architecture effects the occupant in real time. Surface This system allows the body to inscribe itself on the architectural surface. The architectural surface is fragmented into small components to provide a networked responsive membrane. Communication This system will allow the burden of attention and communication to be shared between the user and architecture transforming the traditional occupant as user, listener, interpreter into one of several participants in a conversation between him/herself and the architectural environment.

Circuit Diagram There are wo sensors: one for light and one for motion.

Installation of Sigh Wall in Avery Hall, Columbia Univeristy. [ Page 47 ]

A multidisciplinary and international research community floating in the Northern Pacific Gyre. The purpose of research is to harvest, collect and study plastics as well as conduct a social experience of alternative living built around the experience of plastics. The structure is designed to sustain human life in open ocean waters.

PLASTIC RUSH

Pioneer Living - Colonization in the Name of Science Stuff Studio Adv. VI Studio | Pacific Ocean | Spring 2011

[ Page 48 ]

15

14

4 7 16

13 3

5

8 1 9

2 12

11

6

17

Conversion of Plastics in Fuel

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

plastic feed nitrogen conveyor compressor flush excess water heater solid plastic liquid plastic cracking reactor carbon emergency exit distillation column partial condenser spray diesel fuel storage [ Page 49 ]

Transporation

Production

Aircraft Carrier

Collection

Container Ship

Research

Housing Equipment

Oil Rig

Assembly Diagram Reuse of Shipping Parts

Aeriel View Rendering [ Page 50 ]

1

2

3 1. Research 2. Water Passage 3. Housing

Section 01 Research Zone and Housing Zone (Separated by Water Passage)

1

Section 02 Floating Beach and Housing Complex

2

3 1. Beach 2. Housing 3. Boat Dock

[ Page 51 ]

Two opposing forces come to mind when considering the fundamental elements of fire and concrete/earth; uplifting (rising) forces versus downward (anchoring) forces. The Pavilion’s design is informed by the interaction of these contradictory forces. Inspired in part by hot air lanterns and balloons, mechanisms in the pavilion fill and lift fabric vessels with hot air, utilizing controlled fires to generate heat in the structure’s basin. Steel cables suspend these fire resistant fabrics above the fires where they await inflation. Just as sand bags and concrete blocks anchor hot air balloons to the ground until lift-off, the pavilion also emphasizes concrete’s anchoring force and fire’s uplifting abilities.

AIR PAVILION Pavilion Design [Four Elements] Professional Freelance [Macro Sea] Spring 2013

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Left to Right: 1. Hot Air Balloons 2. Tomas Saracenco “On Space Time Foam” 3. Chinese Lantern Festival 4. David Mafouda 5. Glowing Pavilion - Overtreders W

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Site of Former General Motors Factory in Tarrytown, NY (Hudson Valley)

Pavilion Site [ Page 54 ]

Pavilion Section

Pavilion Plan [ Page 55 ]

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Water serves to juxtapose both Fire and Earth. Water, which neutralizes fire by limiting it’s spread, provides heat relief by offering cooler temperatures. The water that penetrates the site also becomes a retreat from the concrete ground plane, challenging its rigidity and stability with a porous, undulating surface. Together, these elements are delicately blended with a mediating structural frame that creates a fluid and fluctuating enclosure. The spaces within embrace and celebrate perhaps the most familiar of fundamental elements, Air.

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The architecture makes this air visible to it occupants and surroundings. Fabric roof vessels lift and fall, responding to the changing air temperatures within. The site itself is a dreamscape, with shifting gravities and undulating ground planes. Located at the former General Motors factory on the Hudson River’s eastern waterfront, this place was once among the largest factories in North America. Today, a derelict and underutilized grid of columns protruding from a concrete expanse tells tales of regional glory, in complete silence. Used only occasionally by local youth who share their individual experiences with one another at odd hours of the night, this location is already a hub of local folklore, ripe for storytelling.

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During the day, the pavilion serves as an art exhibition space and sculpture park, filling the void for a highly-desired amenity within the area. At night it becomes illuminated with the glow of the countless fires of varying sizes, including a large central bonfire surrounded by the primary performance space. As the fires are lit, the pavilion’s fabric pockets fill up, impregnating it with inviting pillows of beckoning light.

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Portfolio 2013