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VOLUME 3 • NO. 2

Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis

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MISSION STATEMENT OF THE SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH OF THE THIRD ORDER OF ST. FRANCIS Dedication to Jesus Christ involves us intimately in the liberating and reconciling misThe Gathering Place

sion—to make God more deeply known and loved, and in so doing, draw all persons

is published to keep

to fuller and freer life.

the public informed Together with all our sisters and brothers

of the mission and

who strive for a more just world, we under-

ministry of the Sisters

take those activities which will promote the material and spiritual development of the

of St. Joseph of the

human family.

Third Order of St. Francis.

It’s no wonder St. Francis and St. Clare were happy people. Their lives were filled with meaning and simplified of all unnecessary trappings. What was essential was clear, and what was unimportant was unimportant. EDITOR

The Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis are like that. That’s because, if you have noticed, they follow the Rule of the Third Order Regular of St. Francis. What’s a Third Order, you ask? You will find the answer in this issue of Gathering Place. You will have the opportunity to find out what inspired St. Francis in the thirteenth century, and how St. Clare was able to put Francis’ ideals into a contemplative life of ministry. These ideals are drawn into the lives of all the Orders of St. Francis so that even today the Franciscan life remains relevant. Four Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis will guide you in your journey through these insights. Then you will have a chance to see what the life of St. Francis looks like today in the lives of some Sisters of St. Joseph,TOSF. You will see that they have taken to heart the admonition of St. Clare to her sisters:

Reneta E.Webb, Ph.D., CAE

EDITORIAL BOARD Sr. Carlene Blavat Sr. Judith David Sr. Marygrace Puchacz Sr. MaryLou Wojtusik Sharon McElmeel

PROOFING STAFF Sr. Mary Adalbert Stal Sr. Dolores Mary Koza Sr. Louise Szerpicki

PRODUCTION & LAYOUT

“In the Lord Jesus Christ, I admonish and exhort all my sisters, both those present and those to come, to strive always to imitate the way of holy simplicity, humility, and poverty, and to preserve the integrity of our holy manner of life…” —The Testament of St. Clare, p17

Welcome to Franciscan life!

Newcomb Print Communications/ The Printed Word

OFFICE Development Office P.O. Box 388129 Chicago, IL 60638-8129 Telephone: 1-773-581-7505 Fax: 1-773-581-7545 Web site: www.ssj-tosf.org e-mail: dev@ssj-tosf.org

Reneta E. Webb

Copyright by the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis, Inc. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited.

VOLUME 3 • NO. 2

DEPARTMENTS FEATURES In the News Peacemaker of the Year— Sr. Claudine Balio Guest House on Heart Island Teacher of the Year— Sr. Michele Nemojeski Poetic Achievement Award— Sr. Barbara Wanat Distinguished Service Award— SSJ-TOSF A Double Celebration— The Installation of the Central Board The Closing of the Centennial Celebration Clippings— Cleveland Women’s Ordination Conference— Sr. Mary Louise Szerpicki “Oxford” Honors Sr. Virginette Czerwinski Employee of the Month— Sr. Donna Warzon

Sponsored Institution Lourdes High to Lourdes Hall Reflection— Funeral Liturgy for Thomas J.Trudell

Formation/Vocation Introducing Three Pre-Candidates

Message from Development Director Obituaries

Franciscan Life

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by Sister Madge Karecki Eight hundred years ago, Francis heard the call of Christ and lived out the gospel life.

Clare of Assisi

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by Sister Francis Therese Woznicki Clare Offreduccio, a “soul sister” for all of us, grasped the spirit of Francis.

The Third Order

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by Sister Jean Ehasz The Sisters of St. Joseph,TOSF follow the Rule of the Third Order Regular of St. Francis.

An Instrument of Your Peace

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by Sister Sharon Dillon The lifestyle initiated by St. Francis is relevant today even after eight centuries.

The Faces of Franciscan Life Sister Lucentia Klonecki Sister Caroline Cerveny Sister Roselle Lesinski Sister Dorothy Pagosa Sister Marilyn Jerzy Sister Marygrace Puchacz Sister Angeline Kubit Sister Gretchen Clark

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YÜtÇv|ávtÇ _|yx by Sister Madge Karecki

I

n the early Franciscan classic, The Little Flowers of St. Francis (LFl 10), there is a won-

derful story of how Brother Masseo wanted to test St. Francis’s humility. Francis had been praying in the woods and Masseo put a question to Francis that is as rel-

evant today as it was 800 years ago. Masseo asked: “Why is the whole world running after you? Why after you? You aren’t a handsome man in body, you aren’t someone of great learning, you’re not noble, so why does the whole world come after you?” Francis answered that God chose him because he wanted to confound the wisdom of this ST. FRANCIS

world so that it would be clear that every good comes from God. Therein, I think, is the secret of Francis’s overwhelming attractiveness: he knew himself as one gifted by

KNEW HIMSELF

God in every way and never doubted God’s faithful love.

AS ONE GIFTED

Francis Bernadone (1182-1226) was born into a society in the midst of social change. An urban revolution was taking place as the cities and towns of Europe were once again

BY GOD IN EVERY WAY

taking shape. All across the continent, kings and princes were being toppled from their thrones and lesser nobility were losing their status as a profit economy was emerging.

AND NEVER

The merchant class was wresting the reins of power from the aristocracy. Pietro Bernadone, Francis’s father, was one of the founders of the Commune of Assisi. He along with other leading merchants wanted to cast off the yoke of the landed aristoc-

DOUBTED

racy and chart the course of their own future. There was money to be made and power to be grasped and Pietro was not about to stand on the sidelines. Part of his

GOD’S

plans was to help his first born son make a name for himself, become a knight and raise the family’s social status. God had something else in store for the young Francis who

FAITHFUL LOVE.

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himself had longed for glory, honors, and wealth.

The problems of a society in transition also engulfed the church. Its leaders were caught up in polit-

voluntary poverty

ical squabbles with emperors and kings and taken up with appropriating power from monarchs so that there could be some stability in society. As a result, the church itself was impoverished because the clergy were not well-trained and could not help the people grow spiritually through well-crafted homilies and responsible pastoral care. People had lapsed into superstition, and heresies

contemplation

abounded. There was need for reform and renewal.

Francis was an unlikely candidate to carry out God’s plan for the renewal of the church, but over a six-year period and a variety of experiences, Francis was led by the Spirit of the Lord on a journey of conversion that resulted in his personal transformation. Four incidents which form part of

minority

Francis’s conversion process deserve our attention:

• his vision at Spoleto, • his meeting with the leper, • Christ speaking to him at San Damiano, and

community

• the Gospel of Matthew 10 proclaimed at the Portiuncula.

wanted to serve.

“Now it happened that, after the start for Apulia, Francis felt unwell on arriving at Spoleto; and thinking with apprehension about the journey, he went to bed; but half asleep, he heard a voice calling and asking him where he was going. He replied, telling of his plan (to become a great prince). Then he, who had previously appeared to him in sleep, spoke these words: “Whom do you want to serve, the servant or the master?” “The Master,” answered Francis. “Then why do you leave the Master for the servant, the rich Lord for the poor man?” Francis replied, “O Lord, what do you wish me to do?” “Return to your own place and you will be told what to do.” (Legend of the Three Companions, 6)

So Francis returned to Assisi and waited for the Lord to reveal his plan.

Francis’s meeting with the leper in which he embraced the man as his brother made such a profound effect on him that it transformed his whole way of seeing and valuing people. In that embrace he received a significant insight into his own need for conversion. “When I was in sin,” Francis said, “it seemed extremely bitter to me to look at lepers, and the Lord himself led me among them and I practiced mercy with them.” (Celano, First Life, 17)

ST. FRANCIS

Since the Holy Spirit is a great respecter of persons, Francis was given a choice about whom he

voluntary poverty

At San Damiano, the Lord said to Francis:“Rebuild my house, which you see is falling into ruin.” He misunderstood the task and began a building project. Things did not clarify for him until he heard the missionary discourse of Chapter 10 in Matthew’s gospel proclaimed at Mass. Jesus tells his disciples to spread the good news of the kingdom of heaven, without encumberances, proclaiming peace. It was then that he understood that the church would be rebuilt by a new kind of mission-

contemplation

ary community intent on living the Gospel among God’s people.

This call to live the Gospel shaped the life of the early Franciscan community and represents the essence of the Franciscan charism (spirit, gift). Once Francis was grasped by the Holy Spirit, he

minority

never looked back. Soon, others joined him and formed a community intent on living the Gospel in a way that would renew the church and draw people to the riches of life in Christ. Their gift to the church and the world was a way of Gospel living characterized by voluntary poverty, not wanting more than is necessary; contemplation, making God the center of life; minority, being little in one’s own eyes; and community, witnessing to the fact that diverse people can live togeth-

community

er in harmony for the sake of the kingdom of God. The whole world continues to run after Francis because after over 800 years, these elements have consistently brought joy to those who were

ST. FRANCIS

called not only to run after Francis, but to run with him on their pilgrim journey.

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Sister Madge Karecki entered the congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph, TOSF in 1966, and began her career as a teacher. After receiving her M.A. in Franciscan Studies at St. Bonaventure University, she went to South Africa in 1984 and worked with the Daughters of St. Francis of Assisi to gain their independence as a religious congregation. Sr. Madge continued her studies, earning an MTh and DTh in Missiology from the University of South Africa. Beginning in 1987 to 1993, she worked for the Diocese of Johannesburg and founded the Office of Worship. During that time, she taught at St. John Vianney Seminary. In 1994, she co-founded the Franciscan Institute of Southern Africa with Rev. Sergius Wroblewski, for which she edits The Little Portion, a bi-monthly Franciscan Bulletin, and the Franciscan Study Guide Series. In 1999, she began teaching Missiology and Christian Spirituality at the University of South Africa. She is a member of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, Task Team for Study Materials. She is teaching in the summer of 2002 in the Formators Programme in Assisi for the International Franciscan Conference. Her publications include “Patterns of Mission Praxis”; “Intercultural Christian Communication”; and, “Dynamics of Interreligious Encounter.” She has edited “The Making of an African Person: Essays in Honour of Willem A. Saayman”.

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by Sister Francis Therese Woznicki

W

ho has not heard of St. Francis of Assisi? Or who has ever adorned their garden with a St. Francis statue,

shown with birds and animals? We all know his charming

love for God’s creation. However, fewer know, and are attracted to, the sobering fact that Francis received the painful grace of the stigmata. That is to say that he so passionately responded to God’s love for us that the wounds of Christ appeared on his body. So how is it that this matchless holy man, this “other Christ,” regards Clare of Assisi as having followed in Christ’s footprints even more perfectly than he was able to do?

This is an intriguing turnabout and one from which we might learn. Who

St. Clare, by Maestro di Santa Chiara, with scenes from her spiritual journey: Receiving a palm branch from Bishop Guido approving her choice to follow Francis’s way of life.

is Clare Offreduccio (1193-1252), this noble woman of Francis’s city and Entering the Portiuncula on March 18, 1212 times? What might her life say to us? The Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis did not expect to feel kinship with Clare because the order she founded is cloistered and radically devoted to poverty and contemplation. However, with the 800th centenary of Clare’s birth celebrated in 1993, the kinship was cemented. The increased publicity and written material about St. Clare revealed that she was, indeed, a “soul sister”. She lived in a culture of increasing materialism, violence, social disparity, sexism, classicism, church crises and even an encounter with Islam. This parallels

Cutting her hair as a symbol of penance and mortification Her resistance to her father’s efforts to remove her from San Paolo Clare’s sister Agnes joins her in a life of penance The Poor Ladies lead a simple life The dying Clare has a vision of the Blessed Virgin

much of what is happening in our world today. The death of St. Clare

life without privilege

If Clare lived today, the media would be capturing countless pictures, video and still, of a Gospel woman in action. Even though her life played out many years ago, there are “Kodak moments” that impress and inspire us: Image One: Clare running away from a life of privilege to live the Gospel wholeheartedly

generosity

Image Two: Clare holding a basket of bread, receiving it from God’s providence and then sharing it with others

strength Image Three: Clare holding up the Blessed Sacrament in a window as Saracen invaders scaled the wall

conviction Image Four: Clare, sick and alone at prayer, but enabled to “see” a Christmas liturgy that was miles away

ST. CLARE

What might each of these snapshots of the Spirit say to us today?

Image One

Already devout and generous as a teenager, Clare witnessed the dramatic reversal in Francis

Bernadone’s life. She saw him change from being ambitious, dissipated and spiritually mediocre into

a lover of God, a servant of the despised and a brother to all. This was Gospel. This was “following in the footsteps of Jesus”. Francis had come to see that what distorted God’s dream for the human family was arrogant ownership. He called this “appropriation,” acting as if we had the right to unlimited acquisition when God calls us to be grateful caretakers of creation and of one another. The only way to respond to a God of lavish giving was to be led by the Spirit to live as the poor

Christ. Clare also caught the fire of this vision. On Palm Sunday, in the dead of night, this 18-year-old left behind the security, prosperity and social status of her family. It was a bold move. Women of her

time had no option for independent choice. In the face of violent family opposition and patronizing ecclesial resistance, Clare dared to create a lifestyle based on the “privilege of living without

privilege”. For her, community was a family of God’s children. All were equal, whether peasant or princess. The loving Christ was their center and their strength. Over 800 years later, thousands of women all over the world live out her charism as Poor Clares.

A question to ponder: What am I willing to leave behind for the sake of the Gospel?

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Image Two In Clare’s time, society was divided into the “majores” and the “minores,” the haves and the have-

life without privilege

nots. Like the Friars, the Poor Ladies of San Damiano (as they were called) chose to be the latter. They supported themselves through manual labor, but depended mightily on God’s providence for their needs. The bread that might have come to them was just as readily given to the poor at the door. A canonization story tells of a time when all that was left was a half loaf for 50 nuns. “Bless

generosity

the bread and keep cutting,” Clare directed as she silently prayed. Piece by piece the bread was given to each one with enough for all.

A question to ponder:

strength

What is the area of my life where I need to trust in God’s loving care with total abandon?

conviction Image Three When, in 1234, the army of Frederick II was devastating the valley of Spoleto, the soldiers, preparatory to an assault upon Assisi, scaled the walls of San Damiano by night, spreading terror among the community of the Poor Ladies of San Damiano. Clare, calmly rising from her sickbed, and taking the ciborium from the little chapel adjoining her cell, proceeded to face the invaders at an open window against which they had already placed a ladder. It is related that, as she raised the Blessed

ST. CLARE

Sacrament on high, the soldiers who were about to enter the monastery fell backward as if daz-

zled, and the others who were ready to follow them took flight. The enemy abandoned its plans to invade Assisi, and to this day, the town celebrates this saving event.

Clare’s response was completely non-violent. We can speculate that, if she chose, she could have used violent means. She came from a family of knights and was familiar with combat. But the spir-

it of “minores,” and the Gospel commandment of love, inspired in Clare a response based on calm and spiritual strength.

A question to ponder: What are the subtle ways that our culture of violence influences my life? What can I change?

life without privilege

Image Four Did you know that St. Clare is regarded as the patron saint of television? This seems a bit strange because television just didn’t exist in the 13th century. The roots of Clare’s connection with television lie in a touching historical incident. It was Christmas Eve, and sickness prevented Clare from joining her sisters for Midnight Mass at the basilica miles away. She turned to prayer for solace.

generosity

Suddenly, she was able to “see” the liturgy that was taking place at the basilica. She transcended the limits of space and time, and participated in the Eucharistic celebration.

Clare exhorted her sisters, “Praise God for every green and flowering plant you see; for every

strength

human person and for every creature. Always and in all things, God must be praised.” Truly, she practiced the “mysticism of open eyes”.

conviction

A question to ponder: Does my prayer also transcend the limits of time and space?

ST. CLARE

C L A R E D A R E D T O C R E AT E

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A LIFESTYLE BASED ON “THE PRIVILEGE OF LIVING WITHOUT

P R I V I L E G E ,” F O R H E R C O M M U N I T Y WA S A F A M I LY OF GOD’S CHILDREN.

Sister Francis Therese Woznicki has served the people of God as an educator, administrator, retreat director, spiritual counselor, hospital chaplain and pastoral associate. Since 1996, Sister Francis Therese ministers out of the Franciscan Center, a resource center for Franciscan Spirituality. She founded the center, with Sister Jean Ehasz as co-director. She continues a ministry of spiritual direction, retreat giving and various other expressions of pastoral care, among which is a weekly prison ministry. One of her sisters says of her,“Sister Francis Therese lives out the spirit of St. Francis by giving witness to the Gospel in action and contemplation. She is an outpouring of love for God into the lives of those she touches in ministry and prayer. Her presence is ‘God visible in the world’.”

The

Third by Sister Jean Ehasz, SSJ-TOSF

What does it mean that the Sisters of St. Joseph are also “of the Third Order of St. Francis”? On July 1, 1901, Bishop Messmer of the Green Bay Diocese in Wisconsin celebrated Mass with a small group of sisters who were forming a new congregation to serve the educational needs of immigrant children. In agreement with the sisters and with Rev. Luke Pescinski, the bishop gave the new religious community a special patron by naming them the Sisters of St. Joseph. The bishop also affirmed the group’s desire, expressed by Sister Mary Kleta (later, Clara), co-foundress, that the new community continue their Franciscan way of life. The Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis are Franciscans—followers of St. Francis of Assisi’s third style of Gospel living. The Rule that guides their way of life is that of the Third Order of St. Francis. The Rule is the basic document that spells out the way of following the Gospel. It expresses the values and principles that inspire a Franciscan way of life. Each community is also guided by Constitutions which are directives (more specific regulations, guidelines and policies) that express its mission and expand on how its members live out the values found in the Rule. The four Franciscan Orders we know today all had their origin in the penitential movement of the Church that predated St. Francis by some six hundred years.The distinctions of the Orders do not imply differences in status (one higher or more important than the others), but differences of emphasis in the spirituality and mission of each.The First Order is comprised of the Friars Minor, Friars Minor Conventual and the Friars Minor Capuchin. The Second Order includes the Poor Clares, cloistered women who are followers of St. Clare of Assisi.The Third Order originally were the followers of Francis who remained in their own homes, some married and some not, who

The

Third THE CURRENT THIRD ORDER RULE IS FORMED AROUND THE FOUR BASIC VA L U E S O F PENANCE (BIBLICAL M E TA N O I A ) , C O N T E M P L AT I V E P R AY E R , P OV E RT Y A N D HUMILITY (MINORITY) LIVED OUT IN F R AT E R N I T Y — A

The spirituality of the Third Order Regular is based on the Penitential Tradition of true faith and ongoing conversion of heart. This means the total and continuous giving of self to God through a generous response to the action of God’s Spirit in everyday life after the manner of the life of St. Francis.The early followers of Francis, known as the “Penitents of Assisi” or “the Brothers and Sisters of Penance,” took their form of life from two spiritual streams. These were the Gospel witness of Francis and the penitential movement. Francis took great interest in these penitential followers and many of them were touched by his words and example. At their request for guidance, he gave them the Letter to the Faithful which was a spiritual directory that outlined the characteristics of those penitents living in the world, yet following a specific Franciscan rule of life.This became the first rule for the Third Order which was an active element in the renewal of the Christian life of the time and a vast movement in favor of peace. The morals and customs of Italian cities were deeply influenced by it. A number of communal insurrections even found Christian solutions, thanks to the non-violence of those associated with the Third Order.

LIFE LIVED IN A R E L AT I O N A L

C O M M I T M E N T TO E AC H OT H E R A S B R OT H E R S A N D SISTERS IN C H R I S T.

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continued in their secular occupations and were committed to performing works of charity. This group eventually evolved into the Secular Franciscans, those who continued the original way of life, and the Third Order Regular, those who began to live in community and professed the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience.

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“Penance” as it developed in the penitential-Franciscan charism is composed of and explained by two principal elements. These are “continuous conversion” in the Biblical sense of “metanoia,” and “active and effective charity,” a dedication of oneself to the spiritual and corporal works of mercy resulting from an interior conversion deeply lived.Three terms often used interchangeably—metanoia, penance, conversion—do not always have the exact same meaning. Roland Faley,TOR, best defines metanoia in the Biblical sense as follows: Metanoia stands at the very center of the teaching of the Gospels. Its meaning is exhausted neither by the idea of the initial turning to God, nor by the notion of reparation, frequently expressed in the word “penance”. The work of both God and the person—this “metanoia” is primarily an act of God’s love which finds its human response in a radical redirection of life centered in the person of Christ himself. … Interwoven, as it is, with the concept of “reconciliation,” it sees peace with God as inseparable from peace with one’s neighbor, and serves as a basis for Christian efforts to overcome hostility and separation at every level.

The

Third

These two elements establishing the charism of the Third Order have remained and been automatically inserted into the form of life of many congregations and groups of Franciscans of the Third Order Regular which have arisen from the time of the fifteenth century to the present. The current Third Order Regular Rule was revised in 1982 and is followed by the Sisters of St. Joseph,TOSF. The Rule is formed around the four basic values of penance (biblical metanoia), contemplative prayer, poverty and humility (minority) lived out in fraternity—a life lived in a relational commitment to each other as brothers and sisters in Christ.This stems from the belief that because Jesus became brother to us all in the Incarnation, we are brother and sister to each other.This is a much deeper relationship than living in community and sharing a common life together. In addition to the Rule, the members of the Third Order Regular publicly profess the religious vows of poverty, obedience and chastity.The whole question of the vowed life takes on a more positive meaning when it is situated within the context of conversion and charity.We all can make a difference today by living out the Mission Statement of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis. It calls us “to make God more deeply known and loved, and in so doing, draw all persons to fuller and freer life”. We do this by our witness to the redemptive power and presence of God in this world by our lives and our works. References: Carney, Margaret, OSF, and Horgan,Thaddeus, SA. The Rule and Life of the Brothers and Sisters of the Third Order Regular of St. Francis and Commentary.Washington, D.C. Franciscan Federation, 1982. Faley, Roland J.,TOR. “Biblical Considerations on Metanoia.” Analecta TOR. 13 No. 123 (1974) 13-33. Horgan,Thaddeus, SA. Turned to the Lord.Washington, D.C. Franciscan Federation, 1987. 1-15.

Sister Jean Ehasz

is co-director of the Franciscan Center at Marymount Congregational Home in Garfield Heights, Ohio. Her ministry has been primarily in the field of education. She has taught in Michigan and Connecticut; in Ohio in the cities of Akron, Elyria, Lorain and Cleveland; and at Trinity High School in Garfield Heights, Ohio. She served as principal at St. Monica School in Garfield Heights for eleven years. She was a formation director for the young women entering the congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis. In 1996, she became co-director of the Franciscan Center.

IN FRANCIS’ S M I N D, P E A C E WA S D I R E C T LY LINKED TO T H E I N C A R N AT I O N — GOD PRESENT AMONG US—

An Instrument of

Your Peace by Sister Sharon Dillon

ur lives changed on September 11, 2001, when passenger planes used as bombs violently crashed and exploded into the World Trade Centers and the Pentagon. It is hard to imagine that any one in the United States didn’t stop to pray that day, or hasn’t continued to pray for peace. The ongoing suicide bombing and fighting in the Middle East between Israel and Palestine, our government’s choice to bomb innocent people in Afghanistan, and the repugnance of child abuse within our own Church are all overpowering realities in our daily lives.

O

AND ALL C R E AT I O N WA S S E E N

At such a time in our world, peacemaking is crucial if we are to give witness as people of faith and as Franciscans. Peacemaking is an integral part of who we are as Christians, committed to life in God’s Spirit.

AS AN EXPRESSION OF

CHRIST’S L OV E . VIEWED T H I S WAY, NO ENEMY EXISTS.

PEACE— “Peace” carries different meanings. Some people kill and die for what they call “peace”. Others equate peace with “no war”. For some who have never known it, peace may have no meaning at all. The kind of peace that settles the soul is the peace promised by Jesus, “Peace I bequeath to you, my own peace I give you, a peace which the world cannot give, this is my gift to you.” (John 14:27) St. Bonaventure described in his writings how Francis became a person of peace. Francis shared with his followers how God revealed to him that he should greet people with the salutation, “The Lord give you peace.” [Testament 18] Thomas of Celano, an early biographer of Francis, said of him:

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“In all his preaching, before he proposed the word of God to those gathered, he first prayed for peace for them, saying, ‘The Lord give you peace.’ He always most devoutly announced peace to men and women, to all he met. For this reason, many who had hated peace and had hated salvation embraced peace, through the cooperation of the Lord, with all their heart and were made children of peace and seekers after eternal salvation.” What might Francis have had in mind when he greeted all creatures with peace? In Francis’s mind peace was directly linked to the Incarnation—God present among us—and all creation was seen as an expression of Christ’s love. Viewed this way, no enemy exists. Francis, in Christ, became free of making enemies.Where others created enemies, Francis created relationships. Each person, indeed, all creation was brother or sister.

A RULE OF PEACE— Francis and Clare built their peaceful lifestyle on the scripture, “Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called the children of God.” [Mt. 5:9] They reflected prayerfully on these words and incarnated them in a way of life that we now call Franciscan. Francis quotes this scripture twice in the Admonitions he gave his brothers: Admonition 13 – Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called the children of God (Mt. 5:9). A servant of God cannot know how much patience and humility he has within himself, as long as he is content. When the time comes, however, when those who should make him content do the opposite, he has as much patience and humility as he has at that time and no more. Admonition 15 – Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called the children of God (Mt. 5:9).Those people are truly peacemakers who, regardless of what they endure in their lives, persevere in peace of spirit and body, out of a deep sense of being loved by Christ. The Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis follow the Rule of the Third Order Regular [TOR] in which Francis stated: “Let them neither dominate nor seek power over one another, but let them willingly serve and obey one another with the mutual love which comes from the spirit.” [TOR #25]

“As they announce peace with their lips, let them be careful to have it even more within their own hearts. No one should be roused to wrath or insult on their account; rather, all should be moved to peace, goodwill and mercy because of their gentleness. The sisters and brothers are called to heal the wounded, to bind up those who are bruised, and to reclaim the erring. Wherever they are, they should recall that they have given themselves up completely and handed themselves over totally to our Lord Jesus Christ. Therefore, they should be prepared to expose themselves to every enemy, visible and invisible, for love of the Lord because he says: “Blessed are they who suffer persecution for the sake of justice, theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” [TOR #30]

INNER PEACE— Peace flows from inner harmony. The source of Francis and Clare’s peace was Christ through whom they were inwardly liberated from selfish desires. Their lives became lives of peace as they immersed deeply in the mystery of the cross.Theirs was not a simplistic peace of feeling good about themselves, but rather the peace of ecstatic union, centered in God, transformed in Christ crucified. Francis and Clare invite each of us who wish to be peacemakers into the same personal journey through prayer, meditation, honest self-examination, and inner healing, knowing that God loves us unconditionally. The same spirit who impassioned Francis and Clare will do the same with us.

PEACE AS A VOCATION THAT TRANSFORMS— It is evident in his writings that Francis personally viewed peacemaking as a special vocation. Through his experience with Christ in prayer, Francis, at the core of his life, was transformed into a peacemaker. Peace, rooted in his soul, radiated outward to the community around him, bearing fruit today in those who follow his rule and ideals. Francis is often lovingly referred to as the universal saint because he was able to relate beyond cultural and religious barriers. He embraced the leper. He chose to be a penitent in a culture of new abundance. He visited the Sultan, a Muslim, in spite of the advice of a society that would never span that boundary.

Sister Sharon Dillon is Executive Director of the Franciscan Federation in Washington D.C. She was powered by Francis’s troubadour soul even as she began her career as a special education teacher at St. Bavo Elementary School, South Bend, Indiana. After three years, she became Recreation and Leisure Service Coordinator at Logan Center in South Bend, Indiana, a facility for developmentally disabled children. She recognized the need for refreshing the caregivers of special children and adults, and, with Sister Gretchen Clark, co-founded Chiara Home, Inc., which provides temporary housing for developmentally disabled persons while the care-givers are away. She served as Executive Administrator of Chiara Home for five years, and is currently on the Board of Directors. Most recently, she was Continuity of Care Coordinator at Memorial Hospital in South Bend, Indiana in the Spiritual Care and Social Services Department. Sister Sharon has a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Education, a certification in Special Education and Physical Education, and a certification in Social Restoration. She completed the Franciscan Internship in Spiritual Direction, offering Franciscan retreats and spiritual direction. She was a 1996 Special Education Ambassador in the Citizens Ambassador program, representing the United States to the Czech Republic and Russia. She received the 1997 Educational Award for service to individuals with developmental disabilities from the City of South Bend Human Rights Commission, and the 1997 European Charity Award for Chiara Home’s mission of service to individuals with special needs from the Military Catholic Commission of Women. One of her sisters says of her, “Sister Sharon Dillon is in the spirit of St. Francis in her deep prayer life, which enables her to live out the Scriptures. She has a spirit of sharing what she has with others, so easily and without counting any cost. She is willing to follow where God calls her to minister, whether she is providing sanctuary to illegal persons, nurturing the spirit of women who are discerning their call to religious life, or as the Executive Director of the Franciscan Federation. Sharon truly exemplifies the Franciscan values of conversion, contemplation, poverty and minority.”

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Francis, the peacemaker, made an impression not only on his contemporaries, but also on us today as Third Order members in 2002. Francis was a social reformer whose equal the world rarely sees. He enthusiastically espoused the cause of the oppressed and poor [minores] of his day. Though he may have had no conscious intent to reform the social structures of his time, his ideals of community [fraternity] and service with the poor [minores] had significant effects on medieval society.

PEACE WHICH TRANSFORMS THE WORLD— Even in the face of today’s persecution, grief, hatred and violence, God’s all-encompassing love can pierce through hatred and teach us to forgive and even to love those we may call the enemy. We can move beyond our own woundedness to greet each other with the message of peace. We can come to see our enemies, and those defined by our nation as the enemy, as brother and sister. The peaceful person sees rightly with the vision of the inner eye of love, for peace is rooted in love.Where there is Christ, there is love.Where there is love, there is peace. Like a spinning disc with its one centered still-point, the true Franciscan sees all of creation from the single still-point which is Christ. All the activities and events which swirl around it take their peaceful meaning from the Center. With the eyes that see rightly, the Franciscan can look at the devastation of violence, fighting, bombing, and abuse, and in a peaceful, non-violent presence, bring redemption to the world. Good News.

The spirit of Francis and Clare lives today. Even though over eight hundred years has passed since the Spirit of God stirred the hearts of Francis and Clare to live evengelical lives, the virtues and values of Franciscan life are as relevant as they ever were.The universe still calls for careful stewardship, for mindful prayer, for peace-maiking and for a relational consciousness of all of creation.The entire congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis is committed to living these values. This is a sample of what it looks like.

“Blessed is that religious who has no pleasure and delight except in the most holy words and deeds of the Lord and, with these, leads people to the love of God with gladness and joy.”

- Francis of Assisi:The Saint, Vol. I, p. 135

g{x jÉÜwá tÇw Wxxwá Éy à{x _ÉÜw Sister Lucentia Klonecki

This photo of Sister Lucentia Klonecki was taken as she ministered to the people of St. Patrick’s Parish in Janesville,Wisconsin. The picture of Jesus is situated in such a way that it clearly shows where Sr. Lucentia draws her life. One of the SSJ-TOSFs described Sr. Lucentia’s ministry this way, “(She) shares the words and deeds of the Lord. She serves the elderly, the sick and the dying, and the families of the same. She and her volunteers never count the time or energy spent for the sake of the Gospel.” Sr. Lucentia entered the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis after graduating from eighth grade at St. Stanislaus parish in Arcadia, Wisconsin, where she and her six other brothers and sisters attended school. She was invested in 1935 and began her ministry as a teacher, serving in Wisconsin schools in Racine, Pulaski, Milwaukee, Stevens Point and Oshkosh. The quality of her teaching, and a Master’s degree in Elementary Education, expanded into a position as School Consultant for the Diocese of La Crosse, a position she held for eleven years. Her ministry at St. Patrick’s began in 1978 and continues even today. She works among the homebound, handicapped, sick and dying. “My ministry began, and continues, as a service of love, devotion and compassion,” she says. “My role in this ministry is to discover and satisfy the spiritual needs of the shut-ins and the elderly.This is done by visiting and phoning on a regular basis, and taking the Eucharist to them. I also visit and serve the parishioners in the nursing homes, group homes and in the hospital. I hold scripture services for the parish, conduct prayer services at wakes and funerals, and meet with the

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families who are in need of companionship in their grief.A dedicated group of volunteers works with me in this ministry, creating a loving community of caring people.” It takes solid grounding to meet that environment day after day with joy and enthusiasm. “I chose the clown as my symbol,” Sr. Lucentia said. “The clown can take in pain, and at the same time bring joy.” The people of St. Patrick’s parish witness to the fact that Sr. Lucentia powers the spiritual life of the parish. She is a Eucharistic minister; she listens and counsels; she laughs and rejoices; she moves among the Christian community in a ministry of Gospel presence. She has made her mark, loving God’s people, one at a time.

“Blessed is that religious who has no pleasure and delight except in the most holy words and deeds of the Lord and, with these, leads people to the love of God with gladness and joy.” Francis of Assisi:The Saint,Vol. 1, p.135

Sister Caroline’s Workshops:

“For me, to capture the

God On The Web

spirit of Francis is to be a

The Technology Influence on Catholic Religious Education in the 21st Century

communicator of the Word! …by the Internet, by

The Age of Transaction and Digital Learning in Religious Education

multimedia, by using the wonderful electronic

The World of E-Learning

tools we have in hand to

Internet Resources for Parish Religious Education

communicate God’s story.”

Interface Evangelization:Technology Transforming the Way We Create and Communicate the Good News Catechesis in a Digital World Power Point of the Word Using Media Effectively With Adults Web Smart Ministry: Making It Work www.catechesis.learn

g{x `âÄà|Åxw|t YÜtÇv|á Sister Caroline Cerveny

Sister Caroline Cerveny does what Francis did. In Celano’s First Life of Francis, Chapter XXX recounts the story “of the manger Francis made on the day of the Lord’s birth,” the first Christmas creche. “I wish to do something,” Francis said,“that will recall to memory the little Child who was born in Bethlehem and set before our bodily eyes. In some way, the inconveniences of his infant needs, how he lay in a manger, how, with an ox and an ass standing by, he lay upon the hay where he had been placed.” And so was assembled the first living Christmas scene where Francis, along with his brothers and the townspeople, celebrated the Christmas liturgy. Engage the senses. Invite people in to an experience of God. Sr. Caroline works at William H. Sadlier, Inc., in New York, New York. “For me, to capture the spirit of Francis is to be a communicator of the Word! What better way to do this in today’s world,” she says, “by the Internet, by multimedia, by using the wonderful electronic tools we have in hand to communicate God’s story.” She is currently working with the Internet team at Sadlier, completing a companion internet site to the Coming to Faith program so that children can be engaged in learning their faith. She researches the web, sorting out the quality sites that can be linked to enhance “cyberfaith.com” as a source for Catholic information. She investigates new digital products that will “set before our bodily eyes” the wonders of our faith. In addition to the office work, Sr. Caroline is “on the road” with several professional workshops, listed.

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Whether she is at a sales meeting, at a convention booth, working with the marketing team in launching a new religion program, or teaching a course at a university, Sr. Caroline is doing what Francis did. Convinced that we have all moved into a new digital world, Sr. Caroline reminds us that the message never changes, but our means of communication must.

She has the heart of a poet, much the same as St. Francis. Poets are blessed “with keen vision, exquisite sensitivity, a great heart and a deep conviction of eternal values”.

ZÉwËá gÜÉâutwÉâÜ Sister Roselle Lesinski

There are some people for whom the veil between the spiritual and the material is very thin. There’s a feeling of being closer to God, by virtue of being in their presence. Sister Roselle Lesinski is one of those people. It’s probably that she has the heart of a poet, much the same as St. Francis. Poets are blessed “with keen vision, exquisite sensitivity, a great heart and a deep conviction of eternal values”. (Introduction to the Canticle of Brother Sun, p. 127. Omnibus). Her keen vision becomes framed in poetry and music, carefully recorded in journals. From her childhood in Flint, Michigan, where she grew up with her two brothers and two sisters, it was obvious that her joyful heart was searching for a way of expressing what she felt. Her family had a bent for music which she easily absorbed. Even without extensive training in musical composition, the deep feelings of her heart find expression in melody. The words spoken by her father on the occasion of her mother’s death, for example, are softly sung by Sr. Roselle in her composition “O, Mama Mine!” Poetry provides the same means of sharing her keen vision. The exquisite sensitivity and great heart of Sr. Roselle shows itself in the way she relates to people, and, yes, to all of creation. She was a teacher and tutor in preschool and the primary grades. With infinite patience, she worked with the little children, helping them master the tasks at hand. She volunteers as a hospital visitor. “I have good news for you,” she says. “God loves you!” She helps with the house services at Marymount Congregational Home. She does more than is necessary to make life better for everyone. As one sister described it, “She is always thinking about what will make things easier for other people. I have been impressed with

—Introduction to the Canticle of Brother Sun, p.127. Omnibus

her many acts of kindness. She is quick to see someone in need, and is always willing to say ‘yes’ to sharing her time and talent.” Another sister went on to recall that, in the biography of St. Francis by Omer Englebert, it stated that “Brotherliness flourished in these Franciscan hermitages, as the friars remembered to practice the Rule’s advice: ‘If a mother loves her son according to the flesh, how much greater ought brothers to love one another according to the spirit.’” (Rule of 1223, VI) “Sr. Roselle,” she said, “lives this admonition.” Sr. Roselle has a deep conviction of eternal values, as all poets do. If you talk to Sr. Roselle, you are reminded of God. It comes out in a cheerful greeting of peace, or a holy card shared, or an assurance of her prayers, or a holy melody hummed. God will come to you in the presence of Sr. Roselle.

_ÉäxÄç _twç VÄtÜx {xtÜ tÇw áxx âá? çÉâÜ Ätw|xá Éy tÄÄ à|ÅxáA lÉâ Ä|äxw |Ç à{x ÑÉäxÜàç Éy à{x ZÉáÑxÄA _xà âá tÄáÉ Ä|äx à{x vtÄÄ Éy V{Ü|áàA Uç [|á zÜtvx? áâáàt|Ç âáA Uç [|á ÑÉäxÜàç? yÜxx âáA Uç [|á ÄÉäx? àxtv{ âá àÉ twÉÜxA

g{ÜÉâz{ à{x Xâv{tÜ|áà j{|v{ çÉâ Üt|áxw áÉ {|z{? cÄxtw yÉÜ ÉâÜ ä|vàÉÜç \Ç à{x áàÜâzzÄxá ãx uxtÜ hÇàÉ Ä|yxËá ÅÉÜàtÄ xÇwA _|yà tzt|Ç à{x Xâv{tÜ|áà g{x VÉÜÑâá V{Ü|áà| tuÉäx âá g{tà ãx Å|z{à ÑÉááxáá çÉâÜ Â~xçÊ gÉ âÇÄÉv~ à{x áxvÜxàá by à{x {xtÜà Éy ZÉwËá ÅxÜvçA @ f|áàxÜ eÉáxÄÄx _xá|Çá~| @

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“Francis always sided with the poor and the marginalized. He left the protection of the city to live among the outcasts. In a world where money and consumerism were taking hold, he took a stand

cxtvxÅt~xÜ Sister Dorothy Pagosa

“... and on the 8th day God invites us to be co-creators in building a more just and harmonious world.” These are the words that introduce the 8th Day Center for Peace and Justice in Chicago, Illinois, the place where Sister Dorothy Pagosa lives out the Franciscan ideal of peacemaking. It’s not easy being a persistent voice for those who have no voice, to be a non-violent person in the midst of anger and greed, and to reconcile relationships in the human community and establish right relationships with the gifts of the earth. Sister Dorothy has been doing this all her life. She was happy as an accountant in North Olmsted, Ohio, but life took an unexpected turn to the Sisters of St. Joseph,TOSF. In her second year of novitiate, Sr. Dorothy spent three months with Sister Sandy LoPorto at the 8th Day Center for Peace and Justice in Chicago, Illinois. That was a defining moment. After two years of parish pastoral work in a parish in Ohio, Sr. Dorothy began full-time work at the 8th Day Center. “This is exactly where I see the ideals of Francis and Clare being lived,” says Sr. Dorothy. “Francis always sided with the poor and the marginalized. He left the protection of the city to live among the outcasts. In a world where money and consumerism were taking hold, he took a stand for Gospel living. This flowed from his conviction that there is a connectedness, a oneness with all of creation. His Canticle of

for Gospel living.”

the Sun praises God in ALL of creation. Thus, there was no distinction between rich or poor, Sultan or leper, Pope or peasant.” Sr. Dorothy’s vision matches the vision of the 8th Day Center: “The spirituality of justice calls the 8th Day Center to envision a world of right relationships in which all creation is seen as sacred and interconnected. In such a world, all people are equal and free from oppression, have a right to the just distribution of resources, and live in harmony with the cosmos.” When Sr. Dorothy made her final profession in the Sisters of St. Joseph, TOSF, not only did she vow poverty, chastity and obedience; she also took a vow of non-violence. Whether she is demonstrating at the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (formerly known as School of the Americas) or in front of the Federal Building in Chicago, hers is a witness of visibility and presence. She lives out what St. Francis said,“Preach the Gospel constantly; speak only if you must.” In every encounter, she shows us what it means to be an instrument of divine peace.

T HE S PIRITUALITY

OF JUSTICE CALLS THE

8 TH DAY C ENTER

TO ENVISION

A WORLD OF RIGHT RELATIONSHIPS IN WHICH ALL CREATION IS SEEN AS SACRED AND INTERCONNECTED.

IN

SUCH A WORLD, ALL PEOPLE ARE EQUAL AND FREE FROM OPPRESSION ,

HAVE A RIGHT TO THE JUST DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES , AND LIVE IN HARMONY WITH THE COSMOS .

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“(St. Francis) met a leper one day and, made stronger than himself, he kissed him… of other poor, too… he was the helper, stretching forth a hand of mercy to those Harriet, Edward, Laurine and Marilyn Jerzy

who had nothing, and showing compassion to the afflicted.”

T [tÇw Éy `xÜvç Sister Marilyn Jerzy

Sister Marilyn Jerzy was a psychiatric nurse for 24 years at St. Mary’s Hospital in San Francisco, California. She would refer to her patients in prayer and in conversation as “my lepers,” loving them when few others would include them in their social circles. Sr. Marilyn was drawn to this deep commitment to Franciscan ideals, even as a young girl. The brown religious habits and white cords worn by her teachers in Cleveland, Ohio, where she was born and raised, were an early image that shaped her vocation. When Marilyn attended Notre Dame College, she met Sister Margaret Mary Majewski, a Sister of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis. Sr. Margaret’s commitment to healthcare and her desire to serve God’s people were an inspiration to Marilyn. Marilyn entered the congregation September 5, 1944.As she prepared to live her religious life ministering in healthcare, Sr. Marilyn noted that there were sisters present in every department of Marymount Hospital in Garfield Heights, Ohio, except in the psychiatric ward and in the emergency room. It was then that she decided to direct her skills to psychiatric nursing. She became Superintendent of the Mental Case Ward and Convalescent Floor at Marymount Hospital. She also served as directress for the young women preparing for religious life in the SSJ-TOSF novitiate. In the late 1960s, she became Regional Director for the SSJ-TOSFs in the St. Francis Region. In 1972, she went to California where she joined the staff of the Psychiatric Department of St. Mary’s Hospital. Now retired, Sr. Marilyn says that the thing that attracts her most about St. Francis is his love of “Lady Poverty”. Sr. Marilyn is truly an example of someone who is unencumbered. As she said, “I can move easily. None of this,” she said gesturing toward her simple furnishings, “belongs to me, so I can leave it all behind.” In the true Franciscan spirit, she is a grateful caretaker of her environment, and visitors soon know that SSJ-TOSF hospitality springs from a blessed attitude toward all of creation.

—Celano, First Life, Chapter VII:17)

The East Bay Services include: EBS Independent Living Skills training and support services for adults Concord House and satellite homes - residential services for adults with developmental disabilities Concord Residential Club HUD-subsidized apartment living for the developmentally disabled C.O.R.E. (Creative Outreach Environments) - Adult day training and functional skills program Evergreen program - to empower the individual to function as a contributing citizen with full rights and responsibilities Evergreen Senior Center specialized program for those 55 or older who are developmentally disabled Open Door Program preparing for integration in community environment Stepping Out Employment Service Agency - Matching meaningful vocational experiences for persons with developmental disabilities Namaste Program - training for caregivers Respite Inn - caregiver service providing temporary care for the developmentally disabled Yes! Concord I - program for “at risk” youth and gang members Yes! Concord II - provides training and placement for adults of varied ethnic backgrounds

cÉá|à|äx tÇw cxtvx@Y|ÄÄxw Sister Marygrace Puchacz

Sister Marygrace Puchacz was reflecting on St. Francis of Assisi, “(He) embraced the breadth and depth of his God, present in all beings and in the beauty of life surrounding him. Francis’s spirit calls us to encircle our world with great love and peace—one life at a time. Our oneness holds the promise of peace, the keen vision that all of us, and all of creation, are related on some deep divine level. Our collective response to this moment in history as people of peace is laid out in the individual choices we make each day. When we choose to think in positive ways and use peace-filled words, we have far-reaching effects on each other and on the environment around us.” This sounds like something uttered by a recluse contemplative, reflecting on the events of the day. However, they were spoken by an active Franciscan contemplative who founded the East Bay Services to the Developmentally Disabled in Concord, California, in 1984. Sister Marygrace, as Executive Director, parlayed the resources at hand into an organization that now employs a staff of 50 and serves over 1,600 clients. Keeping the corporation functioning smoothly on a day-to-day basis is no small feat. But to do it in a positive, peace-filled way takes a true Franciscan who sees Divine relatedness in all things. “Sister Marygrace has a welcoming spirit that makes a person in her presence feel important, welcomed and loved,” says one of her sisters. “She has a way of telling each person, without words, ‘I’m really happy to see you!’” Sr. Marygrace has lived the admonition of the Rule of the Third Order Regular of St. Francis which states:

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“Let the brothers and sisters be gentle, peaceful and unassuming, mild and humble, speaking respectfully to all in accord with their vocation. Wherever they are, or wherever they go throughout the world they should not be quarrelsome, contentious, or judgmental towards others. Rather, it should be obvious that they are ‘joyful and good-humored,’ and happy in the Lord as they ought to be (cf. Ph 4:4). And in greeting others, let them say, ‘God give you peace.’” - TOR Rule, Chapter V:20 -

When asked what “charges her up” each day, Sister Angeline easily explained, “When we first pronounce, and then renew our vows, we say ‘I trust that together with these sisters, I can achieve my life goal of response to the ongoing revelation of God by my personal dedication to Jesus Christ.”’

gÉzxà{xÜ ã|à{ à{xáx f|áàxÜá Sister Angeline Kubit

St. Francis sang joyfully of Brother Sun and Sister Moon. His companions were “brothers” and “sisters”. All creation was a revelation of God, and deserved his care, from the leper to the Sultan. Sister Angeline Kubit has grasped these Franciscan ideals and makes them visible as community, communion and caregiving.

Community Sr.Angeline was born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, the second youngest of the six children of Mary and Joseph Kubit. That was the environment in which Angeline learned the art of creating solid community. And as early as her First Holy Communion at St. John Cantius Parish, “I told Jesus I wanted to stay close to him, to love him.” The Kubit family drew even closer when their father died shortly after Angeline graduated from eighth grade; she was 14 years old. She attended Marymount High School for three years before she entered the Sisters of St. Joseph,TOSF. She was invested on August 6, 1946. When asked what powers her, what “charges her up” each day, she easily explained, “When we first pronounce, and then renew our vows, we say ‘I trust that together with these sisters, I can achieve my life goal of response to the ongoing revelation of God by my personal dedication to Jesus Christ.’ I have tried to live always ‘together with

these sisters.’” The day-to-day living is what counts. And her sisters say of her, “Without seeking recognition, Sr. Angeline does so much for others without asking for thanks. She constantly reflects the spirit of Francis in her quiet daily life.” With the strength of Sr. Angeline’s presence, educational programs were continued, schools smoothly transitioned and other sisters were companioned in their ministries. Her quiet daily life, even in her retirement, involves substitute teaching, a little cooking, sacristan work, participation in the Parish Life program in Cleveland, nursing home visits as Eucharistic Minister, gardening and full-time caregiving.

Communion Sr. Angeline was a teacher for almost 40 years in schools in Michigan, Ohio, and Connecticut. During this time, her special dedication was preparing children for First Holy Communion. Year after year, she brought children to the table of the Lord. Even today, she continues to teach “PSR” (Public School Religion) at St. Barbara’s Parish in Cleveland, Ohio, with the same sacramental emphasis. A little math will show that, over the years, Sr. Angeline has prepared almost a thousand children for the reception of the sacraments. In her role as sacristan and Eucharistic Minister at St. Barbara Church, she prepares the altar and the sacristy for daily Mass. In many ways, the Eucharist is central to her life.

Caregiving For the last several years, Sr. Angeline has been providing daily caregiving for her sister in religion, who suffers from congestive heart failure. “Together with these sisters” takes on special meaning when it involves basic daily needs. This care has now extended to other persons in the parish community. She also cares for the pastor’s mother who has macular degeneration and she cares for a homebound parishioner with muscular dystrophy. Sr. Angeline describes her lifestyle as “not extravagant”. An understatement. She asks little and gives all. For this, we are fortunate to be in communion with her.

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Chiara Home is Sr. Gretchen’s permanent residence, and the guests come and stay in her home to be cared for with love and patience.

cxÜyxvà ]Éç Sister Gretchen Clark

Sister Gretchen Clark has Brother Leo living at her house. It was Brother Leo who, in the thirteenth century, was St. Francis’s student in understanding the meaning of “perfect joy”. Even today, Brother Leo, a pet pig who brings laughter to the residents of Chiara Home in South Bend, Indiana, lives in the center of perfect joy. Chiara Home is a facility that provides respite care over a brief period of time for temporary relief from the emotionally and physically demanding task of being a primary caregiver of someone who has a special need, developmental difference or mental disorder. Sr. Gretchen does this 24/7. Chiara Home is Sr. Gretchen’s permanent residence, and the guests come and stay in her home to be cared for with love and patience. It was a serendipity event in 1992 that started the respite care service. Sr. Gretchen was then the Director of the Office of Spirituality and Life Transitions for the Sisters of St. Joseph, TOSF. She was living with Sr. Sharon Dillon, whose friend asked if she would care for their daughter for a weekend. Both Sr. Gretchen and Sr. Sharon came to realize the need for respite care in the South Bend area, and in 1993, Chiara Home was incorporated with the following mission:

Dedicated to the spirit of St. Clare of Assisi who is known for her care of the outcast by providing both food and hospitality, Chiara Home desires to provide this same care to those among us who have been identified as having developmental difference or special need. Chiara Home strives to undertake those activities which will promote a gentle home atmosphere so that all persons in our care may experience a place of rest and a time of total acceptance.

Sr. Gretchen and her staff provide positive interaction with the guests and staff, not only in supportive care but also in play, conversation and outings. Over the years, the services have expanded to the point where Chiara Home has plans to build a new facility, capable of providing more conveniences for the guests. This Franciscan spirit of joy and care is not new to Sr. Gretchen. She was raised with her family in Detroit, Michigan, the third oldest of nine children. Her father was an X-ray technician and also drove an ambulance. Somewhere in that environment, Gretchen developed a strong sense of commitment to “the material and spiritual welfare of the human family”. She is not afraid to move ahead and be creative with the events of life as they unfold. She entered the congregation in 1967, when religious life was undergoing enormous changes. While she was an elementary school teacher as well as a high school math teacher, she always had the desire to do missionary work. In 1978, she went to British Columbia, Canada to work with the French Canadian Indians, teaching at Prince George High School, and then at St. Michael’s School in Sutton Bay, Michigan. She then became Vocation Director for the congregation, moving into Provincial leadership in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1986. From there, she moved to South Bend, Indiana, where she was Director of the Office of Spirituality. Chiara Home has been her ministry since 1992, a ministry she lives out in perfect joy.

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Peacemaker of the Year 2002:

Sister Claudine Balio At the 37th Conference of the Franciscan Federation to held August 14-17, 2002 in St. Louis, Missouri, Sister Claudine Balio was honored as the SSJ-TOSF’s “Peacemaker of the Year”. The award is given annually by the Franciscan Federation to individuals who labor tirelessly in the area of peace and justice, assuring that all God’s children participate in the bounty of God and of the earth. The award was presented during the Awards Dinner on Friday, August 16, 2002.There is no question that this award is highly deserved. Sister Claudine is the founder of “Guest House,” located in Rice Lake,Wisconsin, which offers emergency transitional housing to those who are homeless due to economic difficulties and/or disasters. This was a dream in the making, even when the dream was not yet conscious. Sr. Claudine was born and raised in East Chicago, Indiana. In the late 1960s, when others were in the whirlwind of Vietnam, calling for freedom, free love, and free expression, she heard God’s call to the religious life. She was 22 years old. With a background in business, physical education and computer science, she used her talents to build the future through teaching, first in schools in Chicago, Illinois, then in South Bend, Indiana. Her teaching experience brought her to St. Joseph School in Rice Lake, Wisconsin, where she also became the principal of the school, as well as fifth grade teacher.

“ P E AC E M A K E R OF THE YEAR” I S G I V E N A N N UA L LY BY THE FRANCISCAN F E D E R AT I O N TO I N D I V I D UA L S WHO LABOR

It was three years ago that Sr. Claudine opened the door of the convent to a homeless woman, who had spent the night sleeping in her car, and with that, opened the door to a whole new ministry in the Rice Lake area. Guest House was opened on Heart Island in Rice Lake,Wisconsin in 1999.

T I R E L E S S LY IN THE AREA OF P E AC E A N D J U S T I C E ,

In addition to the Peacemaker of the Year Award, Sister Claudine also received the 2002 “Teach as Jesus Did” award at St. Joseph School, Rice Lake, Wisconsin. This award is given to a person, voted by colleagues, who exemplifies the spirit and values of Jesus in the ministry of education.

A S S U R I N G T H AT ALL GOD’S CHILDREN PA RT I C I PAT E IN THE BOUNTY OF GOD AND O F T H E E A RT H .

Guest House on Heart Island

THE PURPOSE OF

GUEST HOUSE IS

TO P R OV I D E

EMERGENCY

TRANSITIONAL

HOUSING FOR THE

P O O R A N D N E E DY

I N T H E G R E AT E R

RICE LAKE AREA

IN WISCONSIN.

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What was a dream is now a reality. Easter Sunday 1999, Sisters Jeanne Conzemius and Claudine Balio realized the need for transitional emergency housing, when they returned home and found a homeless woman at their door who had spent Holy Saturday night sleeping in her car. After that experience, the two sisters began working with Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College (WITC), the local technical college, the board of Community Connections of the Greater Rice Lake Area, Inc. (an organization Sister Claudine founded) and many local businesses to bring their dream to reality. Under the guidance and watchful eye of Sister Claudine, the construction of the Guest House began in the spring of 1999, when the foundation was laid. Now a Guest House is standing on Heart Island overlooking lower Rice Lake. This Guest House will help those who are homeless due to economic difficulties and/or disasters, such as fire, tornado, etc. The Guest House is a simple house with two bedrooms, living room and kitchen on the first floor that can accommodate a family.The basement provides additional housing with a living area, bedroom, living room and kitchenette.The purpose of the Guest House is to provide emergency transitional housing for the poor and needy in the greater Rice Lake area in Wisconsin.The Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis are the only ones who provide this type of housing in the area.The guests are allowed to stay in the Guest House for up to a 30-day stay.The Guest House has provided a home to almost 40 families since it opened. While this is a start, the need is great. Sr. Claudine is in the difficult situation of having to turn away at least seven to ten families per week. She is working with a group of Rice Lake women who are studying the housing problem in the area.The Guest House is owned and operated by the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis. It is the only emergency transitional house that the community owns.

Sister Michele Nemojeski

Receives the Teacher of the Year Award The first and second grade students at Sacred Heart School in Stevens Point,Wisconsin are really fortunate to have Sister Michele Nemojeski as their teacher. Sr. Michele received the Teacher of the Year Award from the Diocese of La Crosse on Thursday, May 30, 2002. She was nominated for the award by the parents of her students, the members of the education committee, and the principal of the school, Sister Ursula Myszka. Diana Roberts, Acting Director of the Catholic Schools of the Diocese of La Crosse was at the ceremony to present the engraved plaque to Sr. Michele.

THE CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF

THE TEACHER OF THE YEAR ARE: SOMEONE WHO HAS GIVEN SPECIAL, RECENT OR PAST CONTRIBUTION(S) AND/OR

“The award is given each year to a teacher not only for their teaching excellence, but also for going above and beyond that excellence,” said Diana Roberts when presenting the plaque. “It’s for someone who exemplifies our Catholic traditions, and for someone who passes on our faith and traditions of the Catholic schools.” A parent of a student in Sr. Michele’s class goes on to say, “She (Sr. Michele) provides tremendous spiritual formation for the children at such a young age. Her openness to parents and her feedback to us have always been consistent.”

OF LA CROSSE, OR OVERALL

Sister Ursula, principal of Sacred Heart School, stated,“Somehow she goes way beyond the expectations of what I anticipate her teaching. She challenges the students, and is a role model for them. When I leave her in charge of the school, I am confident that things will be handled in an efficient and professional way.”

COMMITMENT TO

Sister Michele has dedicated her life to Catholic education, so it was entirely fitting that she receive the award. She began her teaching career at Assumption BVM in Pulaski,Wisconsin, in 1958. After serving in several other Wisconsin schools, she came to Sacred Heart in 1982. “It’s just such a joy,” she says. “I wouldn’t trade my job for anything!”

SERVICE TO THE CATHOLIC SCHOOLS IN THE DIOCESE EXCELLENCE IN JOB PERFORMANCE

A PERSON WITH CATHOLIC SCHOOLS

A PERSON WHO POSSESSES A CLEAR VISION AND PHILOSOPHY OF CATHOLIC SCHOOLS AND CATHOLIC IDENTITY

A PERSON OF FAITH WHO CARRIES OUT THE CATHOLIC SCHOOL PHILOSOPHY IN HIS OR HER OWN PERSONAL LIFE

Sister Barbara Wanat

Poetic Achievement Award Congratulations to Sister Barbara Wanat and the “poets” from Holy Cross School in New Britain, Connecticut! The honor of being selected for this award speaks well of the talent and ability of Sr. Barbara in teaching creative writing to her junior high students, but also the consistency of her excellence. Sr. Barbara and her students were recognized in the top 10% of the thousands of literary entries not only this year, but also in previous years.The recognition in 2002 is two-fold. First, the Holy Cross students’ poems will be published in Celebrate! Poets Speak Out, a volume published each year by Creative Communication, Inc.The book contains high merit poems selected from a statewide contest.The poems are chosen on their literary merit, creativity and social awareness. As Thomas K. Worthen, Ph.D., Editor of Celebrate! Poets Speak Out, says,“The teachers and students of your school should feel honored as there were thousands of entries in this contest; however, less than 50% of the poems submitted are selected to be published.The fact that you have numerous students who were accepted makes a strong statement about your school.The list of your students who have been accepted to be published represents a lot of talent, hard work and dedication from your teachers and students. In judging tens of thousands of poems each year, our judges have found that the single most important factor in creating a quality poem is the quality of the instruction.We have found that the schools with excellent language arts programs have a much higher percentage of their students’ poetry accepted.With excellent teachers, come excellent poets... Your school stands out and will be recognized in the book, of all the authors receiving a ‘Poetic Achievement Award.’ This honor is reserved for the top 10% of the schools that entered the contest.” Secondly, Sr. Barbara herself will be published in Celebrate! Poets Speak Out. Her poem “The Glory and Suffering of Winter” was selected as one of high merit as part of the Educators Poetry Contest - 2002.

The Glory and Suffering of Winter by Sister Barbara Wanat

Deciduous trees standing against the cloudy sky once brownish-black Change their appearance from their dark nakedness to a vision of white glory Soon the sun rises above the horizon. Arms are gracefully uplifted to the sky. A glazed whiteness shines on them as they reach upward in praise of their Creator.

The pine trees whose long fingers are continually raised upward are now carrying heavy burdens of snow. Their arms ache - their backs are breaking.

For her own creative talent and for her ability to encourage that talent in her students—congratulations to Sister Barbara Wanat!

Clumps of snow bedraggle each branch to the ground like the heavy load once carried by the Savior.

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SSJ-TOSFs

Receive the Distinguished Service Award On May 1, 2002, the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis received the first-ever Distinguished Service Award given by the Stevens Point Area Catholic Schools (SPACS). The award was presented to the congregation for their dedication to Catholic schools; their foresight in founding the first Catholic High School in the Stevens Point/Plover area; their service to the thousands of youth over the years; and their tradition of faith, service and excellence in SPACS schools today. The cornerstone for St. Joseph Academy was laid in Stevens Point in 1902. It served as the motherhouse for the newly formed congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph,TOSF, as well as a high school for the young women who were entering the congregation. In 1922, St. Joseph Academy was opened to the general public, accepting registrations from young girls. Maria High School was built in 1956 and St. Joseph Academy continued in the new facilities under the new name until the early 70s. At that time, the all-boys Pacelli High School and the all-girls Maria High School merged to establish the co-ed Pacelli High school. Both student bodies and staffs joined together in the Maria building using the Pacelli name. Over the years, the sisters have continued their important relationship to the Stevens Point Area Catholic Schools. Many sisters have taught in SPACS and even continue their relationship after retirement. The convent chapel at St. Joseph Congregational Home is regularly used by Pacelli students for Mass, sacraments and special occasions. A portion of the congregation’s property is used for Pacelli soccer and baseball practice fields. In addition, SPACS utilizes the propert’s prairie for its outdoor environmental classroom. Sister Adalbert Stal, a former principal of Maria High School, accepted the award on behalf of the congregation from Gregg Hansel, SPACS president. The afternoon concluded with a reception at Pacelli High School.

A Double Celebration Two significant events occurred on July 1, 2002. First, the Central Board Leadership Team of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis was installed for a sixyear term starting in 2002 and ending in 2008. The ceremony on July 1st was the celebration of the elections that took place in March of 2002, electing the four-member team who had served for the previous six years: Sister Jeanne Conzemius Sister Katherine Wyszynski

Sister Mary Alice Jarosz Sister Valerie Kulbacki

The Eucharistic leader said to the Central Board, “On behalf of the Sisters, thank you for saying ‘Yes’ and accepting the position of Central Board Leadership for the next six years. We promise to pray and support you in your leadership.” Then the Central Board Leadership Team responded to each of the invocations:

Holy Spirit, give us your gift of wisdom to know what is important in life. Holy Spirit, gift us with wisdom. Holy Spirit, give us your gift of understanding to genuinely care for one another Holy Spirit, gift us with understanding. Holy Spirit, give us your gift of knowledge to know right from wrong. Holy Spirit, gift us with knowledge. Holy Spirit, give us your gift of fortitude to courageously live our faith. Holy Spirit, gift us with fortitude. Holy Spirit, counsel us to make unselfish decisions for ourselves and on behalf of others. Holy Spirit, gift us with counsel. Holy Spirit, give us your gifts of piety and fear of the Lord to reverence and love God in all we do. Holy Spirit, gift us with piety and reverence.

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Second, July 1, 2002 signified the end of the Centennial celebration of the founding of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis. The congregation was involved in the celebration, beginning in 2000-2001 with the Year of Sabbath. That year was a time of reflection on “Who are we? What is God calling us to be and do?” The fruits of this reflection were brought together during the two sessions of the 24th General Chapter, in July 2001 and March 2002. At that time, the sisters determined to pursue “the heart of the matter,” that is to examine and articulate the personal, Franciscan and cosmic stories of each individual. During 2001-2002, the congregation also engaged in 16 separate celebrations of the Centennial. These were held in various locations across the United States and in Peru, involving friends, family, colleagues, former students, and former members of the congregation. On June 30 and July 1, 2002, celebrations were held at each of the three congregational homes in Garfield Heights, Ohio; Bartlett, Illinois; and Stevens Point, Wisconsin. At all three of these Centennial closings, each sister received a card with the chapter commitments printed. A “heart” was on the cover of the card, representing the heartfelt commitment that each sister had to fulfilling the Centennial insights into the “heart of the matter”. As a sign of their commitment to this process, each sister put her “heart” in the basket which was in turn put on the altar of celebration. The final centennial celebration in Stevens Point included a “21 Red and White Balloon Salute” to honor all the deceased members of the congregation. The cemetery located on the grounds of the Stevens Point congregational home is the burial place of the foundresses, Mother Mary Felicia Jaskulska and Mother Mary Clara Bialkowski, as well as all of the Mothers General and the Presidents. It was in the congregational cemetery that a memorial stone was erected in July 2001 to symbolically “bring home” all the sisters who are buried in locations other than Stevens Point. The Centennial celebrations ended with a rousing “Bring Forth the Kingdom” which is exactly what the Sisters of St. Joseph,TOSF are committed to do.

Sister Mary Louise Szerpicki and

The Cleveland Women’s Ordination Conference The Cleveland Women’s Ordination Conference (CWOC) held its 21st annual Ordination Day Prayer Vigil on Saturday, May 18, 2002, outside St. John Cathedral in Cleveland, Ohio. Sister Louise Szerpicki was among the group of women who assembled for one hour during the ordination of three men into the priesthood. The CWOC stated, “We are here to rejoice with the young men—this year there are three—who are being ordained to the Catholic priesthood inside our cathedral this morning, and we express our sorrow at the continuing exclusion of women from that ordained priesthood. We believe our Church, in fidelity to its Gospel mission, must become equally open to the full participation of women, as well as men, in its ministries and decisions.” The vigil was peaceful and respectful. Passers-by were given flyers to help them understand the purpose of the vigil gathering. The members of CWOC joined in prayer for shared faith among all God’s people.

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Sister Virginette Czerwinski Honored at

Appreciation Dinner Sister Virginette Czerwinski provides pastoral services at the Federal Correctional Institution in Oxford, Wisconsin. At the annual appreciation dinner on April 27, 2002, the warden presented her with a clock, inscribed with “Volunteers give the time of their lives!” Sister Virginette volunteers at “Oxford,” planning ecumenical prayer sessions, conducting discussions with the inmates and provides other religious services as necessary. Because her work is so comprehensive, her gatherings have come to be called “Sister Virginette’s Group”. One of the participants asserted,“This group’s visit to FCI Oxford is the first priority for me over all other events I participate in. We gather together to share our spiritual experiences, spiritual notions, individuality, and community.” Thank you, Sister Virginette!

Employee of the Month Sister Donna Warzon Bob Stearns, President and CEO of St. Coletta’s Home for Adult Handicapped, presented a plaque to Sister Donna Warzon, commending her service.“I am pleased to present this award to you in recognition of your hard work and dedication as an employee and a volunteer at St. Coletta. Your hard work and dedication to the Franciscan values of caring and respect, and the compassion that you show for others, is evident in everything that you do at St. Coletta. You are a dedicated employee who goes out of her way to help others in so many ways ...Your unselfish service has been acknowledged by many of your co-workers and friends at St. Coletta. Thank you for doing such a great job to assist us in providing high-quality services to the individuals we support.” Sr. Donna has been at St. Coletta since 1977. The home provides care and training in life skills for adults with developmental disabilities. As a staff member, Sr. Donna has a variety of responsibilities ranging from the mailroom and kitchen to assisting in “Affirmative Industries,” the life skills training program for the guests.

S P O N S O R E D

I N S T I T U T I O N S

From

Lourdes High School Lourdes Hall to

n June 14-15, 2002, Lourdes High School (LHS), Chicago, Illinois, made an official transformation to Lourdes Hall, girls campus of De La Salle Institute, Chicago, Illinois. A Closing Ritual and Open House was held at the now-closed campus of Lourdes High School for the Sisters of St. Joseph,TOSF; for LHS faculty and administration, past and present; and LHS students and alumnae.

O

The ceremony on Friday, June 14, 2002, was a more private ceremony for the sisters to ritualize the closing of Lourdes High School. Brother Michael Quirk represented De La Salle Institute at the ceremony, and Sister Mary Alice Jarosz, SSJTOSF Central Board and liaison to the congregation’s sponsored institutions, led the closing ritual. The service began with a welcome by Sister Josita Krzeminski, Principal of Lourdes High School and future Associate Principal of Lourdes Hall, the women’s division of De La Salle Institute. Next was a PowerPoint picture history of Lourdes High School, from 1936 to the present, prepared by Reneta Webb, Director of Public Relations for the SSJ-TOSFs.Then, Sister Mary Alice began her reflections with a quote of Daniel Webster which appeared in the 1936 Dedication Book for Lourdes High School: “If we work on marble, it will perish; if we work upon brass, time will efface it; if we rear temples, they will crumble into dust; but if we work upon immortal souls, if we imbue them with principles, with the just fear of God and the love of fellow man, we engrave on those tablets something which will brighten all eternity.” She went on to say, “We bid farewell today not just to a school that happened to be housed on this campus, but rather to all that it has meant in our lives and in the lives of the thousands of young women who walked these halls, who were infected with its spirit, and who went on to become successful professional women and successful members of their church, their society and of the families that they established and raised.” Sister Mary Alice then presented symbolic “treasures” of Lourdes High School. She was assisted by Sisters Rosemarie Morowczynski and Ann Mary Wundrach who have served at LHS for many years. One by one, the pennants, the awards, the lists of faculty members, the pictures of each of the 37

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S P O N S O R E D

I N S T I T U T I O N S WE BID FAREWELL TODAY NOT JUST TO A SCHOOL THAT HAPPENED TO BE HOUSED ON THIS CAMPUS, BUT RATHER TO ALL THAT IT HAS MEANT IN OUR LIVES AND IN THE LIVES OF THE THOUSANDS OF YOUNG WOMEN WHO WALKED THESE HALLS,WHO WERE INFECTED WITH ITS SPIRIT, AND WHO

principals, a Lourdes Lion, and a statue of our Lady of Lourdes found their way into a treasure chest which was then presented to Brother Michael Quirk and the sisters who will work at De La Salle next year, for the heritage display of Lourdes at De La Salle Institute.

WENT ON TO BECOME SUCCESSFUL PROFESSIONAL WOMEN AND SUCCESSFUL

Brother Michael stated that when the all-male De La Salle Institute was investigating the possibilities of co-education, he visited many girls’ high schools in the area. The reception he received at Lourdes was warm, open and inviting. He was convinced that this was the appropriate partner for the archdiocesan experiment of “One School - One Mission - Two Campuses”. The campus of Lourdes Hall will be located in the school building of St. Mary of Perpetual Help parish, at 32nd and Aberdeen Streets in the Bridgeport area of Chicago, Illinois. “I learned two things that are significant to this location,” said Brother Michael. “First, St. Mary’s was built in 1892, the same year that De La Salle was built. And second, the founders of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis, Mother Mary Clara Bialkowski and Mother Mary Felicia Jaskulska, were both teaching at St. Mary’s when the decision was made to form the new congregation of sisters. The establishment of Lourdes Hall at St. Mary’s is like coming home.”

MEMBERS OF THEIR CHURCH,THEIR SOCIETY AND OF THE FAMILIES THAT THEY ESTABLISHED AND RAISED.

S P O N S O R E D

I N S T I T U T I O N S On Saturday, June 15, 2002, approximately 600 alumnae, past and present faculty, and Sisters of St. Joseph, TOSF, gathered for Eucharistic liturgy in Stritch Hall. They, too, blessed the “treasures” passed on to De La Salle. Following the liturgy, there was opportunity for the assembly to walk through the halls for a final look at the LHS facility. They reminisced over refreshments, with the opportunity to view the picture history of LHS and to purchase LHS items. People left that day with relationships renewed and assurance that the spirit of Lourdes High School would continue.

“SINCE (THE CONGREGATION) BEGAN ON JULY 1, 1901, WE CONSISTENTLY LOOKED AT THAT PART OF THE WORLD IN WHICH WE LIVED AND ASKED OURSELVES

The contribution of the administrations and faculty of LHS over the years was acknowledged by Francis Cardinal George in a letter of recognition in which he said, “Over its 66-year history, Lourdes has served the needs of young women on the Southwest side of Chicago. It has helped them through the trials of adolescence by nurturing their faith and developing their skills. I am grateful for all that your sisters have done to educate and form young women these many years. You can be proud and grateful for what has been accomplished at the Lourdes campus.” Nicholas Wolsonovich, Superintendent of the Catholic Schools, also sent a letter “acknowledging your great ministry in the Church of Chicago”. After recounting the contributions of LHS, he concludes, “We are aware that many teachers and administrators in our schools are Lourdes High School graduates. Your influence and investment continue to serve the students of the Archdiocese! We celebrate with you a courageous, successful ministry within our Church. Thank you for being there!”

HOW WE COULD MAKE A FITTING RESPONSE FOR PEOPLE. WE HAVE ALSO ASKED OURSELVES, IF WE DON’T DO SOMETHING— WHAT WILL HAPPEN TO THE CHILDREN?” Sister Jeanne Conzemius, SSJ-TOSF Central Board member

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On June 24, 2002, a press conference was called at Lourdes with Arne Duncan, Superintendent of the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) and several CPS Administrations, as well as Sister Jeanne Conzemius, SSJ-TOSF Central Board member. The press

S P O N S O R E D

I N S T I T U T I O N S

conference was to announce that LHS would be leased to the CPS for use by the John Hancock High School. CPS has been leasing space in several Catholic schools in the past. However, the John Hancock High School plan differs from the past in that the school will be self-contained, that is, instead of the principal working out of the feeder school with off-campus classes as “annex,” the John Hancock High School will have its own principal on site with the student body. Sr. Jeanne recalled the founding spirit of the Sisters of St. Joseph, TOSF, saying, “Since (the congregation) began on July 1, 1901, we consistently looked at that part of the world in which we lived and asked ourselves how we could make a fitting response for people. We have also asked ourselves, ‘if we don’t do something, what will happen to the children?’ ... It is with pleasure and with great excitement that we, the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis welcome the children of the Chicago Public Schools. We, your neighbors, your friends and your sisters, welcome the children to a new educational home that is a beautiful, safe, nurturing and learning environment. It’s about the children, always the children.”

Alderwoman Shirley Coleman and Sr. Josita Krzeminski, Lourdes HIgh School Principal.

“SO MANY TREASURES LOVINGLY HOLD WITHIN THEM THE ESSENCE OF LOURDES HIGH SCHOOL. THEY ARE PHYSICAL

The mutual cooperation of the Catholic schools and the public schools is a winning situation for the students. The use of the Lourdes High School building for the John Hancock High School relieves the overcrowding in their original facility. At the end of the school year in 2000, the Bridgeport Academy closed, leaving the school building at St. Mary of Perpetual Help, Chicago, Illinois, unused. Lourdes Hall will open in that building in the fall of 2002 as the girls campus of De La Salle Institute.

REPRESENTATIONS OF THE LEGACY OF THIS SCHOOL AND ALL IT HAS MEANT OVER THE YEARS TO THE SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH OF THE THIRD ORDER OF ST.

Chicago Alderwoman, Shirley Coleman, attended the press conference and stated that the Sisters of St. Joseph, TOSF were to be commended at being so forward thinking. The congregation was participating in exciting educational initiatives for the good of the community.

FRANCIS. THESE TREASURES ARE THE MEMORIES,THE HEARTBEATS,THE

Lourdes High School is one of four Catholic facilities being utilized by the Chicago Public Schools. “We all know that Chicago’s Public School population has grown substantially over the years,” said Arne Duncan, CPS CEO. “As a result, we have experienced serious overcrowding in some areas of the city. These new schools will help relieve this problem so that our teachers and students can focus more on instruction and less on space availability.”

LAUGHTER,THE TEARS, THE BREATH AND LIFE OF ALL THOSE WHO HAVE CALLED THIS INSTITUTION ‘HOME’ SINCE 1935

The words of Sister Mary Alice Jarosz continue to be true as the physical plant of Lourdes High School becomes home to another group of students and faculty. “So many treasures lovingly hold within them the essence of Lourdes High School. They are physical representations of the legacy of this school and all it has meant over the years to the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis. These treasures are the memories, the heartbeats, the laughter, the tears, the breath and life of all those who have called this institution ‘home’ since 1935 when the first shovel went into the ground to build these hallowed walls.” Now new memories are being made by the students and faculty of Lourdes Hall of De La Salle and of John Hancock High School at the LHS campus.

WHEN THE FIRST SHOVEL WENT INTO THE GROUND TO BUILD THESE HALLOWED WALLS.” —Sister Mary Alice Jarosz

S P O N S O R E D

I N S T I T U T I O N S

Reflection

by Sister Mary Alice Jarosz

Funeral Liturgy for Thomas J.Trudell, President and CEO of Marymount Healthcare Systems

I

n 1979,Tom Trudell sailed, almost literally, into the lives of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis like a speedboat on the water. He had the flexibility to appreciate the beauty of the flowing currents. At the same time, he possessed within himself the power to overcome the troubled waters of any storm, and, by staying the course, to arrive at the chosen destination actually stronger for having made the journey. We soon came to know Tom as a man of principle and foresight; an extremely intelligent, insightful and capable leader; a man totally committed and fiercely dedicated to the accomplishment of goals and the achievement of success. At the same time, we got to know a man who deeply loved his soulmate, partner, friend and wife, Sandy, and we were privileged to watch his children, Chris and Nicole, grow up in our midst and blossom into the loving successful adults they are today. Back then, we never imagined how becoming the proud grandfather of Cameron could introduce us to yet another dimension of this man—one absolutely thunderstruck by the miracle of his daughter’s child. As Tom’s tenure at Marymount Hospital and Health Care Systems continued and his achievements multiplied, he crossed a line that no male before him had crossed...as I told the Management Team at the hospital, he became one of us, he became a Sister (or Brother if you will) of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis. He became a bearer of our history and joined in the building of our legacy. He put our name on the map and made sure that nothing that bore the name Marymount or that represented the ministry of the Sisters was anything less than first-class. He showed a group of humble Franciscan women that we were greater than we ever imagined ourselves to be. He sat with us, laughed and cried with us, and he spun new dreams with us. He talked the Cleveland Clinic into creating a health care system so that he could strengthen our ministry of health care at Marymount; he partnered with Trinity High School, transformed Clare Hall, and offered assistance in any way needed at the Congregational Home. He was, indeed, our brother and our friend.

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S P O N S O R E D

I N S T I T U T I O N S

No matter what we achieve at Marymount Hospital in the future, or on the entire Marymount campus, it will be touched by the influence of this man and it will be a part of his legacy with us. It is for us now to promise Tom that we will not let any of his dreams for us die, that we will see them to

TOM, YOU TOUCHED THE LIVES OF THE

completion and that we will do so in a way that he SISTERS OF

would have been proud of.

ST. JOSEPH OF THE

On a more personal note, I have to say that, like many of you, I have been reflecting during these last few

THIRD ORDER OF ST.

days about the person I was before I met Tom Trudell

FRANCIS

and how my life has changed because of having known him. I have served on hospital and health systems boards and committees with Tom for the last 18 years. We have shared the speaker’s podium together at countless employee appreciation dinners and assemblies, ribbon cuttings, dedications and celebrations. We felt free to call each other at any time of the day or

AS WITH A MAGIC WAND; YOU SHOWED US HOW THE SPIRITUALITY OF FAITH-FILLED LAY

night. Without Tom’s help, the sister I live with would not have come through her countless health emergencies doing

LEADERS LIKE YOURSELF

as well as she is today. Like most of you, I am a much bet-

CAN NOT ONLY

ter and stronger person because of my association with him—I have much to be grateful for and much to continue to live up to.

PRESERVE AND MOVE FORWARD THE VALUES

Tom, you touched the lives of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis as with a magic wand; you showed us how the spiri-

AND MISSION OF OUR FOUNDRESSES, BUT CAN DO SO WITH

tuality of faith-filled lay leaders like yourself can not only preserve and move forward

A RICHNESS AND DEPTH

the values and mission of our foundresses,

NOT AVAILABLE WITHIN

but can do so with a richness and depth not available within the current reality of vowed community life. For your deep love and respect for us, even when we may

THE CURRENT REALITY OF VOWED

not have been our best toward you; for constantly giving and caring and responding to our needs above and beyond the call of duty, for the countless dozens of beautiful roses you showered us with for so many occasions, we are eternally grateful. Although today you soar like an eagle to your heavenly reward, know that we will miss you terribly as partner and friend. Please remember us always, and please ask God to bless us with all you know we need to carry on.Thank you,Tom, and farewell.

COMMUNITY LIFE.

F O R M AT I O N / VO C AT I O N

Introducing Pre-Candidates Three Pre-Candidates join Anita Haller, Karla Magruder, Patricia Melchert and Patricia Torrefranca in the first step to becoming full members of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis. All three of these women are from Lima, Peru, and will continue their formation there under the direction of Sister Josephine Espinos.

Asuncion Del Pilar Reyes Montano Pilar Reyes works in an office in Peru. She has also worked as a youth minister for seven years in connection with the parish of Nuestro Sra del Rosario which is served by the Sisters of St. Joseph,TOSF. Pilar was an Associate of the congregation for several years before deciding to pursue becoming a vowed member. She was able to join the sisters in their celebration of the congregation’s Centennial last July in Stevens Point,Wisconsin.

Amanda Elizabeth Malque Iparraguire Amanda Malque is a school teacher at Our Lady of the Rosary School in Lima. The school staff looks to her to organize many of the school events. In addition, she is one of the main leaders of the Baptism “team” for the parish, providing Baptism preparation, not only in the parish, but also in outlying areas in the top zones of Tahuantinsuyo.

Debi Maita Gutierrez Debi Maita is a social worker, dedicated to the service of people. In Peru, social workers work by contracts of 1 or 2 months at a time with very little security, finishing one contract, while looking for the next. She has volunteered, along with some of the other Associates, to help out on Saturdays in an area outside of Lima called Sapan, where there is no priest and where the people are very poor. The people are trying to obtain water and electricity (a very long process) in order to set up homes. The volunteers work with beginning catechesis for families.

There are now seven Pre-Candidates who are in this first step of integration into the congregation, allowing the individuals to pray and discern the life of a Sister of St. Joseph,TOSF.

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Dear Friends, St. Francis and St. Clare have been a guiding inspiration in the lives of the Sisters of St. Joseph, TOSF over the past one hundred years. It is our goal, together with you, our dear benefactors, to continue to serve those in need through our ministries of service and prayer into the next one hundred years. The fundamental values of Franciscanism, simplicity, joy, works of mercy and the pursuit of peace through justice, will continue to guide us in these ministries and those yet to be discovered. Together with St. Francis we pray: “Holy Father, keep in your name (Jn17:11) those whom You gave me in the world; they are Yours and You gave them to me”(Jn17:6). And “the word which you gave me I gave to them, and they accepted it and truly believed that it came forth from You. And they have accepted that You sent me”(Jn17:8) I pray for them... Bless them and sanctify them” (Jn17:17).

The peace, joy, love and happiness of Sts. Francis and Clare fill your lives always! Sincerely,

Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis Development Office P.O. Box 388129 Chicago, IL 60638-8129

Sister Denise Seymour, SSJ-TOSF Phone: (773) 581-7505 Fax: (773) 581-7545 e-mail: dev@ssj-tosf.org

Sister Denise Seymour

Sister Anatolde Gwiazdowski Born into this life: July 19, 1909 Born to eternal life: June 8, 2002

Sister Cordelia Laczynski Born into this life: June 25, 1913 Born to eternal life: July 19, 2002

Sister Regina Klimczak Born into this life: August 4, 1911 Born to eternal life: July 21, 2002

For his dedication to the mission and ministry of Marymount Healthcare Systems and Marymount Hospital as President and CEO

The Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID CHICAGO, IL PERMIT #5504

Sisters of St. Joseph,TOSF Development Office P.O. Box 388129 Chicago, Illinois 60638-8129 www.ssj-tosf.org

Address Service Requested


Volume 3 No 2