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M a rch 2 0–2 6, 2 014 | f r ee | Vol . 3 3 No. 38 | pi t ch.coM

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m a rch 2 0 -2 6, 2 014 | V ol . 3 3 No. 3 8 E d i t o r i a l

cas h dump

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jen Chen, Liz Cook, April Fleming, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Savage, Nick Spacek

The Citadel’s toxic half-life keeps getting longer. b y s t e v e vo c k r o d t

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a r t

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever

P r o d u c t i o n

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

Th aT New New wesTpo r T

a d v E r t i s i n g

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Sharon Donat, Becky Losey Director of Marketing and Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland Digital Marketing Specialist Lisa Kelley Sales and Marketing Assistant Anna Brescia

c i r c u l a t i o n

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B u s i n E s s

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

s o u t h c o m m

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Chief Operating Officer/Group Publisher Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales and Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

n a t i o n a l

A party district grows up. b y dav i d h u d n a l l

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a d v E r t i s i n g

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

d i s t r i B u t i o n

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

mo r Ni Ng, No o N aNd Ni gh T Baked in Kansas City is almost too much of some good things. by charles ferruzz a

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c o P y r i g h t

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2014 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

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Questionnaire news feature agenda art café fat city music d a i ly l i s t i n g s savage love

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PhotograPhy by brooke VandeVer

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MiSSiON GATEWAy coming in … 2016? JAx FiSH HOuSE will open in the new Polsinelli building on the Plaza. JACK CASHiLL is investigating the missing Malaysian Airlines plane, already has a CONSPiRACy THEORy.

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ir tF a e

y ida r F

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Questionnaire

Amber VersolA

Trainer and community organizer

Hometown: Galva, Kansas Current neighborhood: JoCo — specifically, Shawnee

What I do (in 140 characters): If I’m doing my

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What’s your addiction? Being present in the space that exists between social justice and public policy. What’s your game? Running. (I don’t know if this counts as a game or an illness.)

What’s your drink? Salted-caramel latte or a skinny Brookside Bob from the Roasterie

Where’s dinner? Genovese in Lawrence, Tapatio in KCK, Chipotle, Cheesecake Factory, or any of the great delis/bistros around the city

“I can’t stop listening to …” Mary J. Blige, classic Motown, pop icons of the ’80s and early ’90s.

What’s on your KC postcard? A picture of Union

The best advice I ever got: I was really strug-

Station and the KC skyline at night. Cliché, I know, but this view never gets old.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” We stopped having only dialogue

and started getting active regarding the education of our children (on both sides of the metro).

“Kansas City screwed up when …” We traded Tony Gonzalez. If I am going a little deeper, I would say we get it wrong every single time we look at the boundaries of our neighborhood as walls. There has got to be a time when we realize that where we are makes up just one piece of the puzzle that is our community. “Kansas City needs …” To be a welcoming community to those aspiring Americans who contribute to our economy and enrich the social fabric of our city.

“In five years, I’ll be …” Influencing public policy

on a deeper level.

“I always laugh at …” The quick, snarky wit and

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job right, I educate, engage, empower, inspire, organize and win … and train others to do the same.

antics of my 10-year-old son. He leaves me no shortage of what I call “diary of a single mom” stories. For instance, the other day he seriously attempted to build an argument around why vacuuming is bad for his back.

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” Scandal. pitch.com

“I just read …” The New Jim Crow. gling at one point in my life, and my mom told me, in her stern but loving Italian-mom kind of way, that nothing lasts forever and I can do anything if even for only a little while. While not particularly profound, her message of perseverance and persistence reminds me not to give up when the fight isn’t comfortable … and really, when I’m working for those who often don’t have the opportunity to have their voices heard, the fight should never be comfortable.

Worst advice: Some of the worst advice I’ve ever taken has resulted in some of my most powerful lessons. My sidekick: Easy — my son. My brush with fame: I have had a few incredible and sometimes surreal experiences of meeting famous politicians and celebrities — from President Obama to George Lopez to Dolores Huerta. My personal goal isn’t to achieve fame for myself but to harness the power to make positive changes in our communities. My 140-character soapbox: Live as though you

are one part of a larger community. Step outside of your comfort zone. And for the love of all things good … vote!

What was the last thing you had to apologize for? Probably my mouth. Sometimes I get a bad case of the inserting-my-foot-directly-intomy-mouth disease.

Who’s sorry now? In general, I think the

“sorriest” thing we face today is the ineffective policies of congressional members and state legislators whose well-meaning policies adversely affect the very constituents they represent.

My recent triumph: My current contract is as a trainer for a statewide fellows program where I am helping a new generation of passionate, intelligent organizers learn the best practices of community organizing, media relations and grassroots fundraising. Collectively, this group had little or no experience in this field. Following their initial training, I gave them a week to plan an action around minimum-wage reform. I tried to be as hands-off as possible with the event (as difficult as this was for me), intervening only when I felt they were in danger of losing the message or were going to fail miserably. They took this important issue and came up with an action where they could thank local small-business owners who were committed to paying a living wage. At the action, they presented the employers with symbolic bouquets of bacon as a way of recognizing their choice to help their employees bring home the bacon. They made sure that those in attendance could bring home the bacon as well by handing out baggies of the fried pork with facts about the minimum wage. Their very first action attracted the attention of The Washington Post, which did a great story on the message that no one who works full time in this country should live in poverty. Seeing my trainees succeed and feel empowered to effectively engage their community was not only my most recent triumph but also one of my favorites.

Dogs World

news

Cash Dump

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By

S T E V E V OCK ROD T

The Citadel’s toxic half-life keeps getting longer.

C

rosby Kemper III sent a letter last year to Tax Increment Financing Commission appointees and Kansas City, Missouri, City Council members that, among other things, invited its recipients to take a tour with him of the infamous, failed Citadel project. To date, no one has taken the Kansas City Public Library CEO up on his offer. And without Kemper-led walking tours of the development disaster at 63rd Street and Prospect, virtually no one treads the empty, still-toxic ground that for years was supposed to become a shopping center. But despite its legacy as one of the worst scandals in city history, the barren site still draws Kansas City taxpayer money as though it were a thriving, incentive-fueled development. Last week, the TIF Commission gave a thumbs-up for the city to solicit bids for an environmental-remediation contract for the Citadel site. Workers have been trying to clean up the site ever since the initial developers, the Community Development Corporation of Kansas City, buried asbestos there. Much of the dangerous material has been removed, but some loose fibers remain in the soil as a lasting reminder of an unrealized project and the lengths to which city officials would go to spur development on the city’s East Side. The city was ready to advance the developers $20 million in 2008, an almost unprecedented move even for a city that historically is keen on cutting developers favorable deals at the expense of taxpayers. Bean counters and City Hall hatched all kinds of unconventional schemes to funnel money to the CDCKC beyond simple tax-increment financing. Among the ideas: raiding the budget meant for Kansas City International Airport and looting the Public Improvements Advisory Committee funds, which are earmarked for smaller neighborhood-type projects. But the CDCKC’s leaders — William Threatt and Anthony Crompton — couldn’t get their act together and operated on the fringes of the law. They didn’t honor contracts with property owners and didn’t meet deadlines, even as they insisted that they couldn’t build at Citadel until the city coughed up more money. Sources have told The Pitch that the FBI quizzed people involved with the Citadel about how the CDCKC spent federal dollars allocated to the project. The feds eventually settled for popping Threatt and Crompton on charges of contaminating the land with asbestos.

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The city has been snowed. Despite all that, Kansas City managed to get itself sued by the CDCKC. The city settled the lawsuit with a $15 million payout. City officials said publicly that Threatt and other CDCKC leaders would not touch the settlement money. But that turned out to be another in a series of untruths expressed over the life of the Citadel. Arvest Bank sued Threatt and CDCKC treasurer Donald Lee in 2012 for pocketing and spending settlement funds. That lawsuit is ongoing, with a federal judge recently ordering mediation. Aside from the wrist slap that Threatt and Crompton received in federal court, the Citadel implosion has been mostly a consequence-free affair. CDCKC attorney David Frantze still appears frequently before city-development agencies asking (and usually receiving) incentives for various clients. Heather Brown, a former city attorney whose signature appears on many of the documents pertaining to the Citadel debacle, got a new job two years ago with the Economic Development Corporation of Kansas City, an agency that doles out incentives to development projects. The latest environmental contract calls for $688,000 in remediation work, with $500,000 coming from an Environmental Protection Agency grant and the remainder getting pulled from city coffers. If the project costs more than the $688,000, the city is on the hook for the overage. That $188,000 balance is a minuscule part of Kansas City’s municipal budget, but it’s another cost atop the millions that the city has poured into a toxic dump — more money hurled at an empty field that has already cost millions.

 E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com pitch.com

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A pArty district grows up. By Dav i D H u D n a l l | P H OTO G R a P H y By B R O O K E va n D E v E R

A

sk around, and most bar and restaurant owners will tell you that 2008 was Westport’s nadir. Downtown’s bright, shiny, city-subsidized Power & Light District had opened early that year. The city passed an indoor-smoking ban in April. In October, the economy tanked. “It was a 1-2-3 punch for us,” says Bill Nigro, a longtime Westport property owner who now leases space to the Westport Saloon and Buzzard Beach. “From our point of view, it was a situation where it was not only that we were up against a bad economy. The city had also, with Power & Light, actually created another entertainment district to compete with us and target our customers, and not just our customers — the Plaza and Martini Corner, too. And they gave P&L a deal so sweet that, even if it lost money, the city would cover the losses.” Westport had already seen plenty of ups and downs over the previous half-century, and not all of the trouble that the district experienced in the years leading up to 2008 came from economic pressures. If you were partying there in the early aughts, you recall evenings filled with gunshots, mace in the air, and brawls spilling into the streets.

Much of that violence centered on America’s Pub, at 510 Westport Road. At the end of 2011, the nightclub’s lease expired and was not renewed. This came as a relief to just about every business owner in the district. But it also raised an interesting question: Would sweeping aside the problem child be enough to resuscitate Westport’s ecosystem and restore its reputation? Two years later, the answer looks pretty clear. Later this month, Bridger’s Bottle Shop opens for business at 510 Westport Road. Where America’s Pub once spilled Bud Light on your shoes, Bridger’s offers more than 600 craft beers for drinking on-site or to take home in bottles. Inside the space is another retailer, Preservation Market — a new venture from Alex Pope, the man behind East Bottoms butcher shop Local Pig — making available a variety of meat and cheese dishes to pair with those small-batch beers. One suspects that 2 Chainz will not be a mainstay of the loudspeakers here. Eric Flanagan, one of the three principals behind Bridger’s, says the partners don’t foresee much need to stay open past midnight or 1 a.m., even though the new business has

a 3 a.m. liquor license. They were drawn to Westport not by its party-district heritage but by its burgeoning culinary scene. “We really like the way the neighborhood has been going lately,” Flanagan says. “We like the locally owned businesses and all the local chefs and other talented proprietors that are increasingly setting up shop there, in addition to the successful businesses that have been there for years. We really didn’t look anywhere else.” As Flanagan notes, Bridger’s is joining a wave of new establishments that are reshaping Westport’s identity. What was once primarily a drinking destination for the post-college crowd is gradually morphing into a district that boasts some of the most progressive restaurants and bars in Kansas City. Westport is growing up. “I think Westport is starting to set the standard and raise the bar for drinking and dining in Kansas City,” says Patrick Ryan, who opened his food truck turned restaurant, Port Fonda, there in 2012. “It’s phenomenal to be here right now and be a part of everything going on.” Ryan deserves some credit for the neighborhood’s recent shift. Port Fonda’s success in Westport — it has managed to endear itself to midtown cool kids and middle-aged Brook-

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side foodies alike — has inspired other credibly pedigreed restaurateurs to follow suit. Half a block down, a trio of partners — Howard Hanna (head chef at the Rieger Hotel Grill & Exchange, recently nominated for a James Beard Award), bartender Justin Norcross and Jim Coley (wine director at Gomer’s) — opened Ça Va, a champagne bar, in early March. It has been jampacked from its first night. Around the corner, Bret Springs and Zach Marten’s Westport Ale House has also just opened, in the former Streetside Records space, with a lineup of craft beers and thoughtful bar food. And in a month or so, Beau Williams, the general manager and head bartender at Manifesto, debuts his whiskey-centric bar, Julep, next door to Port Fonda. These new ventures join Blanc Burgers + Bottles, across the street at 4120 Pennsylvania, which just returned to Westport after ending a Plaza tryst that started in 2010. Meanwhile, Aaron Confessori’s French-leaning Westport Café and Bar — which took Blanc’s former space, at 419 Westport Road — quietly continues to be one of the city’s premier date spots. Story continues on page 13. See next page for more Westport. march 20 -26, 2014

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That New New Westport

Bye-bye, Beaumont

continued from page 9

CHAr bAr

bridger’s bottle sHop

510 Westport Road Niche: An overwhelming selection of craft beers, for taking home or consuming on-site The basics: More than 600 beers from all over the planet, plus a new venture from Alex Pope (Local Pig) called Preservation Market, which will supply meats, cheeses and breads to accompany the suds. The place is named after Jim Bridger, a 19th-century mountain man who did business in Westport back in the day, and the interior is accordingly rustic. “It’s kind of like a liquor store in terms of the way we operate it,” partner Eric Flanagan says. “You just grab beer out of the coolers and either drink it here or bring it home. There won’t be table service, just busers. And there won’t be a lot of six packs — it’ll mostly be mix-and-match six-packs. A lot of craft-beer drinkers don’t want to drop $10 on a six-pack they might not like.” Open: Later this month.

4050 Pennsylvania Niche: Smoked meats and craft beers, plus the old Westport Beach Club patio, from James Westphal and Mark Kelpe (McCoy’s, the Foundry, Beer Kitchen) The basics: Westphal and Kelpe have been keen on craft beers at their restaurants since 1997, when McCoy’s opened for business. Char Bar will continue the tradition and add some bar games to the mix: outdoor pingpong, a foosball table, possibly a croquet course on the patio. “Foodwise, we’re specializing in smoked meats — there’ll be many different styles of KC barbecue represented — but also offering strong vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options, which we believe is important,” Westphal says. “As far as the beers, it’ll be less like McCoy’s, which specializes in its own house-made beers, and more like the Foundry or Beer Kitchen, which celebrate craft beer in a wider way.” Projected opening: September

Fields: Putting down roots.

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tHe Westport sAloon

4112 Pennsylvania Niche: Folk- and country-music venue, plus comfort food The basics: This space was formerly occupied by Dark Horse Tavern and Torre’s Pizza, which served slices in the back. Now Westport Saloon books a slate of solid local music on its stage, while the kitchen makes dishes such as pork-belly bahn mi and a chickenand-waffles sandwich from Eat Me Gourmet. It’s an upgrade by just about any metric. (We recommend Sunday’s Backsliders Brunch, an all-you-can-eat buffet featuring a bloodymary bar and live gospel music from noon to 4 p.m.) “We’re serving American roots music and whiskey in a comfortable setting, with delicious food to top it all off, and we’re doing it at reasonable prices,” manager Travis Fields says. “That’s pretty much our sales pitch.” Open: Now

Zach Marten (left) and Bret Springs: Keeping busy.

Westport Ale House

4128 Broadway Niche: Upscale sports bar from the pair behind the Plaza’s Coal Vines pizza and wine bar The basics: American craft beers on tap and 40 other canned beers. The menu includes a variety of flat-patty burgers (such as the Q: an old-fashioned double-decker with pecan-smoked bacon, smoked gouda, stout barbecue sauce and crispy onion straws), Maryland crab tots, and a Kentucky Hot Brown. “We felt like Westport didn’t exactly have the type of sports bar where it’s almost an extension of your living room, where you can watch the games and get damn good food,” co-owner Bret Springs says. Open: Now

Julep CoCktAil Club

ÇA VA

4149 Pennsylvania Niche: Champagne bistro from Howard Hanna and Justin Norcross (both of the Rieger Hotel Grill & Exchange) and Jim Coley (wine director at the midtown Gomer’s location) The basics: In addition to several champagnes (most by the bottle, a few by the glass), this intimate, 32-seat space serves champagne cocktails, savory bites from local producers (Tamworth prosciutto from La Quercia in Iowa, pit ham from Paradise Locker Meats in Trimble, Missouri) and, brilliantly, Miller High Life — the champagne of beers. “So far, we're drawing the diverse clientele we were hoping for: people in fancy clothes on their way to the Kauffman but also younger people who hang around Westport and just pop in for a drink,” Hanna says. “We want people to use us in different ways.” Open: Now

4141 Pennsylvania Niche: Whiskey bar from Beau Williams (Manifesto) and his wife, Keely Edgington The basics: An emphasis on American whiskeys, whiskey flights and a light-food menu featuring the type of low-country Southern dishes that go well with whiskey. “Manifesto is great for what it is, but you usually have to call ahead, and there’s only so many seats,” Williams says. “Julep’s a totally different animal. We’re going for a more convivial atmosphere where Edgington and Williams have a new manifesto. people can mingle. Standing room is allowed and encouraged. Whiskey is the focus, and I’ve created a lot of drinks you can’t get anywhere else. But the appeal will be broader. We’ll have a wine list, and I imagine we’ll be popping beer tops and pouring vodka tonics for big portions of the night. We’re trying to appeal as much to the shot-and-a-beer crowd as to the specialty-cocktail crowd.” Projected opening: Late April

continued on page 13

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That New New Westport continued from page 9

Bridger's crafts a new vibe inside the old America's Pub.

regularly slammed on weekends; manager (Though the five-table Italian bistro Cucina della Ragazza, at 301 Westport Road, is giving Jeremy Roth confirms that sales have risen over the past two years. it a run for its money.) Westphal, whose company arguably has This new Westport, then, looks something more at stake than any other operator in like the more gentrified parts of Brooklyn: smart, artisanal, local. And any resemblance Westport, says he thinks the district is beginning to recognize its true potential. is intentional. “I’ve felt for a while that Westport should “We want to be a part of bringing a new be aiming to be something more like Lincoln clientele to Westport,” Williams says. “We’re not necessarily going to be trying to pull Park in Chicago or Central West End in St. Louis — a historic part of the city that mixes nightthe kids who go to Gusto into our place. I life and also nicer restaurants,” he says. “And think we’re probably going after the types of people who would probably never consider now it’s starting to get there. You see tourists, families, college students, businesspeople. going to Gusto in the first place.” On a given Monday, you see art students and “What I like is that there’s all this young architects sharing homemade beer at McCoy’s. blood among the restaurateurs in the neighYou see a 56-year-old couple having dinner at borhood right now,” says Westport Ale Beer Kitchen after a movie House’s Springs. “There’s at the Tivoli. It’s an entera lot of guys around their This new Westport tainment district, but it’s 30s — Howard, Patrick, other things, too.” Alex Pope, Beau, Aaron looks something Williams also sees Confessori, Zach and I — larger metros as influence doing exciting concepts like the more and a motivation. and really putting money “Back when Patrick was into the neighborhood.” gentrified parts trying to get Port Fonda off “It’s definitely getting the ground, he was pulling to be a more mature deof Brooklyn. day shifts at the Rieger. And mographic — closer to 30 we shared a space in the years old than 21,” says kitchen there. I’d be doing James Westphal, who coprep work for Manifesto, and he’d be doing owns McCoy’s, the Foundry, Beer Kitchen and, soon, Char Bar, a barbecue-and-beer prep work for the food truck,” Williams says. joint set to open in the fall in the former “So we’d talk — we’re both pretty opinionated guys. And we found we both really loved the Beaumont Club space. food and booze scene in Chicago, not just And yet, Westport bars catering more the product but the experience, the way the to that younger, Fireball-and-RumChatainterior design of a lot of the places up there shots crowd are seeing bumps in business as set them a notch above what was going on well. Nigro says Buzzard Beach just signed a 20-year lease and is fresh off a record year. in KC at the time — kind of like New York but cheaper and a little more accessible. Which Kyle Kelly, owner of Kelly’s Westport Inn, is why it’s really cool to me that, a few years reports that 2012 and 2013 were the two best later, we’ve actually been able to make those years the bar — the oldest in Kansas City, ideas real here in Westport.” depending on how you count — has ever had. Harry’s Bar & Tables, once the quiet, mature older sibling of the district, is now E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

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JCCC 2014 Johnson County Community College joins the global effort to stop violence against women and girls.

A MEMORY, A MONOLOGUE, A RANT AND A PRAYER WRITINGS TO STOP VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND GIRLS

2 and 7:30 p.m. Sat., March 29 Polsky Theatre, JCCC $5 students; $15 general public in advance, $20 general public at the door Tickets available through the JCCC Box Office, 913-469-4445, or www.jccc.edu/vday

Enjoy a benefit reading featuring a groundbreaking collection of monologues by world-renowned authors and playwrights, edited by Eve Ensler and Mollie Doyle. Directed by Beate Pettigrew, associate professor of theatre, JCCC. Performed by members of the JCCC community. 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, Kan. 66210 www.jccc.edu

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Daily listings on page 28 pitch.com

march 20 -26, 2014

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15

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art

Following Tracks W

hen Matthew Dehaemers makes his art, his point isn’t simply that it be beautiful — though his works do function on that level. He means to connect the object to the place-ness of where it will be — as in “Catalyst,” for instance, his kinetic metal sculpture at 31st Street and Troost. The public art’s subtle mechanics and striking symmetry complement the medallions that Dehaemers embedded in the nearby sidewalk to commemorate the cultures and individuals who helped establish the Troost corridor, starting with the Osage Indians. That fixation on place and history has its roots in the artist’s ideas about family, identity, how generations e pass stories down, and r o M how those stories are c hosen. Dehaemers’ family, transplanted e at n i l On m o from Belgium, has been .c h c pit in the Kansas City area since 1912. The subdivision where his family’s farm used to be — near what is now 67th Street and Quivira — is now called Tanglewood Estates. Charles Street is named for Dehaemers’ great-grandfather, Charles Dehaemers, who came through Ellis Island with his brother and his wife, Elisa. Know that much and you start to understand Re-Tread, Dehaemers’ first hometown solo exhibition. “I want to show people I’m not just ‘that public-art guy,’” Dehaemers tells me. We’re at his work space, part of the Studios Inc. hive, a few days before the show’s opening. Large costume masks wait in one corner as if for Mardi Gras, but Dehaemers is too busy to take part this year in the usual 18th Street march from the Crossroads to the Jazz District. Re-Tread turns Dehaemers’ public-art instincts inward, allowing him in the process to demonstrate his draftsman skills, his printmaking background and his understanding of craft materials such as dowel rods and wooden reeds and paper. These more intimate studio practices underscore how personal Re-Tread feels. Dehaemers’ dad worked on the family farm, stooping to cut spear after spear of asparagus that would be sold at the City Market, and he lost his own father at age 9. Dehaemers’ grandfather was only 34 years old when he had a heart attack after changing a tire; his father went on to spend 40 years working the counter at an auto-parts salvage business, listening to orders come through by radio. Know these things, and you find more

courtesy of the artist

ART

“I’m Trying to See It Both Ways,” by Dehaemers layers in Re-Tread’s series of rebuilt vehicles rescued from the junk heap, pieces of Dehaemers’ past intended to operate on a more universal level, too. We each have families, and most of us have more questions than answers about the generations preceding our appearance. At 41, Dehaemers is making memories with his own young children. Coincidentally, his family recently moved to a house less than a mile from the original family farm. Johnson County used to be a patchwork of small farms, a fact of the not-so-distant past that we don’t often recall as we drive through that increasingly developed part of the metro. A tire motif runs through Re-Tread, stemming in part from Dehaemers’ experience exploring the salvage yard when his dad eventually sold the business and its land. Dehaemers was wrapped up in graduate school at the time and says he regrets not better documenting the scene. The office alone, heaped with old Chilton auto-repair manuals, was for him an archeological site. Like other vanishing mom-and-pop businesses, its detritus was fast turning to relics. Dehaemers could see the decline just looking

Matthew Dehaemers brings

By

his family to Studios Inc.

T r a c y a be l n

Together As We Go,” is tucked in a nearby corner. (Dehaemers points out the marriage of masculine and feminine ideas in making tough trucks out of lightweight materials, the kind of basic things that could be found in any child’s art box.) In addition to monster trucks and abstract constructions incorporating tires — a standout being “Descendants,” a 6-foot paper tire attached by a wooden axle to a much smaller one, a direct statement about family ties — six large drawings echo the three-dimensional work perfectly by giving iterations of the family narrative. Also on a wall by itself is “I See You, I See Us, I See Them,” a woven-reed tire form encircling a mirrorlike chrome hubcap. Hanging from an I-beam in the vast gallery space is a giant wooden tire swing, “Navigating a Way,” and it’s the show’s multisensory masterpiece. A planned holdover from the last Studios Inc. group exhibition, it anchors Re-Tread because it’s big, yes, but mostly because it’s as moving emotionally as it is literally. Step into it and take a seat. It may at first feel like a kids ride at a Renaissance festival, but as you listen to the words bouncing out of four hidden speakers and start to equate the swaying with the rhythms of a trans-Atlantic steamer at sea, you’ll hear Dehaemers’ family story unfold and feel it envelop you. It works at his dad’s original 1960s Ford tow truck out best with a partner. back, buried in hundreds of discarded tires Dehaemers told his story to local poet and accumulated over four decades. artist José Faus, who crafted a nine-stanza Tires are clunky, heavy, dirty things, the anchors of safety during travel that, when work called “El Camino Rests in the Tanglewood.” KC Repertory Theatre audio engineer worn out, become useless and cost money to Jeffrey Keirsey split Faus’ animated readget rid of. Dehaemers approaches tires as he ing into separate channels, then incorpodid with “Point of Departure,” the ethereal, rated various ambient sounds, such as radio lacelike streetcar sculpture that hung over shows, the running engine of Central Street as part of Dehaemers’ dad’s old pickup 2003’s Avenue of the Arts: Matthew Dehaemers: truck, and historic recordings Lanternlike armatures of Re-Tread from Ellis Island. The poem is light wood are covered Through April 18 written on the floor around with translucent Japaat Studios Inc. the work in a large spiral in nese paper (kinwashi). 1708 Campbell, 816-994-7134 yellow, in the style of the What is durable, dirty studiosinc.org grease pencil used to mark and functional is retraced car windows. into something airy and When the gallery isn’t echoing with a delicate. dozen opening-night conversations, you can Illuminated from within, a set of 4-foot hear the poem as you view any of the works. monster-truck tires is attached to a towering The sound keeps planting reminders of what frame topped by a double-faced truck body starts to feel like your own story. Walk the with glowing headlights. It is “painted” in dirt and drives forward and back, toward space awhile and you hear the ending more the past and into the future, with rootlike than once: The whistle of a train/That arcs back on itself/Over and over again. The words and branches dangling from its chassis that, to the art, poignant and persuasive, re-tread me, represent the present. “I’m Trying to your sense of time. See It Both Ways” invites a 360-degree view of itself and the idea of conflicting thoughts. A smaller version, “Figuring It Out E-mail feedback@pitch.com

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Ch a r l e s F e r ru z z a

Baked in Kansas City • 706 Westport Road, 816-561-2253 • Hours: 7 a�m�–9 p�m� Tuesday–Thursday, 7 a�m�–10 p�m� Friday–Saturday, 7 a�m�–8 p�m� Sunday, closed Monday • Price: $–$$

have a dream that someday in Kansas City, I’ll be served a cheese plate that doesn’t look as though it had been hastily assembled for — or by — a group of third-graders. There is something both romantic and elegant in a proper assiette de fromage, that combination of fruit, cheese and bread designed as the overture to a good meal. Think of 16th-century poet Giovanni della Casa comparing the qualities of a kiss with cheese and pears. Around here, though, restaurant cheese plates rarely aspire to much more than a peck on the cheek. Still, my hopes were high for the version I ordered at the two-month-old Baked in Kansas City. I figured that the bread would be very good, and it was. But the rest of the plate was a still life of disappointing elements: a few bland balls of goat cheese, several slices of creamy brie, a hunk of milky Spanish manchego surrounded by a fan of sliced strawberries, a smattering of fresh raspberries and blueberries, a few oily olives. A kiss this was not. This is a problem only because Baked in Kansas City clearly means to be much more than a mere kiss. Its object is something closer to a long, loving caress, starting with breakfast and lasting through a late dinner. Baked is the dream project of restaurateur Frank Sebree, who did an impressive job reviving the former Majestic Steakhouse (now the Majestic Restaurant, at 931 Broadway) after it had lost much of its old luster. Sebree wanted to stage a similar makeover here, returning the brick building on the less raucous side of Westport — once the beloved Napoleon Bakery — to its roots as a place for bread and pastries. The plan didn’t stop there, though. Sebree also set out to create serious dining: lunch, dinner and a weekend brunch, each with a separate, ambitious (sometimes too ambitious) menu. To bring all of this to life, Sebree installed an imaginative kitchen staff, including executive chef Liz Huffman (who holds the same position at the Majestic), sous chef Grant Klover and pastry chef Nicolette Foster. To that team’s credit, this restaurant mostly works. That cheese plate may lack ingenuity, but the main courses, like the pretty pastries in the glass display cases, are often close to perfect. I have to pick on another starter, though, because it sums up the clash between Baked’s aspiration and its execution. I’ve twice ordered the menu’s trio of distinctly different deviled eggs, and both times I’ve wondered how the plate made it past testing. The oldfashioned preparation — dusted in paprika — is fine but not especially flavorful, but the other

AngelA C. Bond

I

hand-cut fries — particularly if you choose the ones that have been fried in goose fat. From a cholesterol perspective, it’s a brush two don’t justify the experiment. One egg is with heart disease. But as a meal, it’s a brush with the divine. purple from a sherry marinade yet dominated There are less decadent choices on both the by a harsh vinegar flavor; the third is a breaded brunch and the lunch menus, of course, but and deep-fried version that comes on like a brawny KFC nugget but offers nothing beyond why settle for a salad when there’s a pancetta Benedict dripping in hollandaise on housethe novelty of its crunch. Contrary to popular lore, there are some culinary creations that made focaccia? Or when the French toast comes amply stuffed with raspberry cream fail to be enhanced by deep-frying. We can cheese? Well, don’t settle. As a rule, the more now add deviled eggs to that list — and scratch meaty or cheesy or rich-sounding a dish is at these eggs off Baked’s good-ideas list. Baked — the more unabashBut the brunch here — edly stimulating you imagin this restaurant’s sunny, Baked in Kansas City ine it might be — the better plum-colored dining room Trio of deviled eggs �������� $3 it really is. Who needs the — is a fine idea. Huffman Beer-braised bison light, poetic kiss of a cheese takes advantage of Baked’s short ribs ����������������������$24 plate when other dishes offer being essentially a satellite Mac and cheese to plant a big fat hickey? of the Majestic by using that with pork belly�������������� $14 Things get more carnal in downtown restaurant’s highSteak frites ��������������������$20 the evening, in the more intiquality beef. That means a Duck panini ��������������������� $12 mate dining area adjacent to tough choice between a Majestic steak burger ���� $9 the bakery-case-dominated thick, first-rate steak burger main space. When Sebree (which comes, naturally, on a gutted the old Napoleon, he fat brioche bun) and a hearty replaced a little-used kitchen area with a cozy prime-rib hash. Both are excellent. anteroom, painted in sexy shades of purple On a recent Saturday morning, I was and red. The dinner menu touches on a few seduced by a grilled panini, the slices of aphrodisiac ingredients, and certain dishes sourdough bread encasing a thick, succulent beckon like a siren. I couldn’t resist a bowl of mound of rich duck confit, pickled onions pasta blanketed in a sauce of bubbling Gruyere, and a slice of Swiss. It’s a magnificent sandwhite cheddar, blue and Muenster cheeses. I wich, and it’s only improved by a stack of

Baked in Kansas City puts its own spin on sweets and salad niçoise�

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had mine with thick, fleshy slices of quivering pork belly, but it also was excellent without the meat. Equally alluring is Huffman’s steak frites, boasting a tidy slab of culotte (the tri-tip end of bottom sirloin), topped with a smoked-paprika béarnaise. (It wasn’t grilled exactly as I ordered it, and neither was my burger a few days later; this kitchen likes to see pink.) The meaty bison short ribs, slow-braised in Anchor porter, were sumptuous, and they came with turnips sliced nearly as thick as paperback novels. They were allegedly roasted, but I found them too bitter and not tender enough. The best thing about dinner in a bakery is that the dessert possibilities for the finale can be head-spinning. Baked offers an enticing assortment of house-made ice creams and sorbets to go with its pastries, and the saltedcaramel ice cream that I tasted was enthrallingly candylike. What I really wanted was one of chef Foster’s “BKC candy bars,” each a squat, dense brick of chocolate enameled in shiny caramel. They tend to sell out long before dinner, though, and for good reason. I found a different antidote to my overindulgence in goose-fat fries: a custard tart embedded with fresh fruit. That’s always better than a kiss, and it never goes too far.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com march 20 -26, 2014

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ou can make a French macaron taste like almost anything, but Sarah Rami has her limits. “I heard there’s a Vegemite macaron,” says Rami, who co-owns Colors Macarons with Colleen Kirk and is a native of Brisbane, Australia. “I’m not going to experiment with it. I love Vegemite, but I don’t think anyone else will eat it.” The City Market bakery makes 10 flavors of the delicate, meringue-based sandwich cookie. The menu includes salted caramel, vanilla, pistachio, chai, and one with fig and goat cheese. There’s also a rotating flavor of the month (March’s: Irish cream). Macarons work well with unusual flavors because the outer shells don’t overwhelm the palate. The cookie part is made from powdered sugar, almond flour and egg whites, with some coloring thrown in and, sometimes, a relatively mild additional flavor (such as cocoa powder in a chocolate macaron). “There’s a sweetness,” Kirk says, but the point of the shell is simply its texture: “crispy, crunchy and chewy.” The filling — traditionally buttercream, ganache or purée — is what drives the pastry’s taste. “It’s endless what you can put inside,” Rami says. “It’s so much fun. I was hungry the other day, so I put a dried apricot in, and I’m inspired to make an apricot macaron.” Rami won’t flirt with Vegemite but she does play around with other possible fillings: a bacon jam from local company Our Sassy Pantry, for instance, to make a breakfast-style macaron that’s savory and sweet. (She and Kirk are also experimenting with other jams from Our Sassy Pantry, such as blueberry balsamic and ancho cherry.) Jasper’s Restaurant has just started carrying Colors’ cannoli macaron, which has a ricotta-and-mascarpone filling. And this summer, the women are participating in Hotel

Rami (left) and Kirk know Colors well. Monroe’s First Fridays, giving out samples and selling their macarons in the hotel’s loft space. Rami and Kirk met through their husbands, who are friends. “We’d go to food events, collaborative dinners … we’d bump into each other at events and discovered our passion for food,” Rami says. She was managing the Roasterie’s retail locations and had become intrigued by macarons, so she worked an apprenticeship at Milk & Honey, a local bakery that specialized in macarons. Milk & Honey’s closing signaled an opportunity for Rami and Kirk, who opened Colors in October. They named the business Colors because they like what the word represents: diversity, brightness, happiness. Macarons themselves come in a spectrum of colors, and the word also allows the women to expand their line without confusing loyal eaters. With Rami being Australian, she and Kirk briefly considered the British spelling: colours. But she says she’s used to the U.S. spelling, which has the virtue of being more Google-search-friendly. For now, Colors operates out of a kitchen in the Opera House Coffee & Food Emporium in the City Market; that’s where the baking happens. The macarons are sold at the Roasterie, Chez Elle, Hen House in Corinth, and other places around town, for $2.25 each. Rami and Kirk hope to open a retail space within the next year — “ideally in the Crossroads,” Rami says. Colors is one of a handful of macaron bakers in town, which means that Rami and Kirk often meet people who haven’t eaten the pastry before. “It’s about 50-50 at events,” Rami says. “I’m excited there are still a lot of people who haven’t tried it yet.”

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y cocktail orders are usually specific, down to the garnish. But the highly skilled Ryan Miller has taken it upon himself to re-educate me ever since my first trip to Voltaire. The restaurant’s head bartender has never led me astray, and I’m happy to be at his mercy. This time, though, he’s at mine. “Make me a drink with Cynar,” I tell him. I’ve made Voltaire the first stop of a project I’ve started: Name an oft-overlooked bar ingredient and ask for a drink prepared with it. Cynar, with its curious, artichoke-emblazoned label, looked to me like an appropriate opening salvo. “It’s pronounced chee-nar,” Miller says. He lets the gentle correction sink in. “What else do you want in it?” “Do what you think is best,” I say. Miller nods and begins bustling behind an array of bitters and bottles, pulling out ingredients and greeting other patrons. I badger him with questions, starting with, “Who decided to make an artichoke liqueur, anyway?” “Cynar is an amaro, which means it’s an Italian bitter liqueur,” he says. “Italians take it after a nice, big dinner. It aids with digestion. You can sip on it — that’s how it’s designed to work because of all the herbs and the botanicals inside. Here, try it.” Miller pours me a bit of the dark, syrupy liquid. It’s sweet at first, cut with an astringency that lingers. Not exactly the savory artichoke flavor I had expected. “Artichoke is in there, but it’s not an artichoke liqueur,” he says. “It’s a neutral spirit base. There are different kinds of barks and bitter roots and things like that — the same things you would find in Chartreuse or Fernet or even Angostura bitters, to some extent.”

The Cynar French 75, at Voltaire Finished with his concocting, Miller places a burnt-orange drink in front of me, a springlooking beverage in a tall Collins glass. Miller has opted for a Cynar take on a French 75, using a full pour of gin and equal parts grapefruit juice, simple syrup and Cynar, with sparkling wine on top. The flavor is bright and bubbly, the acidity of the citrus toning down the Cynar’s thick taste and the cava adding a crisp finish. “Grapefruit juice is bitter like Cynar is, but it also plays really well with natural sweetness there,” Miller explains. “But the bitterness balances out the sugar and the wine. And Fords Gin is great for this. It’s a very fine product, new to the market here in Missouri, and it’s delicious, light and dry and juniper-forward.” The verdict? Perfect and patio-worthy.

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march 20 -26, 2014

music

PSYCH OUT

A year later, Lawrence’s Psychic Heat is still hot.

By

N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

T

he dudes of Psychic Heat refer to their music as “ADHD rock” for a reason. Clustered around a table at Lawrence’s La Prima Tazza, the four 20-somethings answer questions about their psych-tinged rock and roll with awkward starts, stops and laughter. Psychic Heat’s lead singer and guitarist, Evan Herd, speaks quickly, almost nervously, about the band’s evolution after forming nearly a year ago. “By this time last year, we had a different bassist and drummer,” Herd says, shaking a wild mop of loose, blondish curls from his eyes. “They e r Mo only played one show with us, and they had kind of other stuff going at e n i Onl .com on. But [guitarist] Tanner pitch [Spreer] and I have been playing together for two and a half years, and we’ve worked on a lot of original ideas together.” Psychic Heat grew out of one of those ideas: The band now features bassist Sam Boatright and drummer Ricky Barkosky. Barkosky is the only member of Psychic Heat still enrolled in school (at the University of Kansas). The rest work day jobs at the Merc, Lawrence’s natural-food co-op and deli. Herd and Spreer also are roommates. “We all feed off each other’s energy.” Their home doubles as the band’s practice a bit. Since releasing its debut EP, Lighter space and sometimes as the house-show and Brighter, last August, Psychic Heat has venue Studio B. It’s a quirky life, one they enjoyed a reputation as one of Lawrence’s never really expected. best live acts. “In a lot of ways, we’re raised to think “I remember seeing these guys [before I that you need to go to college, and nearly joined] for the first time a year ago,” Boatright every one of us is a college dropout,” Herd says, “and Evan went out into the crowd for a says. “As a young 20-something, we’re solo and got down on his back with his guitar, taught to think that’s a bad thing, but it and I was like, ‘Oh my God, this is awesome.’ doesn’t really feel like that. It’s nice to have When they asked me to play with them, my this thing, this band, where who knows how first thought was, ‘There’s no way I’m just long it’s going to last or if anything is gogoing to stand there. I’ve ing to happen with it, but got to move around.’ So it’s been something really Psychic Heat from the very beginning, exciting, and people have with Mouthbreathers it’s been my goal to be as been rea l ly suppor t ive Monday, March 24, at the active onstage as they are, about it.” Eighth Street Taproom, and I think we all just kind For their part, the memLawrence of feed off each other’s bers of Psychic Heat are tryenergy in that way.” ing to make the music last. Spreer agrees: “Once the music starts goThat’s why they’re throwing themselves a ing, we just get into that zone and try to give first-anniversary party March 30. it as much as we can. It’s one of my favorite “A year and a half ago, if someone had things to do, to play live, and I always try to told me I’d be singing my songs in front of make the connection with the other guys. A people, I wouldn’t have been able to picture lot of the time, we’ll mess up because of it. it,” Herd says. We’ll fuck up a key or something. We finally Spreer laughs and nods his head: “I’ve manknocked the cymbals over at the last show.” aged to keep something going for 12 months. I Psychic Heat’s appeal isn’t just stage presthink that’s worth celebrating.” ence and drum-kit trashing. A lot of ’60s- and Spreer might be underselling the band

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’70s-era rock music flavors the band’s sound. Between jumping from one corner of the stage to the other, Herd grumbles and chants into the microphone, at times sounding like a convincing version of Roger Daltrey. On Lighter and Brighter, hazy guitar riffs pay homage to Led Zeppelin and Deep Purple. Herd’s obtuse, minimalist lyrics — which, he says, aren’t necessarily his forte — are actually suited to all the different pieces that the band is trying out. And that’s the other side of Psychic Heat’s collective ADHD: Though the members speak vaguely about wanting to tighten the songwriting — and speak more ardently about wanting to grow the band beyond Lawrence — they seem content with what they’ve achieved in a short amount of time. I ask the guys what has changed for the band, aside from the lineup, since the EP’s release. They’re quiet as they ponder the question. “Nothing really, honestly, and that’s what’s awesome about it,” Spreer says finally, smiling. “We’ve found this thing for us that is really great. I think we all struggle from anxiety, and Psychic Heat has been a great outlet for us to destroy that. It’s this anxietykilling way to express ourselves.”

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

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march 20 -26, 2014

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23

Sprung!

music kcmo THURS. 3/7

GettinG AwAy with it

Mary Ocher on rejection and swimming against the current

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N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

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march 20 -26, 2014

THE PITCH

W

hen Mary Ocher was 20 years old, she packed her bags and left her home in Tel Aviv for what she hoped would be a more liberal creative life in Berlin. The move worked. On her latest album, the King Khan– produced Eden, Ocher’s eccentric musical style lands somewhere between avant-garde art songs and opera. Now 27, Ocher has settled into a sometimes thrilling sound that can jar the uninitiated. Her bungee-jumping vocal tricks, set against orchestral elements, suggest classical music scores run through a shredder and pieced back together. Ahead of her Wednesday-night show at RecordBar, I called Ocher. Expecting to find evidence of quirkiness, I wasn’t disappointed — she answered her phone inside a Reno, Nevada, laundromat. The Pitch: You have an interesting history. You were born in the Soviet Union, you moved to Tel Aviv when you were 4 and then to Berlin when you were 20. And you seem to have started on your path pretty early. “I can get away with anything Ocher: I was 7 when I decided I wanted to be when I’m onstage.” an artist, and I originally thought I wanted to interested in going with the same option, be a visual artist. I think around the age of 11, there was a kid in my class that was better at and that means they follow the same pattern over and over again and try to go with drawing than me, and I had to find something something that has already been discovered else that I could be good at. [Laughs.] So I and approved. started writing songs. It makes me really angry because I feel like When I was about 13, I recorded my first these people have power. They have the power song with this producer, and it was just a crappy pop song. I spent the next year trying to make things available, and they can eduto find a way to perform. I was terrified. I had cate people and empower people, but instead they’re choosing the easy way out. They’re just horrible stage fright. And I didn’t really know trying to appeal to the most common denomihow to do it. It took a few years for me to figure nator. And they’re all interested in making as out what my thing was, exactly. And I would much money as possible, and they’re not really send stuff to labels constantly, since I was a aware of their potential. teenager, and get constantly rejected. But I’ve Sometimes it seems that you’re almost daring just kept doing it. You definitely don’t come off as shy in your people, with your music, not to like you. I think that comes from years and years music videos or in live performances. of rejection. And you kind of grow up thinkWell, I’ve been doing it for so long now, and ing that there’s no place on Earth where you that’s where I feel most comfortable: onstage. It’s the only time where I don’t feel a need to can be accepted, where you can have friends, apologize or explain myself because I feel like where people will appreciate you. And then, at some point, you are grownI can get away with anything up and you realize that there when I’m onstage. Mary Ocher are people that respect you Your music does sound Wednesday, March 26, and like you, and you can unusual, though — not mainat RecordBar feel really welcome, and it’s stream in the least. still strange. There’s very little that I I really don’t take it for granted now. I really can relate to in mainstream music, if anything appreciate the fact that there are people in the at all. I feel like there’s a certain safety in world that sort of understand. And I feel like what’s considered commercially appealing we all have to stick together because so many today. For instance, music that is not being people I know have very similar backgrounds. released today would have been released in They all have experienced some sort of lack the ’60s. But record labels today don’t take that many risks anymore, and they’re not in- of acceptance. They grew up in small places, and their parents were religious or didn’t like terested in changing the sound now. They’re

pitch.com

the fact that they were gay, or they wanted to make art and not have a normal life. They wanted to become something that everyone told them they would never become. And they just kept trying. And I feel like we should stick together and support each other in that.

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

J a z z B e at NEwport Jazz FEstival 60th aNNivErsary, at thE GEm thEatEr

This year, the Newport Jazz Festival turns 60, and it’s celebrating with a tour of past festival all-stars that stops Saturday night at the Gem Theater. One artist of special interest to locals: singer Karrin Allyson, who spent the better part of the 1990s building her repertoire and swingingly expressive vocal style at the Phoenix and other KC clubs before moving to New York. Grammy-nominated CDs, international acclaim — and the Newport Jazz Fest — have followed. Other jazz luminaries sharing the Gem stage include clarinetist and saxophonist Anat Cohen, trumpeter Randy Brecker, guitarist Mark Whitfield, pianist Peter Martin, bassist Larry Grenadier and drummer Clarence Penn. — Larry Kopitnik Newport Jazz Festival 60th anniversary, 8 p.m. Saturday, March 22, at the Gem Theate r (161 5 Ea st 18th St re e t, 816-474-6262), $45–$55.

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march 20 -26, 2014

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25

Music

Music Forecast

By

n ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

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Davina Sowers scats like Christina Aguilera and belts like Etta James, and she has the get-up-and-dance-with-me magnetism of Tina Turner. From behind her piano, in the company of her Vagabonds, the classically trained Sowers wields a stage presence that rivals any arena-ready diva. In her adopted home of Minneapolis, crowds pack blues and jazz rooms to hear the onetime street performer spin her vaudeville-tinged tales of love on the rocks. Fans of jazz, blues, rockabilly or just a rockin’ good time should carve this night at Knuckleheads into their calendars. Thursday, March 20, Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

Fenster

Berlin’s Fenster calls its music “deconstructed pop,” which is a typical European way of describing electro-pop music. Still, we’ll let them have it. The songs on Fenster’s latest fulllength, The Pink Caves, are like feathers strung into a dreamcatcher: wistful, mysterious and a little creepy. The band takes inspiration from science fiction and cultish mysticism, and its music lets that weird energy out by employing various non-instruments (shovels, among other innocuous objects). The sound is like being dropped into a Dali painting, which makes for an interesting live show. Spirit Is the Spirit opens. Thursday, March 20, Replay Lounge (946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676)

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the pitch

march 20 -26, 2014

Some new, fun trouble is stirring at 37th Street and Broadway. Black & Gold Tavern has undergone a bit of rebranding. The upstairs space is now known as Vandals, with new lights, sound equipment and a stage. Vandals celebrates its grand opening with a handful of local bands that are all party connoisseurs. The Big Iron’s beefy, strong-armed rock and roll will guide your hand toward another

Davina and the Vagabonds beer; Drop a Grand’s irreverent weirdness will make shots seem like the best possible idea; and the dirty, coarse-ground punk rock of Sneaky Creeps will guarantee bad decisions worthy of an early morning Taco Bell run. Saturday, March 22, Vandals at Black & Gold Tavern (3740 Broadway, 816-561-1099)

Skaters

On its debut record, Manhattan, Skaters — from, you guessed it, Manhattan — doesn’t really push the envelope. The group writes songs about what it knows: living in New York City, being young, partying, and making romantic connections that are less about emotional attachment and more about who looks good when you’re wearing beer goggles. Skaters uses electronic drumbeats, synths and distorted vocals, but a few vogue touches don’t mean the band is trying to impress anyone. Manhattan is more like a Kerouac ode to living the slightly disheveled sweet life in the country’s capital of instant gratification. If nothing else, you’ve

f o r e c a s t

got to admire a band that doesn’t shove dirty laundry under the bed just because there’s company. Wednesday, March 26, Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

ZZ Ward

It has been quite a whirlwind career for ZZ Ward. The 27-year-old singer-songwriter has been on the national scene only since 2012, when her debut album, Til the Casket Drops, confounded reviewers with its genre mashup of blues, soul and hip-hop. At least, that’s what critics keep pointing out. But Ward isn’t so hard to read. All of her radio-ready, cannedbut-catchy pop songs (and quirky fedoras) reveal a more polite version of Adele. It’s not that she doesn’t sound good — she’s an excellent singer — but that she just doesn’t sound all that different. Wednesday, March 26, The Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

K e Y

Pick of the Week

Dream Pop

Oh, to Be Young Again

Get Your Jazz On

 Locally Sourced

 Indie Rock

Who Doesn’t Love a Diva?

 Party Pants

Wear Your Fedora

 European Imports

 Stay Hydrated

The Next Pop Starlet

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KANSAS CITY PITCH WEEKLY

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march 20 -26, 2014

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27

3/13/14 3:40 PM

AGENDA

continued from page 15

Thursday | 3.20 |

LORDE

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS Barred Meadows, oil paintings by Rachel Gregor | 7-11 p.m. Friday, Subterranean Gallery, 4124 Warwick, Apt. B, subterraneangallery.com

PERFORMING ARTS

FRIDAY

3.21

The Goldenberg Duo — piano and violin |

12:15 p.m. Lunch and Listen Series, Visitation Church, 5141 Main; and 7 p.m. Good Shepherd Catholic Church, 12800 W. 75th St., Shawnee

Edgar Degas Pastels | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

al, B e roy s Cit y.

Ka n s a

Organist Peter Richard Conte | 7 p.m. Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway

Dressed Up | Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd., kemperart.org dy/nas/ty • Ebony G. Patterson | Nerman

LITERARY EVENTS

Museum of Contemporary Art, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, nermanmuseum.org

Laura McHugh discusses her new work, The Weight

of Blood | 7 p.m., $26, Rainy Day Books, 2706 W. 53rd St., Fairway, rainydaybooks.com

en bloc, by Jorge Garcia Almodovar | UMKC Gallery of Art, 5015 Holmes, Room 203

COMEDY

ABCs of Improv | 6:30 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and

Echoes: Islamic Art and Contemporary Artists | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

Best of KC Stand-up Showcase | 7:30 p.m. Improv

History & Hope: Celebrating the Civil Rights Movement | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art,

Grill, 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee

Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Trevor Moore | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK The Recess Players Improv Showcase | 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Draws for a Cause, benefiting Habitat for Humanity | 6-10 p.m. Boulevard Brewing Co., 2501 Southwest Blvd., habitatkc.org

Revolutionary Organizing in the Age of Reaction: The Fight for the Soul of the Cities , a discussion with Eric Mann, director of the Labor/Community Strategy Center in Los Angeles | 6:30 p.m. Kansas City Plaza Library, 4801 Main, kclibrary.org

4525 Oak

Lorde | 7 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

In the Looking Glass: Recent Daguerreotype Acquisitions | Nelson-Atkins Museum,

Fenster | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts,

The Suits, Laura Hope and the Arktones | 9 p.m.

4525 Oak

Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s

Big Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

That 1 Guy | 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts,

Lawrence

Neeta Madahar: Falling | Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd.

Grand Marquis | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

A Touch of Class with Horace Washington |

Other Faces: Paintings and Drawings by Jane Mudd and Nora Othic | Thornhill Gal-

Lawrence

Katy Guillen and the Girls | B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ,

1205 E. 85th St.

Rich Jones, Winners Circle, Stew, Don Vito, Dash the Verse | Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massa-

chusetts, Lawrence

Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

lery, Avila University, 11901 Wornall, avila.edu

Tropic Thursdays with Bartholomew | The Kill

Polychromatic: An Exhibition in Color, with new works by Melissa Powlas, Jeanne Rittmueller and Lisa Rogers | Opening reception, 6-9 p.m. Friday, Kiosk Gallery, 3951 Broadway

Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

Bram Wijnands Duo | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931

Broadway

Reality and Fantasy: Land, Town and Sea M-Bird Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall | 8-10:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611

NIGHTLIFE

| Nelson-Atkins Museum, 4525 Oak

Broadway

Brodioke | 9 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Black Actress, the Bad Ideas, the Oldfield Victory | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Mutts, Scruffy & the Janitors, Cadaver Dogs |

Feel Good | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire,

Third Thursday at the Nerman | 3:304:30 p.m. Thursday, Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

Caucasian Debris, Adam Evolving, the Bastard Suns | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

Jennifer Nettles, Brandy Clark | 8 p.m. The Mid-

land, 1228 Main

Music trivia bingo | 9:30 p.m. The BrewTop Pub &

This American Life | Fridays and Saturdays, Kemper East, 200 E. 44th St.

Davina and the Vagabonds | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads

Michael Pagan | 5 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601

D&D Music Factory | The Brick, 1727 McGee

Damon Parker | 7-11 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

Dead Voices, David George & A Crooked Mile, Chris Meck & the Guilty Birds | 7:30 p.m. The Riot

Phosphene, the Guild, Jericka/Johnny | 7 p.m.

MUSIC

Saloon, 2715 Rochester

7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Broadway

Lawrence

Patio, 6601 W. 135th St., Overland Park

Friday | 3.21 | PERFORMING ARTS

Room, 4048 Broadway

Everette DeVan Trio with Dionne Jeroue | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

28

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march 20 -26, 2014

Aftershock Bar & Grill, 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam

Nikki Scruggs | Mestizo, 5270 W. 116th Pl., Leawood Sons of Brasil | 8 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601 Broadway

pitch.com

Golden! Girls Gone Wild!! | 8 p.m. Missie B’s, 805 W. 39th St.

La Bohème | 7:30 p.m. Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcopera.org

James Turrell: Gard Blue | Spencer Museum of Art, 1301 Mississippi , Lawrence The Tyranny of Good Taste | La Esquina, 1000 W. 25th St., charlottestreet.org COMEDY

Lavell Crawford | 8 & 10:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St. Trevor Moore | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK continued on page 30

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continued from page 28 SportS & rec

TheaTer Dates and times vary.

MIssouri Mavericks vs. Quad city Mallards |

7:05 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence MuSIc

Akkilles, coriander, Mat Shoare | The Brick, 1727 McGee

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

the Belairs | 8 p.m. Trouser Mouse, 410 S. Hwy. 7,

Blue Springs

Boogaloo 7 | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand Buck rogers Band | Jerry’s Bait Shop, 13412 Santa

Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa

chance the Arm | The Dubliner, 170 E. 14th St. coversmith | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence everette DeVan with Sharon thompson and eboni Fondren | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E.

hion Week The PKitCcFhaPsrs nts tation nioneS Riff Raff@@UR iot Room

KC Fash n itWcehePkrsents eP Thio @ Unio t Room at@ ionRio RiffnRSatff

18th St.

Upcoming Events

nvention Tattoo Co heater T @TUwpistotewdnXma s @ Indie

3.21 - Lorde @ Indie 3.22 - Kathy Griffin @ Uptown Theater 4.4 - First Friday in the Crossroads

See more on the “promotions” link at p the pitch

march 20 -26, 2014

pitch.com

Other Desert Cities | Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main, unicorntheatre.org Playboy of the Western World | UMKC Theatre, Genessee Studio, 1615 W. 45th St., umkctheatre.org Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike |

Spencer Theater, UMKC, 4949 Cherry, kcrep.org

MUSeUM exhibiTS & evenTS Citizen Soldiers on the Prairie | Johnson

Dan Doran Band | 9 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

Convergence: Jazz, Film, Dance and the Visual Arts | American Jazz Museum,

8614 N. Boardwalk Ave.

Onl

ine

at

M piTch.co

Filthy 13 | Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. the Gleaners, Hidden planets | 6 p.m. Replay

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

1616 E. 18th St., , americanjazzmuseum.org

Hands-on History | National World War I Museum, Liberty Memorial, 100 W. 26th St., theworldwar.org 100 Years of Genocide | Fridays and Satur-

Anthony Gomes | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon,

2715 Rochester

days, Campanella Gallery inside McAfee Memorial Library, Park University, 8700 N.W. River Park Dr.

Honest Loot, Brendan MacNaughton Band, two Headed cow | Coda, 1744 Broadway

On the Brink: A Month That Changed the World | National World War I Museum, Liberty

Huey p. Nuisance, the Abnorm, Ir Neko, pistol pete | 10 p.m. Replay, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence Lorde | 7 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main Lost Wax | Kelly’s Westport Inn, 500 Westport Rd. My oh My, Gypsy Sparrows, Dirty river ramblers | 10 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania Kirsten paludan & the Key party, Barclay Martin, the caves | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. the Quivers cD-release show with the cave Girls and Sphynx | Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

retroActive | 9:30 p.m. The BrewTop Pub & Patio,

6601 W. 135th St., Overland Park

Shannon & the rhythm Kings | B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

30

Godspell | Egads Theatre Co., at Off Center Theatre, Crown Center, 2450 Grand, egadstheatre.com

County Museum of History, 6305 Lackman Rd., Shawnee, jocomuseum.org

EvEnts

Tattoo Conventio n @ Uptown The as mer X at d e t Twis die @ In

The Frowning Vajayjays of Shady Pines

| Just Off Broadway Theatre, 3051 Central, kcmeltingpot.com

the Disappointments | The BrewTop Pub and Patio,

MOre

Twiste d Xm @ Indie as

Drawn to Murder | KC Mystery Train, the Golden Ox, 1600 Genessee, kcmysterytrain.com

Memorial, 100 W. 26th St.

Outstanding Women of Missouri | Fort Osage Education Center, 107 Osage St., Sibley

Snow tha product, caskey, Les paul, $taxx | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence Sons of Brasil | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Leawood Mike Stinson: A Living room Session | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

the Waterdog Nation, opium-chalkline, No Safe Haven, promethus Firegod/plague | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

White Girl, Sphinx, Max Justus | 9 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Wonderfuzz | Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

On the Brink: A mOnth thAt chAnged the wOrld

946 Massachusetts St. Lawrence, KS 785.749.7676 On the Brink: A Month That Changed the World | National World War I Museum, Liberty Memorial, 100 W. 26th St., theworldwar.org

Years Past, Shyner | 7 p.m. Aftershock Bar & Grill, 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam

Sporting KC vs. San Jose | 7:30 p.m. Sporting Park, 1 Sporting Way, KCK, sportingkc.com

Nightlife

CommuNitY eveNtS

Brodioke | 9 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main flirt friday | 9 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino,

1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

ted live Re-Broadcast event | 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $10, tickets required, Atkins Auditorium, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Atkins Auditorium, 4525 Oak, nelsonatkins.org

Raqs Boheme Bellydancing | 6 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Saturday | 3.22 |

film

National theatre live presents War Horse | 11 a.m. Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania, tivolikc.com

PeRfoRmiNg ARtS muSiC

Golden! Girls Gone Wild!! | 8 p.m. Missie B’s, 805 W. 39th St.

P p PROMOTIONS > Free Stuff

SERVING FOOD

Log on to

TILL 4AM

4112

Pennsylvania Ave

816.960.4560 Mon-Fri 4p-3am Sat-Sun 12pm-3am

to register for some

FREE

APPEARING LIVE THIS WEEK

Every MONDAY Open Mic w/ Brody Buster 7-11pm

Stuff!

Tickets Passes CDs DVDs & more!

8bitlA and ChipWiN Present: Chiptunes in Kansas City | 7 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway ComedY

lavell Crawford | 7 & 9:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club

At the left hand of god, the Soiled doves, See the elephant, dJ’s Neff & Stryfe | 8 p.m. The Riot

Kathy griffin | 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Atomic voodoo | Jerry’s Bait Shop, 13412 Santa Fe

and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

trevor moore | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Room, 4048 Broadway

Trail Dr., Lenexa

dC Bellamy | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E.

85th St.

food & dRiNK

City market | 6 a.m.-3 p.m., 20 E. Fifth St.

Bridges Burnt Cd-release show with unwritten Rulez and the hollowpoint | 7 p.m. VooDoo Lounge,

grand Court farmers market | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Grand Court Retirement Center, 501 W. 107th St.

Chiptunes | 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

SPoRtS & ReC

Crankshaft and the gear grinders | 9 p.m. Knuck-

Bowling for Rhinos, with proceeds benefiting animal

conservation | 5:30-9 p.m. Mission Bowl, 5399 Martway, Mission, kcaazk.webs.com

Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

leheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

dolewite | The BrewTop Pub & Patio, 6601 W. 135th St., Overland Park continued on page 32

Every TUESDAY Open Blues Jam w/ The Coyote Bill Boogie Band

WEDNESDAY Night Trivia from 7-9pm thurs. march 20:

THE SUITS, LAURA HOPE & THE ARKTONES

FRI. march. 21 :

ADRIANA AND SARAH DINNER SHOW MY OH MY, GYPSY SPARROWS, DIRTY RIVER RAMBLERS

FRI. march. 21 :

PAST TENSE BLUEGRASS DINNER SHOW HUBCAP BANDITS, CLAWHAMMER, SCRATCHTRACK

816.960.4560

westportsaloon.com

Live Music Live Music 7 nights 7 nights a week

a week

816.561.2444 www.erniebiggs.com nsas 4115 Mill Street West Port Ka pitch.com

march 20 -26, 2014

City

the pitch

31

continued from page 31 Emmure, Volumes, Thy Art Is Murder, Gideon, Sworn in on the Shoulders of Giants | 6:30 p.m.

U Neek, PT’s Rico, Dutch Newman & Joey Cool, Spade Lunn, Ay Musik, Influence, Courtney Bell, Team Legion, C Major, DJ Rick featuring Turnt Up | 7:30 p.m., $7/$10. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

PARADE ROUTE

Aftershock Bar & Grill, 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam

Flannigan’s Right Hook | Kelly’s Westport Inn, 500

Monday | 3.24 |

DAY SATUR

3.22

Westport Rd.

Angela Hagenbach | 6-9 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club,

3601 Broadway

PERFORMING ARTS

Classical Revolution KC: informal, late-night chamber music | 9:30 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania

out Come . to d ay

Hearts of Darkness, DJ Rico | 10 p.m. RecordBar,

1020 Westport Rd.

Golden! Girls Gone Wild!! | 8 p.m. Missie B’s, 805 W. 39th St.

Hubcap Bandits, Clawhammer, Scratch Track | 10 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

COMEDY

Jazz Disciples with Pam Watson | 8:30 p.m. The

Uptown Comedy Night with Norm Dexter | 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway, uptownartsbar.com

KC Groove Therapy | Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St., Over-

MUSIC

Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

land Park

Bob Bowman & Roger Wilder | 10 p.m. Green Lady

Lounge, 1809 Grand

Key Party, Knife Crime, C.S. Luxem | 10 p.m.

Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Lonesome Hank | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. The Ned Ludd Band, the New Lost Souls | 10 p.m.

Parade Route | David Wayne Reed and others perform in this free 7:30 p.m. event, at Paragraph Gallery, 23 East 12th Street, charlottestreet.org.

Captiva, Save the Great, Fresh the Plaza | 10 p.m.

Coda, 1744 Broadway

Tim Whitmer | 4:30 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

FOOD & DRINK

Mad Kings, Lonesome Hound Dogs | Jackpot

The Wolves, the Secret Post, Ab5urdum | 8 p.m.

Backsliders Brunch with gospel music by T.J. Erhardt and A.J. Gaither | 1-4 p.m. Westport Saloon,

MGDs | 9 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

Wonderfuzz | BrewTop Pub, 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave.

The Nace Brothers | 8 p.m. Trouser Mouse, 410 S.

Carolyn Wonderland, Maria the Mexican | 9 p.m.

Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

Newport Jazz Festival 60th Anniversary Tour

featuring Anat Cohen, Karrin Allyson, Randy Brecker, Mark Whitfield, Peter Martin, Clarence Penn and Larry Grenadier | 8-10 p.m. Gem Theater, 1615 E. 18th St.

Platinum Express | 8 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy, 1601

E. 18th St.

Luke Polipnick Quartet | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Rev Gusto, Ings, Alien Jones | The Brick, 1727 McGee The Sexy Accident, the Perfect Pursuit | 7 p.m.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Sunday | 3.23 |

7 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

Regina Carter: Southern Comfort | 7 p.m. Kauff-

32

the pitch

march 20 -26, 2014

Ken Lovern with Molly Hammer | 7 p.m. The Blue

Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Mark Lowrey Trio | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931 Broadway Open Mic with Brody Buster | 7-11 p.m. Westport

Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

Rural Grit Happy Hour | 6-9p.m.TheBrick,1727McGee Ume, Maps for Travelers, Be/Non | 7 p.m. Czar,

God’s Country Fat Tire Festival and Duathlon |

La Bohème | 2 p.m. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway

Missouri Mavericks vs. Quad City Mallards |

Golden! Girls Gone Wild!! | 6 p.m. Missie B’s, 805 W. 39th St.

4:05 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence MUSIC

Solo, dance presented by the Smith Project | 3:30 p.m.

Unicorn Theatre, Jerome Stage, 3828 Main

Lavell Crawford | 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and

Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Sandra J. Scott reads from her new novel, Prelude to a Distant Future | 2-3:30 p.m. Kansas City, Kansas, Public Library, Main Branch, 625 Minnesota Ave., KCK

Armenian Church, 4400 Wyoming

931 Broadway

man Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway

Todd Strait | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W.

Gerald Trimble’s Celtic and World Music Sessions presents: Barakabarocco | 8 p.m. St. Garabed

Jazz brunch | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant,

9 a.m., $40-$50, register by March 20, Lawrence River Trails, north Lawrence, fattireduathlon.blogspot.com

LITERARY EVENTS

151st St., Leawood

City Market | 8 a.m.-3 p.m., 20 E. Fifth St.

PERFORMING ARTS

Spoonfed Tribe, DJ vs. Drums, Sri Yantra | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

4112 Pennsylvania

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

SPORTS & REC

COMEDY

The Sing-Off Live Tour featuring Home Free, the Filharmonic, VoicePlay and the Cat’s Pajamas |

Brody Buster Band, Jazz Cigarettes | Jackpot

Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

FA S H I O N & S T Y L E

Beauty & Bow Ties | 6 p.m., $35-$50, 28 Event Space, 1300 W. 28th St., kcbbt.com

pitch.com

Rich Berry | Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. Dirty River Ramblers, the Ready Brothers |

1531 Grand

Waldo Jazz Collective | 7-10 p.m. The Piano Room,

8410 Wornall

NIGHTLIFE

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | 7:30 p.m. Rhythm and Booze, 423 Southwest Blvd.

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | 8 p.m. Green Room

Burgers & Beer, 4010 Pennsylvania

6 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Karaoke | 10:30 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee

Japanese Game Show, Scruffy & the Janitors, Organ Loaners | Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachu-

Louder Than a Bomb: The American Jazz Museum’s youth poetry festival | 6-8 p.m. Gem Theater,

setts, Lawrence

1615 E. 18th St.

Mark Lowrey Trio jazz jam | 6 p.m. The Majestic,

Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia | 7 p.m. RecordBar,

Jimbo Mathus and the Tri State Coalition | 8 p.m.

Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States |

Lee McBee and the Confessors | 6-9 p.m. B.B.’s

Trivia with Matt Larson | 8 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

931 Broadway

Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

1020 Westport Rd.

8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Vinyl Appreciation Night with DJ Titties | 9 p.m.

The Frowning Vajayjays oF shady Pines

The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

FEATURED

Tuesday | 3.25 |

• DE A LS•

ComeDy

Conrad Courtney, Scott Shaffer, Zach Smith, Dennis Chanay, Adam maxwell, maeret Lemons | 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

101 Southwest Blvd.

muSiC

el Barrio Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

Busker’s Banquet | 9 p.m.The Uptown Arts Bar,

Gerome Berry

open-mic comedy night | 9 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s,

The Frowning Vajayjays of Shady Pines | Just Off Broadway Theatre, 3051 Central, kcmeltingpot.com

3611 Broadway

City Pop, Free Throw | Jackpot

More

EvEnts

in Onl

Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

e at

pitch.co

m

Horror Remix | 8 p.m. The

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Hermon mehari Trio | 6 p.m. The MajesticRestaurant,

931 Broadway

Louder Than a Bomb: The American Jazz museum’s youth poetry festival | 6-8 p.m. Gem

Theater, 1615 E. 18th St.

Tap Room Trivia | 8-10p.m.WaldoPizza,7433Broadway Trivia Bang Bang | 7:30 p.m. Helen’s Just Another Dive, 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City

Wednesday | 3.26 |

Hermon mehari Trio | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931 Broadway

mary ocher, Blondie Brunetti | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

PINKIE COUTURE

$50 COLOR SERVICE FOR ONLY $25 $12.50

organ Jazz Trio | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809

Grand

outlaw Jim & the Whiskey Benders | 8 p.m.

Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

PeRFoRmiNG ARTS

modern Day Fitzgerald, NowHere | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Naughty Pines Happy Hour Band | 6-9 p.m. Coda,

Disney on ice: Let’s Celebrate | 7 p.m. Sprint Center,

1407 Grand, sprintcenter.com

1744 Broadway

ComeDy

open Blues Jam with the Coyote Bill Boogie Band | 9 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania Roadkill Ghost Choir, Tyler Gosnell | 8 p.m. The

Devin Henderson’s mind madness | 7:30 p.m.

Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Poetic underground open mic | 9 p.m. The Uptown

Gerald Spaits Trio | 7 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club,

muSiC

Scott Stapp, For the Broken | 7 p.m. The Granada,

Breaking even, eleven After, Pyridial, the Last Glacier | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

3601 Broadway

1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Ben Taylor with Sara morgan | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Roger Wilder Trio | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1809 Grand

NiGHTLiFe

DJ Rico & the Boss Hooligan Soundsystem | 10 p.m. Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway

Karaoke with Paul Nelson | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

The River monks, Attic Wolves | Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Shinetop Jr. | 7-9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Drew Six | 6-9 p.m. Cactus Grill, 11849 Roe, Leawood

LiTeRARy eVeNTS

Rock, Paper, Scissors | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020

Westport Rd.

Reckless Kelly | 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massa-

chusetts, Lawrence

Full Bloods, See Through Dresses | The Brick,

1727 McGee

Herbalize | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main Karaoke | Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

Skaters, Team Spirit | 7 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand ZZ Ward with Grizfolk, the o’my’s | 7:30 p.m. The

B.A.R.T Wednesdays with DJ G Train | 10 p.m.

MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

JoCo Dems happy hour | 5 p.m. Lucky Brewgrille, 5401 Johnson Dr., Mission

Karaoke with Lo | 10 p.m. Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway

Trivia | 7-9 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

elaine mcmilian and Kirk Scott | 8 p.m. Californos,

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com

4124 Pennsylvania

7TH HEAVEN

$50 CERTIFICATE FOR $25

NiGHTLiFe

Loose Change jam | 7 p.m. Trouser Mouse, 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

$20 CERTIFICATE FOR $10

Skaters | 7 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Midland, 1228 Main

T.J. erhardt | 7 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

JOE’S PIZZA

.com

or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

pitch.com

march 20 -26, 2014

the pitch

33

dating.

S ava g e L o v e

Poké PlushoPhiles Dear Dan: I am a liberal parent. I raised a daugh-

ter who is bi and poly. I always thought that I could accept anything that parenthood might throw at me. I knew that I could embrace my son if he were straight, gay, bi, trans, etc. If there is a controlling consciousness of the universe, it has a nasty sense of humor. Putting it bluntly: My son is sexually attracted to Pokémon. He dropped hints that I didn’t really pick up on. But over the last few years, I have stumbled across evidence of his browsing habits that left me pretty clear about his proclivities. He is now 17, so thoughts that he would “grow out of it” are fading. My biggest fear is that he won’t find someone to pair with. I love my children and want them to be happy. Should I address this with him? Try to discourage an orientation that, to me, seems kind of pathetic?

Dad of Pokémon Enthusiast Dear DOPE: “It’s possible that DOPE’s son is

just a curious kid who finds unusual sex fascinating, with his browsing habits no more revealing than discarded tickets to a carnival act,” says Jesse Bering, Ph.D., the author of Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us. Bering is a research psychologist and science writer who regularly contributes to Slate, Scientific American, and other publications. “But if it’s true that Pokémon lights this boy’s fire in the ways DOPE imagines, there’s not much DOPE can do about his son’s ‘pathetic’ orientation. By age 17, his son’s singular erotic profile is pretty much fixed, like it or not.” What might cause a young man to take a sexual interest in Pokémon? “Scientists can’t exactly do controlled laboratory experiments on humans to determine the cause of a given kink,” Bering says. “So nobody knows why some people are more prone to developing unusual patterns of attraction than others. But the best available evidence suggests that some people — mostly males — have a genetic predisposition for being ‘sexually imprinted’ during development.” It’s like this: Some kids are going to sexually imprint on random shit, kids are exposed to random shit all the time, there’s no way of predicting which kids will imprint on what shit, so there’s no way to prevent Pokémon fetishists or foot fetishists or sneeze fetishists or clown fetishists from happening. A small number of our fellow human beings, your son included, will have kinks that strike others — folks who don’t share their kinks, folks who don’t have any kinks — as pathetic, twisted, sick, or silly. And because being shamed by his dad or mom (see below) won’t save a kid from his “pathetic” orientation, shaming your son is a waste of time that will serve only to damage

34

the pitch

march 20 -26, 2014

pitch.com

your relationship with him. As for your fears that your son will wind up alone … “Although DOPE might prefer a regular old queer child instead of a rare plushophile, the good news is that his son grew up in a world where, somewhere out there, other people were being erotically molded by animated Japanese chimeras in exactly the same way,” says Bering. “Reaching out to that community online can only empower him and help him to accept a now unalterable — and completely harmless — part of his nature. In many ways, life can be easier for DOPE’s son: He’s got a ready-made sexual niche, complete with hookup opportunities at annual conventions.”

Dear Dan: I am a het husband. Before we mar-

ried, I let my wife know that I loved spanking women and I was not a faithful man. Fastforward 20 years: She does not like to be spanked and does not want me cheating, despite my earlier proclamation. So I watch spanking porn and remain faithful. Am I cheating on my wife with porn? Was I not specific enough when we got married?

Wannabe Intensely Spanking Husband Dear WISH: You are not cheating on your wife

when you watch porn — spanking or otherwise. And I don’t think getting together with other women for spanking-only playdates would constitute cheating. Sadly for you, I’m not your wife.

Dear Dan: When I was a teenager, my mother

found some dirty stories I wrote on my computer. They were hardcore (bondage, slavery, whippings), and some featured neighborhood MILFs that I had crushes on. I was 14 at the time. My mom went ballistic and terrorized me about my kinks until I left for college. I hated my mother

By

D a n S ava ge

so much during this time. I didn’t feel like I could trust her, and I never confided in her about anything. It took me a decade to get over it. I’m now 30, straight, and married. My wife and I appear to be “normal.” But we are both into bondage and S&M, we go to fetish parties, and we’ve explored cuckolding and forced bi. My wife and I aren’t a perfect fit — I enjoyed cuckolding (my fantasy) but not so much forced bi (seeing me suck dick was her fantasy) — but our kinks have brought us a lot of joy. Cutting to the chase: My wife is pregnant. We announced the news to my mom and dad, and they were delighted. I was honestly delighted to make my parents so happy. Then my mother sent me an e-mail saying that I had her to thank for my relationship and my child-to-be. If she hadn’t “nipped those dark sexual impulses in the bud,” I would “not now have a lovely wife and a morally acceptable lifestyle,” and she wouldn’t be expecting her first grandchild. Mom thinks her five-year-long campaign of shaming me— and constantly spying on me and haranguing me — cured me of my kinks! I’m so angry. I want to tell my mother that she has my “dark sexual impulses” to thank for her first grandchild! I met my kinky wife on Fetlife! No kinks, no wife! No wife, no grandchild! My wife would rather not be outed as kinky to her mother-in-law and says to let it go. What do you say?

Mad Over Terribly Hurtful E-mail Received Dear MOTHER: I agree with your wife: Let it go. Ignore your mother’s hurtful e-mail — just don’t respond — and focus on your wife and the child you two are having together. The last thing you need is your mother getting in your wife’s face about her kinks or running to fetus protective services because she believes kinky parents are a danger to their children. But just in case your mother brings it up again — if she presses you for an undeserved thank-you-for-terrorizing-me note — write an e-mail to your mother, one that your wife sees in advance and approves. Something along the lines of: “My adolescent sexual fantasies were none of your business, and your inability to respect my privacy and sexual autonomy caused me great personal distress at the time. Your actions did not help me. They damaged our relationship. My adult sex life is none of your business, and I am not going to answer any invasive or inappropriate questions. All you need to know is this: My wife and I are very happy together — both emotionally and sexually compatible — and if you want to be fully involved in the life of your grandchild, you will never bring up this subject again.” Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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BTC Building Brighter Futures offers the following... SOCIAL SERVICES: Career Readiness Services, Construction Skills Training, Temporary & Permanent Housing, Transportation Assistance, Legal Advocacy Our Career Readiness Workshop has an 80% Success Rate!, Housing Avail. for felons & at risk job seekers & Transportation Assistance Available Contact: 816-842-4975 • beyondtheconviction.org • 1734 E. 63rd St, Suite 301, KCMO 64110 Open AuditiOns fOr

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march 20 -26, 2014

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Classifieds

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Other Openings available, call our Job Hotline. 816-303-1696 Pre-screen Interviews: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday 8:30am - Noon & 1:00-3:00pm

Pride starts with my team and extends to everything I touch. It’s a powerful feeling, to belong. It’s that moment you feel truly and completely yourself. It’s working with a team you call family. At Marriott we know that when you feel at home, you’ll make our guests feel at home. And it’s why so many of our associates come for a job, but stay for a career. If this sounds like the place for you, join us. Overland Park Marriott, located at 10800 Metcalf Drive is currently hiring for the positions below. The ideal candidates will have a flexible schedule. Open Positions include the following: Attendant-Catering Service – Job ID 140000FW Server-Banquets – Job ID 140000G0 Washer-Laundry – Job ID 140000KK Attendant-Gourmet Coffee – Job ID 140003MR Housekeeper – Job ID 140008IB Dishwasher/Utility – Job ID 140008IC Food Runner – Job ID 14000CBN Guest Service Representative – Job ID 14000ESH Housekeeping Aide – Job ID 14000FZE Marriott International is consistently recognized as an employer of choice around the globe by FORTUNE and Working Mother magazines, DiversityInc, Great Places to Work Institute, and the CRF institute among others. Visit our newsroom to learn more: news.marriott.com To submit your application for this job, please go to: http://jobs.marriott.com/careers Connect and network online with us: www.facebook.com/marriottjobsandcareers www.twitter.com/marriottcareers www.linkedin.com/company/ marriott-international www.weibo.com/marriottcareers

marriott.com/careers Search by the job ID number listed next to the position.

1329 Baltimore Kansas City, MO 64105 pitch.com

Marriott is an equal opportunity employer committed to employing a diverse workforce and sustaining an inclusive culture.

march 20 -26, 2014

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p Do you have

Sun DamageD Skin?

Actinic kerAtosis lesions Are precAncerous. You maY be eligible to Are you in the SUN a lot? participate in a clinical Compliant Clinical Research, Inc. is now reSearch Study if you: conducting a clinical research study to evaluate an investigational cream and its • are an adult with high levels effect on sun damages skin (Actinic Keratosis) of sun exposure • have scaly or rough lesions Do you have scaly or rough lesions on your face or scalp? on your face or scalp • can visit our office 4 times Qualified participants will receive at no cost: in 24 weeks • Study related exams • Study cream or placebo Qualifying participants will receive financial compensation for their time and travel. You could earn up to $200 over 4 visits to our facility.

For more information or to schedule a screening, please contact us at 913-481-6415 153 West 152st Street, Suite 100, olathe, KS 66061

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Discover a career with purpose... Programs in Massage Therapy, Medical Assisting, Fitness Training & Wellness. Campuses in KC & Lawrence 1.866.443.9140•www.wellsping.edu

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Are you out of housing options? Have Credit Problems? Previous Evictions?

We rent to the rent challenged

Spray Booth tech/ color Matcher

Starting at:

If you have experience in visual color matching, air brush or spray gun technique we may have the perfect job for you at our Kansas City, Missouri location. Job Responsibilities may include: Garment mark-in, Garment pressing (leather), Garment dying/color matching. Job RequiRements: Fluent in english, must be a team player & like to work in a fast paced environment, must be able to listen and troubleshoot problems, excellent hand/eye coordination, dry cleaning experience a plus, but not required. compensation: $12.00 an hour starting, benefits package avail.

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1333 Washington blvd., Kc, Ks cleaning & delivery driver Job Responsibilities include: Frequent moving, climbing

ladders and lifting of equipment. A day consists of driving to jobs, loading & unloading supplies, as well as cleaning all types of window treatments. Job RequiRements: monday-Friday, full-time, needed 8am-4pm. must have a clean driving record, have or obtain a class e license, have superior customer service skills, be dependable and clean cut. Any prior dry cleaning, carpet &/or upholstery cleaning experience would be preferred.

compensAtion: $11/hr start/depends on exp. benefits package Avail.

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The Pitch: March 20, 2014