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F e b r u a r y 2 7–M a r c h 5 , 2 01 4 | F r e e | V ol . 3 3 No. 3 5 | p i t c h.c oM

f e bru a ry 2 7-m a rc h 5 , 2 014 | V ol . 3 3 no. 3 5 E d i t o r i a l

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jen Chen, Liz Cook, April Fleming, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage, Nick Spacek

too mu c h fre e do m At whose bidding has the Hickman Mills school board been operating? b y s t e v e vo c k r o d t

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Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever

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We hold a summit on the state of craft beer in Kansas City. b y j u s t i n k e n da l l

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Circulation Director Mike Ryan

t he be at man

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KC producer Andrew Sinclair speaks a different musical language. b y n ata l i e g a l l ag h e r

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Questionnaire streetside feature agenda shop girl stage café fat city music d a i ly l i s t i n g s savage love

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The Pitch’s BACON & BOuRBON FESTiVAL is April 10. New poll says Sam Brownback is TRAiLiNG PAuL DAViS. KANSAS DEMOCRATS aren’t having a great legislative session in Topeka, either.

Questionnaire ArtsKC–Regional Arts Council

S a b r i n a S ta i r e S

Paul Tyler

Grants director,

Hometown: Barstow, California, by birth;

“Kansas City screwed up when …” They let the

Current neighborhood: Hyde Park

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” The first

Richmond, Virginia, by length of residence. But now Kansas City definitely feels like home!

What I do (in 140 characters): Help artists and

arts organizations in the KC metro region thrive and flourish by providing financial support, info, guidance and coaching.

border war on economic development and job poaching escalate so much — everybody loses in the long run.

few seasons of Breaking Bad — we were late adopters — until we caught up to season three.

“I can’t stop listening to …” Tom Waits.

What’s your addiction? The arts, all genres and

“I just read …” The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt, a deliciously dark Western fable with a dry and grotesque sense of humor.

What’s your game? A regular neighborhood

The best advice I ever got: “If you can be happy doing anything other than the arts as a career, then you should, because a life in the arts is just so damn hard” — from a professional stage manager I worked with when I was 22.

disciplines — they’ve always been the foundation of my personal and professional life, and I can’t imagine existing without them. low-stakes poker game with good friends, just for the fun of it and bragging rights (OK, and a little pocket change, too, when you win).

What’s your drink? For years it was micro-

brewed pale ales, but lately it’s been bourbon and ginger — when crafted with Dark Horse Distillery bourbon, Vernor’s Ginger Ale and a dash of Angostura bitters, it’s heaven in a glass.

Where’s dinner? Mostly at home, but when we

go out, someplace in the Crossroads Arts District, like the Jacobson or Anton’s Tap Room … or Teocali on Hospital Hill for casual dining on a weekend night.

What’s on your KC postcard? The NelsonAtkins Museum of Art by night, with the Bloch Building all aglow.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” They realized they could be both a

first-rate arts town and a first-rate sports town. It’s not a question of one or the other.

Worst advice: The same … because obviously it didn’t work for me! My sidekick: My wife, Laura, a Hallmark senior designer, and our two black Lab-mix rescue dogs, Halo and Blitzen My brush with fame: I was honored to be a Downtown Council Urban Hero a few years ago. I’m afraid that’s about it. I prefer to work behind the scenes. Maybe that’s the old stagehand in me. My 140-character soapbox: Buy art locally, give to your favorite art groups and then toss a few bucks to the ArtsKC Fund, so that the overall arts scene will thrive. My recent triumph: Celebrated my 12th anniversary of working at ArtsKC, which is five years longer than I’d ever worked at one place before.

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The AnTi-PickuP ArTisT I

t has been the observation of several women I’ve known that among my deficiencies as a mate is a stubborn aversion to expressing my feelings. I used to think this characteristic was native to my gender rather than a failing specifically mine. But at a certain point, you have to acknowledge your blind spots and try to correct them. In my defense: I was raised Catholic in a German-Irish family in the Midwest. My people prefer to suffer and to do so in silence. I really never had a chance. I would further suggest that the ocean of my True Feelings is perhaps not worth diving into. Wade past the obsessions with food and sex that dominate my daily existence, and, depending on my mood, the waters get pretty dark pretty quickly. When you wondered aloud about my feelings, were you wanting to discuss how all the things that humans spend their lives thinking about — relationships, careers, religion, mortality — are ultimately just distractions that serve to keep at bay the terrifying likelihood that our lives have no real significance? Because that was probably on my mind when you asked. Still, I take the point about my emotionally stunted personality, and that’s part of why I drove to Lawrence last week to speak with Jeffrey Hall. For the past seven years or so, Hall, a communications professor at the University of Kansas, has gathered research and conducted experiments on the topic of flirting. He has studied how people flirt in various environments — including, most recently, the Internet. Last year, Harlequin Books (the romance-novel house) published The Five Styles of Flirting: Use

the Science of Flirting to Attract the Love You Really Want, Hall’s self-help book. I was half-hoping that Hall might be some kind of romantic wizard, able to impart closely held trade secrets. But the man is no playboy. He’s a married academic, with kids. He wouldn’t even go to a bar with me to observe undergraduates in action. “I’m kind of like the anti-pickup artist,” he told me, referring to the sleazy characters in The Game, Neil Strauss’ nonfiction best-seller about the seduction community. “As somebody with a feminist bias, I find their [pickup artists’] rape-y approach totally abhorrent.” Hall’s research has led him to a handful of conclusions. One is that different people flirt differently, and that the common behaviors we tend to associate with flirting are far from the only ways people communicate attraction. As its title suggests, Hall’s book identifies five flirting “types.” 1. The Physical Flirt: Very forward, lots of body language, sexually charged. Does well in dance clubs. 2. The Polite Flirt: Very careful, doesn’t respond well to aggressive flirting, wellmannered. Does well in churches and coffee shops. 3. The Sincere Flirt: Wants to create a strong emotional connection immediately, very verbal. Good on a date. 4. The Playful Flirt: Sees flirting as a game. Often flirts nonsexually, to get out of parking tickets or close a deal. Thrives in bar culture. 5. The Traditional Flirt: Comfortable with men as the pursuers and women as passive and yielding.

Running lines with Jeffrey Hall,

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KU’s resident f lirting expert.

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Hall, not in a bar Hall recommends taking his online quiz (at flirtingstyles.com) to learn what type you are, and then, based on it, consider adjusting the ways you seek out romantic partners. “I think a lot of people, especially those in college or in their 20s, feel bad about themselves because they don’t know how to go to a bar and pick up somebody,” Hall said. “But that doesn’t mean they don’t know how to communicate attraction. It just means they can’t do it at a bar. At a bar, the playful style of flirting is always going to win out. It’s appropriate to that context. I try to tell people that it’s OK if the bar isn’t your scene — you’re better off in a different context, so go to these other places.” Because he has studied flirting on eHarmony and social networks, I was curious about Hall’s take on Tinder, the location-driven dat-

ing app that seems to be hitting its tipping point. I admitted that I had recently set up an account and found Tinder to be almost dangerously addictive — more like a video game than a relationship tool. And I asked him whether the greasy thrill of “matching” with somebody we find attractive might not be a healthy trade-off for a new paradigm of evaluating others in a matter of seconds based on a handful of selfies. “My suspicion is, it’s being used by a lot of people looking for a quick self-esteem boost. I will say that online-dating studies have demonstrated that perusing face after face and picking the most attractive is not the healthy way to go, and that it is unlikely to lead to success. It gives you a distorted feeling of shopping for human beings, rather than trying to have a relationship with them.” Hall is enthusiastic about online dating in general, though, which he called the “number one way Americans meet each other and marry.” He added: “The fact that it overcomes the biggest hurdle, identifying people who are single — just that access alone is monumental. And if you’re a certain type of person — a Sincere Flirt, for example — online dating is just so much better than the alternatives.” Unfortunately, that doesn’t do much for me. Hall’s flirting quiz revealed that I have virtually no qualities common to Sincere Flirts. The quiz commentary stopped just short of calling me an emotionally hopeless robot: “In serious relationships, you are very unlikely to experience a strong emotional connection and sexual chemistry.” Eh, I’ve heard worse.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

LOSS & DESIRE

Johnson County Library presents a series of events addressing the impact loss and desire have on our understanding of the world.

Featured Event: Climate Change – What do we really know? Alan Werner, professor of geology at Mount Holyoke College, shares his prognosis for the future.

Saturday, March 1 • 2 p.m. • Central Resource Library Visit

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Too Much Freedom At whose bidding has the Hickman Mills school board been operating? By Steve Vockrodt

M

issouri Auditor Tom Schweich is expected to make a trip to Kansas City on March 4 to announce the results of an extensive and potentially explosive audit by his office into the Hickman Mills C-1 School District. What started as a routine matter has turned into one of the longest and most detailed efforts carried out by the Missouri State Auditor’s Office. In early February, Hickman Mills schoolboard members were shown a draft of the audit, and those familiar with its findings say it uncovered financial irregularities in the district’s business office, including a series of no-bid contracts and questionable expenditures. Some of those contracts appear to have connections to the East Side political club Freedom Inc. Hickman Mills insiders say the audit’s implications could have an impact on the April 8 Board of Education elections, in which 10 candidates are vying for three open seats. One incumbent in the race is Breman Anderson Jr., who was ousted just a few months into his Hickman Mills’ school-board presidency not long after a chaotic April 18, 2013, board meeting. It was in that meeting that the district’s longtime attorney, Chris Gahagan, was suddenly fired and replaced by lawyers from the Husch Blackwell law firm. Board members who opposed Gahagan’s dismissal contend that the move violated Missouri’s open meetings law by discussing Gahagan’s firing in a closed session. They contend that, because Gahagan is a private-practice lawyer who contracted with the district and was not an employee, the closed session violated the law. (Gahagan was brought back as the district’s attorney later that year.) One of the lawyers who replaced Gahagan was Donna Wilson Peters, whose primary legal expertise is real-estate development. She previously served on the board of Freedom Inc., for which Anderson has been a member. Freedom Inc. has long been a fixture in Kansas City, Missouri, school-district politics, endorsing and raising money for school-board candidates. Founded in 1962 by prominent

Kansas City black activist Leon Jordan, the club proved itself over time to be a political force in the black community, supporting candidates for school board, City Council, Statehouse and the Jackson County Legislature. However, in recent years, Freedom Inc.’s influence within the Kansas City, Missouri, school district has waned, and the club appears to be attempting to exert its influence in south Kansas City, including in Hickman Mills, a district with provisional accreditation that scored lower than the fledgling Kansas City Public Schools on the latest Missouri School Improvement Program evaluation. Last year was the first time that the club publicly involved itself in a Hickman Mills election, throwing its support behind two candidates: Byron Townsend and Shawn Kirkwood. Once elected, Townsend and Kirkwood for a time formed a majority on the seven-member board with Anderson and Darrell Curls (uncle to Freedom Inc. leader and Missouri state Sen. S. Kiki Curls). And once again, Freedom Inc. figures to be a force in the April schoolboard election. Gayle Holliday, a member of Freedom Inc.’s leadership team, says the club has yet to screen or endorse any of the candidates vying for seats on the Hickman Mills board. However, at least one candidate, Carol Graves, is a Freedom Inc. member. Former board president Anderson maintains close ties to Freedom Inc.’s attorney, Clinton Adams. A board member who asked not to be named says of Anderson: “He is his boy. He does what he [Adams] tells him.” While Holliday downplays her organization’s involvement in the Hickman Mills district, others remain suspicious of the club’s presence. Freedom Inc.’s past influence over the school district has led at least one candidate to enter the race. “The current board members who seem to be affiliated with Freedom have personal

agendas,” says Sandy Sexton, a Ruskin High School graduate and an office manager for the Ruskin Heights Homes Association, who is running for the board. “Some of those have to do with not necessarily educating children but controlling the business aspect of things.” Holliday contends that Freedom Inc.’s membership is composed largely of elected officials, not local business owners. But some companies that have received no-bid contracts from the Hickman Mills board have connections to the political club. Last year, the board suddenly dismissed its longtime insurance broker, Charlesworth & Associates, and replaced it with the McDaniel Hazley Group without a competitive bid. Former Kansas City Councilman Charles Hazley was a key partner in the company and a member of Freedom Inc.’s three-person leadership committee (along with Holliday and Sen. Curls) until his death late last year. Anderson tells The Pitch that the McDaniel Hazley Group was brought in because board members were concerned that the district’s insurance policies were not financially realistic. He acknowledges that there was no competitive bidding for the contract, but he sees no problem with it. “I don’t think it needed to be bid,” Anderson says. “It was a change of broker. It was not a bid issue. I think it comes up next year to be bid.” The district had put its insurancebrokerage business out to bid in the past, but Charlesworth & Associates was the one chosen for nearly two decades. The board’s policy is to competitively bid any contract exceeding $5,000. While state law does not require a school district to bid most contracts (construction projects and certain banking services are the exceptions), it is considered good business practice to bid large contracts, both to save taxpayer money and to avoid cronyism. The state audit is expected to show that the school board routinely waived that policy.

“I don’t care who gets on the board, as long as it’s not Breman’s group.”

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Anderson tells The Pitch that during the 2011–12 school year alone, the year before he became board president, the board awarded $2.3 million in contracts without competitive bids. (The district disputes some of that figure.) Missouri state Rep. Bonnaye Mims served as board president from 2008 to 2012. Freedom Inc. endorsed Mims, who still serves on the board, in her Statehouse campaign. Mims now appears to be distancing herself from the club. The practice of awarding no-bid contracts continued after Anderson first became board president in 2012. The Pitch filed open-records requests with the Hickman Mills School District for contracts and bid documents associated with Gallagher Benefit Services, the Holman Schiavone law firm and the McDaniel Hazley Group. None of those contracts were competitively bid, even though each exceeded the $5,000 threshold. The board can waive the bidding of contracts if it believes that no other company can reasonably provide those services. That doesn’t appear to be the case with some of the no-bid contracts awarded by the Hickman Mills district. The board hired Gallagher Benefit Services with what was supposed to have been a flat-fee $30,000 no-bid contract to search for a replacement for superintendent Marjorie Williams, who retired in 2012 after more than 20 years of working in the district. Gallagher Benefit Services found current superintendent Dennis Carpenter, but not before the company’s contract was increased to a $36,400 payout. Finding headhunters, especially those specializing in school-district personnel, isn’t difficult. The Missouri School Board Association conducts superintendent searches. For a district of Hickman Mills’ size, the MSBA would do a search in return for 8 percent of the new superintendent’s salary. Carpenter makes $180,000, so MSBA’s search would have cost $14,400. The Gallagher contract wasn’t the only no-bid payout related to Williams’ retirement. The district hired the continued on page 8

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Too Much Freedom continued from page 7 Holman Schiavone law firm to handle legal matters arising from an investigation into how much accrued sick time and leave were supposed to be paid to Williams. The former superintendent claimed that the district owed her about $200,000. Holman Schiavone lawyer Amy Maloney, a former assistant to U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, whose congressional races have been supported by Freedom Inc., was tasked with reviewing the district’s calculations. The district ended up paying Williams $72,262 but balked at the rest of the $121,896 balance. In May 2013, Williams sued the school district in federal court to recoup her outstanding benefits. The case was later settled. Through her attorney, Williams declined to comment for this story. Another financial oddity within Hickman Mills’ books: Multiple payouts were made to the Urban Summit of Greater Kansas City, a weekly gathering of African-American community leaders founded by Bishop James Tindall. The district paid $2,000 for the organization’s Youth Summit, a free event. Sources familiar with the state’s audit of Hickman Mills say the district failed to present auditors with any documentation of district officials attending the summit. Anderson claims, however, that roughly 200 students, plus some district staffers, were in attendance. He describes the payment to the Urban Summit as a “small contribution.” As for the lack of documentation: “I’m sure we could have done better,” Anderson says. Clinton Adams is co-chairman of the Urban Summit. Adams, a politically active lawyer with a reputation for meddling in Kansas City, Missouri, school-district affairs, has represented Hickman Mills students and staffers in legal grievances against the district. He also serves as Anderson’s personal attorney, all of which seems to add up to an intractable conflict of interest. Adams did not return calls seeking comment for this story. Anderson bristles at questions about the district’s payments to the Urban Summit and its ties to Adams. “If that is what this is leaning toward, you need to let that go,” Anderson says. “Now that is a stretch.” Debbie Aiman, a Hickman Mills schoolboard member from 2008 to 2010 and a candidate in last year’s election, tells The Pitch that she was invited to a meeting with Adams and Anderson early in her 2013 campaign. During the meeting, she says, they made her an offer: Agree to be a yes man to Anderson on the board, and Adams and Anderson would help her get elected. “I said, ‘You know me better than that,’ ” Aiman tells The Pitch. Not long after, residents in Hickman Mills began receiving mailers from an unregistered political action committee that amounted to hit pieces on Aiman and longtime Hick-

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Anderson (center) at a recent board meeting man Mills board member George Flesher. One piece claimed that Aiman was fired as a teacher from Hickman Mills and charged that she lived with her boyfriend outside the district’s boundaries in Cass County. The campaign literature supported Freedom Inc.’s candidates, Kirkwood and Townsend, who told the Jackson County Advocate that they weren’t involved with the attack advertising. Aiman is among the 10 candidates running in the April 8 election. “I don’t care who gets on the board, as long as it’s not Breman’s group,” she says. Anderson briefly enjoyed a majority voting bloc after the 2013 elections. But it wasn’t a harmonious term with other board members. Anderson wrote a letter dated May 15, 2013, to Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster complaining about board member Eric Lowe, an assistant attorney general under Koster. Anderson wrote that he spoke for the entire board when he accused Lowe of holding unannounced meetings with other members to drum up votes on contentious matters facing the district. He also accused Lowe of unspecified illegal cash contributions and campaignliterature violations. Anderson added that Lowe used his position in the Attorney General’s Office in order to influence other board members. Board member Dan Osman found out about Anderson’s letter and sent a rebuke of his own to Anderson, calling the accusations “preposterously unsubstantiated.” That dust-up appeared to set the stage for a vote, about two weeks later, in which a majority of the board voted to remove Anderson as president and replace him with Lowe. Kirkwood, previously aligned with Anderson, seemed to switch positions by voting with the 4–3 majority. Osman, who became board vice president at that time, says he had grown tired of Anderson’s behavior as president. “There were a number of issues,” Osman says, “everything from basic rudeness to the administration and staff members to con-

tracts that we saw that were questionable and paperwork that I specifically requested that I couldn’t get my hands on.” Anderson not only lost the board presidency but also was kicked out of an office in the district’s southeast Kansas City administrative headquarters, at 9000 Old Santa Fe Road. School board members don’t typically maintain a physical presence on district property. Anderson now says he’s sanguine about the coup, adding that he was relieved to no longer carry out “the very time-consuming, challenging endeavor” of being board president. He says he’s pleased with the audit, even though some of it may tarnish his reputation. Auditors, according to those familiar with their work, zeroed in on board members’ trips to training conferences paid for by the district. One such excursion was a 2013 trip to San Diego for the National School Boards Association conference. Anderson went on the trip, along with board members Lowe, Osman and Curls. The trip cost the district about $26,000. While other members attended several sessions, Anderson showed up to only a few. Anderson says he was sick and also had to tend to district matters while in San Diego. But those district matters didn’t seem to involve the other board members who attended several sessions. Tending to too many district matters may have earned Anderson a larger slate of opponents in the upcoming election. “I will say this: If Breman didn’t pull the stuff he tried to pull last April, I don’t think we would have 10 people running,” says Karry Palmer, who is among the 10 candidates seeking a seat on the Hickman Mills board. Palmer remains suspicious of what he views as Freedom Inc.’s growing influence in district affairs. “I see what they did with Kansas City, Missouri [school district], in the ’90s,” Palmer says, “and they’re trying to do the same thing with Hickman Mills.”

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

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WEEK OF FEBRUARY 27-MARCH 5, 2014

MARDI GRAS O

ne of the best parties in Kansas City is the 18th Street Mardi Gras parade, from Birdies and YJ’s to the Mutual Musicians Foundation. We’re not sure if the Fat Tuesday march is on, so here are a few weekend alternatives. SocialHeart throws a masquerade party on Friday, February 28, at the Beast haunted house (1401 West 13th Street) from 8 p.m. to midnight. Tickets cost $60; proceeds go to nonprofit Boys Grow of Greater Kansas City. Hearts of Darkness and the Phantastics play a Mardi Gras masquerade at Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club (3402 Main) at 9 p.m. Saturday, March 1. The show doubles as a fundraiser to send HOD to Austin for South by Southwest. The roller girls of the Dead Girl Derby throw a party at Aftershock (5240 Merriam Drive, Merriam) Saturday. The bands start at 8 p.m., with a costume contest at 11. Cover is $5. Carnival season comes to the Power & Light District with a Mardi Gras Festival Saturday at 8 p.m., with live music, a crawfish-eating contest, fire jugglers, street performers and fortune tellers. Tickets cost $25–$35.

Daily listings on page 26 pitch.com

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want to show off their Sunflower State pride. urt Scholla, who owns the Bunker, has his “Through our designs, we’re paying tribown quality-of-life index for his fellow ute to the city that raised us,” Mahaney says. Kansas Citians: T-shirt sales. In recent years, his Westport clothing bou- “The arts resurgence here is really exciting to us, and we seek to incorporate that in our tique has seen demand rise for locally themed work by going for a hand-done, artsy look.” apparel. So last year, he decided it was time While many cities have a well-known tee for the store to make its own local mark. The — think “I ♥ NY” — Mahaney and Egger focus result: a simple but edgy logo centered on on local themes to land on different designs. the letters “KCMO,” designed by his wife, “Kansas City is known Krista Scholla. It did well on for its innovation right now, hats, so now it’s on T-shirts, BUY LOCAL TEES and we’re looking to innohoodies and beer cozies. vate good ideas,” Egger says. As Kurt Scholla sees it, The Bunker “We’re always trying to find two factors fuel the local 4056 Broadway, 816-561-7407 the best design. We’re not love: the post-recession just putting a ‘K’ and a ‘C’ shop-local trend and the Normal Human on a shirt.” national attention that Kan(open Saturdays only), 5916 Three years into Normal sas City’s cultural scene has West 59th Terrace, Mission, Human, Mahaney and Egger earned over the past few 913-730-0366, nrmlhmn.com are ready to expand their reyears. lationships with other local “People love the KCMO small businesses. A trip to items, and we’ve found it’s Maker Village KC makervillagekc.org buy sausage turned into a all due to a strong sense of gig designing shirts for the KC pride,” he says. Local Pig, and they want to Throughout the city, continue building business organically. designers are adding their voices to the If all goes as planned, Normal Human T-shirt uptick. Dan Mahaney and Pat Egger love every- will soon move from Mission to a spot in the Crossroads — in the thick of a like-minded, thing Kansas, Missouri and Kansas City. Together, they form Normal Human, a Mis- growing niche. “There’s this cool ecosystem of printers down there. We’re excited to be sion screen-printing shop with an extensive part of it,” Egger says. collection of fresh tee designs to prove it: Maker Village KC T-shirts — including archery arrows aligned to form the state of Missouri (a nod to the state’s Native Ameri- a “Makers Gotta Make” tee, picturing an eagle stamped with “KC” — embody the local can history); the word “Stateline”; wheat and stars alongside the letters “K” and “C”; handmade-goods movement. “The logo is a little rough around the and an “Ad Aspera” design for those who

Clockwise from left: The Bunker, Mahaney and Camacho rep KC. edges, but I think that is what feels so industrial about it,” says shirt designer Roberto Camacho. “It fits Maker Village KC so well. Everyone is unique, and most are rough around the edges, but all of them share a passion for creating things that make them and the city of KC feel very proud.” The shirts feature the Maker Village logo: an eagle signifying American-made products as well as the strength of the industrial movement, along with a ball-peen hammer and a claw hammer to honor makers’ works. Camacho designed two gray shirts for Maker Village KC founders Nick Ward-Bopp and Sam Green, whom he counts as friends. (Camacho works a day job at Willoughby Design outside of his involvement with Maker Village.) La Cucaracha Press screen-prints the shirts. Those involved in Maker Village are rehabbing a building into a member-based workshop where engineers, entrepreneurs and designers can access woodworking and metalworking equipment and shop space. Ward-Bopp took a break from power washing the building’s floors earlier this month to speak with The Pitch. The shirts, he says, have raised funds as well as serving as thank-yous. “When somebody builds something for us,” he said, “it’s nice to show our appreciation by handing them this shirt that shows what we’re all about.”

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S ta g e

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la’s publication — sharpens the stake a bit.) A ay what you will about our cultural obsesdreamy pas de deux between Dracula and the sion with vampires, it hasn’t bled us comunwitting Jonathan Harker (danced last Friday pletely dry. The Kansas City Ballet finds fresh by Ryan Jolicoeur-Nye) is a highlight, at once marrow in the blood-soaked myth with its production of Michael Pink’s Dracula, a charged a power play and a seduction. In one breathmeeting of classic ballet and rich theatricality. taking sequence, Dracula rolls his groin along Harker’s shivering spine in a fluid, controlled The cast rotates with each performance, motion. The lifts are subtle and unhurried, but opening night featured in the title role a hypnotic Anthony Krutzkamp. He luxuriates exhibiting Krutzkamp’s enormous strength as he appears to manipulate Harker like a rag doll. in the part, showing us a master vampire equal Dracula requires good actors as well as parts dignity and disdain as he pads somberly dancers, and Laura Hunt is among the finest across the stage and whirls his cloak like a flaas the vivacious Lucy Westenra. She captures menco dancer. Lucy’s girlish energy in an expressive and spirPink’s rolling choreography crafts snake pits of slippery bodies and erotic pairings that ited performance, demonstrating her range after Dracula’s influence transforms her into a descend into the grotesque, and the technisnarling, frenzied creature of the night. Molly cal elements are up to the blend of romance Wagner creates elegant lines and meltingly soft and darkness. David Grill’s moody lights alpostures as the count’s reluclow Dracula to slink like a tant conquest Mina Harker, specter from the shadows, Dracula though her performance can catching us off guard with Through March 2 at the feel a bit cool. James Jordan, each appearance. ProducKauffman Center for the company ballet master, is tion designer Lez Brotherthe Performing Arts, 1601 precise and powerful as Van ston makes smart use of the Broadway, 816-931-2232, Helsing, and the supporting scrim to create subtle silhoukcballet.org company members are no ettes and to mask intricate less skilled. (Yoshiya Sakuset pieces as they fly in. The When I Come to Die rai is exuberant as a wriggly sumptuous, multistory sets Through March 16, on the KC bell boy at the Grand Hotel.) are exquisite models of cold Repertory Theatre’s Copaken Philip Feeney’s original stone and coiling metal, texStage, 13th Street and Walnut, score buoys the dancers with tured with fabric that drapes 816-235-2700, kcrep.org a lush orchestral backdrop, and pools sensually onstage. with haunting, ethereal choAnd there’s much senruses pushing through sersuality on display. Bram pentine trombone slides and staccato strings. Stoker’s novel drips with as much homoeroticism as horror, and Pink’s adaptation captures Pulsing timpani and reedy clarinets offer subtle accompaniment for the production’s those undertones. (A sign briefly onstage in Act intimate duets. I that announces Oscar Wilde’s release — the Pink’s adaptation follows Stoker’s novel author had been imprisoned for sodomy and closely, though some plot points seem mud“gross indecency” a few years prior to Dracu-

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is bloody convincing.

­L i z ­C ook

Don ipock

Steve WilSon

Fang Sway

The KC Ballet’s Dracula

the pitch

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Left: Sarah Chun and Logan Pachciarz Above: Will Cobbs (left) and Conan McCarty pass time in When I Come to Die. dled. The sanatorium scenes play out less coherently here, though Ian Poulis dances the lunatic Renfield with appropriate abandon. Ballet seems like a natural medium for this famous tale, bringing subtext to life in dances that expose the vampire’s chilling, magnetic allure. Our familiarity with the myth may have desensitized us to its horror, but the Kansas City Ballet’s potent production proves that Dracula still has the power to surprise us.

The WaiTing The Rep’s W hen I Come to Die: a postcard from death row.

D

eath-row prisoner Damon Robinson has been reborn, though he is no angel. After a lethal injection fails to kill him, he sits on a cot in his cell, disoriented and confused. He was prepared to die. Now what? In the cell next to Damon’s, James “Roach” Teagle is a little spooked. He wonders how Damon’s uncanny survival might affect his own fate. He frets over final words, rehearsing daily: “Good day to you all, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for joining me …” “Ladies and gentlemen” are, in fact, the first words we hear in Nathan Louis Jackson’s When I Come to Die, which addresses us from a place we don’t often think about. Unless a scheduled execution gets some media play — lawyers are appealing, DNA evidence is being examined — the condemned inmate is already forgotten. Jackson, a playwright in residence at Kan-

sas City Repertory Theatre, gives depth and a distinctive voice to these exiles. He doesn’t judge them but frees them from stereotype and lets them challenge our preconceived ideas about those whom the state locks away and means to execute. It’s a small play connected to a big subject. Under Kyle Hatley’s direction and led by Will Cobbs (fierce and charismatic as Damon) and Conan McCarty (excellent as Roach), the quietly powerful 90-minute oneact never loses focus or lets out attention stray. Is Damon a miracle? Is he a monster? The warden and the governor (who never appear) — and the prison priest, Adrian Crouse (Kevin Cristaldi, in a sensitive portrayal) — want to understand what happened and, ultimately, how to proceed. Damon, who professes no religion, finds a secular solace in his meetings with Crouse, who urges him to make use of whatever time he has left. For most of the play, we don’t know Damon’s or Roach’s crimes. We see just flawed people before us, experiencing their world of confinement, boredom and no control. There’s little contact between prisoners, whose isolation is profound. “I sit in a cell all day,” Damon says. He holds on to shoeboxes filled with letters that his family returned unopened. No one has visited him in years, so he reads them aloud to keep himself company. Roach wants to get outside for an hour, but his request is denied. Their claustrophobia — the lack of fresh air, the idleness, the loneliness — is palpable. (The impressive set by Jack Magaw and Courtney O’Neil contributes to the sterile atmosphere.) A long row of prison cells, convincingly metallic- and concrete-looking, take up the breadth of the stage, a bare light bulb in each. In front of that backdrop, Damon and Roach inhabit adjoining cells and talk

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around the imaginary wall separating them. When Damon’s younger sister, Chantel (the very good Janae Nicole Mitchell, a third-year MFA student), shows up for a visit, she may have a motive for finally reaching out. They converse from opposite sides of the stage, staring out at the audience. It’s a touching scene, though projections of their faces high above them, perhaps to augment their having to speak through a barrier, distract. (They might be useful to those in the nosebleed section of the Copaken, which is a vast venue for such an intimate play.) In scene changes between the prison cells and the priest’s office, raised flooring slides on tracks, accompanied by a clang of metal doors, leg chains and handcuffs (sound design by Joseph Concha), reflecting the cold prison environment and its regimentation. Protesters, too — for and against Damon’s execution — can be heard outside, and other prisoners’ voices rise when Damon, frustrated and angry, tries to “shake things up.” “We’ve been given more time but we’re just sitting here,” he says. “We gotta do something.” But there’s not much to do here but wait, with as much sense of self as possible. —Deborah Hirsch

Matt Leonard as Capt. Stanhope

hardened temperament clashes with Raleigh’s naïve enthusiasm. Spencer D. Christensen makes a sizable impression in a small role as the cheerful Capt. Hardy, and Charles Fugate’s Lt. Osborne is tender and paternal. Matthew Rapport explores every nuance in his portrayal of the preternaturally steady Trotter, lending the second lieutenant a voice as full and butter-rich as Trotter’s figure. His banter with company cook Mason (Joseph Fournier), over some ration meat of dubious Journey’s End digs into World provenance, seems to lighten the men’s load. It’s one of the frequent funny moments in SherWar I with grace and wit. riff’s script, wringing wry British humor from s the World War I centennial approaches, grit and catastrophe. As the forced propriety continues, however, we sense the strain behind memorials and monuments take on the smiles. When two of the men are assigned greater significance. But the distant solemnity to a probable suicide mission, Trotter proclaims of cold marble and bronze leads to an uncomit “a damn nuisance,” and his resignation hits fortable question: Are we remembering the us harder than any breakdown. actual people? Anxiety boils under the surface instead, Kansas City Actors Theatre and UMKC Theatre restore our proximity to the fighting men made notably manifest in Uldarico Sarmiento’s smart, visually textured scenic design. with their co-production of Journey’s End at the Devorah Kengmana’s evocative lighting deNational World War I Museum. Playwright R.C. sign is similarly attuned to Sherriff, himself a veteran of the needs of the production, the Great War, offers a comJourney’s End suggesting dazzling flashes plicated and compassionate Through March 2 at the from exploding shells in one look at the lives of British National World War I Museum moment while allowing us to officers near the front line. 100 West 26th Street, appreciate the gentle blush Sherriff’s play chronicles 816-235-6222, kcactors.org of candlelight. And there’s war’s banalities as much as room in Michael Heuer’s dyits battles. All three acts take namic sound design for haunting a cappella place in a dugout in the trenches of Saint-Quentin, France, where the officers of C Company war songs and the atmospheric thrum of distant German whiz-bangs and bombs. swap stories. Intelligence suggests a German The realism on display underscores Sherattack is imminent, and as each quiet hour riff’s ambivalent attitude toward combat. Like passes, the tension mounts, the men winding their watches or counting down the minutes Stanhope, the playwright rejects hero worship and glorified depictions of war, choosing inaloud. Director Mark Robbins submerges his tal- stead to focus on the strength of the relationented cast in a pressure cooker of nervous en- ships among these men. It may be the highest ergy. Jacob Aaron Cullum finds the earnestness compliment I can pay these actors to say that in Raleigh, the newcomer eager to please Capt. it’s hard, at the end of the play, to picture the Stanhope, his schoolboy idol. Matt Leonard is men of C Company cast in bronze. They’re just men — capable of heroism, yes, but also explosive as Stanhope, a young commander cowardice and vice, love and longing. —L.C. with the cynicism (and liver damage) of a much older man. He’d sooner stomach a bottle of whiskey than an ounce of hero worship, and his E-mail feedback@pitch.com

ENTER-TO-WIN A COMPLIMENTARY TICKET! LOG ON TO GOFOBO.COM/RSVP AND INPUT THE FOLLOWING CODE: PITCHVZ0F LIKE US ON facebook/43KIXKansasCity OR FOLLOW US ON at/43KIXKansasCity THIS FILM HAS BEEN RATED R for strong sustained sequences of stylized bloody violence throughout, a sex scene, nudity and some language.

Trench FeaT

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Please note: Passes are available on a first-come first-served basis. While supplies last. No purchase necessary. Limit one admit-two pass per person. Employees of participating sponsors are ineligible. Arrive early! Seating is first-come, first-served, except for members of the reviewing press. Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. Theater is not responsible for overbooking.

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Go Crazy

Lemongrass Thai Cuisine can be good — if you know what to order.

By

Ch a r l e s F e r ru z z a

Lemongrass Thai Cuisine • 7316 West 80th Street, Overland Park, 913-385-5566 • Hours: 11 a�m�–9:30 p�m� Sunday–Thursday, 11 a�m�–10 p�m� Friday–Saturday • Price: $$–$$$

t’s not unusual for a restaurant to serve a few dishes that aren’t on the menu. Charles d’Ablaing, for instance, tells me that if one of his Chaz on the Plaza diners requests a dish from a previous menu — even five menus back — and he has the ingredients in the kitchen, he’ll make it. Letting people go “off menu” is a courtesy for regulars and the savvy — the kind of customers a restaurant wants. And in Asian restaurants, including a few around here, there’s often a separate menu, a discreet batch of dishes for those who want, say, xiao long bao rather than lo mein. Which leads me to the “crazy noodles” I sampled last week at Lemongrass Thai Cuisine. That dish isn’t on the menu — and, according to the manager, may never be. Ask for it anyway because it’s among the best plates I tried at the month-old Overland Park restaurant. It’s made with rice noodles, flash-fried basil, red and green peppers, and a vibrant soy-based sauce with a hint of fiery chilies. Order the crazy noodles but don’t get carried away with the feeling that you’re in on a quiet conspiracy. At Lemongrass, the dish is a secret only in the broadest sense; it has been a frequent dinner special since the place opened. Lemongrass Thai Cuisine appears to be a traditional Thai restaurant at first glance, but its menu isn’t limited to popular Siamese dishes: curries, pad Thai, satays. Right now, it shows off nearly as many ethnic culinary influences as a casino buffet: several ChineseAmerican entrées on the dinner menu; a bowl of steaming Vietnamese pho; Indonesian fried rice; and that staple of 1960s Polynesian-style restaurants, Hawaiian fried rice tossed with cashews and pineapple chunks. What, no moo goo gai pan pizza? What the place needs are a few more secrets, if they’re as good (that is, as authenticleaning) as the crazy noodles. I asked manager Rath Nou why Lemongrass insists on making General Tso’s chicken or pepper steak when the kitchen can do better — and when the popular Dragon Inn remains practically around the corner. “Chinese cooking has been an influence on Thai cuisine for centuries,” Nou says. “Dragon Inn has its specialties. We have ours. Our version of General Tso’s chicken is called General Tao’s chicken and has a very different sauce.” Not different enough, especially given that nearly two dozen Thai restaurants around the metro serve comparable (and similarly indistinct) dishes. Lemongrass’ indecisive culinary style might

AngelA C. Bond

I

simply called “House Beef.” It comes tossed with pieces of fresh asparagus, onions and mushrooms, and it’s as satisfying a meal as this place makes. be a function of its newness — something also Another simply named meat dish, “House on display in the restaurant’s sometimes shaky Pork,” is a variation on that crispy beef, and service — but the place has potential. On my first visit, I found that the starters it, too, is memorably tasty. Shredded pork gets a dusting in water-chestnut flour bewere an indication of things to come: the good, the bad and the ugly. The fried calamari was fore it’s flash-fried in spoon-size hunks and doused with a piquant wine dreadful (cold, chewy), and sauce. Its sweetness veers the marinated chopped pork Lemongrass Thai close to candy, but I found ribs were gristly, boasting Cuisine myself not minding. more fat than meat. But an Tiger wings ���������������������$6�99 Sweet and crunchy aren’t order of deep-fried chicken Chopped ribs ������������������$6�99 Pad Thai with chicken ���$11�99 necessarily virtues, howwings, in a fragrant basil Green curry ever, in Lemongrass’ fried sauce, was excellent — a perwith shrimp������������������$12�99 tilapia (called “pla laad priq fect blend of fire and sweet — Lemongrass katiem”). What I tasted had as were the plump dumplings House Beef ������������������$13�99 spent too many precious stuffed with ground pork. Pla laad priq katiem ���� $14�99 seconds in the deep fryer. One frigid night when It arrived as shiny as a lacI stopped by, a piping-hot quered grajabpi (Thai lute), colored a dark, bowl of tom kha kai left me feeling fine about tempting mahogany, but that gloss camouwinter again. The richly perfumed concoction flaged a tough, tough piece of fish. — made with the grassy, sour lemony leaves No better was the pad Thai I ordered. That that are this restaurant’s namesake, as well as peppery galangal root, kaffir-lime leaves and noodle dish should be an easy mainstay for a sweet coconut milk — was delicious, filling and Thai restaurant, but don’t judge Lemongrass by what I tried: a visually lifeless, disapaltogether restorative. pointingly bland version of a staple. The featured beef dish here — slices of A bowl of green curry, on the other hand, flank steak delicately coated with rice flour was perfection, hitting precise notes of and sautéed just long enough to brown the meat and give it an almost ethereal crunch — is sweetness, tartness and fire.

The beautifully garnished entrées at Lemongrass Thai get best-dressed honors�

pitch.com

The Lemongrass dining room is a soothing and sophisticated room with curvy walls and black tile floors, a sleek makeover that banished all physical traces of the spectacularly dire venue that preceded Lemongrass (the combination restaurant, sushi bar and nightclub called Intentions). No more karaoke, in other words. Lemongrass Thai Cuisine is quiet and demure and all about the food. But you can still hear a song echoing around the room sometimes, one with a nagging refrain: “We sold out of it at lunch.” That’s a line I heard several times from servers here. “We had a rush on sticky rice today,” a manager told me, explaining why a dessert — sweet rice in coconut milk with sliced fresh mangoes — was MIA. As it turned out, the wonton-wrapped fried banana and the cheesecake had vanished as well. Their absence left me to order some chalky, tasteless ice cream. One scoop was said to be green tea and the other coconut, but I detected so little flavor that I would have believed I was eating vanilla or waterchestnut ice cream. “Don’t you have a secret dessert?” I asked one of the servers. “I could bring you a banana,” he said.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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ansas City doesn’t feel short on craft beer. The home of Boulevard Brewing Co. saw two additions this month — Martin City Brewing Co. and Kansas City Bier Co. — to a growing portfolio of microbreweries: Cinder Block, Big Rip, Rock and Run, and Green Room Burgers & Beer. And the area’s oldest such enterprise, Free State in Lawrence, celebrated its 25th anniversary in late February. But the people who actually make the stuff say they’re only now catching up to the rest of the country. That’s one thing we learned when we sat down with a panel of local craftbeer experts. Screenland Armour owners Adam Roberts and Brent Miller hosted the meeting (BYOB, naturally) with Neil Witte, a Master Cicerone and Boulevard’s manager of field quality and training; Brian Duff, director of craft beer at North Kansas City Beverage Co.; and Bryce Schaffter, Cinder Block’s founder and brewer. We turned on our tape recorder and let the conversation — and the beer — flow. The Pitch: With the openings of Martin City Brewing Co. and KC Bier Co. and the emergence of Cinder Block, Big Rip, Green Room, and Rock and Run, the scene seems pretty strong. Duff: It’s a long time coming. We’re way behind everybody. If it wasn’t for Boulevard and Free State, this wouldn’t be going on at all. Now you’re getting people who went away to school or went away to work in different areas and gained experience in some more vibrant locations, and now they’re coming back. What held us back? Schaffter: Boulevard really met the need for the longest time, and they still do. They always were coming out with different beers. I think in the last five years, you’re seeing more of a grassroots movement. Witte: When I started at Boulevard, there were the core brands and three seasonals, and that was it. We thought that was all we were ever going to do. But now, if that’s all we were doing now, we’d be out of business. It’s just a totally different dynamic. It’s easy to compare [Kansas City] to St. Louis, but St. Louis is a really unique market because that was so local-focused on Anheuser-Busch. There were so many people who just drank that beer. When they got bought, I think there was a big sense of betrayal, and people were then looking for something else. So it was right in line with craft beer — “If we’re going to switch brands, there’s always new stuff out there.” Schlafly is right there. They were big beneficiaries.

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Witte (left) and Duff talk craft. Everybody is hyper-local with their beer there. They still want to drink something that’s made in St. Louis because that’s what they’ve always done. Duff: In St. Louis, in the transition from AB to InBev, a lot of upper-management executives got huge buyouts, and then all of a sudden they had money to invest. Urban Chestnut [Brewing Co.] is a great example. They’re like, “Well, we can do what we know,” and they stayed in the industry. Or they just went with people that they respected that were out there home brewing, or maybe a brewpub. How does Kansas City catch up? Witte: What’s happening right now: more breweries, more local beer. I think the community probably needs to organize around it a little more. It’s probably time for a Kansas City Craft Beer Week. Maybe where we have an advantage is, people in this market are more deliberate in their plans and making sure they’re going to do it right before they go into it. It’s OK not to be going at lightning speed because the ones that are going at lightning speed, there’s a lot of mediocre beer out there. Schaffter: We feel a lot of pressure to go to market fast outside of just our taproom, but right now we still iterate on everything that we do. We intentionally do that because we know how good our product needs to be. The consistency and expectations

are so much higher now from a craft-beer drinker. They’re having amazing beers from all these different brewers across the country. Why aren’t we seeing more brewers spinning off from Boulevard? Duff: Boulevard must be a really good company to work for because the people have stayed there year after year after year. You look at other breweries of their size, there’s brewers that have rotated through the door and started their own breweries. Joe Blow that was working at the big brewery went and started a brewery, and that built into something that was big regionally, and so on and so on. Eventually that’s going to happen here. Schaffter: There are other people who are in planning right now. It’s just going to be a matter of time before we have more brewers in town. There are so many times that I’ve wanted to go to John McDonald and say, “How did you make it through?” There’s a lot of tough times, and it’s a long haul. I definitely got into it for the love of beer. I’m not looking to take over the world. If it’s open past three years, I’m happy. Duff: At the end of the day, whether they’re a larger brewery or a smaller brewery, I guarantee you that everybody who is doing what they’re doing has a passion for it. We all love what we’re doing.

E-mail justin.kendall@pitch.com

fat c i t y

Hot Mess

By

A nge l A l u t z

Getting death-winged at Grinders

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he Death Wings arrived in a paper basket. They came with carrots and celery sticks and some blue-cheese dressing. And a full pitcher of ice water. “That’s for you,” the server said. “You’ll need it.” The chicken was shellacked with spices, speckled deep-red and brown: the colors of dirt and blood. Merely being in their presence made my nose burn and my eyes water. “That smells painful,” my boyfriend said. We had chosen a secluded corner in Grinders, so that I could be relatively unseen while undertaking this experiment in Scoville-unit fury. Our server, for one, didn’t want to watch. He lobbied hard against my order, basically restating the menu’s strongly worded warnings regarding the restaurant’s Near Death Sauce: “This sauce is so F-ing HOT!!! It will blow your mind and burn off a few taste buds.” I listened and then ordered anyway. “That’s not cool,” the server said. He wasn’t smiling even a little. “How about I bring you some Molten Wings?” “No,” I said, trying to sound self-assured. “I want the Death Wings.” He gave in, the way a bartender might pour a drink for someone who does not need another. Now he was standing by our table, trying not to grimace as I ripped off a chunk of meat with my teeth. My entire face immediately started burning. I wanted to wave my hands and run around the room hollering swear words. Instead, I sat and smiled. After years of practice, I was good at riding out the initial pain of a spicy dish. But was I a good enough actor? “Is this not affecting you?” the server asked. “Oh, it’s affecting me,” I said. A lava flow of snot was starting to drip from my nose. “It’ll be a few minutes before it really hits you,” he said. He was right. The Near Death Sauce delivers a slow burn that starts at the back of the throat and gradually encompasses the entire head. Imagine sitting in a steam room infused with horseradish or holding your face 2 inches above a pot of boiling water. I was able to finish one more of the wings before the heat became intolerable. The spices — cayenne pepper and habanero mash, among others — had overwhelmed all five of my senses with their 337,000 Scoville units of hurt. (That’s approximately 30 times spicier than a jalapeño pepper.) Tears ran freely down my cheeks. I was momentarily deaf. “It’s really not that bad,” I said, my hands trembling. “Am I shouting?” I shouldn’t have been surprised by the intensity of the wings. A friend once tried a bit

o f LDS! R BES T T h e TH WO BO

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Fire in a basket of the sauce — a fleck on the tip of a toothpick — and reported: “Things were not OK — at all.” In 2013, Near Death won top honors for hottest sauce and best ghost-pepper sauce at the Houston Hot Sauce Festival’s People’s Choice Awards, where it was judged against other feats of heat from around the world. And a quick Google search yields such phrases as “a destroyer of livers and bowels,” as well as videos of people wigging out after eating the stuff. It is basically a weaponized condiment. Under all that heat, though, a surprisingly good flavor emerged. The hell wizards at Grinders have managed to concoct a substance that destroys your taste buds but leaves you, against all logic and in defiance of all you know to be true, wanting more. That’s a singular culinary accomplishment. It also means that — once I could sort of feel my mouth again and once my body could regulate the temperature of my face — I was able to devour three more of the wings. (Pro tip: Saturate the wings in blue cheese.) “Why are you still eating those?” my boyfriend asked, peering at me over the small mountain of tissues I’d discarded beside my plate. My facial dripping had resumed. “It’s kind of refreshing,” I said, unable to feel my tongue. “Like a brisk jog.” I’d come through a plateau and found the runner’s high: I felt reinvigorated, sinuses and mind clear. I even ate a few of Grinders’ threefor-a-dollar tacos after finishing my fifth wing. My stomach was steel. Then, on the drive home, it all fell apart. I had put the Death Wings inside my body. Now the Death Wings wanted out — and it was going to happen on their schedule, not mine. That server was right. Definitely not cool.

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19

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

FEBRUARY:

26: The Late Night Callers, John Velghe & The Prodigal Sons, Katy Guillen & The Girls 27: Murali Coryell 27: Paul Cebar Tomorrow Sound 28: Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears

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For more info & tickets: knuckleheadshonkytonk.com 20

the pitch

music

The BeaT Man

KC producer Andrew Sinclair speaks

By

a different musical language.

N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

A

ndrew Sinclair is nervous. He isn’t used to being interviewed, he tells me. He taps his foot against the floor inside Westport’s Tea Drops and picks distractedly at the corner of the table. I tell Sinclair that he has no reason to be nervous, that this is just a conversation about his background and his music. He nods his head, but he looks far from relieved. He seems wired, as though one more roar from the barista’s blender would send him bolting for the door. e r Mo “I’m more nervous talking to just one person than I am getting up at ine in front of 400 people in Onl .com pitch a warehouse and playing music,” Sinclair says. “It’s not that I dislike people. It’s just that I’m most comfortable when I have an invisible wall between me and them.” As a DJ, Sinclair is often separated from a mass of sweaty concertgoers by a turntable. But Sinclair is most comfortable in the producer’s seat, behind a computer, surrounded by speakers. For those keyed in to Kansas City’s burgeoning electronic-dance-music scene, Sinclair’s name is not new. He has been with EDM label Think 2wice Records — headed up by local DJ veteran Brent Tactic and his brother, Ben Tactic — since 2011. “He’s one of the most talented guys I think I’ve ever been around,” Brent Tactic says of Sinclair, who approached him three years ago, shyly handing over a collection of demos. Tactic immediately scooped him up. “It was one of those things where I didn’t really expect much, and I listened to it three, maybe four times in a row. I was floored.” Sinclair has released two EPs with Think 2wice, and the more recent, last July’s Sadness, is a knockout. Tactic couldn’t agree more. “Honestly, him in a studio is scary,” Tactic says. “All of his suggestions are good. He’s an incredibly fast worker, and he’ll do a couple of things real quick. He’ll take something that sounds like a five [-star track] and in a couple seconds make it sound like a 10.” Sadness is a mix of three original Sinclair tracks and three remixes that runs just less than 35 minutes total. Sinclair works the deep, atmospheric beats and synths like a snake charmer — slithering around, oiling up all the moving parts for a stunning whole. He might be creating under the catchall umbrella of EDM, but what Sinclair does is far more sophisticated than basic house music. Talking to Sinclair about what he does is confounding. A simple question — How old

M us i c

f e b r ua ry 27- m a r c h 5 , 20 14

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Barrett emke

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

Andrew Sinclair is a synth mastermind. are you? — is answered with a soliloquy that encompasses everything from his first exposure to Daft Punk (as a kid, sneaking upstairs to watch Adult Swim) to his bouncing around from one Midwestern state to another with his parents. (“I’ve never seen an ocean, but I’ve seen all the Great Lakes.”) He always answers the question, and there is the added benefit of his immaculate attention to detail. Sinclair, 24, explains the splintering details of his subgenre — electronic garage music, maybe — in a spiraling monologue. “I try to take concepts and cram them down,” Sinclair says. “It’s like minimal art. If you really take techno or house as an art form, and are not just making it for the dance floor. You’re taking simple elements and trying to convey something that’s simple and clean. Like ‘Time Lapse’ [off Sadness] — that’s about driving and the experience you get, the rushes through the tunnels, the lights going by.” On the surface, what seems like an abstract song or idea is, at least for Sinclair, connected to a very real experience. Sinclair says when he first moved back to his native Kansas City, a little more than five years ago, he would drive around to release stress, to get lost and see if he could find his way back. For an artist whose music has no lyrics, Sinclair can be suspiciously poetic. He describes his song “Sadness” as a reflection on “the overall experience of falling apart with people” and “Orbital Frame” as “a driving, mechanical track with a little bit of heart to

it.” Nerves have made Sinclair a fast talker, and these notions tumble out of him at an alarming speed. More than once he mentions that he has an ADHD brain. “We’ll ask him about something he did to a track, and he goes into all these technical terms,” Tactic says of Sinclair. “His IQ has to be through the roof, and he’s finally getting a chance to be alive and, to use a cheesy phrase, spread his wings.” Sinclair explains parts of his background — a sheltered childhood of small Midwestern towns and home schooling — as an excuse for his own perceived awkwardness. Music is a way of organizing his thoughts and making sense of the world around him. “I had my issues of where I don’t fit in necessarily or I don’t communicate with people in normal ways or I’ve been afraid to communicate with people on some level,” Sinclair says. “The interesting thing about music or art in general or anything humans like to do — sex, love, music, art, drugs — they all require a degree of release or a degree of vulnerability. And for me, this [my music] is a way of expressing those things without words.” In August, Sinclair will complete a degree with the Institute of Audio Engineering Arts at BRC Audio Productions in Kansas City, Kansas. The language of his music is something that he’s still expanding. “I think we would have seen him blossom a lot sooner,” Tactic says. “He’s got a ways to go as far as harnessing all his talent, but when he hits a home run, it’s gonna be scary.”

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

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21

Music POOL TABLE • MEGATOUCH • 7 PINBALLS PINBALL TOURNAMENT • WEDNESDAYS TOUCHTUNES INTERNET JUKEBOX • DRINKING ON THE SMOKING PATIO • CRAFT BEERS • $2 PBR / HIGH LIFE

Xiu Keeper

Xiu Xiu frontman Jamie Stewart on moving to Los Angeles and making difficult music.

By

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22

the pitch

iu Xiu has made a 12-year career of menacing moods, centered on singer Jamie Stewart’s unflinching and unironic emotion. Think Trent Reznor with maybe eight more razor blades and a driving, warped aural force. In fact, the new Angel Guts: Red Classroom may be Xiu Xiu’s darkest record yet — and that’s saying something. But the avant-industrial band’s frontman isn’t as melancholy as the music suggests. Last fall, Xiu Xiu (pronounced “zhoo zhoo”) released Nina, an album of covers that’s essentially a love letter to the legendary Nina Simone. And he has a generous laugh, which The Pitch heard in a phone interview ahead of the band’s Sunday, March 2, RecordBar show. We called Stewart at his Los Angeles home. The Pitch: The new record is as dark as advertised, almost dystopian. Do you think most of that had to do with the move to Los Angeles? Stewart: Certainly the particular neighbor- Stewart: looking for his happy place. hood that I moved to had a lot to do with it. “The Silver Platter” was really difficult As well, really thinking hard about pending environmental apocalypse certainly had a lot to sing. “El Naco,” also, which was the last song that we recorded… . This will sound to do with it. And the state of my personal life totally absurd, but when I was done, I had to had a lot to do with it. There was a tremendous amount of anxiety in my life around the time leave the studio, and I found myself weeping uncontrollably between two parked cars. that it was being made. Not because I was so fraught by the song I can sense that. Are you still living in that itself, but I was just so worn-out. I think also neighborhood? relieved. I was worried about doing that one, I’m looking forward to not living here. I love Los Angeles, but this particular neighbor- being the last one on the record. This combination of being physically hood — I just need to make worn-out by it and relieved some money and then I can Xui Xui, — I had never experienced leave. It’s a really compliwith Farewell that before, just finishing a cated place. It’s the most Sunday, March 2, song and having my body densely populated part of at RecordBar basically collapse. Los Angeles, and the povA lot of the tracks seem to erty and the drug use in the be anchored in a really driving beat, but there surrounding blocks is really intense. And, unusually for Los Angeles, there are a lot of are other, more foreign sounds. Something on one song almost sounds like a distorted ambupeople all out on the street all the time. So that kind of difficulty and struggle misery is lance siren. Where do those sounds come from? I spent a lot more time getting sounds on more in your face than it is in other parts of the city. Oddly, it’s near a big park with a lake in this record than I had on any other record. it, which in some ways is incredibly beautiful, That’s my favorite part of music, just turning but it’s filled with people that are almost dead, knobs and trying to make something that I haven’t made before. walking around like zombies all the time. This and the Nina Simone record obviously To what extent are you trying to tell a story are very different. It’s interesting to have them with the way you sing, as well as the lyrics? I don’t know if I think about it that way. come out relatively close to each other. Yeah, the processes couldn’t have been I do … try to have the timbre of the vocals reflect the emotionality of the song. It’s like more different. [Laughs.] On the Nina record, choosing a particular synthesizer sound. One Ches Smith [Xui Xui’s drummer] did all of the arrangements, and we rehearsed the band sound will feel like something, and one type live and recorded everything live. I think we of vocal sound will feel like another thing. Is there a song that is particularly difficult finished it in one day. Really? One day? for you to sing?

f e b r ua ry 27- m a r c h 5 , 20 14

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[Laughs.] Good players. And then Angel Guts was done over two years, with a tremendous amount of tinkering, and probably half of the record was thrown away. Very, very fraught, very concentrated. The Nina record was a celebration and a record of appreciation for her. Angel Guts is quite the opposite of appreciation and celebration.

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J a z z B e at LaiLa BiaLi Trio, wiTh GrEG CarroLL, aT ThE BLuE room

Sting has described Laila Biali as “an exciting and unique talent,” and that’s good enough for us. This Canadian-born pianist and singer weaves pop and soul with her own sense of swing, delivering contemporary songs with a jazz touch. Biali covers music ranging from Frank Sinatra standards to Joni Mitchell and David Bowie but with her own arrangements, bringing a fresh voice that intrigues — you know the song, but not quite like this. She begins a U.S. tour Saturday night at the Blue Room. The trio — Biali on piano and vocals, Adam Thomas on bass and Fred Kennedy on drums — is joined by vibraphonist and American Jazz Museum CEO Greg Carroll. — Larry Kopitnik Laila Biali Trio with Greg Carroll, 8:30 p.m.–12:30 a.m. Saturday, March 1, at the Blue Room (1600 East 18th Street, 816-474-8463), $15 cover.

INTERNS WANTED P p

If you have an interest in marketing, advertising, design, event planning and/or media, we may have an opportunity that will fit your internship needs. To qualify you must currently be enrolled in college and able to receive college credit. You also must be able to handle multiple projects at once and have related computer knowledge.

COLD NIGHTS HOT COUNTRY WITH CODY CANADA AND THE DEPARTED

The Pitch is currently accepting applications for interns for the Spring & Summer semesters in the departments listed. Feel free to send us an email letting us know why you would like to intern with us.

SAMANTHA FISH AND TERRY QUIETT March 15, 2014

March 13, 2014

AN UNPREDICTABLE EVENING WITH TODD RUNDGREN

CRAIG MORGAN April 24, 2014

April 3, 2014

UPCOMING SHOWS: 3/7

Isaac James with Solus, Collapse and Blacklight Eternity

3/8

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3/14

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Marketing / Business 3/22

Bridges Burnt CD Release

jason.dockery@pitch.com

3/29

Killer Queen with Landslide and Saucy Jack

Sales / Business erin.carey@pitch.com

Graphic Design / Advertising christina.riddle@pitch.com

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Music

DAILY MENU

Music Forecast

By

n ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

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HAPPY HOUR

MONDAY-FRIDAY

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westportsaloon.com

Screenland at the Symphony: The Wizard of Oz

I first saw The Wizard of Oz when I was in middle school, on a boring afternoon spent at my grandmother’s house. She stocked only the classics on VHS, and watching some doe-eyed girl in pigtails sing about rainbows in blackand-white seemed like punishment. (Though it did look better than Citizen Kane.) By the end of the film, I was enchanted. I shoved the video in my backpack and wore it out on my VCR at home. Judy Garland has that effect on many Americans of a certain generation. On Thursday night, the Kansas City Symphony shows Garland’s landmark performance as Dorothy on the big screen, with a live orchestra accompanying the original Oz recordings. Experience the classic 1939 film like never before — or take someone who never has and introduce her to the magic. Thursday, February 27, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7222)

2 Chainz

2 Chainz, Pusha T

Despite a little kerfuffle with the law over drug possession in Oklahoma City last August, Tauheed Epps — better known as 2 Chainz — didn’t have a bad 2013. He scored three Grammy nominations for his debut record, Based on a T.R.U. Story, and his second studio album, released in September, B.O.A.T.S. II: Me Time, was met with critical acclaim. So far, reviews of 2 Chainz’s tour have marked it as entertaining and bawdy, so prepare for a wild night. (If you were in attendance at the November Sprint Center show with 2 Chainz and Tech N9ne, you don’t need to be told.) Pusha T and August Alsina open. Thursday, February 27, the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

Black Joe Lewis

If you prefer that your blues slowly soothe and sizzle, your guitar play gently and your singers possess a melodic voice, then Black Joe Lewis is not for you. But if you’re into feral guitar riffs, savage drumbeats, and bat-out-of-hell sing-

ing, then get to Knuckleheads Friday. Lewis and his band (formerly known as the Honeybears) are touring in support of their full-length Electric Slave, a monstrous record that swings into speakers like King Kong smashing into a building. Electric Slave’s tracks blend scuzzy garage rock with carnal guitar notes that recall Jack White. Lewis, with his ferocious yowling, practically chews your ear off. Friday, February 28, Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

Katy Guillen and the Girls, Maria the Mexican, the Philistines, Chris Meck & the Guilty Birds

The Midwest Music Foundation presents the final installment of its SXSW concert fundraisers on Saturday, fêting a handful of diverse and talented acts. Katy Guillen and the Girls is one of Kansas City’s hottest blues-rock acts, and we have a feeling that Guillen’s star is just beginning to rise. Sisters Maria and Tess Cuevas have been making music since they were children playing with their grandmother in the legendary Mexican folk band Mariachi Estrella. Now,

f o r e c a s t

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the pitch

the two perform as Maria the Mexican, with a folk-pop sound and songs in both English and Spanish. Psych-rockers the Philistines, and Chris Meck and the Guilty Birds round out the bill. Saturday, March 1, the Brick (1727 McGee, 816-421-1634)

Amos Lee

Two kinds of people like Amos Lee: Those who listened to popular music in the 1970s and those who wish they had been born sooner so that they had experienced music in the 1970s. Lee has built his career evoking that era’s trademarks with his folksy songwriting, lazySunday-morning singing and a touch of melodic funk. That’s what you hear on Lee’s latest, the predictably titled Mountains of Sorrow, Rivers of Song. It’s not a bad album. It’s enjoyable, relaxing, inoffensive — the kind of neutral CD you’d play on your car stereo while driving around with your least favorite relatives. Tuesday, March 4, the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

K e Y

Pick of the Week

 Grammy Contender

Something for Everyone

Bring the Kids

Blues Party

Sounds Like the ’70s

 We’re Off to See the Wizard

It’s Gonna Get Loud

 Singer-Songwriter

Hip-Hop

 Fundraising

 Locally Sourced

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S TA R T YO U R

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AgendA

continued from page 11

Thursday | 2.27 | Performing Arts

the Kansas City Ballet presents Dracula | 7:30 p.m., $29-$99, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcballet.org

Contemporary ameriCan indian art

art exhibits & events William S. Burroughs Creative Observer | Law-

“Fall,” from the Four Seasons Series, by Wendy Red Star

rence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Edgar Degas Pastels | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

screenland at the symphony: The Wizard of Oz | 7 p.m., $35-$75 (adults), $20-$45.(kids), Kauffman

Dressed Up | Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd., kemperart.org

Comedy

final friday Art Walk | Massachusetts between Seventh and 11th streets, downtown Lawrence

Laugh riot | 8-10 p.m. Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachu-

final friday Lawrence Art Party | 5:30-

Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway

setts, Lawrence

9:30 p.m. Lawrence Creates Makerspace, 512 E. Ninth St., Lawrence

mtV’s Girl Code All stars with Jessimae Peluso and Carly Aquilino | 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club

Gorgeous & Outrageous: The Art of Tony Naponic | Leedy-Voulkos Art Center, 2012

and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Baltimore, leedy-voulkos.com

felicity Ward | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867

Village West Pkwy., KCK

History & Hope: Celebrating the Civil Rights Movement | Nelson-Atkins Museum

of Art, 4525 Oak

sPorts & reC

Crown Center ice terrace | Noon-9 p.m., $6 ($3 skate

In the Looking Glass: Recent Daguerreotype Acquisitions | Nelson-Atkins Museum, 4525 Oak

rental), 2450 Grand

red dog’s dog days | 6 a.m. Allen Fieldhouse, 1651

Contemporary American Indian Art | Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, JCCC, 12345 College Blvd.,

Molly Kaderka: Sacred Spaces | 6 p.m. Friday,

UmKC vs. grand Canyon women’s basketball | 7 p.m. Swinney Recreation Center, UMKC, 5100

murali Coryell | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon,

2715 Rochester

Bram Wijnands duo | 6 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant,

931 Broadway

Kaws • Ups and Downs; Dylan Mortimer • Illuminate | Nerman Museum of Contemporary

grand marquis | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

Charles d. Williams | 5 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club,

Neeta Madahar: Falling | Kemper Museum

nightLife

oBJet ~ pop-up boutique and Tea Time zine showcase | Noon-5 p.m. Wednesday, Friday-

Naismith Dr., Lawrence

Rockhill Rd.

teChnoLogy

social media day-Kansas City | 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sheraton Crown Center, 2345 McGee

Overland Park

JL of Bhood, Joey Cool, mel Belu, Versitile, dutch newman, shag, ill nino | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

food & drinK

Loves it | The Brick, 1727 McGee

feel good with filibusta, Pleasure and sigrah | 9 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Reality and Fantasy: Land, Town and Sea

m-Bird songwriter’s showcase with megan Birdsall | 8-10:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611

rAW natural Born Artists | 8 p.m.-midnight, Valentine Room at the Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Stages of Conversion: Santero Shrines of Gene Emerson Friedman | Thornhill Art

Broadway

dine downtown — Winter restaurant Week | Power & Light District, 14th St. and Main

indoor farmers market | 4-6 p.m. Cottin’s Hardware

Store, 1832 Massachusetts, Lawrence mUsiC

Arara Azul | 8 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601 Broadway Aztlan | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St. Beau Bledsoe | Mestizo, 5270 W. 116th Pl., Leawood Paul Cebar tomorrow sound | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

26

the pitch

of Contemporary Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd.

Saturday, Paragraph Gallery, 23 E. 12th St.

Laura Lisbeth | 7-9 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway national theatre Live presents War Horse |

Art, JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

Brodioke | 9 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

fiLm

7 p.m. Cinemark Palace at the Plaza, 500 Nichols Rd., and at the Cinemark 20 in Merriam, fathomevents.com

3601 Broadway

Kiosk Gallery, 3951 Broadway

rapscallions | 10 p.m. Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

swillionaire’s Ball with Kutty slitz, info gates, Lou rip, dutch newman, Vertigone | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

2 Chainz, Pusha t, August Alsina | 7 p.m. The

Midland, 1228 Main

22 Kings, Jib Jab Jones & the indigo Circus, nick reiter | 8:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand twinsmith, the Caves | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946

Massachusetts, Lawrence

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Friday | 2.28 | Performing Arts

Cellist sunnat ibragimov, presented by Park University Center for International Music | 7:30 p.m., Graham Tyler Memorial Chapel, 8700 N.W. River Park Dr., Parkville

| Nelson-Atkins Museum, 4525 Oak

Gallery, Avila University, 11901 Wornall

thieves guild drink and draw | 7 p.m. Monday, Fatso’s Public House and Stage, 1016 Massachusetts, Lawrence

The Tyranny of Good Taste | La Esquina, 1000 W. 25th St., charlottestreet.org

the Kansas City Ballet presents Dracula |

We Are Not This Body — A Solo Exhibition by Scott Dickson | Saturday, PLUG Projects,

screenland at the symphony: The Wizard of Oz |

We Now Pronounce You: Redefining Marriage in the 21st Century | 5 p.m. Monday,

7:30 p.m., $29-$99, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcballet.org

7 p.m., $35-$75 (adults), $20-$45.(kids), Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway

1613 Genessee, plugprojects.com

UMKC Gallery of Art, 5015 Holmes, Room 203

TheaTer

Felicity Ward | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Black Joe Lewis & the Honeybears, with Pickwick | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Food & drink

me Like Bees, not a Planet, the electric Lungs | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Dates and times vary. All Sinatra | Quality Hill Playhouse, 303 W. 10th St., qualityhillplayhouse.com

Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson | Starting

Friday, the Barn Players, 6219 Martway, Mission, thebarnplayers.org

Drawn to Murder | KC Mystery Train, the Golden Ox, 1600 Genessee, kcmysterytrain.com Geek Mythology: I Was a Teenage Immortal | The Coterie, 2450 Grand, Crown Center, thecoterie.org

dine downtown — Winter restaurant Week | Power & Light District, 14th Street and Main, powerandlightdistrict.com

red daughters, Fake Fancy, Sam Cassidy | Jack-

Friday Farmers market at BadSeed | 4-9 p.m.,

run With it, Chasing Fire, Ghost Town Heart, midnite Alibi | 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

1909 McGee

HiSTory

Phantoms of kC — Streetcar | 5-8 p.m. The Rieger Hotel Grill & Exchange, 1924 Main

pot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

ryan Swartzlander, Akkilles, the Givens | Coda,

1744 Broadway

WIFI NOW AVAILABLE!

Twinsmith, Caves, Cahoots | 10 p.m. MiniBar,

Harriet Tubman in the Footprints of Freedom | Theater for Young America, H&R Block City Stage, 30 W. Pershing Rd., Union Station, tya.org

Jekyll & Hyde | She & Her Productions, at

Critical mass | 6:30 p.m. meet-up, Sun Fresh Market,

4001 Mill St., in the back lot off Pennsylvania, next to Westport Coffee House

Crown Center ice Terrace | Noon-11 p.m., $6 ($3

skate rental), 2450 Grand

Video ranger, Lazy, Human Traffic | 10 p.m. Replay

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Jason Vivone & the Billybats | 7 p.m. The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

The Weeks, the Problems, Atlas | 7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Just Off Broadway Theatre, 3051 Central, sheandherproductions.com

TFC 27: Titan Fighting Championships | Memorial

Journey’s End | KC Actors Theatre and UMKC Theatre, National World War I Museum, 100 W. 26th St., kcactors.org

muSiC

Jason Aldean | 7:30 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

The Night of the Iguana | Metropolitan

Jason Boland and the Stragglers | 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

dJ Sike | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Other Desert Cities | Starting Wednesday,

Book of Gaia | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Five Star Fridays with JT Quick | Hotel, 1300 Grand

The Vagina Monologues benefit perfor-

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Brazilian Carnaval with Arara Azul | 10 p.m.

Flirt Friday | 9 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

deadman Flats, Brody Buster Band, dusty Grove | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire,

1401 W. 13th St.

dolewite | 10 p.m. The Brooksider, 6330 Brookside Plz.

105.1 Jack Fm’s Back to the ’80s Party with the Zeros | 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Ensemble Theatre, 3614 Main, metkc.org

Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main, unicorntheatre.org

mance | 7 p.m. Tuesday, UMKC Student Union, 5100 Cherry, umkc.edu/womenc/vday2014

When I Come to Die | Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Copaken Stage, 13th St. and Walnut, kcrep.org Winter Shorts, with Tara Varney | 7 p.m.

Sunday, the Fishtank, 1715 Wyandotte

MUSeUM exhibiTS & evenTS Citizen Soldiers on the Prairie | Johnson

County Museum of History, 6305 Lackman Rd., Shawnee, jocomuseum.org

Convergence: Jazz, Film, Dance and the Visual Arts | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St., , americanjazzmuseum.org Comedy

Hall, 600 N. Seventh St., KCK

Lawrence

The doo dads | 6 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Wonderfuzz | Kelly’s Westport Inn, 500 Westport Rd. niGHTLiFe

dJ Wendi Cakes, eric Coomes | 9 p.m. Mosaic

Lounge, 1331 Walnut

OUT OF THE

PARTY

Saturday | 3.1

dan doran Band | 9 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601

PerForminG ArTS

evolution inc. | 8 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

Heritage Philharmonic Concert: Percussion Fiesta with marimba Sol de Chiapas | 7:30 p.m.

Broadway

Fox & the Bird, Sunflower Colonels | 6 p.m. Replay

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

molly Hammer & oJT | 9:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Blue Springs High School, 2000 N.W. Ashton Dr., Blue Springs, heritagephilharmonic.org

The kansas City Ballet presents Dracula | 7:30 p.m., $29-$99, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcballet.org

Junebug and the Porchlights | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawn-

Comedy

Leering Heathens, Simple Lines, Cowards | The

mTV’s Girl Code Jessimae Peluso and Carly Aquilino | 7 & 9:45 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Din-

Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Brick, 1727 McGee

ner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Top Shelf Comedy Tour with Bruce Bruce, Arnez J, Gary and dominique | 7 p.m. Municipal

Levee Town | 8 p.m. Trouser Mouse, 410 S. Hwy. 7,

Felicity Ward | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy

Auditorium/Music Hall, 301 W. 13th St.

DON’T BE LEFT

mardi Gras masquerade Party | 8 p.m. The Beast,

side BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

mTV’s Girl Code All Stars with Jessimae Peluso and Carly Aquilino | 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and

CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

3810 Broadway

SPorTS & reC

Godspell | Egads Theatre Co., at Off Center Theatre, 2450 Grand, Crown Center, egadstheatre.com

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417

Blue Springs

Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

continued on page 28

pitch.com

ST. PATRICK’S DAY

GUIDE MARCH 6 & 13 CALL US FOR MORE INFO

816.218.6759

f e b r ua ry 27- m a r c h 5 , 20 14

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27

MA XIMUM OVERDRIVE

continued from page 27 FOOD & DRINK

FOOD & DRINK

Backsliders Brunch with gospel music by T.J. Erhardt and A.J. Gaither | 1-4 p.m. Westport Saloon,

City Market | 6 a.m.-3 p.m., 20 E. Fifth St.

4112 Pennsylvania

Dine Downtown — Winter Restaurant Week |

DAY SATUR

Power & Light District, 14th Street and Main

3.1

Grand Court Farmers Market | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Grand Court Retirement Center, 501 W. 107th St.

keeps Alamo in’. ck u r on t

Lenexa Rotary Shrimpfest | 5:30 p.m. Lenexa Community Center, 13420 Oak, Lenexa

City Market | 8 a.m.-3 p.m., 20 E. Fifth St. Dine Downtown — Winter Restaurant Week | Power & Light District, 14th Street and Main,

powerandlightdistrict.com

Jazz brunch | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant,

931 Broadway

F E S T I VA L S MUSIC

Red Head Rally & Parade | 1:30 p.m. Celtic Ranch, 404 Main, Weston

Air Dubai, Itch, Matt Easton, the Phantastics | 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

SPORTS & REC

KC Dixieland Band | 2 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-11 p.m., $6 ($3 skate rental), 2450 Grand

Stan Kessler Quartet | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1809 Grand

KU vs. Iowa State women’s basketball | 7 p.m. Allen Fieldhouse, 1651 Naismith Dr., Lawrence

Mardi Gras 5k | 10 a.m. The Beast, 1401 W. 13th St.

The Late Show: Maximum Overdrive | 10:30 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, 1400 Main

Missouri Mavericks vs. Wichita Thunder |

7:05 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence

Kansas City Tip-Off Concert with Thompson Square | 6 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

PJ5k Run/Walk | 9 a.m. Colonial Presbyterian Church, 12501 W. 137th St., Overland Park, pj5k.org

Kansas Music Hall of Fame 2014 Induction Ceremony | 6 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts,

Lawrence

MUSIC

The Beerbellies | 7-9:30 p.m. Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Mas-

sachusetts, Lawrence

Mark Lowrey | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

Magic 107.3 Saturday Groove Party | 7 p.m.

VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Lee McBee and the Confessors | 6-9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Neck Deep | The Jackpot, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Monday | 3.3 LITERARY EVENTS

Mardi Gras Scavenger Crawl | 6:30 p.m. Kelly’s Westport Inn, 500 Westport Rd.

Sunday | 3.2 |

Author Jan-Philipp Sendker discusses his latest novel, A Well-Tempered Heart | 7 p.m., $15.95 plus tax, Unity Temple, 707 W. 47th St., rainydaybooks.com

Anna Lunoe, LC, Bill Pile, Ben Sigrah | 10 p.m.

PERFORMING ARTS

FILM

The Kansas City Ballet presents Dracula | 2 p.m., $29-$99, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcballet.org

Video Vortex: Death Spa | 7 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse,

New Orleans Tribute with Mike Smith and the Kings of Sax | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. Summer Osbourne and Jen Harris | 7 p.m. The

COMEDY

Massachusetts, Lawrence

Shades of Jade | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

MTV’s Girl Code All Stars with Jessimae Peluso and Carly Aquilino | 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and

Cowboy Indian Bear | 10 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737

Stevie Stone, Smart Money Rio, Skitzo and Yung Rich, Shag and Yung T-Will, E Mase and more | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Laila Biali Trio with Greg Carroll | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Sherry Brummett and Mike Ning | 5:30-8:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Burial Teens, All Blood | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946

New Hampshire, Lawrence

Danny Cox | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Eboni Fondren Quartet | 5:30 p.m. Green Lady

Lounge, 1809 Grand

Czar, 1531 Grand

85th St.

MUSIC

Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Sundiver, In Aeona, A Light Within | 7 p.m. Czar,

1531 Grand

Tim Whitmer & KC Express | 4:30 p.m. The Phoenix,

Katy Guillen, Maria the Mexican, the Philistines, Chris Meck & the Guilty Birds | The Brick,

302 W. Eighth St.

1727 McGee

Bob Bowman & Roger Wilder | 10 p.m. Green Lady

Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $6 ($3

skate rental), 2450 Grand

Missouri Mavericks vs. St. Charles Chill |

4:05 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence FILM

Hearts of Darkness | 9p.m.Davey’sUptown,3402Main

DJ Thundercutz | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Jared & the Mill with Sara Morgan | 8:30 p.m.

Kansas City Mardi Gras Festival | 8-11 p.m. Power

Oscar Roast with Cheap Shots, Movie Interruption and Dannyboi | 5:30-8:30 p.m.

& Light District, 14th Street and Main

Screenland Armour Theater, 408 Armour Rd., North Kansas City

Joey Cool, $taxx, Farout, Marty Notes | 10 p.m.

KC Cabaret variety show | 9:30 p.m. The Uptown

Oscar watch party | 7 p.m. Missie B’s, 805 W. 39th St.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

28

the pitch

Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

f e b r ua ry 27- m a r c h 5 , 20 14

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Lounge, 1809 Grand

Brother John’s Motivational R&B/Soul Showcase | 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

SPORTS & REC

NIGHTLIFE

Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

1400 Main

Marshall Crenshaw & Bottle Rockets | 8 p.m.

Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Dead Meadow, Various Blonde, Merlin | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Jazz Disciples with Karita Carter | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Kodaline, LP | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Lord of the Lost, Fashion Bomb, Murder FM | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Mark Lowrey Trio | 6 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant, 931 Broadway

ROBERT EARL KEEN

Wednesday | 3.5 | LITERARY EVENTS

S WEDNE

DAY

Author Maija Rhee Devine, part of the Ethnic Voices Poetry Series | 6:30 p.m. Kansas City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St., kclibrary.org

3.5

your Ready i. confett

COMEDY

Jay Leno, at the Greater Kansas

MORE

EVENTS

ONL

INE

AT

M PITCH.CO

City International Auto Show, benefiting Children’s Mercy Hospital | $75, Bartle Hall, 301 W. 13th, kcautoshow.com

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

Sandman the Hypnotist |

7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St. EXPOS

Robert Earl Keen | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Waldo Jazz Collective | 7-10 p.m. The Piano Room, 8410 Wornall

NIGHTLIFE

Dropout Boogie | Westport Flea Market, 817 West-

port Rd.

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | 8 p.m. Green Room

Burgers & Beer, 4010 Pennsylvania

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | 7:30 p.m. Rhythm and Booze, 423 Southwest Blvd. Karaoke | 10:30 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee

Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Trivia with Matt Larson | 8 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Tuesday | 3.4 | MUSIC

Naughty Pines Happy Hour Band | 6-9 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway

946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Trampled Under Foot | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

2715 Rochester

Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Bram Wijnands | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

KU vs. Texas Tech men’s basketball | 7 p.m. Allen Fieldhouse, 1651 Naismith Dr., Lawrence

Animal Eyes, Stone Cowboys | 10 p.m. Replay

The Pitch’s Sugar Ru sh @ Promise Event Spac e

Reina Del Cid & the Cidizens, Old Sound (trio), Kasey Rausch and Friends | 8:30 p.m. Czar, 1531

Grand

Electric Six, Yip Deceiver, Antennas Up | 8 p.m.

The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

The Yawpers, the Blind Pets, Bearing Torches, Bad Wheels | 8 p.m. The Riot Room,

4048 Broadway

Kings of Leon | 7:30 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

Folk Alliance nference International Co

Monokino, Monta At Odds | 10 p.m. RecordBar, NIGHTLIFE

1020 Westport Rd.

DJ Rico & the Boss Hooligan Soundsystem |

Brian Ruskin Quartet | 7 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W.

Drinking with the Dames | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown,

NIGHTLIFE

10 p.m. Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway

Amos Lee, Chris Kasper | 7 p.m. Uptown Theater,

3402 Main

Fat Tuesday Bash | 9 p.m. McFadden’s Sports Saloon,

Louis Logic, Ecid, Second Hand King, Ir Neko | 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

1330 Grand

Mardi Gras Party with Arny Young’s Necessity Brass Band | 8 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Moonface | 9:30 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

skate rental), 2450 Grand

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

We Are the In Crowd, William Beckett, Set It Off, State Champs, Candy Hearts | 6 p.m. The

Fat Tuesday with the MGDs, Royalphonic, DJ Elgin Smith | The Brick, 1727 McGee

Hermon Mehari Trio | 6 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant,

Crown Center Ice Terrace | Noon-9 p.m., $6 ($3

MUSIC

Joe Louis Walker | 7:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon,

18th St.

931 Broadway

r Rush The Pitch’s Suga ace Sp t en Ev e @ Promis

SPORTS & REC

Archie Powell & the Exports, Something & the Whatevers, the Damn Choir | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge,

El Barrio Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy, 1601 E.

3700 Broadway

2014 Greater Kansas City International Auto Show | 5 p.m. Bartle Hall, 301 W. 13th St.

Rex Hobart’s Honky Tonk Supper Club | 7 p.m.

Jazz for Justice Mardi Gras Party benefiting the Justice Project | 6 p.m., EventPort, 208 W. 19th St., thejusticeprojectkc.org

Eighth St.

B.A.R.T Wednesdays with DJ G Train | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Girlz of Westport | 8 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania

Turntable Matinee with the Cowtown Playboys | 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

pitch.com

Excision Tour @ In

die

Upcoming Events 2.27 - 2 Chains @ Indie 2.28 - 80s Dance Party with The Zeros @ Uptown Theater 3.1 - AIDS Walk Open 3.1 - American Heart Association Pulse Party @ KC Convention Center 3.4 - Amos Lee @ Uptown Theater See more on the “promotions” link at p

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KC’S # 1 DATELINE

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Hopeless Over Painful Experience Dear HOPE: Women typically expect the guy

30 minute FREE TRIAL

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Dear Dan: I’m 21 and still a virgin. I also have depression. I don’t understand why I haven’t had a girlfriend since I was 10. I feel myself becoming increasingly violent. I’ve tried to provoke a fight that wasn’t necessary, and I try to intimidate other guys when I’m out. I’ve been unemployed for three years, since dropping out of college, and I haven’t met a girl I was interested in. I’ve never made the first move. I never feel compelled to, regardless of how attractive I find them. I do get a lot of eye contact from girls, and I’ve been approached by girls, but we barely get past exchanging names before they wander off or their friends pull them away.

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By

D a n S ava ge

end our relationship, but I’m moving out when our lease is up.” If your boyfriend breaks up with you, it’s probably for the best — and it may not be forever. If he dumps you for defensive reasons, then he didn’t really want to dump you, right? Once the shock wears off and his anger subsides, he may decide that having you in his life is more important than having you all to himself.

Dear Dan: I’m a heterosexual male. I was dat-

ing this girl for six months. We weren’t living together, but there were two toothbrushes at my place, tampons and birth control pills in my medicine cabinet, and yogurt in my fridge. Things were going well until she told me about a friend-of-a-friend building a website for a local “swingers club.” I didn’t get outraged, and this outraged her. After a four-hour discussion, during which I held my “good for them” ground, I no longer had yogurt, tampons and birth control pills at my place — or a girlfriend. Does this seem a little extreme?

to do the approaching/asking out/hitting on. And if a woman is making eye contact with you in a space where it’s generally understood that people are open to meeting new people, flirting with them and potentially fucking them, it’s an invitation to introduce yourself. But if women are approaching you and then “wandering off” or being rescued by their friends, then you’re doing something wrong. I’m guessing you came across as angry and potentially violent, and you’ve made a selfdefeating decision to cultivate an intimidating vibe. You’re never going to get anywhere with women — or employers — if you give yourself over to anger, violence and menace. Fully 15 percent of 21-year-old men are virgins, while only 5 percent of 25-year-old men are virgins. You have a better chance of losing your virginity if you can stop wallowing in self-pity and giving yourself over to anger. Get your ass to a doctor and a therapist. Getting help is the best way to increase your odds of getting laid and/or getting a girlfriend.

Dear Dan: During my last relationship, I got to explore the kinkier side of my libido. One year and some heartache later, I’m ready to date, but I don’t want a vanilla sexual relationship again. People ask to set me up, and I keep turning them down. I don’t want to get involved with someone unless I know that we’re sexually compatible. Yet I feel some angst about using Fetlife or similar sites, as if I’m making sex paramount.

Dear Dan: I’m a 25-year-old bi girl, and I’ve

Nervously Avoiding Intriguing Vanilla Entanglements

been with the same hetero guy for almost three years. We made an attempt at being monogamish, but feelings were hurt and we went back to monogamy. He still parties like he’s in college and is dependent on me socially, whereas I crave independence and, quite frankly, pussy. I want to move out when our lease ends. I’m willing to work on our issues, but I fear that when I have this conversation, it will break his heart and he will break up with me as a defensive approach. How can I express my need for other sexual partners and more space without sounding like I’m calling off the relationship? Is it even worth it?

Insert Quirky Acronym Here Dear IQAH: Here’s what you should say: “You’ve got some growing up to do, and I’ve got some eating pussy to do. I don’t want to

Her Ex Looks Perplexed Dear HELP: Thank that friend-of-a-friend. If

he weren’t building a website for a swingers club, you might still have tampons, yogurt and scented soaps in your apartment — along with the crazy, controlling, insecure nut job.

Dear NAIVE: Sexual compatibility is hugely important, but dating only kinksters on Fetlife or just nice girls you’re set up with is a false choice. Date both. You have to establish emotional compatibility with a woman you meet via Fetlife or sexual compatibility with a woman you meet via real life. And don’t assume that a woman you meet through friends is vanilla. It’s a bad idea to give someone a laundry list of your kinks on the first date. No one finds that kind of emotional cluelessness attractive. When the conversation turns to sex, just say: “I’m pretty sexually adventurous.” There’s a good chance you’ll get a “me, too.” Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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The Pitch: February 27, 2014