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February 6–12, 2014 | Free | Vol. 33 No. 32 | pitch.com

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valentine’s guide cont’d february 13

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F e bru a ry 6 -12 , 2 014 | v ol . 3 3 no. 3 2 E d i t o r i a l

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Liz Cook, April Fleming, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage, Nick Spacek

a r t

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever

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Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

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n a t i o n a l

There’s no slowing Sean Kelley’s relentless art-world charm offensive. b y dav i d h u d n a l l

6

cu ltu r e clu b At least one restaurant chameleon helps Carma’s karma. by charles ferruzz a

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clos er l i sten The Phantastics’ debut takes everybody on a funky ride. b y n ata l i e g a l l ag h e r

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The Kansas City Symphony records Beethoven’s Fifth with GOOGLE GLASS, makes history. HIGH-FIVES might soon be Missouri’s official state greeting. FREE STATE BREWING releases a beer in honor of William S. Burroughs’ 100th birthday.

Questionnaire president of the board

S a b r i n a S Ta i r e S

Joshua Minnis

Millennial League

Hometown: I spent my formative years in the

suburbs.  

Current neighborhood: Midtown  

What I do (in 140 characters): I work with

a group of young people to raise HIV/AIDS awareness in our community and funds for local AIDS service organizations.   What’s your addiction? Nintendo   What’s your game? Take your pick of the Legend of Zelda franchise.   What’s your drink? Vodka. It’s so versatile.   Where’s dinner? Chaz on the Plaza has the best beef More tenderloin fillet in town.  

Q&As

Onl

ine

at

m pitch.co

 

What’s on your KC postcard? I’ve heard of those.

They’re like mail texts?

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” We elected Sly.  

“Kansas City screwed up when …” We let El Rancho in Westport go out of business.   “Kansas City needs …” El Rancho back.   “In five years, I’ll be …” 32. Anything else is up in the air.   “I always laugh at …” Plaza joggers. Is there really nowhere else for you to go sweat?   “I’ve been known to binge-watch …” Disney animated classics.

  “I can’t stop listening to …” Let it go, let it gooooo! Oh, Frozen, you melt my heart.   “I just read …” Mary Poppins.   The best advice I ever got: Always let your conscience be your guide.   Worst advice: Pray.   My sidekick: The Condom Crusader!   My dating triumph/tragedy: My favorite date buddy is a heterosexual, engaged man. How’s that for tragic?

My brush with fame: My Disneyland autograph book is pretty impressive.   My 140-character soapbox: Respect yourself, your lover and your community enough to know your HIV status. We have to take care of each other. Use a condom, always.   What was the last thing you had to apologize for? I cursed at the Time Warner man today.  

Who’s sorry now? Time Warner. Welcome to KC, Google Fiber!  

My recent triumph: Some girl tapped me on the back at a bar last weekend and asked if I had any condoms. “Aren’t you one of those condom kids?” Yes, yes, I am.   The Millennial League’s Carni-Val-O-Ween party begins at 8 p.m. Friday, February 7, at the Madrid Theatre (3810 Main). Proceeds benefit the AIDS Service Foundation of Greater Kansas City. pitch.com

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news

Zone Defense

What happens when art replaces blight, then gets ripped off ? A fine mess.

D

eep inside the belly of Kansas City, Missouri’s beastly bureaucracy lies something called the Board of Zoning Adjustment. Twice a month, the BZA holds public hearings on City Hall’s 26th floor to “consider appeals from any order, decision or determination of the Codes Administrator, applications for special exceptions and conditional uses, and actions authorized by the City Council,” according to the city’s website. Fuse the thrill of watching a council meeting on TV with waiting in line at the DMV, and you have a basic idea of what it’s like to attend a BZA meeting. Last Tuesday, the board fought off yawns while listening to an appeal from a Northland homeowner seeking to extend the height of his detached garage. Statutes were reviewed. Several moons passed. A ruling was reached. Eventually it was time for Israel Alejandro Garcia Garcia to argue his appeal. Garcia is a local artist. He also runs a Crossroads galler y, Garcia Squared Contemporary, in the Bauer building. In 2006, he bought a parcel of land, roughly 25 feet by 95 feet, near the intersection of 17th Street and Beardsley Road, in the Westside neighborhood. On the lot at the time of his purchase was a structure that functioned as a commercial billboard, which Garcia has since stripped of advertisements, coated in white industrial paint, and repurposed as a canvas for his art. He says he spent about $1,500 to hang a print version of his sculpture “Salvation Tortilla” — which was exhibited at the Mattie Rhodes Art Gallery and the Kansas City Public Library — on the property back in 2008. In other words, Garcia is engaging in, at his own expense, precisely the kind of artistic neighborhood beautification that Kansas City’s civic leaders vocally encourage. See, for example, the recent recommendations of the Mayor’s Task Force for the Arts: “Artists can often activate and enliven spaces in the urban landscape that would otherwise be vacant or un-designed. These untended spaces, public and private, are both a missed opportunity and can contribute to blight. The City can facilitate artists’ temporary and opportunistic use of such spaces and venues as vacant walls, storefronts, empty buildings, open spaces and unused billboards.” Last June, Garcia’s print was stolen from his property. To leave outdoor advertising structures blank and untended is illegal in Kansas City. That’s a reasonable ordinance; tattered old billboards featuring law-firm hotlines and bygone summer blockbusters are an eyesore. But Garcia’s billboard is no longer commercial — it’s now a privately owned art

Don’t steal this sign. space. Nevertheless, he soon received a letter from the city informing him that he had 90 days to put something else on the billboard. “I called City Hall and tried to explain that it wasn’t a commercial billboard, that the property hadn’t been abandoned, that the artwork had been stolen, and that I was working to create something to take its place,” Garcia tells The Pitch. “And I asked for an extension on the 90 days, because the artistic process for that canvas is very involved. It takes me a long time to pay for a piece, to complete it, to put it up. And I hadn’t considered the possibility that the art would be stolen, so I didn’t have anything ready to replace it. So I would call every couple of weeks and update them and ask for an extension, and all I’d hear back is these cold, standoffish answers: ‘Just take care of it.’ I was never told I could file an appeal until it was too late.” When 90 days had passed without Garcia replacing the billboard’s art, the city sent him a letter fining him and ordering him to tear down the billboard. Thus he found himself sitting before the BZA last Tuesday. In his appeal, Garcia emphasized what he said was the indifference of the city employee to whom he had taken his concerns when notice of the fine arrived. “I made myself continually available to the city,” he said. “Nobody ever transferred me to the correct desk where I could fix the problem.” He said he had bolted some art onto the billboard days after receiving the final notice, and that he now had three pieces of art in storage in case of future thefts. He also presented the board with letters of support

By

D av iD HuDn a l l

from members of the Westside community, including John Fierro (CEO and president of the Mattie Rhodes Center), Melody Stutzman (principal of Altavista Middle School) and Carlos Gomez (CEO and president of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce). A number of people also showed up to speak on Garcia’s behalf. A few noted the irony of a board that ostensibly exists to eliminate blight cracking down on a citizen for his private effort to eliminate blight. Theresa Otto, BZA chairwoman, said she appreciated Garcia’s position but noted that the board had limitations. For one thing, there is no separate ordinance for a billboard that exists as an art structure. “By your own testimony you’ve said you received the initial letter and that you left the sign blank for 90 days,” Otto said. “I’m hearing a lot of good comments from the crowd, but this board doesn’t have the latitude within the ordinances to treat this sign different from any other sign.” Then something unexpected happened. One of the board members, Mark Ebbitts, pointed at one of the screens projecting a photograph of Garcia’s billboard and asked, “Mr. Garcia, you see in the center panel of the billboard, that little object at the bottom?” He smirked a little and gestured at a pentagonshaped image. “Could that classify as art?” Garcia caught Ebbitts’ drift. If the scrapings could be called art, then the original violation might be tossed out. “I think so,” he said. “It was an attempt to do some imagery by scrapings, but I stopped.” For a moment, the perfect loophole seemed within reach. The members of the BZA would not have to play the role of heartless bureaucrats, and the artist could keep his canvas. Otto instructed someone from the city to consult the law. “Looks like a crown to me,” she joked of the scrapings. “Maybe a teapot? It’s in the eye of the beholder. Any artist will tell you that.” The answer came back: The board did not have the power to reverse the original violation. An unsatisfying compromise was reached. The BZA would give Garcia another six months to present a case that would allow him to keep the billboard and avoid the fine. “I’m an art lover, but we have to uphold city statutes here,” Ebbitts said. “You got the letter in time and you failed to resolve the situation.” Maybe the whole mess could have been avoided if Garcia had just slapped something else onto the billboard in time. Something as simple as, say, a piece of red tape.

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5

Art VAmpire There is no slowing Sean Kelley’s relentless art-world charm offensive. By DAViD H u Dn A l l • pH otog r A pH y By CH ris m u l lins

6

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P

at McCormick and Barry Eisenhart’s Gatsby-like house towers over Interstate 35 near downtown. It’s the crown jewel of the modern homes dotting the West Side, an ideal location for a ritzy afterparty on the opening night of the Lyric Opera’s production of The Magic Flute. Sean Kelley, standing outside the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts with his boyfriend, Jim Hubbell, had been invited. “It’s just a few blocks,” he said. “Let’s walk and talk.” Kelley, always animated when discussing the arts, was especially buoyant on this November evening. The Lyric’s presentation of Mozart’s work featured set design by Jun Kaneko, an Omaha ceramic artist whom Kelley had known for decades. And the Lyric’s new general director, Deborah Sandler, had met with Kelley ahead of the show, seeking his guidance on how to spread awareness in the local arts community about this and other Lyric productions. It amounted to a peripheral connection — good for free seats to the opera. “Jun Kaneko is the real fucking deal,” Kelley said on the walk to the West Side. “Not a lot of artists could have handled that. The way he was able to translate his pattering and use of color, the way he used the stage as a form for his sensibilities …” He went on for another few minutes, peppering his critique with buzzy words: matrix, linear, geometric, angular, minimal, metamorphosis. “It made me think of Jun’s work in a new way,” he finally said. Kelley is not an artist, not technically. He’s an art appreciator, an art critic, an art dealer, an art facilitator. Most recently, he has become a civic arts booster, having served as co-chairman for the Mayor’s Task Force for the Arts, which last year discussed ways to develop and market the city’s arts footprint. (The city’s 2014-15 budget proposal includes an extra $325,000 for arts programs as a result of the task force’s recommendations.) But if we are all artists in our own ways, as Kelley believes, then Kelley’s true canvas might simply be the discussion of art: its potential, its meaning, its practitioners, its role in the culture. And he’s a virtuoso conversationalist, a jazzman of talk. Critical monologues often pour out of him in fully formed paragraphs, one word flowing musically into the next. At other moments, he takes a different kind of solo, falling silent midway through a soliloquy and aiming his blue eyes into some middle distance. Whether he’s pausing in deep contemplation or merely doing some mental scurrying to avoid a dead-end thought, though, he seems always to catch the beat when it comes back around. The afterparty’s guests were an olderskewing mix of Lyric friends, society types and art-world denizens done up in semiformal attire and occasionally eccentric eyewear. Kelley, who is 55, was in his element. On the rooftop terrace, he chatted with Sherry Leedy, a prominent gallerist. In the kitchen, he patted Kaneko on the back and

called him the “man of the hour.” He walked through the house and gave its art collection — Kelley had advised McCormick and Eisenhart on some pieces — a verbal browsing. In front of a long, horizontal landscape painting by Keith Jacobshagen, Kelley said, “Pat had that one commissioned. Don’t you just love the division between sky and land? It’s this brilliant fusion of real and abstract.” He descended the stairs to the ground floor, where Eisenhart, an aspiring sculptor, keeps a small studio. Kelley has been mentoring Eisenhart for the past two years. “If somebody comes to me and says, ‘I’m an artist and I want to learn,’ I’ll do anything for them,” Kelley said. “I don’t judge. I love seeing what a person is doing and talking to them about my perspective and what I see and understand about their work. “A lot of what I do now is mentorship,” he continued. “I’m the vampire who, all you have to do is invite me in. You’ll get a conversation that is mature, precise, respectful and clear about what I see and who you are. I know how to get to that point. It’s painless, it’s fun, it’s honest, it’s sincere. “Because what’s art?” he said. “It’s a conversation.”

K

elley has an origin story he likes to tell that involves being in second grade and catching his mother kissing a nun in a church basement. “I knew I was gay from an early age, and I just remember thinking it was so cool when I saw that,” Kelley says. “My father was a drunk, a madman. By fourth grade, I was taking love notes every day to and from school between my mom and this nun. And today she’s still my mom’s partner. I tell people that Jesus is my stepfather.” Kelley came to Kansas City from St. Louis in the late 1970s to play soccer at Rockhurst University and was quickly pulled in by the charms and, to him, mysteries of what he calls the “cultural corridor” of Kansas City: Rockhurst, the then–Missouri Repertory Theatre, the UMKC Conservatory, the Linda Hall Library, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Kansas City Art Institute. Soon he was working at an art-house theater at 47th Street and Troost, and at an adjacent punk club called the Downliner. “William Burroughs would come read at punk and new-wave shows I helped produce at an old VFW hall at 31st and Main,” he says. “I remember meeting Taylor Mead, of Warhol’s Factory. I was around a lot of volatile cultural action. It was very exciting.” Kelley found that visual art interested him most. He started spending a lot of time at the Nelson and befriending artists at KCAI. “I had no art education whatsoever, and I was perplexed by why certain objects had value and certain ones didn’t,” he says. “It was like learning a new language. But I put myself in positions where I went to a lot of lectures and picked it up.”

“I met Sean when I was an undergraduate at the Art Institute,” says Nick Cave, a KCAI alumnus who now works in Chicago. “He was always up to something, always out there doing things, using the city as a creative palette — kind of a hustler type of guy. He lives and breathes the cultural climate, and he was someone I found it very easy to come together with and brainstorm ideas on a project. And we continue to have that relationship today.” Kelley spent time with such artists as Ken Ferguson and Victor Babu, who were in the process of turning KCAI’s ceramics program into one of the country’s most respected. He worked at Morgan Gallery under Myra Morgan — “a venerable diva gallerist at the time,” Kelley says, who “did a lot of pop artists.” At Morgan, he adds, “I met a lot of artists who were just starting their careers. I was able to watch the professional navigation and negotiation of the art world that was going on through them.” He curated the walls at a Plaza-area restaurant called Venue and, in 1989, opened his own gallery in the Uptown Theater building, which had fallen into disrepair. Kelley stayed there until 1995 and made regular pilgrimages to New York, where he fell in with a coterie of artists that included Alice Aycock, Vito Acconci and Dennis Oppenheim. “Being in New York, I was meeting so many great artists and thinkers. Those neighborhoods are so dense and full of them,” Kelley says. “Chuck Close, Roberta Smith — the meanbitch art critic for The New York Times, who grew up in Lawrence, Kansas. I’d go to Dean & DeLuca, one of whose founders came from Kansas City. A very ‘tight world’ type of thing.” The riff goes on: “And it was all about selfidentity, and I just loved that. Nothing else in life but art allows that it’s-all-about-me mentality — the idea that this object, this work, is about me but it’s meant for you. It’s like, ‘I’m trying to get you to understand how fucked up my life is, how beautiful my life is — the successes, the failures, the loves, everything.’ And that’s what I learned in New York. That, and it exposed me to a really dark subterranean subculture for the first time — clubs like the Anvil and the Mine Shaft. You go in, and it’s a legitimately scary abandoned warehouse, and there’s people fucking right out in the open, people pulling chains out of each other’s asses. I’m this Catholic boy from the Midwest standing there staring like, ‘What the fuck is going on in here?’ ”

He pulled his Jetta into the driveway of a large stone house. “This was my first apartment in Kansas City,” he said. “I lived on the third floor.” He put the car in park. “What the hell,” he said. “Nobody’s living here right now anyway.” He crossed 45th Street and looked back for a wider view of his old place. “That one right there,” Kelley said, pointing at the house next door, “that’s where Margaret Silva used to live. That’s how I met Margaret.” In 1993, Kelley’s boyfriend at the time, Greg Cabrera, died of AIDS. Kelley had grown less enamored of the gallery business — “You’re often in the awkward position of whoring out artists you love to these johns who don’t care about the work and are just trying to get the best deal they can squeeze out of you” — and decided it was the right time for a big change: a move to New York. “At the time, Alice and Vito and Dennis and I would have conversations, and they’d ask me what I wanted to do,” Kelley said. “And I would tell them about how I would drive around Kansas City and have daydreams about being in a position where I could do what I really loved, which was to support artists and help them show their work and give them curatorial and financial support and be a part of their evolutionary process and allow them to mature as artists.” He went on: “I specifically remember saying that I wished I could find a person, a woman who didn’t want to have sex with me, that had more money than she knew what to do with, that would let me financially divert her money toward supporting artists through helping them with new bodies of work or one seminal work. And then, not long before I was set to move — I’d already sublet an apartment and everything — Margaret stopped by one day and said, ‘I don’t want you to go to New York.’ And she handed over an envelope with a $50,000 check in it. Then she put $1.5 million into a gallery space downtown and said, basically, ‘Do whatever you want.’ I just couldn’t believe it. My wish had come true! And that’s what became Grand Arts.” Silva, who did not respond to requests to comment for this article, is an heiress to the Hallmark fortune, the granddaughter of Hallmark founder Joyce C. Hall. Starting in 1995, she and Kelley, as co-directors, began shaping Grand Arts into what became a nationally recognized gallery and studio space. It imported major artists to Kansas City and provided them with the freedom and money to produce original works. It gave Cave, Aycock, Isaac Julien, Tim Rollins and K.O.S., Roxy Paine and others exposure to Kansas City and, in turn, gave the local art community access to big-name artists. continued on page 9

“I’m the vampire who, all you

have to do is

invite me in.”

I

n mid-January, Kelley was circling a parking lot north of the Nelson. It was an unseasonably warm Saturday afternoon — weather that meant a crowd. There was nowhere to park.

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Art Vampire continued from page 7 “It was a way to bring the art world to Kansas City,” Kelley said. “When artists came here to live and work and play and build with Grand Arts, I would take them on studio visits, I would arrange lectures. It was a great opportunity to meet these people as they were evolving as artists. And if you’re an aspiring artist in Kansas City, and you meet somebody in town for Grand Arts, all of a sudden you’re connected to them somehow. That’s how you get better as an artist, by seeing other great artists and then going back to the studio and pushing yourself to be better.” Sherry Leedy agrees. “Grand Arts was a tremendous contribution to both the community here and the artists they worked with,” she says. “It was a totally unique and special enterprise.” “It was an unusually generous amount of money that allowed me to freely experiment and create work in a really beautiful environment,” Aycock says. Kelley’s tenure at Grand Arts lasted eight years. Ask art folks in town to talk on the record about what led to his departure, and most react as though you’ve suggested they cannonball into an empty swimming pool. Neither Silva nor Stacy Switzer (who replaced Kelley as artistic director) would comment, but the picture that emerges from other sources is not one of a graceful exit. Silva and Kelley’s working relationship became complicated by their close personal relationship. Kelley said he turned to a variety of substances to cope with the stress of that relationship. “One day she would come into Grand Arts and blame me for everything wrong in her life, and the next day she’d be happy and excited about what we were doing,” Kelley said. “Grand Arts was just a job for her, a way for her to feel good about herself. She didn’t know the artists. She didn’t care about the artists. I was working 24/7 with the artists. And don’t get me wrong — I was loving it. I was as happy as I’ve ever been. But eventually, I couldn’t take her cruelty anymore. Then she told everybody in town that I was addicted to coke or addicted to meth, which I wasn’t. But I was self-medicating because there was this mean woman in my life who suddenly got bored of me and turned on me.” Kelley left Grand Arts, which is closing this year, in 2003. He doesn’t think much of the way the organization has been run since then. “A lot of inaccessible, esoteric nonsense,” he said. He resurfaced in 2010 to help David and Ron Dumay convert the old City Ice Building, at 21st Street and Campbell, into an arts hub: a gallery with retail space and studios. The Dumays bankrolled renovations, and Kelley and sculptor-designer Dale Frommelt designed the gallery. But that, too, ended in acrimony. Kelley blames a leaky roof for his ultimate fallingout with the Dumays and City Ice Arts (which is still in operation, with a gallery, studios,

DON’T BE LEFT OUT OF THE

PARTY

Howard’s Organic Fare and Vegetable Patch, and La Cucaracha Press). “Water was leaking into the gallery during a Garry Noland show,” Kelley said. “Then I let Art Institute seniors show their work there, and there was more leaking and damage to the objects. And it wasn’t just a trickle. I told Dave [Dumay], ‘I can’t program here unless I feel comfortable that I can protect the artists.’ And he said he’d already done all he could. So I left. Basically, I didn’t feel they were respecting the artists there. It was an incredibly disappointing experience.” David Dumay recalls the City Ice collaboration differently. “Look, Sean is a funny guy, very likable. He understands art. He’s a great talker,” Dumay says. “But following through on a project is a different thing than talking. Our goal is to partner with artists and small businesses, abate their rent for six months or a year while they get on their feet, and create a community over here. We gave Sean a gallery to build a business, we gave him plenty of time to develop it, and he didn’t follow through on it. Then he’s running around bad-mouthing me to the other tenants. We were trying to get something meaningful done, and Sean was just hanging out, causing trouble, getting on Facebook and making paper airplanes.”

T

here are at least three explanations for Kelley’s appointment as co-chairman of the Mayor’s Task Force for the Arts. One is that, with more than 30 years of experience working with artists in Kansas City, he was simply well-qualified for the job. Mike Burke, the point man on the task force (and Sly James’ opponent in the 2011 mayoral election), says, “His contribution was immense. His enthusiasm alone was a huge help. But he also has a wealth of knowledge about the KC arts scene. He knew who we should be reaching out to. We all relied on him for a huge amount of direction throughout the process.”

Kelley says he’s “out of the fog.” “He showed up for everything,” says Porter Arneill, director and public art administrator for the city of Kansas City, Missouri. “Whenever there was an event or meeting, Sean would be there helping facilitate conversations and taking things to a deeper level.” Another explanation is that Kelley went to college with the mayor, and the two reconnected during the latter’s campaign. (Kelley later worked on James’ transition team after the election.) “Working with Sly the last few years has really brought me out of the fog I was in that started toward the end of my time at Grand Arts,” Kelley says. “It’s reminded me what I’m good at: talking to people and making connections with people in the service of art.” And there’s reason No. 3: Kelley is an exceptionally charming individual who can talk his way into anything. But Kelley is no cheerleader for the local arts establishment, and he has a critic’s instinct for identifying weakness. He sees a lot of areas for improvement in Kansas City, and he’s not shy about broadcasting those opinions. On the Nelson: “When you put a bad painting by a local artist like Shea Gordon in the contemporary room next to an Agnes Martin painting, it indicates a lack of responsible behavior on the part of the professional community here. They’re just nowhere near the same league.” On KC’s gallery scene: “There are good galleries here, but I don’t know of one that strives to help artists export work or ideas into the larger visual-art environment.” On local collectors: “We have only one great collector in town: Jerry Nerman.” On the Charlotte Street Foundation: “I think a lot of artists in town have a short-term goal of getting a grant from Charlotte Street. That’s fine, but it won’t get you anywhere outside of Kansas City — nobody over there is connected to the larger art world. continued on page 11

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Kelley is a stinging critic.

continued from page 9 It’s a good part of the local ecosystem but it’s totally isolated, and when artists are isolated, they don’t grow.” On art publication Outpost Journal’s KC issue: “Horrible.” “What Kansas City needs, to quote Jack Nicholson in Batman, is an enema,” Kelley says. “The conversation about art here is generally one of naïve isolation and timid acceptance because people are afraid to criticize the big names in town. That’s not how you become a major arts city. If you want to be considered a respectable destination by the larger art world, you have to have institutions in place that aren’t just promoting artists but also challenging them, honestly critiquing them.” But is it realistic or useful to compare Kansas City with New York as a milieu for artists? “I think that, in a lot of ways, Sean is more interested in the blue-chip art market — artists who went to the right schools, have the connections, showed at the right New York galleries, and whose work is sold as a portfolio item,” says one local arts administrator. “Which is fine. And it’s fine for him to want that for local artists. But there’s a lot happening outside that rarefied air that he doesn’t seem as interested in.” Still, because Kelley has access to artists who have that national reputation (Cave, Aycock, Paine), and because pretty much everybody agrees that his work at Grand Arts was significant, he remains a valuable ally for emerging artists. And because about 75 percent of his income comes from the buying and selling of roughly 600 pieces of art he owns, he has plenty of time to visit studios and talk shop. “He’s very available to young artists,” says Calder Kamin, an artist and career adviser at KCAI. “I always stress the importance of net-

working to artists, and he’s definitely offered that to both me and a lot of students here.” “He has a knack for bringing to the forefront ideas that make the piece more real, more about yourself,” Eisenhart says. “He’ll look at one of my objects and be like, ‘eh.’ Then he’ll ask questions about why I did this or why I did that. And it makes you question why you make what you make and it makes you aware of how others interpret your work, and I think both of those things are important for artists to consider.” Kelley’s cocktail of analytical knack and sheer force of personality is potent enough that, if he has made enemies, he seems unfazed by that thought. He’s comfortable wherever he goes — and he goes everywhere. At Haw Contemporary one recent Saturday afternoon to browse new works by Del Harrow and Corey Antis, Kelley chatted up every person in the building, including Bill Haw Jr., the owner, and Paul Smith, an up-and-coming local artist. Later, at the Bill Brady gallery, he raved about the space to the gallery manager and correctly guessed the price of a Steinman and Tear piece ($3,000). Kelley smiled wide. Everybody smiled back. Driving out of the West Bottoms, he spoke of Brady’s pedigree — “He has a certain mythology about him of showing a lot of Next Great Artists” — but questioned the price tag of the show’s centerpiece, a 15-foot Douglas-fir leanto sculpture by Virginia Overton. “I mean, it’s impressive, it’s imposing, it casts those cool shadows on the wall, but $44,000?” he said. “Is that justified? I don’t know about that. It’s a conversation worth having.”

“We have only

one great collector in town.”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com pitch.com

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WEEK OF FEBRUARY 6-12, 2014

FIRST FRIDAY HIT LIST

F

ebruary is a short month, and by First Friday it’s already one-quarter over. A week ahead

of Valentine’s Day and well before Mardi Gras, February 7 might fi nd Kansas City covered in snow — but that’s no reason to stay home. See Art, page 17.

Pratt & Whitney under construction in 1943. Image courtesy of Albert Kahn Associates Inc., Detroit. At the Belger Arts Center.

Daily listings on page 32 pitch.com

february 6 -12, 2014

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The Joan STore

Bettys, too, find a new old style at Melissa Evans’ Retro Vixen.

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Demand for loud, blingy pieces saw a spike elissa Evans’ adoration of the old after The Great Gatsby arrived in theaters Holly wood style — as well as her biker edge — shines inside her shop, Retro Vixen. last year. Months later, customers still seem braver about sporting grand pieces. Curve-hugging dresses from the 1940s to the Evans stocks Retro Vixen with new, 1960s mix with siren-red or black leather vintage-inspired women’s clothing intended accessories and subtle skeleton patterns. to flatter all body types. In particular, she This is her own look, yes, but she’s finding caters to what she calls the Bettys and the that it’s also a business that works. Joans: the Mad Men characters who embody “A majority of the women who come in here are not happy with how they look, and what Evans says are the girl-next-door style and the sultry, curve-rockin’ look. I hope my store plays a role in women learnEvans first stepped into the retro vixen ing to love themselves,” she says. look while a teenager living in Ventura, “I love beauty and fashion, but that’s just California. She gravitated the surface,” Evans says. toward a high school crowd The 32-year-old typically Retro Vixen of kids who took art classes, sports jet-black hair, dra1620 West 39th Street dyed their hair outrageous matic eyeliner and red lip816-561-1525 colors and wore combat stick, and she has amassed retrovixenkc.com boots. Her parents, whom two colorful tattoo sleeves. she describes as unconvenShe also spends a significant amount of her free time on the streets tional entrepreneurs, inspired her business and on phones rescuing animals. “I’m here moves. In Ventura, they run a bed-andbreakfast in a converted Victorian church. for a bigger purpose. I simply want to make “I always knew I wanted to own my own others — animals and people — feel good.” Popular culture has taken the pinup style business, but I never knew what it would be until I moved to Kansas City,” Evans says. more mainstream in recent years, and this With her husband’s roots in the Kansas has been good for business at Evans’ threeyear-old women’s boutique on 39th Street. City area, she came here eight years ago.

Evans (left) plies wares with which to release one’s inner vixen. She developed a friendship with Nikki Moreno, of Vixen Pinup Photography, and began picking out clothing for Moreno’s clients. Local stores didn’t seem to carry pieces suitable for the portraits, and having to constantly order online was frustrating. “I’m pretty spontaneous, and one day in June 2010, I decided I wanted to open a shop and went for it,” Evans says. Retro Vixen’s 600-square-foot space originally housed both Moreno’s photography studio and Evans’ shop. Both businesses grew, leading Moreno to seek her own place. In the shop’s infancy, Evans thought it would attract mostly women with fashion tastes similar to her own. But she has found a surprisingly diverse clientele. What unifies her shoppers, she says, is a desire to support a local business. Her mission, she says, is to support those customers. “The most rewarding part of my job is when I see a woman become comfortable with who she is while in my store.”

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Kayla Wroblewski, Portrait, paper, 2013. Courtesy of the artist.

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Coo, coo, ca-choo, Mrs. Robinson ... Mixing live theatre with radio theatre, complete with live sound effects on stage, L.A. Theatre Works presents The Graduate, a cult favorite and an artistic triumph since its premiere 50 years ago. Even now, we all continue to ask the same question as Benjamin, Mrs. Robinson and the rest ‌ What does the future hold?

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art

First Friday Hit List

A big slate for a small month.

By

T r a c y a bel n Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

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awl Pitch Fitness Cr ng xi Bo s as Br @

Courtesy of Charlotte street

n December 2012, Kansas City, Kansas, funk icon Marva Whitney died at 68, just before the publication of her memoir. Curator Patrick Alexander honors her memory and gives us a “platform to celebrate, educate and discuss the musical heritage of Kansas City’s soul mu­ sic” with a multimedia exhibition called Art & Soul, It’s My Thing, at Kultured Chameleon Street Art Gallery (1739 Oak). Alongside con­ temporary artwork commissioned from the likes of Alexander Austin, Duncan Burnett, J.T. Daniels, Erra, Ociel Ramos, Luke Rocha and Pat Rocha, Sike, Danny Staton, Aaron Sutton and Will Willmott, you’ll find items from local music collectors’ personal files of KC soul memorabilia: photos, posters and al­ bums. Listening stations featuring music from Whitney’s husband’s KC record label turn the gallery into a mini museum the rest of the month. Friday night, DJ Joc Max brings it live. On January 25, the Kansas City Plein Air Coterie celebrated its 100th session. This fluid band of artists uses its outdoor time as a weekly retreat from studio practice (see Theresa Bembnister’s “Field & Street,” Feb­ ruary 28, 2013). One of its “rules” is to work from observation, which translates to a lot of art. Some of that bulk finds its way into Sunday Painter, opening at Greenlease Gallery at Rockhurst University (54th Street and Troost) from 6:30 to 9 p.m. While the exhibi­ tion is up, the KC PAC is slated to complete five more outings and mark the beginning of its third year of continual practice. (New­ comers are always welcome.) Included in the show: Elvis Achepohl, Corey Antis, Jane Ashcraft, Christopher Bell, Wes Benson, Molly Bingaman, Robert Josiah Bingaman, Matt Bollinger, Hillary Carlson, Kelly John Clark, Jonah Criswell, Molly Kaderka, Krystal Kuhn, Melissa Lenos, Tom Matt, Nicole Mauser, Lee Piechocki, Rachel Rolon, Scarlett Schonhoff, Tristan Telander, Jennifer Wetzel, Lucas Wetzel and Ruby Wetzel. It was a Pratt & Whitney Wasp engine that powered Charles Lindbergh across the Atlan­ tic, and when World War II came, the Con­ necticut company expanded — a boom that included Kansas City. Today we know its local site as the Bannister Federal Complex (Honey­ well, Bendix, Westinghouse, DOD landfill, etc.), but back before war profit was so scorned or anyone worried about contamination and cancer, Pratt & Whitney’s plant was a patriotic keystone of national defense. The Belger Arts Center (2100 Walnut) tonight opens Velocity of Change: The Evolution of Albert Kahn’s Pratt and Whitney Plant in Kansas City, pairing historical images from the 1942–43 construc­ tion with large­format photographs chart­

ing the plant’s evolution through the present day. Unless you know someone who works there or is a Plowshares protester, you might not think about what’s going on in your own backyard. Learn from architectural historian Cydney Millstein and photographer Richard Welnowski, who co­curated this exhibition. Between community­development projects and struggling with City Hall about regulations (see News, page 5), Israel Alejandro Garcia Gar­ cia (of Garcia Squared Contemporary, 115 West 18th Street, inside the Bauer Building), finds time to curate. This month he presents Sietes Flatfiles Show, a group exhibition of works by Latino and Latina artists. We’re not sure if he has been hiding in Russia with Edward Snowden, but Johnny Naugahyde returns to the West Bottoms to­ night with a new show at 1522 Saint Louis (that’s the gallery’s address, too). The Soviet Pen Pals of Johnny Naugahyde follows recent group shows at Pierogi Gallery in Brooklyn, New York; Graphic Arts Workshop in San Fran­ cisco; and the closing exhibition at the Dolphin gallery (now Haw Contemporary), allowing you to catch up with an old favorite. Watch an installation take shape at City Ice Arts (2015 Campbell) as four artists from New

Bill Cosby @ Indie

“Pink Cut Marble” by Brandon Anschultz, at La Esquina York and Kansas City get Synchronized. Rob de Oude is skilled at painterly maximalist op­ art tricks, making straight lines seem to bend; Mark Sengbusch uses a scrimshaw process on panels, with inlaid results unlike 2­D paint­ ing; Robert Howsare also works with tricking our optics into processing visual stimuli; and Gehry Kohler uses a layering technique that requires angled views to process. What will 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 be? Find out, starting at 7 p.m. In his second local exhibition, Charlotte Street Foundation curator­in­residence Danny Orendorff aims to challenge the hierarchy of fine art’s value with The Tyranny of Good Taste, which opened first at Columbia Col­ lege’s Glass Curtain Gallery to good reviews. At La Esquina (1000 West 25th Street), look for lowbrow materials held up by Brandon Anschultz, Mara Baker, Tim Brown, Jared Clark, Julia Anne Goodman, Ben Harle, Michelle Hartney, Jack Henry, Matt Jacobs, Cara Krebs, Bobbi Meier, Garry Noland, Sabina Ott, Matthew Schlagbaum and Dean Roper.

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n construction, wit and delivery, jokes don’t get much better than the good-natured zinger that Tina Fey and Amy Poehler lobbed at George Clooney last month at the Golden Globes. The one about Hollywood’s 52-year-old bachelor king preferring to drift into space and die rather than spend another minute with a woman his own age (as Clooney’s character does in Gravity, opposite 49-year-old Sandra Bullock). In construction, wit and delivery, Clooney’s new movie, The Monuments Men — which he directed, co-wrote and co-produced with usual partner Grant Heslov, and in which he stars — could be a lot better. But one complaint you can’t make about it is that it’s youth-obsessed — or youthful at all. Down to Downton Abbey patriarch Hugh Bonneville’s 1.25-hanky supporting role, this well-intentioned, sleepily paced World War II caper is basically a $70 million PBS movie. It assembles a clutch of well-regarded, award-friendly actors known for their relatively high IQs (Matt Damon, Cate Blanchett, Bill Murray, Bob Balaban, John Goodman) and lets them say smarter things than most movies allow — about history, about art, about matters of life and death. In no other picture will you see Murray draw a pistol in search of the Ghent Altarpiece and Michelangelo’s Madonna of Bruges. Clooney gives you Paris on the brink of liberation, Jean Dujardin (Oscar-winning star of The Artist) on the brink of English, enough voice-over to send even Ken Burns out to the lobby for Milk Duds. It is, at a minimum, better than Leatherheads. But The Monuments Men operates at just that: a minimum — a comfortable, charismatic, forgettable minimum. As usual when he directs, Clooney keeps himself static and just off the plot’s center, appearing more than performing. In his first scene, he wears an academic’s neat beard and stands at a lectern in the dark, giving a slide-driven lesson in art history to FDR. You get the feeling that Clooney might prefer this Harvard dress-up to the Army uniform he has worn before. Like too much of what follows, it’s a confidently rendered, dramatically inert bit of exposition, too much book and not enough liberty. The book is Robert M. Edsel’s fine 2009 The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves, and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History, which traces the efforts of some 350 men and women who made up the Allied Powers’ Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives Section. From 1943 through 1951, they worked to recover thousands of pieces of art displaced by the war, most of it stolen or destroyed by the Nazis. Clooney plays Frank Stokes, a fictional version

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of George Stout, the Iowa-born art conservator who was among the first in the section. Edsel describes Stout as, among other things, “debonair,” and Clooney dutifully sounds that note but not much more — serious when serious things happen, light when Damon is around. Clooney’s actors seem eager to out-underplay their boss. Even Dujardin dims his mugging to refrigerator-bulb strength. The script keeps the cast broken into pairs for much of the movie, which at least results in small, knowing illustrations of repertory companies overlapping, concentrated IMDB Venn diagrams of where Steven Soderbergh veterans meet Wes Anderson standbys and then trip over Joel and Ethan Coen favorites. Like Soderbergh’s Oceans trilogy, The Monuments Men is foremost a buddy movie made up of multiple Hope-Crosby combinations, the kind of product that gives actor-directors a good name. Murray is granted an honest misting up, Balaban juices his Balabanian fussiness most of the way up, and fellow hams Goodman and Dujardin ground each other. And, of course, they — along with Damon and Bonneville and Blanchett — get to play scholars without having to wear much tweed. What Clooney has essentially made is his first stab at an art-house movie, something fashioned for a demographic other than the people he dates. It’s a kind of Best Exotic Marigold Oceans Hotel, and it gets points for sheer stubborn nerdiness. But, like Clooney’s last outing as director — 2011’s heavy-breathing but lightheaded The Ides of March — The Monuments Men also poses and answers a simple question in a complicated marketplace: How good does a George Clooney movie have to be? Better than this. But not very.

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urning the Leawood outpost of Carmen’s Café — the garlic-scented Brookside bistro serving Italian and Spanish dishes — into a similar restaurant called Carma involved more than a spelling change. There was the dropping of two brothers (Juan and Francisco Bautista, owners of the original Carmen’s Café). There was the addition of More people related to the restaurant’s major investor, t Don Sanders. And, as an a e in Onl .com exclamation point, there h c it p was the hiring of largerthan-life Beena Brandsgard, former owner of the jazz club Jardine’s, as the general manager. If you believe in the metaphysics of karma, you know that positive intent and deeds lead to future happiness, while bad intent and deeds lead to a future of suffering and misery. Carma’s karma has yet to play out, but the three-month-old restaurant gives signs of being on an upward trajectory. That promising vibe owes a great deal to Brandsgard’s charisma. She’s something of an endangered species: a restaurant personality who truly enjoys interacting with patrons. And, as she’ll tell you herself, the best idea at the new Carma was hers: adding live music. Carma’s long, narrow dining room isn’t an obvious performance space, but Brandsgard (who has worked for years with most of the entertainers she’s booking here) makes the most of it. She sets the musicians, primarily duos, at the front of the house near a large window, making smart use of the room’s surprisingly fine acoustics. It takes talent and guts for artists to take supporting roles in a place where most ears are tuned elsewhere. These performers — including Rod Fleeman, Dan Bliss, Danny Embry and Everette DeVan — have both, and they know exactly how to play where an audience is more focused on dining than on listening. The music is soft and unobtrusive, yet very much present and as soothing as good scotch. Count me among the grateful that there’s still a restaurant putting live music ahead of satellite radio or a bartender’s iPod. The music here improves the ambience enough that even the food tastes somehow more sophisticated. But to rip the needle rudely off the record, it must be said that, without that music, Carma is actually just another expensive Park Place restaurant with inconsistent food and a menu that already needs an overhaul.

AngelA C. Bond

Café

when I tried it. When veal borders on jerky, it’s time to rethink the preparation. There’s better meat to be had. One of longSanders has kept most of the Bautistas’ dishes, and a few still work. For all its novelty, time chef Leo Santana’s newer dishes is an excellent, sumptuously tender filet mignon, a new kale salad (tossed with a champagne topped with a mahogany-colored tangle of vinaigrette) can’t compete with the Bautista onions caramelized in a hearty balsamic family’s house salad: cold romaine and iceberg lettuce jumbled with chopped artichoke hearts, vinegar and sided with a clump of good gratin potatoes. That dish, steak Santana, is a costly pimientos, red onions and lots of grated parmecut of beef, but it’s delicious. san, with a slightly sweet red-wine vinaigrette. Other dishes don’t live up to their price A couple of the starters so beloved by fans of points — fettuccine carbonara runs $23, scanCarmen’s Café linger here, too, but they need dalous even in Leawood — to go. The gorgonzola cream while there’s a discordant sauce blanketing the pilCarma cheapness in some of the lowy, round ravioli (stuffed Pesto ravioli��������������������������$8 ideas at work. The restauwith pesto ricotta) came out House salad �������������������������� $5 rant has mercifully ceased thicker than wallpaper paste Gnocchi���������������������������������$18 serving honey butter with on one of my visits to Carma. Steak Santana������������������� $30 Flan����������������������������������������� $7 its bread (that spread goes And the seared scallops on a with cornbread and corndifferent appetizer were unbread alone), but no topping forgivably chewy. The biggest change is at least a very posi- could have helped the flavorless pretzel bread I was served one night. That’s another culitive one: So far, Carma’s kitchen is using fresh, nary trend that should have vanished when homemade pasta instead of the dry, packaged fast-food joints picked it up, and this one was product. The fluffy gnocchi is very worthwhile — and considerably better than another hold- further hurt by the teaspoon-size portion of “butter” it came with: something that had been over from the Carmen’s repertoire, the veal whipped with whole-grain mustard. No! Now piccata, which was disappointingly tough

Carma reincarnates some Carmen’s faves�

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that bread service has become almost a luxury in modern restaurants, the stuff should not be presented with something not immediately recognizable as good, plain butter. (Flatbreads are served now, too, including a rich and enticing marsala-chicken version that might have been a winner if the crust I sampled hadn’t been so ridiculously soggy.) So, yes, there are a few sour notes played at Carma (another being its staccato, not quite lyrical service). The desserts I tasted were certainly theatrical, but the Napoleon construction — made with phyllo pastry and white chocolate — was difficult to eat, let alone share, and a creamy flan might have been divine had it been made with some subtlety. Instead, a dousing in Grand Marnier meant that eating it was like being pelted with a bag of Valencias. Still, when the music is on, even these annoyances can feel petty. If Brandsgard’s decision to have talented performers playing at this restaurant is her way of paying it forward, well, there’s at least good karma happening at Carma.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com february 6 -12, 2014

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21

fat c i t y

ChoCohol U

I

D

Ju s t in K e nd a l l

Boulevard’s Chocolate Ale returns this week

WEDDING G

By

E

FEB 20TH DEADLINE: FRIDAY, FEB 14

RESERVE YOUR SPACE, CONTACT

ERIN.CAREY@PITCH.COM OR 816.218.6735

B

oulevard founder John McDonald glides up the stairs to the second-floor tasting room. The local craft brewery’s Obi-Wan Kenobi notices a few new faces and then spots a bottle of a much-anticipated Smokestack Series beer on one of the long wooden tables. “Trying Chocolate Ale?” he asks. “I’m excited to taste it,” I tell him. “Remember,” McDonald says, “it’s just beer.” The brewery founder’s Jedi-like advice may be wise, but try conveying it to any beer lover who has scoured the city’s liquor stores for the e Mor stuff and come up dry. To say the bottles of the collaboration between at ine Bou leva rd brew masOnl .com pitch ter Steven Pauwels and chocolatier Christopher Elbow go fast is an understatement. Demand was high before Boulevard shelved Chocolate Ale for a year. In 2012, after discovering that three batches didn’t have the right flavor, the brewery bought back the questionable bottles at retail prices. Chocolate Ale was conspicuously absent from Boulevard’s release schedule in 2013. This year is different. For one thing, Chocolate Ale may not be as hard to find; production has doubled to 9,200 cases and 2,800 one-sixth-barrel kegs. Chocolate Ale started flowing Monday from taps across the city, and 750-milliliter bottles arrived on store shelves Wednesday.

fat city

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Now on tap: Chocolate Ale On the Friday before Chocolate Ale’s release, I meet Boulevard brewer Jeremy Danner in the Brewhouse Bar for my firstever sample of Chocolate Ale. Danner grabs a couple of glasses for us — and some water because the ale is 9.1 percent alcohol per volume. Danner uncorks the bottle, and it pops like he has opened champagne. “That’s a good sign,” he says. He pours a couple of glasses. We swish the brew around and sniff it. Brewmaster Pauwels has said the beer smells like chocolate milk, and he’s right. The aroma of cocoa is strong. We breathe it in and then take sips. The chocolate flavor is really pronounced — as it should be, given that this year’s batch was brewed with 3,000 pounds of Valrhona cocoa nibs. The beer goes down smooth, a lot smoother than I expected. “This here is the most chocolatey that it’s going to be, right now,” Danner says. “It’s very similar to how I remember it.” Meaning: Don’t save this beer. It’s not for hoarding. Drink it now. Like the other Smokestack bottles, this is a beer to be shared, so that’s what happens. Danner pours a glass for The Pitch’s art director, who’s along to take photos. He pours a glass for a Boulevard worker passing through the second floor. The bottle is soon empty.

E-mail justin.kendall@pitch.com

fat c i t y

Spice Girl

By

Ch a r l e s F er ru z z a

Season + Square is Andrea Morrow Joseph’s Brookside dream.

with Love Breakfast • Lunch • Catering • Gifts Baskets Breakfast: Mon-Sat 7am-12pm, Sun 8am-1:30pm Lunch: Mon-Sat 11am-3pm, Sun 11am-1:30pm

4 0 9 W. G r e g o r y , K C M O

(816) 444-1933 • www.theclassiccookie.com

MONDAY-SATURDAY

All You Can Eat Buffet

7

$ .99

W

hen Andrea Morrow Joseph was discussing college options with her 16-year-old daughter, Izabella, she found herself telling the teenager that she had to follow her dreams. “That’s when I realized what a hypocrite I was,” says Joseph, who had spent most of her own career in corporate sales, most recently pushing dental products. “I certainly wasn’t following my dreams.” Several months later, Joseph had signed a lease on a Brookside storefront at 6205 Oak — a former shop for bridesmaid gowns — and was preparing to open her dream business, Season + Square. Its focus: fresh small-batch spices, housewares, goods made from recycled materials, and cooking products. The 900-square-foot venue will sell those spices in bottles and in bulk and stock highend, Boston-made R. Murphy knives among its cookware. Other products include Dram Apothecary and Bar Keep bitters and, from this region, chocolate (bars and baking chocolate and nibs) from Askinosie Chocolate in Springfield, Missouri. Also: handmade cards from Austin Press in San Francisco, and Wondermade marshmallows (with flavors such as honey, lavender, Sriracha, rose raspberry, carrot cake, bourbon, and Guinness) from Florida. “I eventually want to add olive oil and vinegars,” Joseph says. “None of our packaging will be plastic,” she adds. “Our square bottles are glass sealed with cork. Our wrapping is butcher paper and string.” Joseph and her husband, Christian (a Cerner executive), have set Season + Square’s soft opening for Thursday, February 6. The shop officially opens Saturday, February 8.

Joseph brings new flavor to Brookside. Joseph isn’t unfamiliar with the food industry. Her family has long owned the Torreon Mexican Restaurant in Overland Park, one of the oldest dining spots in Johnson County and among the first Mexican restaurants in the metro. She wasn’t drawn to the family business, though. Instead, she became a makeup artist and, later, a top rep for Trish McEvoy Cosmetics for a decade. The birth of her second child made her re-evaluate her 80-hour workweeks. The space is small, but Joseph hopes that it will become a neighborhood gathering spot. “This summer, we’ll be offering cooking classes with Katie Galloway, who owns a farm in Weston. And we’ll have an extensive collection of cookbooks for customers who come in and are looking for a specific recipe. We’ll serve Broadway Roasting Co. coffee, too. If Joseph’s dream shop sounds as if it has a somewhat clubby quality, well, it does. “We’re going to offer a Founders Membership for $60 a year that will feature discounts on our products, first news about our classes and events, and two private events each year,” Joseph says. Now that the store is ready to open, Joseph has quit her full-time job. “I’m very excited about this new chapter in my life,” she says. Joseph wanted to acknowledge her signature square bottles in the name, Season + Square — “much easier to see on a shelf,” she says. The shop will be open from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The phone number is 816-326-3148.

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E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com pitch.com

february 6 -12, 2014

the pitch

23

Valentine’s Day Guide

he Spread t

LOVE

Dogs World of FUN

JOYERIA/JEWELRY STORE VALENTINES ESPECIAL!

STERLING SILVER JEWELRY FROM TAXCO, MEXICO WATCH

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Mexican Jewelry Silver & Gold Repair Miriam & Charles Velasquez 816.651.1538 (Espanol) 913.406.4503 (English) 400 Grand Suite 416 W

This Valentine’s Day, Friday, February 14th, spend it with someone who loves you -

Y K T N U F and get in O W N FREE!!

8300 E. BLUE PKWY KANSAS CITY, MO for reservations call 816.737.FUNK (3865) 24

the pitch

februarY 6 -12, 2014

pitch.com

FUN!

MON–FRI: 6:30am–5:45pm • SAT–SUN: 9:30am–3pm dogsworldoffun.com

Valentine’s Looking for Mart that special something to give this valentine’s day?

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A new mystery begins...

Drawn to Murder Opens Feb 7 at the Golden Ox

VALENTINE’S DAY AT FINNIGAN’S! The Mystery Train

Tickets now available at The Central Ticket Office:

816-235-6222 www.kcmysterytrain.com pitch.com

february 6 -12, 2014

the pitch

25

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

music

Closer Listen

The Phantastics’ debut takes everybody on a funky ride.

By

N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

FEBRUARY: 5: The Crayons 6: Nikki Hill 7: Bob Schneider

SATURDAY, FEB. 8 WHITEY JOHNSON levee town, andy t, & nick nixon

Barrett emke

(AKA Gary Nicholson)

B 8: Sky Smeed, Lyal Strickland & Kasey Rausch - GL 11: John Corbett w/ Sara Morgan 12: Randy McAllister 13: Eleni Mandell w/ Vikesh Kapoor 15: Ronny Cox - GL 15: The Belairs & The Nace Brothers

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadshonkytonk.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

26

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februarY 6 -12, 2014

ack in December, a wild seven-piece group called the Phantastics released its debut album with uncharacteristically little fanfare. Amid the holiday buzz and chatter, Closer (on Lawrence’s Silly Goose Records) slipped quietly under the local radar. But the Phantastics isn’t the kind of band to go ignored for long. Since forming back in 2010, it has steadily built a reputation as one of the area’s most accomplished party acts — party being not just a favored Phantastics gig site but also the best explanation of what its music sounds like. The band blends genres like a toddler attacking a fresh Play-Doh set. The six tracks on Closer incorporate jazz, gospel, hip-hop, neo soul, and even a few jam-band flourishes. It’s an intense collision of sounds that probably shouldn’t work together but somehow does. Part of that success stems from teamwork. The Phantastics counts two lead singers: rapper Kemet Coleman — better known as thePhantom* — and Leigh Gibbs. They provide the lyrics and front the band, but they aren’t its leaders. Neither is guitarist J.J. Cantrell, bass player Danny Florez, drummer Ashley Thompson, saxophonist D.J. Mitchell or keyboard player Austin Quick. The group functions as a collective — from songwriting to band management, an immaculately organized nimbus of different energies and disparate backgrounds. “Sometimes you get thrown into a lot of interesting musical situations where you don’t know what the other musicians know, and they don’t know what you know,” says Gibbs, who grew up singing gospel in church choirs. “You just have to hope that it works, and that’s kind of what happened with us.” The Phantastics originally came together as

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a backup band for Coleman. In 2009, Florez, Gibbs (left): “Our music is for everybody.” Cantrell and Thompson were performing as a track driven in equal parts by Coleman’s the prog-rock outfit Stone Deph. They brought quick rhymes and Quick’s spunky, Steely Mitchell and Quick into the mix around the Dan–flavored organ, gives way to “Gimme time that Coleman’s Synesthesia came out, in early 2012. Coleman recruited Gibbs, who had Somethin’,” a sexy electric hotbox that hints at a Janelle Monáe influence. And on the clossung on the album. ing “Bananas,” Cantrell delivers sizzling “Faces were melted,” Gibbs says of the new group’s first rehearsal. “Faces were melted for notes while the song furiously builds to a metallic thrashing (a nod, perhaps, to Florez’s a lifetime.” Since then, the Phantastics’ identity has hardcore background). But the standout is the slow-burning “Stay evolved from backing band to full-fledged With Me,” on which Gibbs repeats just these funk machine. lyrics: Stay with me, baby, I need you to stay with “We take a bunch of little pieces and figure out how to stack them to make one big piece,” me. It’s a chilling performance, her creamy vocals sweeping over Cantrell’s weeping electric Cantrell says. “There’s a sense of continuity from a whole bunch of unique, different sound- guitar. The rest of the album is designed to conquer the dance floor, but “Stay With Me” shoots scapes that we all instinctively draw from, because we’re all from very different musical an arrow through the heart. Which was, Gibbs says, the plan all along. backgrounds.” “Our music is for everyAdds Gibbs: “Our goal is The Phantastics body, without being over the to create intelligent dance Saturday, February 8, at head of some or beneath othmusic.” Jazzhaus, in Lawrence ers,” she says. “We want to Anyone who hears the create a sound that is relatPhantastics’ debut will immediately understand what Cantrell and Gibbs able. … And I love the fact that even though I don’t know a damn thing about how he are talking about. Closer doesn’t wait for you to think about the music; it devours you whole, [Cantrell] plays or how he [Florez] plays exactly, we’ve learned to dance together.” its all-encompassing songs swallowing you “When we all got together to make music, into a sweaty frenzy. Without its three bonus tracks, Closer clocks we decided to make the music that each of us in at just over 25 minutes — a span given over individually wanted to make,” Cantrell says, “and then figure out how to make it work toto grooving, dancing and general freedom. The gether without conflicting. It was about comopening track, “Phire,” cracks with attitude as the entire group contributes to vocals, with ing up with the way to make all those different Gibbs and Coleman commanding what is es- pieces sound like it’s not this guy’s show, it’s sentially the Phantastics’ mission statement: not this girl’s show — it’s everybody’s show.” Shake what your momma gave ya! The pace remains exhilarating. “Cruisin’,” E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

pitch.com

february 6 -12, 2014

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music

Cult StatuS

The Pixies and Cults talk band breakups and makeups.

L

ast year’s out-of-nowhere EP1 ended more than two decades of studio silence from legendary rock band the Pixies. It was also the first release from the Pixies without bassist Kim Deal, whom guitarist Joey Santiago affectionately refers to as “the favorite Pixie.” Now the Pixies are on tour with a new bassist, Paz Lenchantin, promoting EP2 and the upcoming EP3, which is due April 27. Ahead of the band’s February 11 Midland show, we chatted with Santiago by phone. The Pitch: I know you’re probably sick of talking about Kim, but I have to ask: What is like recording without her? Santiago: Well, it certainly is different — a lot different. You know, her opinions we really liked. But there’s three of us, too, and it’s funny that sometimes people just discount the three of us. Or we’re just missing the charm of Kim. I mean, undeniably, she was the favorite Pixie. And we knew that. But, I mean, we’ve done our mourning. We’ve mourned enough. I think we’ve healed through it. You just gotta go on. We miss her dearly, but we’ve gotta go on. We have to be a band. We’ve been around for a while — 26 years — and we’ve changed one band member. There’s nothing unique And now you’ve got Cults opening for about it. you. I imagine your audience today spans What have been the challenges and rewards generations. of bringing on Paz as a new band member? The th ing for people is that we’re The delight is her bright personality. She’s consistent. You’re gonna hear the songs the really positive. Also, she’s a shit-hot bass way they are. It is what it is. We play the player. She’s a great musician. We’ve been music true to its form. We’re tight. We’re doing these acoustic sets for radio stations, so tight as musicians. We don’t fuck around and she plays the violin, too. [Laughs] That with it. just puts us in another stratosphere. I think the challenge, for her, must have been that it was up to her, just to see if we meld all f you haven’t heard “Go Outside,” by Cults, together. And she does, she melds. She’s a you may have been dead since 2010. That perfect fit. song, off the New York band’s self-titled deYou’ve been part of the music industry but album, poised multi-instrumentalist through the best of times and the worst of times. and synth mastermind Brian Oblivion and And we’re not getting singer Madeline Follin for a r ipped of f, you k now? breakthrough. The duo reThe Pixies, with Cults We’ve a lways had that leased a follow-up last OctoTuesday, February 11, creative freedom. No one ber, and where Cults was a at the Midland [at previous labels] ever convoluted pop-sugar rush, came in there and was like, Static is a more mellow col“Ugh, make this sound lection of delicate, haunted like this, make this do that,” or whatever. house-ready tracks. There were never any editors there. No one We spoke with Oblivion just as he arrived was ever in the studio, ever. None of our in Durham, North Carolina, ahead of Cults’ girlfriends at the time were in there at all, first show with the Pixies. just the four of us. And when we went to The Pitch: One big difference since Cults Wales [to record EP1], it was the same thing. is the change in relationship status for you That was one of the reasons why we went and Madeline. You’re no longer romantically to Wales. The UK was the birthplace of our involved. How has that changed the work career, where we took off. dynamic for you?

I

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pitch.com

By

N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

talked about touring, and you mentioned playing in Lawrence to a tiny bar with four people, then a packed show at the Granada. Now you’re opening for the Pixies at the Midland. Yeah, you’re catching me at the moment where I’m probably the most nervous about it. Right now, I’m kind of losing my mind. There’s always kind of a stranger-in-astrange-land kind of a thing when you’re opening up for a band. It’s like showing up the first day at summer camp. Like, “Am I gonna make friends?” But instead of it just being about friends, you have to perform every night in front of thousands of people. How did you feel when you first got the call about opening for the Pixies? That’s the crazy part of being a musician and having this quote-unquote job — one day, you can wake up and you’re sitting around and you’re bored and you’re making yourself coffee, and then you check your phone and you have an e-mail saying, “Do you want to open for the Pixies?” and it just comes out of nowhere, and you’re just like, “Yes!” Whenever something like that happens, it’s a real blessing, and we’re hoping we’re going to rise to the occasion.

Santiago (right): “We’re so tight as musicians.” Oblivion: It definitely separates things a

little more. We work more autonomously, I think, in me doing the music and her doing the vocals and lyrics. The first record was a little more of a collaboration, because we were spending every single moment of our time together. But I think it’s a nice evolution of the band, because it allowed me a lot more time to work on the music and to experiment. Going forward, I think it’s an advantageous relationship, especially now that we can be civil and more professional with each other, because we’re not so close all the time. When we go forward, working, we want to live in a different world for each record so that in the end we can have a semi-complete picture of what’s in that world. Everything that we’ve been doing for the next one sounds super tough. You’re already working on a new record? Yeah, well, we never really stop. The beginning process of records for us is always me making a bunch of loops. I’ll just sit around with idle time that we have and make 16 seconds of music and when it comes time to actually write, we’ll flip through 40 or so 15-second pieces of music and start to think about songs. I remember reading something where you

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

J a z z B e at PEtEr Schlamb QuartEt, at takE FivE coFFEE + bar

The vibraphone has always found a home in jazz (think Lionel Hampton and Milt Jackson) but not so often in Kansas City. Until now. Vibraphonist Peter Schlamb is one of the young musicians reshaping KC’s jazz scene. His vibes jump with a contemporary sensibility — he’s at home swinging a standard, weaving a bop line or commanding his own modern compositions. Trumpeter Hermon Mehari, whose range extends from Duke Ellington to hip-hop, and bassist Karl McComas-Reichl stand apart as two more emerging jazz voices. Drummer John Kizilarmut is new to town and making a name for himself. All three join Schlamb Saturday night for a glimpse at the future of KC jazz. — Larry Kopitnik Peter Schlamb Quartet, 8–10 p.m. Saturday, February 8, at Take Five Coffee + Bar (5336 West 151st Street, Leawood, 948-5550), $5 cover.

pitch.com

february 6 -12, 2014

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29

p Music Forecast Music

Amer ican

GaBArRage r:

4 -7pm, M-F Anti-Valentine’s Day Bash

FEB 14 • 9p-1a

Shotgun Jesus

Saturday ,

Tru Blood Blues Band

FEB 15 • 9p-1a

1 SE 4th St. • Lee’s Summit, MO • 816.525.1121 americangaragebar.com

DAILY MENU

SPECIALS

HAPPY HOUR

MONDAY-FRIDAY

UPCOMING LIVE MUSIC: Trivia 2/5/2014 - 7:00pm The Voyageurs 2/6/2014 - 8:00pm Coyote Bill 2/7/2014 - 9:00pm Flannigan’s Right Hook 2/8/2014 - 9:00pm

Nikki Hill has superwoman vocal cords. Think Mavis Staples meets the Alabama Shakes’ Brittany Howard. On last year’s full-length, Here’s Nikki Hill, the St. Louis singer delivered a dazzling concoction of roots, blues and rockabilly tunes. She shrieks, whoops and slides over the album’s 10 cuts, including the roadhouse rambler “I’ve Got a Man” and the slow-dripping, heart-melting “Hymn for Hard Luck,” a tune to cure anyone's bad-day blues. What Hill does on record, she does a hundred times better live. Thursday at Knuckleheads, you’ll see why she has earned the nickname “Southern Fireball.” L.A. psych-pop act the Blank Tapes opens. Thursday, February 6, Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

2 Live Crew

For old-school rap connoisseurs, Club Hammerjacks in St. Joseph offers a very special — if not bizarre — concert. Brother Marquis and Fresh Kid Ice, original members of 2 Live Crew, apparently are still making music together. The As Wild As We Wanna Be Tour is in support of the duo’s as-yet-untitled album due out later this year. It’ll be hard to top 1994’s charmingly unsavory “Me So Horny,” but I’m sure Marquis and Fresh Kid will make a solid effort. This show could be the most awesome thing you do this year or the biggest letdown of 2014. Either way, it does offer the chance to relive your impetuous youth and create new memories. Friday, February 7, Club Hammerjacks (512 Felix, St. Joseph, 816-617-6668)

Betse Ellis, Brandon Phillips, Cody Wyoming, Tommy Donoho

The Midwest Music Foundation has quite the local lineup assembled for Friday night. Betse Ellis is one of Kansas City’s go-to fiddle players, and last year’s High Moon Order was one of The Pitch’s top albums of 2013. Ellis blends an Ozark sound with her own folk sensibility, making the sort of front-porch-at-twilight music that

Nikki Hill feels so natural. Brandon Phillips, frontman for punk-rock outfit the Architects, also performs a solo acoustic set. Cody Wyoming, of the Pedaljets and the Philistines fame and a dozen other projects, is also slated to appear. Tommy Donoho, the man in charge of the rowdy, rootsrocking Dollar Fox, rounds out the night. Proceeds from the show go to funding the Midwest Music Foundation’s SXSW showcase. Friday, February 7, Bandwagon Merch (408 East 19th Street, 816-298-0691)

Yuck

Despite divorcing frontman Daniel Blumberg in early 2013, English alt-rock band Yuck soldiers on, much to the delight of nostalgic 1990s-rock enthusiasts. In September, Yuck released Glow & Behold, its second album and the first without Blumberg. Guitarist Max Bloom has taken over as lead singer, and the 11 tracks on Glow revel in fuzzy guitars and give what the band must have considered heartfelt odes to that grunge subculture. But Glow feels like a parody of its 2011 self-titled debut, an honest-to-God, best-of-the-’90s reincarnation. Glow is the album your mom would buy

f o r e c a s t

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n ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

Nikki Hill, with the Blank Tapes

happy hou

Friday ,

By

februarY 6 -12, 2014

if she was trying to understand your taste in music. She’s close, and it’s sweet, but it’s not quite right. The band’s Riot Room gig should give us an idea of how well Bloom does as the man leading the new fight. Saturday, February 8, the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

The Kin

When Pink turned the Sprint Center into her own trapeze studio last November on the Truth About Love Tour, her opening act was Australian trio the Kin. Brothers Isaac and Thorald Koren, along with drummer Shakerleg (really), gave an unadorned, enthusiastic performance for a scattered handful of people who may have been paying attention in the packed arena. All I wanted was for these spectacularly fit Australian dudes to play a smaller venue, where their radio-ready, high-energy rock could really be heard. The band’s debut EP, Get on It, is full of swagger and promise. We’ll see how the svelte trio adjusts to Czar after their arena stint. Monday, February 10, Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

K e Y

Pick of the Week

 Locally Sourced

 Could Be Rock Stars

 Southern Fireball

Fiddle Playing

Aussies

On the Road Again

 ’90s Revival

 Acoustic Sets

 Bizarre Reunions

 From Across the Pond

 Old-School Rap

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february 6 -12, 2014

City

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31

AgendA

continued from page 13

Thursday | 2.6 |

Art Exhibits & EvEnts

cults

William S. Burroughs. Creative Observer

Literary events

| Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Writers at Work: John Freeman and Frank Bill in Conversation with Whitney terrell | 6:30 p.m.

Kansas City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

Gorgeous & Outrageous: The Art of Tony Naponic | Leedy-Voulkos, 2012 Baltimore

Comedy

History & Hope: Celebrating the Civil Rights Movement | Nelson-Atkins Museum

erik Griffin | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Vil-

lage West Pkwy., KCK

of Art, 4525 Oak

steve Hoffstetter | 6 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

In the Looking Glass: Recent Daguerreotype Acquisitions | Nelson-Atkins Museum, 4525 Oak

a.G. White | 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

oBJet ~ pop-up boutique and Tea Time zine showcase | Paragraph Gallery, 23 E. 12th St.

musiC

Stages of Conversion: Santero Shrines of Gene Emerson Friedman | Thornhill Art

the Band Perry with easton Corbin and Lindsay ell | 7:30 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E.

Gallery, Avila University, 11901 Wornall

Valley View Pkwy., Independence

Beau Bledsoe | Mestizo, 5270 W. 116th Pl., Leawood Blue 88 | 7:30 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St. Brody Buster Band with rolling Foliage and Jazz Cigarettes | Frank’s North Star Tavern, 508 Locust, Lawrence

Pat Green, Zane Williams | 7 p.m. The Granada,

1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

nikki Hill with the Blank tapes | 7:30 p.m. Knuck-

leheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Jazz tap Jam with Billie mahoney | 7-9 p.m. Uptown

Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Cults, with the Pixies | 8 p.m. Tuesday at the Midland, 1228 Main, midlandkc.com

Feel Good | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire,

LGBt

Xo Blackwater with steve Gardels | 10 p.m. Mini-

midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay transgender ally College Conference | 5 p.m. Bartle Hall, 301 W. 13th

Lawrence

Bar, 3810 Broadway

Friday | 2.7 | PerForminG arts

Free state story slam — theme: Caught | 7 p.m. Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Kansas City symphony: Sheherazade! | 8 p.m.

St., mblgtacc2014.org

sPorts & reC

the ice at Park Place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

eddie moore & the outer Circle | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Rain – A Tribute to the Beatles | 8 p.m., $45-$60, Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

ultimate Blue Corner Battles | 6:30 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., NKC

the Phantom, dutch newman, abnorm, shag Ls | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Underground presented by the storling dance theater | 7:30 p.m. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway

sHoPPinG

William saunders Presents a night of Love songs | 8 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway

Comedy

sons of Brasil | 8 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601 Broadway

ultra Bide, drop a Grand, alternative tentacles | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

erik Griffin | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Pauly shore | 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St. eXPos

the Woody Pines | 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main niGHtLiFe

KC remodeling show | 10 a.m.-8 p.m. American Royal Complex, 1701 American Royal Ct.

dJ super Chip, dJ Proof, John G. | Jackpot Music

topeka Boat & outdoor show | 3-8 p.m. Kansas

Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

32

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februarY 6 -12, 2014

Expocentre, 1 Expocentre Dr., Topeka, topekaboat.com

pitch.com

We Are Not This Body — A Solo Exhibition by Scott Dickson | PLUG Projects, 1613 Genessee,

We Now Pronounce You: Redefining Marriage in the 21st Century | 5 p.m. Monday, UMKC Gallery of Art, 5015 Holmes, Room 203, info.umkc.edu/art

Crown Center ice terrace | Noon-11 p.m., $6 ($3

skate rental), 2450 Grand

monster Jam | 7:30 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, MonsterJam.com

926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

W. 25th St., charlottestreet.org

plugprojects.com

Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org

Bob marley birthday tribute show | Jazzhaus,

The Tyranny of Good Taste | La Esquina, 1000

British invasion: Celebrating the Beatles | 5:30 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601 Broadway

L.a. Fahy & the argyle sky | 6 p.m. Replay Lounge,

946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

the Floozies, manic Focus, Purusa | 8 p.m. The

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

molly Hammer | 9 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601 Broadway

infected mushroom, Butch Clancy | 8 p.m. The

Good Ju Ju | 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m., 1420 W. 13th Terr.

Midland, 1228 Main

rag and Bone | 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., 1412 W. 12th St.,

King King | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

ragandbonekc.com

restoration emporium | 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m., 1300 W. 13th St., restorationemporium.com

urban mining vintage | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urban Mining Vintage, 3924 Walnut, urbanminingvintage.com musiC

Bob marley tribute show with anthony B. | 9 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

mood swings | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St. the new riddim, Clockwork, the tektites | 9 p.m.

The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

nuthatch-47 | 10 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway oils, sneaky Creeps, the Fog | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge,

946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

olassa, 40 Watt dream | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Mascontinued on page 34

sachusetts, Lawrence

SH T W OW O S

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february 6 -12, 2014

the pitch

33

1/31/14 7:38 AM

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continued from page 32 Plug Uglies, Electric Lungs, MJP, Uzis | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

The Ready Brothers, the Matchsellers, the Big Idea, Famous Seamus and the Travelbongs | 6 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

.com EATS Oak 63: $40 deal for $20 ChiusanO’s: $32 deal for $16 TeOCali: $10 deal for $5 JOe’s Pizza: $20 deal for $10 The Dubliner: $40 deal for $20 Duke’s On GranD: $20 deal for $10 em Chamas: $30 deal for $15 luCky brewGrille: $20 deal for $10 nOrThern liGhTs Pizza: niCa’s laGniaPPe: $20 deal for $10 $15 Deal fOr $7.50 $3.75 wOODsweaTher Cafe: $16 deal for $8 QuinTOn’s walDO bar: $10 deal for $5 Green rOOm burGers & beer: $15 deal for $7.50 OPera hOuse COffee anD fOOD emPOrium: $20 deal for $10 PhO GOOD: $15 deal for $7.50 OPen fire Pizza: $20 deal for $10 huDDle hOuse: $12 deal for $6 llywelyn’s Pub: $20 deal for $10 kOrean resTauranT sObahn: $20 deal for $10

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Double Discount Days

34

the pitch

$15 deal for $7.50 $30 deal for $15 $15 deal for $7.50 $15 deal for $7.50

februarY 6 -12, 2014

pitch.com

Gerald Spaits Trio | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Leawood

Starhaven Rounders | 7 p.m.

MoRe

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

EvEnts

Onl

ine

$3.75 $7.50 $3.75 $3.75

Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

KC Improv presents Live in Front of a Studio Audience! and Improv Clusterfunk | 8 p.m. Kick Comedy Theater, 4010 Pennsylvania, kcimprov.com

Saturday Night Programming hosted by the Recess Players | 10 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway Pauly Shore | 7 & 9:45 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Winter Comedy Showcase | 7 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

C U LT U R A L E V E N T S

at

m pitch.co

Ultra Bide, Drop a Grand, All Blood, Mace Batons |

9:45 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Irish WinterFest | 3-10 p.m. Irish Museum and Cultural Center, 30 W. Pershing Rd. ExPOS

Vik G. Trio | 6 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand Jason Vivone and the Billybats | 9 p.m. Coda, 1744

Broadway

Wild Men of KC | 8:30 p.m. Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

KC Remodeling Show | 10 a.m.-8 p.m. American Royal Complex, 1701 American Royal Ct., kcremodelingshow.com Topeka Boat & Outdoor Show | 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Kansas Expocentre, 1 Expocentre Dr., Topeka, topekaboat.com

NIGhTLIFE LGBT

Carni-Val-O-Ween 2014 | 8 p.m.-midnight, Madrid Theatre, 3810 Main

Cinemaphonic with DJs Cruz & Cyan | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference | 11 a.m. Bartle Hall, 301 W. 13th

St., mblgtacc2014.org

SPORTS & REC

Fourth Annual Date Auction benefiting the Dream Factory | 6 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, 1400 Main Third Annual Pink Friday Trivia Night | 7 p.m., $40

per person, BrewTop Pub and Patio, 700 N.E. Woods Chapel Rd., Lee’s Summit

Saturday | 2.8 |

LIVING

northern lights Pizza Pachamama’s restaurant latin bistro saigon 39

Bob Schneider solo acoustic with Strangelandic | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

The Improv’s Comedy Magic Show | 4 p.m. Improv

11th Annual Idiots’ Open Golf Tournament | 9 a.m. Smiley’s Golf Complex, 10195 Monticello Terr., Lenexa

KU vs. West Virginia men’s basketball | 3 p.m. Allen

Fieldhouse, 1651 Naismith Dr., Lawrence

Missouri Mavericks vs. Allen Americans |

PERFORMING ARTS

7:05 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence

City in Motion Dance Theater: A Modern Night at the Folly choreographers’ showcase | 8 p.m.

Monster Jam | 2 & 7:30 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, monsterjam.com

Fairy Tales for Grownups with Laura Packer |

Psycho Wyo Run Toto Run 50k, 20-mile, 10-mile | 8 a.m., Wyandotte County Lake Park, 91st St. and

Folly Theater, 300 W. 12th St., cityinmotion.org

9 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Kansas City Symphony: Sheherazade! | 8 p.m. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org The Nervous Set: a Jazz Musical of the Beat Generation | 8 p.m. Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence, lawrenceartscenter.org

Underground presented by the Storling Dance Theater | 7:30 p.m. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway

Leavenworth Rd., KCK, psychowyco.com ShOPPING

LOLA Valentines Show | 10 a.m. Pachamama’s, 800

New Hampshire, Lawrence

FILM

Freedom Seekers: Stories From the Underground Railroad, presented by CinemaKC and Gary Jenkins |

11 a.m. Screenland Crown Center, 2450 Grand, third floor

COMEDy

Erik Griffin | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club,

1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

The Hunchback of Notre Dame | 1:30 p.m. Kansas City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

POTLUCK PRODUCTIONS FRIDAY

2.7

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

ts by g scrip Readin rs e it r w local

Potluck Productions stages readings of work by local women playwrights | 8 p.m. Friday, at Uptown

Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

MUSIC

Steady States record release | 9 p.m. Davey’s

Uptown, 3402 Main

Gary Cloud, Good Time Charlie, the Hobo Nephews of Uncle Frank | 10 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112

Pennsylvania

Cowboy Winter, Psychic Heat, Roboman, Wight Light | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts,

Thee Fine Lines, Nikki and the Rooftop Punch, the Gardenheads, the Monarchs | 8 p.m. Coda,

1744 Broadway

Lawrence

Andy T./Nick Nixon Band & Whitey Johnson with Levee Town | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

The Floozies, Muzzy, Thumpur | 8 p.m. The Bottle-

Vandal? Vandal! | 6 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Kelley Gant Quartet | 9:30 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club,

Victor & Penny, Kyle Reid & the Low Swingin’ Chariots | 7 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania

neck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

3601 Broadway

Millage Gilbert Blues Band | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside

BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Angela Hagenbach | 6 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club,

3601 Broadway

Yuck, Bummer, the Dead Girls | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

The Zeros | Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park NIGHTLIFE

Jazz Disciples | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E.

Dropout Boogie | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

NowHere, Silver Maggies, Haunted Maestro |

Foxy By Proxy’s 4th Annual Valentine’s Day Cabaret | 9 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence

The Phantastics | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts,

Frost Ice Festival | 8 p.m. KC Live Block at the Power & Light District, 14th St. and Grand

18th St.

The Brick, 1727 McGee

Lawrence

Reggie and the Full Effect, Dads, Pentimento | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Randy Rogers Band, McKenzie’s Mill | 7 p.m.

Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Sky Smeed, Lyal Strickland and Kasey Rausch: a Living Room Session | 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Second Annual Bar Olympics | 12:30-8 p.m. 10320 Shawnee Mission Pkwy., Shawnee, sharkskc.com

Sunday | 2.9 | PERFORMING ARTS

Charity Art Battle 3: Schroeder vs. Tulipana | 8 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

continued on page 36

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february 6 -12, 2014

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35

theater Dates and times vary. The Addams Family | 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Lied Center of Kansas, 1600 Stewart Dr., Lawrence

Afflicted: Daughters of Salem | The Coterie,

continued from page 35 Kansas City Music Teachers Association pre­ sents Multi­Piano Concert | 2:30 & 4 p.m. Lied Center of Kansas, 1600 Stewart Dr., Lawrence

Kansas City Symphony: Sheherazade! | 2 p.m.

CoMedy

All Sinatra | Quality Hill Playhouse, 303 W. 10th

Pauly Shore | 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner

Bring It on: The Musical | Opening Tuesday |

exPoS

Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, theaterleague.org

Laverne Cox: My Journey to Womanhood

| 7 p.m. Thursday, Crafton-Preyer Theater, 1530 Naismith Drive (Murphy Hall), Lawrence

Drawn to Murder | KC Mystery Train, the

Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

KC Remodeling Show | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Ameri-

St., mblgtacc2014.org

The Graduate, presented by L.A. Theatre Works | 2 & 8 p.m. Saturday, Polsky Theatre

| Theater for Young America, H&R Block City Stage, 30 W. Pershing Rd., Union Station, tya.org

The Importance of Being earnest | Journey-

2450 Grand, Off Centre Theatre, Crown Center, spinningtreetheatre.com

Staged readings of works by local women playwrights | Potluck Productions,

8 p.m. Friday, Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

romeo and Juliet | Kansas City Repertory

Theatre, 4949 Cherry, kcrep.org

Winter Shorts with Prisca Jabet Kendagor

| 7 p.m. Sunday, Fishtank Performance Studio, 1715 Wyandotte, fishtanktheater.blogspot.com

mUSeUm exhibitS & eventS Citizen Soldiers on the Prairie | Johnson

County Museum of History, 6305 Lackman Rd., Shawnee, jocomuseum.org

Convergence | American Jazz Museum,

Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St.

36

the pitch

february 6 -12, 2014

fourth Annual Clash of the Comics | 7:30 p.m.

eddie Moore | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St. Matt owen & eclectic Tuba | 8 p.m. Californos,

4124 Pennsylvania

skate rental), 2450 Grand

KU vs oklahoma women’s basketball | 2 p.m. Allen

Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

April Macie | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK MINd & Body

The Changing face of Beauty: Healthy Wellness and Living panel discussion, presented by Fashion Group International | 6 p.m. Hotel Sorella, 901 W. 48th Pl., kansascity.fgi.org

Tuesday | 2.11 | LITeRARy eveNTS

SPoRTS & ReC

Crown Center Ice Terrace | Noon-9 p.m., $6 ($3 skate rental), 2450 Grand

on the Plaza, 707 W. 47th St., rainydaybooks.com

KU vs. TCU women’s basketball | 7 p.m. Allen

Fieldhouse, 1651 Naismith Dr., Lawrence

f00d & dRINK

Customer Appreciation Party | 5-8 p.m. GreenAcres Market, 4175 N. Mulberry Dr. greenacres.com

Fieldhouse, 1651 Naismith Dr., Lawrence

Monster Jam | 2 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

6:30 p.m. Kansas City Central Library, Central Library, 14 W. 10th St., kclibrary.org

The Revivalists, Katy and the Girls | 8 p.m. The

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $6 ($3

MUSIC

Captiva, Connor ehman and Quinn Cochran, Pro­ fessor Salty and the Wallet | 7 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

MUSIC

Big Time Grain Co. | Kanza

More

EvEnts

Onl

ine

at

m pitch.co

Hall, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

folkicide, Rabbit Killer |

8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

MUSIC

John Corbett with Sara Morgan | 8 p.m. KnuckleAdriana Nikole, the Lucky Graves, Page 9, david.J. olsen, Sri yantra, odd­o­Matic, Casey and Cora | 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway Amon Amarth, enslaved, Skeletonwitch | 6:30 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence Ronnie dunn, dustin Lynch: Sun., Feb. 9. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., NKC

heads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

HMPH, Jorge Arana Trio, Simple Lines | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Hudspeth and Ruskin | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ,

Houndmouth, Willie Williams | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Let the Beat Build 3 | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 West-

port Rd.

Randy McAllister | 7:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon,

1205 E. 85th St.

2715 Rochester

Hermon Mehari Trio | 6 p.m. Majestic, 931 Broadway

Chris Meck & the Guilty Birds, Please Please Me, Sydney Wright | The Brick, 1727 McGee

Stan Kessler Quartet | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

Matt otto Quartet | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

The old No. 5s | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

Mark Lowrey Trio jazz jam | 6 p.m. The Majestic,

Please Please Me, Natalie oliver, Sydney Wright | 8 p.m. Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Peter Schlamb | 8 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601

NIGHTLIfe

12th Planet, Protohype, Herobust, Antiserum |

1809 Grand

931 Broadway

Monday | 2.10 | PeRfoRMING ARTS

Blue Monday poetry and open mic | 8-10 p.m.

Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

1616 E. 18th St., , americanjazzmuseum.org

Take five Tour | 6 p.m. Thursday, American

Bob Bowman & Roger Wilder jam | 10 p.m. Green

Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Authors Timothy Schaffert and Cathy Marie Buchanan | 7 p.m., $16-$27.95 (plus tax), Unity Temple

SPoRTS & ReC

man Theatre, Just Off Broadway Theatre, 3051 Central, journeymantheatre.com

Motherhood out Loud | Spinning Tree Theatre,

CoMedy

Still the Sky’s Limit, Naked Sunday, A Gecko Named Terrance | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference | Bartle Hall, 301 W. 13th

Harriet Tubman in the Footprints of Freedom

MUSIC

940 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Topeka Boat & outdoor Show | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Kansas Expocentre, 1 Expocentre Dr., Topeka, topekaboat.com

Fat Pig | The Living Room, 1818 McGee, thelivingroomkc.com

unicorntheatre.org

The Lincoln Deception by david o. Stewart |

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

LGBT

Grounded | Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main,

Haxan: Witchcraft Through the Ages, narrated by William S. Burroughs | 7 p.m. Lawrence Arts Center,

can Royal Complex, 1701 American Royal Ct., kcremodelingshow.com

Golden Ox, 1600 Genessee, kcmysterytrain.com

at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

LITeRARy eveNTS

Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway

2450 Grand, Crown Center, thecoterie.org

St., qualityhillplayhouse.com

fILM

Music for end Times | 11 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Wednesday | 2.12 |

CoMedy

PeRfoRMING ARTS

Uptown Comedy Night with Norm dexter | 10 p.m.

Schoenberg and Prokofiev: free Happy Hour Concert presented by the KC Symphony | 6 p.m.

Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

pitch.com

Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org

Broadway

7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

White Lies | 7 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts,

Lawrence

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

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a dresserful of pleated jeans, but it seems unnecessary. I suggested flipping a coin as a compromise. She wasn’t interested. Breaking up over the details of your future life together seems like a dumb thing for two smart people in love to do.

Inserting This Chances Harm

Running Into No Go

Dear ITCH: “Sex toys aren’t regulated like food

Dear RING: If you were my boyfriend, and you

when it comes to packaging,” said Hannah Jorden, senior staff sex educator at Smitten Kitten (smittenkittenonline.com), a progressive sex-toy and -gear shop in Minneapolis. “It could be latex; some other porous rubbery substance; or even a nasty, rash-inducing, endocrine-disrupting, cancer-causing mixture of PVC and phthalates.” Phthalates, a chemical compound found in everything from cosmetics to shower curtains to sex toys to food packaging, block male hormones, harm fetal genital development, interfere with adult brain function, and may put people at greater risk of breast cancer and testicular cancer. “The trick,” Jorden said, “is to buy only nonporous, nontoxic toys from trustworthy manufacturers and retailers.” So what should you look for when you go dildo shopping? “The best option is medical-grade, platinum-cured silicone,” Jorden said. “Silicone dildos come in lots of different textures and firmnesses, and you can quickly sterilize them by putting them in boiling water for a few minutes or running them through a hot dishwasher cycle. As long as they’re sterilized between uses, silicone dildos can be safely shared with different partners, and they can be used in different orifices without risk of bacterial contamination.” You can put also condoms over older sex toys and continue to use them. “Progressive sex shops, like those that are members of the Progressive Pleasure Club [progressivepleasureclub.com],” Jorden said, “can help figure out which toys are safe.” Jorden recommended a few trustworthy brands: Toys from Fun Factory, Tantus, and Vixen Creations. And here’s a nonporous, nontoxic, nonsilicone option for you: the stainlesssteel toys made by NJoy (njoytoys.com).

months into a relationship with a 30-year-old bisexual woman. We get along wonderfully and fuck wonderfully. Have you ever tried to see who can out-rim whom? Fun stuff. We want a life together. The snag is that she has a dedication to Catholicism and wants us to marry. I’m agnostic on God, but I don’t care for his earthly representatives. I know that a marriage license doesn’t automatically come with a dead bedroom and

Say “Pitch Weekly”

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D a n S ava ge

Dear Dan: What is the best way to sanitize a latex dildo? At least I think it’s a latex dildo. I had a yeast infection a few months ago, and before I knew what was up, I used my toy. Now I’m afraid to touch it until I know it won’t reinfect me!

Dear Dan: I’m a 30-year-old straight guy 18

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said you would marry me if you lost a coin toss but not because marriage mattered to me, I would never rim your ass again. Because if my feelings mattered less to you than a coin toss, your ass would have to learn to eat itself. Look at it this way: You fell in love with a woman who wants to spend her life with you, and you want to spend the rest of yours with her. And the woman you want to spend the rest of your life rimming wants to marry the man she spends her life rimming. You’re the one who should compromise.

Dear Dan: I manage a restaurant, and I’m perceived as pretty levelheaded, so employees confide in me. A 21-year-old Mexican employee came to me and blurted out, “I had sex with a woman. Then two months later, I met her husband at a bar. I did not know that she was married! As it turns out, her husband is a good guy. Now I really feel bad and don’t know what to do.” This young man is a very spiritual guy and appears shaken. I asked him how many times he “dated” this woman. He said maybe five and that the sex happened only once. What should I tell him?

Employee Relations Resource Dear ERR: Some married people cheat on their spouses and some married cheaters fuck people who wouldn’t fuck ’em if they knew they were married. It’s unfortunate — and unnecessary. There’s no shortage of people who will fuck married people. Tell him that some married couples have open relationships, some have “don’t ask, don’t tell” understandings about outside sex, some married men are into cuckolding, and some people “cheat” because they’re married to “good guys” or “good gals” who have sexually neglected and/or rejected them. Your employee has no way of knowing if this woman’s husband was wronged. But if a wrong has been committed, he didn’t knowingly do anything wrong, so the wrong isn’t his. Nor is it his to right. He should avoid further contact with this woman, unless he gets an explanation that eases his conscience. And he should avoid becoming buds with the husband, however good a guy he might be. Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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februarY 6 -12, 2014

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AT TENTION: EX-OFFENDERS & AT RISK JOB SEEKERS Do you need job placement assistance? Do you need your criminal record expunged?

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The Pitch: February 6, 2014