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APRIL 24-30, 2014 | fRee | VoL. 33 No. 43 | PItch.com

Dimming star Things jusT geT less and less brighT aT The ciTy’s shrinking daily paper. by david hudnall

a p r il 2 4 -3 0, 2 014 | V ol . 3 3 no. 4 3 E d i t o r i a l

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jen Chen, Liz Cook, April Fleming, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Savage, Nick Spacek

a r t

Art Director Jeremy Luther Layout Editor Dillon Kinnison Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever

P r o d u c t i o n

not s o mean j ean Jean Peters Baker didn’t exactly chase James Tindall from office. b y s t e v e vo c k r o d t

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di mmi ng star

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

Things just get less and less bright

a d v E r t i s i n g

at the city’s shrinking daily paper.

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Sharon Donat, Megan Fletcher, Becky Losey, Alyssa Scaletty Director of Marketing and Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland Digital Marketing Specialist Lisa Kelley

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Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B u s i n E s s

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Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

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Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Chief Operating Officer/Group Publisher Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales and Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

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d i s t r i B u t i o n

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

c o P y r i g h t

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2014 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

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Various Blonde’s Josh Allen holds nothing back. b y n ata l i e g a l l ag h e r

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Mohammed Whitaker is the suspect in KC’s HiGHWAy SHOOTiNGS case. BOuLEVARDiA announces its music lineup. JASPER’S RESTAuRANT: After 60 years, Mother knows best.

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H

erschel Young hadn’t finished his first day on the job before a lawsuit was filed to remove him from it. It was 2011, and Young was presiding commissioner of Cass County. Prosecutor Teresa Hensley, who filed the suit, said the law was clear: Felons couldn’t hold public office in Missouri. Young was popped in 1995 for slapping a guy who had spit on Young’s wife. He challenged the statute but lost when the Missouri Supreme Court sided with Hensley’s interpretation of the law. Action against felons holding office in Jackson County is far less swift. James Tindall, for instance, was able to serve a long tenure in the Jackson County Legislature, despite a 1999 felony conviction for tax fraud. And he was cruising toward re-election in the 2014 primary, until a 27-year-old law-school student figured out what Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker seemed unsure of until recently. Zachary Berkstresser, who is running for Tindall’s seat, filed a lawsuit March 31 in Jackson County Circuit Court to challenge the legislator’s eligibility to hold an office he’d won in 2006 and 2010. “The county prosecutor would not take action,” Berkstresser said on his campaign site that day. “So I did.” Baker, who was appointed Jackson County prosecutor in 2011 by County Executive Mike Sanders, had been in office for three years before deciding to take up the Tindall matter. The investigation wasn’t her idea. On March 14, the Missouri secretary of state told her to look into it after receiving complaints about Tindall’s eligibility. Despite the precedent set by the Missouri Supreme Court in the Hensley-Young case,

Jean Peters Baker: delayed justice Baker consulted the Missouri attorney general, her own staffers and an outside law firm, asking whether Tindall could continue to serve. “We all came to the same conclusion: The law in the state of Missouri is clear that a felon may not hold elected office,” Baker said in a written statement issued April 10. That statement came out only after Tindall announced his resignation, effective June 30. Baker was slow to dance with the facts but picked up the pace for her jig on Tindall’s political grave. “My job is to uphold the law aside from political pressure, past support or friendship,” she said, affecting a tough tone. “Today, that’s exactly what my office has done.” That sounds awfully courageous. So to recap: • Baker becomes prosecutor in 2011 (the same year that Hensley gave Young only a few hours in office before challenging his legitimacy) at a time when Tindall’s felony status was not a secret. • She watches in 2012 as the Missouri Supreme Court affirms a prosecutor’s duty to remove a felon from office. • She decides to start thinking about Tindall’s status as a politician after the Missouri secretary of state refers the matter to her office. • She waits until Tindall resigns, then tells the media that her office has upheld the law. Tindall’s departure from office is no heartbreaker. The rules are the rules, no matter how long a county prosecutor waits to almost enforce them.

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

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DIMMING STAR THINGS JUST GET LESS AND LESS BRIGHT AT THE CITY’S SHRINKING DAILY PAPER. by David Hudnall

O

n Monday, October 21, 2013, Greg Farmer, senior assistant managing editor of The Kansas City Star, placed a rare call to Karen Dillon. He wanted to know when Dillon would be in the office that day.

Good reporters are invariably compared with canines: “dogged,” a “pit bull,” a “bulldog.” Dillon belongs to this breed; she’s the kind of journalist whom other journalists admire. On the morning Farmer called, Dillon had been with the Star for 22 years, during which time she had earned a reputation as one of the city’s best investigative reporters. In 1998, she won a George Polk Award for a series of stories on genderequality violations at the NCAA. A report on controversial practices by Missouri police during drug-money seizures earned her the 2001 Goldsmith Prize for investigative reporting from Harvard University. More recently, Dillon had been patrolling Johnson County for the Star, uncovering stories about missing municipal money in Merriam, improper searches of homes in Leawood, and the fractious city government in Shawnee. Dillon, in other words, possesses the sharp instincts that build up over the course of a career in bullshit detection. But even a rookie would have intuited something

amiss about Farmer’s call. Dillon paused, then asked Farmer if she was being fired. “You know the drill, Karen,” Farmer said, according to Dillon. She did. Less than a year before, on December 10, 2012, Dillon had answered a similar call from Farmer. He asked her to meet him in the publisher’s conference room — grim site of dozens of the layoffs that have decimated the Star’s ranks over the past decade. There, she met the firing squad: Farmer; Steve Shirk, the Star’s managing editor; Mike Fannin, Star editor and vice president; and Chris Piwowarek, human resources vice president. Also present in the room, curiously, was another Star reporter, Dawn Bormann. “Fannin explained that he had been told to eliminate a position and he had selected either my job or Dawn’s,” Dillon tells The Pitch. “He said I had seniority, so if I decided to leave, Dawn would stay, and vice versa. Piwowarek talked about the process and said we had one week to decide.” Dillon and Bormann exited the building continued on page 8

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a p r i l 2 4 - 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 Illustrations t h e p i by t cJohn h Lee 7

Dimming Star, continued from page 7 and spent the next several hours talking over the ugly and bizarre task their employer had just assigned them. They eventually agreed that Dillon would stay — she had two young grandchildren to take care of. “I had thought that being fired would be the worst thing I could face,” Dillon says. “I realized I was wrong. I hadn’t prepared myself for being put into the position of sacrificing a friend.” By the following day, word had spread in KC media circles. Hearne Christopher Jr., the former Star gossip columnist who took a buyout from the paper in 2006, published an account of the meeting on his blog, KC Confidential, comparing the Star’s management approach with something out of The Hunger Games. Christopher’s piece caught the eye of Jim Romenesko, who runs a nationally influential journalism site. “Any chance you want to comment on being put into this position?” Romenesko asked Dillon in an e-mail. “I knew that any response would be frowned upon by management,” Dillon says. “I also knew that journalistic cowardice would not be acceptable. I decided to walk the tightrope the best I could by responding truthfully, yet not criticizing management.” She wrote back: “It’s one of the most difficult situations I’ve ever faced.” Romenesko’s story was subsequently picked up by several other outlets, including Gawker, The Huffington Post and Bloomberg Businessweek. The next day, Fannin called Dillon to his office. He was furious. “A special project that two reporters had worked on for a year had been published that Sunday and Monday,” Dillon says. “Fannin actually told me that the favorable reaction he had expected from the series was being overtaken by the Hunger Games controversy.” Fannin pounded on his desk and demanded to know if Dillon had been the one who called Christopher. Then he reprimanded her for responding to Romenesko. “I asked him what he expected me to do and was met with a stony silence,” Dillon says. “I told him that I had been put in the situation unwillingly. I said I wouldn’t lie to Romenesko or anyone, and I thought it was cowardly to respond with a ‘no comment.’ I told him I gave Romenesko the most innocuous quote I could think of.” Fannin dismissed Dillon from his office. The next day, Star publisher Mi-Ai Parrish sent out an employee memo with a less-than-plausible denial of the reports. “The Star has tried to make voluntary options available on many occasions when it has been necessary to make reductions in our workplace, in order to 8

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lessen the impact of involuntary eliminations,” Parrish wrote. “For this particular severance program, for any group of two or more employees in which a reduction is to occur we did offer the voluntary option. However, if there are no volunteers, as is our practice, the employee with the least tenure will be included in the reduction.” Got that? Ten months later, when Farmer again informed Dillon that her position was being eliminated, he began the meeting

Even before the Internet came along and disrupted the newspaper business model, though, the quality of many dailies was already suffering as a result of increased corporate ownership. As recently as 15 years ago, newspapers enjoyed luxurious operating margins — sometimes as high as 30 percent. Wall Street liked the looks of it: big dough, lots of market share, not much pressure to innovate. Before long, what once were hometown-owned organizations with vested interests in the communities

“I had thought that being fired woul d be the worst thing I coul d face. I real ized I was wrong. I hadn’t prepared myself for being put into the position of sacr ifi cing a fr i end .” by pointing out that she was in the room alone this time around — “an obviously sarcastic reference to the previous fiasco,” Dillon says. She believes she was targeted for this second layoff as punishment for the answer she had given to Romenesko. (Neither Farmer nor Fannin would comment on Dillon’s termination.) In February, Dillon landed at KSHB Channel 41. Last month, she led a multipart investigation for the station into Kansas law enforcement’s restrictive open-records laws, drawing national attention to the issue. Dillon, who was the only full-time reporter at the Star dedicated to covering government in Johnson County, has been replaced by freelancers who contribute occasional pieces to the paper’s 913 section. The Star, headquartered two miles east of the Kansas-Missouri state line, has just one full-time government reporter covering the state of Kansas: Brad Cooper, who covers the Statehouse, 60 miles away in Topeka. Count only metro-area reporters, and the number is zero.

T

here are several reasons that KC’s daily paper does not document the metro as comprehensively as it once did. “Because the Internet” is the short answer. A more detailed explanation would note the emergence of Craigslist (which, by letting users post ads for free, effectively caused newspapers’ classified-ad revenue to evaporate) and the foolish decision, made in the 1990s by just about every newspaper on the planet, to devalue itself by giving away its editions for free online (which taught readers to avoid paying for subscriptions).

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they served became budget line items for billion-dollar conglomerates. This is, to an extent, what happened to the Star. It hasn’t been locally owned since 1977, when it was sold to New York–based Capital Cities Communications, which later merged with Disney, which in 1997 sold the Star to Knight Ridder. In June 2006, Knight Ridder sold the Star, along with 20 other newspapers, to the McClatchy Co., a Sacramento-based newspaper chain, for $6.5 billion. After the sale, McClatchy CEO Gary Pruitt came to Kansas City to give a customary newsroom pep talk. “He’s standing up behind this podium, giving this big spiel about how great of a purchase it was,” says Jim Fitzpatrick, a former Star bureau chief in Wyandotte and Johnson counties, who was with the paper for 36 years. “When in fact McClatchy had bought all these papers at the exact wrong time and had taken on all this debt to do so. The previous few years with Knight Ridder had been pretty rough — lots of buyouts and layoffs. So I raised my hand and asked if he was planning any buyouts. He just laughed and said they were planning on expanding, not contracting. I just remember thinking, ‘How the fuck am I gonna get out of here?’” (Fitzpatrick retired later that year.) Newspapers are struggling everywhere, of course. But McClatchy papers are facing a particularly scary future. In 2005, McClatchy stock traded at $75 a share. Today, the share price hovers around $6. And the company still carries a staggering amount of debt from the Knight Ridder purchase: $1.5 billion in consolidated debt, as of its 2013 SEC filing. The hope that the print business model might be replicated online fades more and more with each passing quarterly state-

ment. Print advertising revenue and print circulation continue to drop as readers go online for their news. In theory, the Star could just transfer its ad rates and circulation fees to the Web. But online advertising fetches only a fraction of what print advertising does. The paper has erected a paywall online, called Star Plus. But the newsroom is thin from a decade of steady layoffs, and getting readers to pony up $120 a year to read an online Star is a tough sell. “This is the big question for companies like McClatchy — the question of digital transition,” says Ken Doctor, a newspaper analyst who writes the “Newsonomics Of” column for Harvard’s Nieman Journalism Lab. “Can they cut the legacy costs — printing papers, operating presses, owning huge office buildings, trucks, the old circulation apparatus — and grow new revenues? Because there is no growth on the print side of things. You just have to try to manage the print side down while growing the digital side as much as possible. But you have to have enough news capacity to produce a substantial enough product to entice people to pay for all-access subscriptions, like the Star’s Plus program. And that is the tough part.” McClatchy’s only play at the moment, apart from filing for bankruptcy, is to unload assets and use the cash to pay down debt. It appears to be moving in that direction, having recently sold its stake in apartments.com, which netted the company $90 million. Cars.com, another digital classified company in which McClatchy shares ownership, is also being shopped around, reportedly for around $3 billion. McClatchy’s share of such a sale, after taxes, would be $475 million. A windfall like that could greatly reduce McClatchy’s debt burden. McClatchy stock rose at news of the potential cars.com sale, a sign of encouragement from the market. But even after such a deal, McClatchy would still have close to a billion dollars of debt on the books. And it would still have to figure out how to suck revenue out of a shrinking industry, mostly through specialized products, events and marketing services. A recent internal McClatchy memo boasts that 39 percent of the company’s revenue is now derived from sources outside the daily paper, namely digital advertising and digital marketing. But its total revenues aren’t growing — they were down 5 percent in 2013, compared with 2012, “due to the continued decline in demand for advertising,” according to its annual filing. “Obviously, when we talk about these financials, we’re talking about how they translate to the health of the newsroom, which produces the paper,” Doctor says. “At McClatchy and elsewhere, they’ve already continued on page 10

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g r o . y t i c s a s n a k k l a aidsw Y! L I M A F E WE AR

Nweew bsite!

hat McClatchy’s woes mean for the staff at 1729 Grand is more of the same: layoffs, buyouts, fur-

in that section. Indeed, the paper’s only notable hiring the past couple of years is its acquisition of a husband-and-wife pair from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Vahe Gregorian, a (white, male, gray-haired) sportswriter who replaced Kent Babb as the paper’s second sports columnist, and Cynthia Billhartz Gregorian, imported to edit the fluffy House + Home section. Check the Star’s homepage on a weekend, and you’re likely to find that fully half the stories are sports-related. From a business perspective, this makes a limited amount of sense. Kansas

loughs and, as of last year, wage freezes. “Miserable,” “morguelike,” “paranoid,” “bleak” — these are among the words that current and former Star employees use when asked by The Pitch to describe the mood in the daily’s newsroom. What this means for KC’s citizens is a lighter paper, one without the resources to cover an entire metro. The Star has shuttered its bureaus in Independence, Johnson County and Wyandotte County; western Jackson County is the only part of the city where it still maintains a significant news presence. Significant but hardly robust: Roughly 20 reporters are now on the metro desk — down from a high of 100. Meanwhile, the Star continues to pay actual salaries to lightweights such as Jenée Osterheldt, whose recent columns explore such topics as her sick dog, Lindsay Lohan’s reality show, and how the seasonal Easter bunny statues on the Plaza are scary-looking. And though the sports desk hasn’t gone without departures, there has been little reduction overall

City is a sports town, after all, and the Star is answering a perceived want from its audience. Certainly readers don’t want their local news to contain only stories of civic malfeasance. But American journalism is rooted in something like a higher calling — the idea of speaking truth to power. So when the Star lays off somebody like Dillon but keeps a writer primarily tasked with rewriting celebrity click bait from around the Web, the message to readers is that the Star isn’t serious about its civic and investigative duties. Dailies in cities of comparable size are less derelict. Milwaukee’s Journal Sentinel lost about 100 employees in a buyout several years ago, but the paper’s commitment to investigative journalism has endured. It has built a special “Watchdog” unit, staffed by nine reporters, which won the paper the Pulitzer Prize in 2008, 2010 and 2011. (The Star’s last Pulitzer came in 1992.) This strategy has translated to respect from its readers rather than financial disaster.

Dimming Star, continued from page 8 suffered great losses in the newsroom. The product has taken a big hit. Given the situation on the financial side, I don’t think there’s any chance we’ll see any newsroom growth at McClatchy papers until at least 2018. And by then, who knows how small they’ll be?”

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Stock of the Journal Sentinel’s owner, the Milwaukee-based Journal Communications, is trading two points higher than McClatchy’s. “We’re definitely not immune from the economic realities that face journalism,” says Greg Borowski, the Journal Sentinel’s investigations editor. “But the top editors here have always maintained that it’s important to do public-service journalism. They’ve made it a top priority, and we see major results from our big investigative projects. Will the average Packers story have more hits online than the average courts story? Yes. But we don’t measure our impact strictly by how many hits we get. We look at the impact on the public and the community as well.” Star editors and management — a group, it’s worth noting, whose positions haven’t been cut nearly as sharply as those in other areas of the paper — would likely point to last year’s “Nightmare in Maryville” story

in the documents was an exchange between Coleman and a Nodaway County prosecutor in which she admitted that, on the night of the alleged rape, she indicated to Matthew Barnett, the accused rapist, that she might provide him sexual favors if he bought her alcohol. The Star’s report on the deposition omitted this bit of information; such nuance apparently did not fit into its established narrative of Coleman as a one-dimensional victim. “In unusual tactic, Miranda rights were read to Daisy Coleman in Maryville case” went the headline.

E

arlier this month, McClatchy sold the Anchorage Daily News, the 13th-largest newspaper in its portfolio, to the Alaska Dispatch, a billionaireowned, online-only publication founded in 2008. McClatchy said in a press release that it hadn’t planned to sell the Anchorage

“I don’t think there’s any chance we’ll see any newsroom growth at McClatchy papers until at least 2018. And by then, who knows how small they’ll be?” as evidence of the paper’s investigative bona fides. The story, by reporter Dugan Arnett, detailed the alleged sexual assault of a young woman named Daisy Coleman, and her family’s mistreatment by Maryville law enforcement and townspeople. It was an explosive story told well, and it became a viral sensation after Gawker picked it up and hacktivist site Anonymous took up Coleman’s cause. Fannin, who won several awards as the editor of the Star’s sports page before being promoted to the paper’s top editor position, is said to have entered the newsroom the day after Arnett’s article ran and declared “Nightmare in Maryville” “the story of the century.” (Fannin strongly denies this. “I’m very proud of the job that we did on that story,” he says. “But I can assure you no one at the Star said that or thinks that.”) The staff at KCUR 89.3 might have been interested to hear his alleged boast. The station had reported on the Coleman case five months before the Star, in a 1,900word piece called “Why Was the Maryville Rape Case Dropped?” Arnett and his editors made their version of the story sing, no question. But the packaging and follow-up also reeked of prize-sniffing. In March, after a special prosecutor re-examined the case and found insufficient evidence for a rape charge, new depositions related to the case surfaced. Among the revelations

Daily News until Alice Rogoff made an offer. But presumably the company is happy to have the extra $34 million. The Alaska Dispatch was originally the effort of two Alaska journalists who were concerned that local and state issues weren’t getting adequate attention from Alaska media outlets such as the Anchorage Daily News, the state’s largest daily. They eventually landed on the radar of Rogoff, a former CFO at U.S. News and World Report and the wife of David Rubenstein, the billionaire founder of the Carlyle Group. Rogoff bought in, and with her financing, the Dispatch was able to hire talent away from other media outlets and build an operation that, at the time of the acquisition of the Anchorage Daily News, boasted 30 employees devoted to covering serious issues in Alaska. Rogoff is only the most recent wealthy individual to purchase a struggling newspaper. Jeff Bezos famously bought The Washington Post last year. Warren Buffett now owns several daily papers, including his hometown Omaha World-Herald. Minnesota Timberwolves owner Glen Taylor recently purchased the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Could something like what happened in Alaska happen here? There are certainly plenty of people with deep enough pockets continued on page 13

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Dimming Star, continued from page 11 to buy the Star. There are not, however, any start-ups like the Alaska Dispatch doing original reporting in Kansas City. That’s somewhat unusual for a city this size. Nonprofit news ventures seeking to fill the gaps left by diminished dailies have sprung up in cities across the country over the past half-decade or so: MinnPost in Minneapolis, the St. Louis Beacon, Voice of San Diego, The Texas Tribune, Wisconsin Watch. Kevin Davis is the CEO and executive director of the Investigative News Network, which promotes some of these nonprofit public-service journalism endeavors. “These are news outlets that cover primarily civic-based news: the mayor, city hall, the budget, the school board,” Davis tells The Pitch. “In other words, the areas that seem to be most lacking in what’s left of the for-profit newspaper business, which tends to focus its remaining resources on sports and business — where

came from donors big and small. Emily Pulitzer, a well-known St. Louis philanthropist, put up an initial challenge grant. “She said, ‘I’ll give you this amount of money — several hundred thousand dollars — and I’ll match you one dollar for every three dollars that other people donate,” Freivogel tells The Pitch. “And that was smart of her because it made sure we were broadening our support throughout St. Louis — it made it so it wasn’t just a thing that she was responsible for. It forced us to go out and talk to lots of people and listen to what they were looking for from a news organization. And they got to know us in the process.” Freivogel says the Beacon’s basic pitch to donors was that good journalism, like the arts, is a fundamental resource for a community, and that it was suffering in St. Louis because of economic shifts in the media landscape. “Back in 2008, people weren’t used to the idea that substantive local news coverage was something that they should be

“I t h i n k w h at we’re go i n g t o see, m o v i n g for w ard , i s a m i xed n ews market of nonprofits and for-profits — kind of like how metro areas have for-profit and nonprofit hospitals.”

you can sell more ads. Our members think of themselves as kind of a melding of community organizers and newspapers.” Davis notes that no one model fits each market, and none have really supplanted daily papers. “I think what we’re going to see, moving forward, is a mixed news market of nonprofits and for-profits — kind of like how metro areas have for-profit and nonprofit hospitals,” he says. “I don’t think either has the potential to grow to the size dailies once were, but I think there’s a patchwork situation that you are starting to see, where some of these nonprofits are working hand-in-glove with smaller, more nimble for-profits.” Margie Freivogel worked 34 years at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch as a reporter, a Washington correspondent and an assistant managing editor, before founding the St. Louis Beacon in 2008. She says the budget for the Beacon’s first-year staff — Freivogel, three editors, five reporters, a fundraiser and a general manager — was around $700,000. Funding for the venture

supporting with their giving,” Freivogel says. “As time went on, it became a more familiar idea.” Late last year, the Beacon merged with St. Louis Public Radio, creating a newmedia operation that rivals the declining Post-Dispatch. “Now we have a newsroom twice the size of what either of us had separately,” Freivogel says. “We don’t overlap on stories, we can cover more with a lot of depth and context, and we can do much more with things like data visualization and long-term investigations.” A similar partnership recently sprouted in Denver, where Rocky Mountain PBS, public-radio station KUVO and the Rocky Mountain Investigative News Network have merged to better cover Colorado. “Daily newspapers aren’t going to totally go away, but they’re never going to have the dominant position they once had,” Freivogel says. “Meanwhile, there’s this great opportunity to use digital media, which is vastly superior for journalism and communications. It’s an exciting time to be in the business of reporting — if you can

get in the right position financially and technologically to execute it.”

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iven its debt burden and the general inflexibility that accompanies out-of-town corporate ownership, the Star is unlikely to engage in any experimental partnerships anytime soon. Certainly, it won’t be teaming up with The Gardner News or The Dispatch in Shawnee, two suburban papers that last year quarreled with the Star over a contract for legal notices in Johnson County. Rhonda Humble, publisher of the Gardner News, believes that Johnson County’s Board of County Commissioners violated state law by awarding the Star the contract, which amounts to roughly $200,000 a year. “It is frustrating to me that the county commission’s decision is contradictory to their own published bid requirements,” Humble tells The Pitch. “And I’m disappointed that the awarding of the bid to a Missouri-based corporation flies in the face of state statute. It makes me wonder whether there was not a political motivation to the legal maneuverings of the commission and county staff to sidestep legal requirements. “One requirement is that the newspaper that publishes the notices must be published in Kansas,” she adds. “The Star’s press and headquarters is in Missouri. So then they say that the Olathe Daily News, which the Star owns, has an office in Lenexa. But that’s not even a real newspaper. The Olathe Daily News is just an insert in the Saturday Star. It’s not recognized by the Kansas Press Association. It wasn’t, at the time of the bid, registered with the secretary of state in Kansas. And it didn’t have a USPS number, which is also a requirement for the contract.” Humble doesn’t think much about the way the Star has conducted itself in Johnson County, either. “I work in Gardner, and I live in Olathe,” she says. “And I never see any Star reporters anymore. They have a nonpresence. When did they fire Karen Dillon? That’s the last reporter I saw out here.”

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SATURDAY, MAY 17 2 P.M. - 6 P.M. Rain or Shine

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WEEK OF APRIL 24-30, 2014

FLOWER POWER

Jenny Kendler’s “New Ways to See” busts (including the one pictured here) are among the works in the Charlotte Street Foundation’s moving new group exhibition, The Stench of Rotting Flowers. See review on page 17.

Daily listings on page 32 pitch.com

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opening weekend april 25–27

roads of

ar abia archaeology and history of the kingdom of saudi arabia

45th & Oak 3 blocks east of the Plaza nelson-atkins.org

Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is organized by the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution in association with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ExxonMobil and Saudi Aramco are gratefully acknowledged as principal co-sponsors of the tour of Roads of Arabia in the United States. Sponsorship is also provided by The Olayan Group and Fluor Corporation.

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Principal co-sponsors of the US tour

art

Mourning gloriEs

Charlotte Street’s Stench of Rotting Flowers: brilliantly decadent decay.

By

L i z C ook

I

t started with a ghost. Charlotte Street curator-in-residence Danny Orendorff divined the subject for his latest exhibition, The Stench of Rotting Flowers, from a haunting photograph of a now-deceased glamour-puss. The photograph in question, Peter Hujar’s haunting “Candy Darling on Her Deathbed,” captures one of Andy Warhol’s superstars posing in her hospital bed, facing death with flowers and flawless lipstick. “I wanted to explore the tonal affectations of bereavement,” Orendorff explains. “Our attachment to heartbreak and sorrow and how we can become indulgent in it all.” That theme, decadence in the face of decay, echoes throughout the exhibition, though Hujar’s photo isn’t part of it. The 13 artists on display at La Esquina collate diverse, secular responses to grief, often fusing ceremonial qualities with camp appeal. It’s nothing new for Orendorff, whose curatorial residency has been marked by an interrogative engagement with social and political themes. No matter the subject, Orendorff’s selections probe barriers: between classes, between cultures, between fine art and massproduced kitsch. The latter division is on full display in local artist Rain Harris’ porcelain confections. Orendorff selected two pieces from her “Poison Bottle” series for the show at La Esquina, and they look, at first blush, like something you might find on your grandmother’s dressing table. The organic shapes bloom with feminine curves and ornate embellishments, floral patterns lustered to a pearlescent sheen. But Harris amps up the accents to a garish pitch, adorning her pieces with plenty of low-culture flairs. Barbie hair spills from the spouts of “Bon Bons for Babs,” cheap rhinestones trapping light around its base. “Festoon” adds feathers to the mix, as well as an erotic charge in the form of pointy, gold-dipped nubs that jut from the bottle like nipples. Harris’ “Poison Bottle” pieces are glamour made grotesque, a worthy complement to Candy Darling’s toilette. They’re also incredibly detailed and fastidious, another important connection to the economy of loss. “I wanted to draw out qualities of the handmade, the meticulously made,” Orendorff says. Those touches tap into the labor and cost of planning a funeral. It’s hard to imagine something more enormous than Jesse Harrod’s sculpture, a lavender tissue box nearly 10 feet tall. “The Enormity of Lesbian Grief” is a behemoth of taffeta and lace from discarded wedding dresses, part minimalist sculpture, part radical nod to the Lavender Menace, a group of lesbian protestors in the 1970s. “Enormity” evokes a tension

Clockwise from top left: “For It Sparkled Like Bracelets and Breast-Pins” by Marie Bannerot McInerney; “Bouquet” by Jeff Tackett; “The Enormity of Lesbian Grief” by Jesse Harrod; “New Ways to See I & II” by Jenny Kendler between the domestic connotations of wed- the surface in an unctuous film. On the floor, Easter lilies peek from peat moss, flanking the ding dresses and handcraft and the sculpture’s painting and inviting you to approach as if to more threatening scale and sexual imagery. Lace details droop from the flowers’ openings an altar. The flowers were lush and blooming on this show’s opening day, but you can imaglike probing, wet tongues. ine the lilies withering and Many of the works at La curling with time, diffusEsquina are similarly grand The Stench ing the fouler perfume that in scale, including an unof Rotting Flowers Orendorff’s title suggests. usually large painting by Charlotte Street Foundation It may seem hard to Peregrine Honig. The local Through June 6 at La Esquina, reconcile Edie Fake’s dazartist’s “#DiscoSaintSelfie” 1000 West 25th Street, zling pen-and-ink meditaanchors the exhibit in an charlottestreet.org tions with hashtags and intricate combination of inBarbie hair, but Orendorff sincere self-indulgence and is determined to give authentic grief its due. authentic beauty. The materials are just as diFake’s “Gateway” drawings are individual verse: A lush floral wreath, rendered in oils, is complicated by a fractured halo of mirror-ball imaginings for deceased friends, blueprints for an afterlife custom-built for one. The vibrant, tiles (poised at head height — perfect for snapsaturated colors and tessellated shapes evoke ping selfies). Glue drips across the tiles, coating

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Islamic tile work or Navajo textiles, sacred explorations of geometric designs. Fake’s work is characterized by meticulous mark making: Each exacting pen line seems like a meditation, a secular analogue to worrying rosary beads between your fingers. Though tonally different from some of the other works on display, Fake’s elaborate portals offer a reminder well within the show’s context: Pain questioned or mocked is not pain less keenly felt. No matter how the artists might denigrate the saccharine, loss and grief remain enormous, complex specters. The Stench of Rotting Flowers succeeds in teasing out diverse, at times contradictory, responses to grief, capturing the solemn as well as the silly. Candy Darling had it right: Loss can be luxurious, a floral perfume turning sickly in the air.

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S TA G E

diving in

Before Jonathan Jensen heads to NYC,

By

he answers our Stage Questionnaire.

De bor a h hir s ch

ew York is about to get a package deal. Jonathan Jensen — actor, singer and theater administrator — and his wife, actress Jessica Jensen, are headed east together. The Kauffman Center’s director of patron services has been busy behind the scenes downtown, but he has also kept a foot on the stage and a hand in theater projects. On the eve of his departure, The Pitch conducted this exit interview by e-mail. The Pitch: You’re planning a move to NYC. What brought about that decision? Jensen: It’s now or never. It’s always been a dream to live and work in New York, and with my recent management experience and my wife’s training at UMKC, we feel confident that Kansas City has prepared us to make a splash in the biggest theatercommunity pond around. What do you hope to accomplish there? It would be great to win a Tony … haha. More importantly, I hope that I can have some impact, big or small, on the future of our industry and the artistic community as a whole. Where’s home? Terre Haute, Indiana What brought you to KC or kept you here? My wife is a graduate student at UMKC. How and when did you decide on a career in the performing arts? When I was deciding on which college to attend, I was debating whether I was going to swim in college. I had been recruited by some big schools, but I really wanted to pursue musical theater as a career. Unfortunately, swimming at 5 a.m. and rehearsing until midnight wasn’t going to work out well. I distinctly remember going for a run with my best friend and talking about the decision to ditch swimming and focus on acting. I think I would have been happy as a swimmer in college, but I think my life has turned out extremely well given the choice I made. It would have been the difference of balancing my swimming career with my schoolwork and acting as opposed to just acting alone. I was able to focus much more on my studies, and I believe that paid off. Where did you train? Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana How and when did you get into acting? I was 10 when I was in my first musical, Big River. I was in the ensemble. It was produced at the local high school. I felt so cool because I was in elementary school but performing on the “big stage.” That led to many bit parts as the token kid, i.e., Winthrop in The Music Man, etc. I got hooked. How often do you perform? 18

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James Banasiak

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Now, I’m not able to perform very often. Jensen takes the next step. I sang with Sutton Foster in Indianapolis, It’s been a long, involved process that Indiana, last October. That was the last perstarted with a conversation in 2009 with our formance where I was onstage. Prior to that, project sponsor, Beth Turcotte. She wanted I did a couple of staged readings of The Circus to write a musical, and we went from there. in Winter in Muncie, Indiana, and New York After finding the novel, we finished our first City. Locally I performed in Dada Is Dead/Long draft in the spring of 2010. It has been rewritLive Dada at the KC Fringe Festival in 2012. ten numerous times since then. In fact, a new How and when did you get into writing for writer, Hunter Foster, has recently joined the the theater, and what projects have you been team to help improve the piece and get it to involved in? the level it needs. I’ve participated in readI started writing when I was at Ball State. ings in Muncie, Indiana; Chicago; I was involved with writing the musiand New York City, but I have cal adaptation of The Circus in never been in a fully produced Winter, a novel, during the final version yet. It was presented semester of my undergraduate at the Kennedy Center’s studies. American College Theater With whom did you collabFestival in January 2012 in orate and what has your role t a ine small pieces and won several been on this project? Onl awards. It will have its first proInitially, I was a member of fessional production in October the writing team. I contributed to 2014 at the Goodspeed Opera House writing the book, or the scene work, in Connecticut. of the musical. I peppered in some lyrics, Your wife, Jessica, also is in theater. How too, but I was also used as a performer to did the two of you meet? Do you perform topresent the piece at the conclusion of the gether or work on joint projects? project. I collaborated with 14 other writJessica and I met as students, and we ers at Ball State under the direction of Beth started dating during a production while Turcotte and the Virginia Ball Institute for playing each other’s romantic interest. It Creative Inquiry. We collaborated with the was a classic “show-mance.” novelist, Cathy Day, as well, who has since Who’s your inspiration? become a great friend. I am inspired by the teachers in my life. What has it been like to adapt a novel and Whether that’s been at home, at school or also to get it produced?

More

Q&As pitch.co

pitch.com

m

out in the world, these teachers have shared their knowledge and experiences with me. I hope I can honor their legacy by sharing the knowledge I gain with the next generation of actors, administrators and artists. What are the best parts about what you do? I work in the coolest environment anyone could dream of, and what makes it better are the people who share that environment with me. What are the hardest parts? Working in the theater, especially when 330 performances and events are hosted in your facility, really limits the time you get out to other venues. Kansas City has so much to offer. I’m blown away by the productions our companies produce. I only wish I had time to see them all. I have to be very selective, and that is hard. There are many wonderful choices available to our audiences. Do you prefer being onstage or working behind the scenes, and why? Whether I’m working behind the curtain, on the stage or in the lobby, the heartbeat of the theater is still present. I feel the same rush of adrenaline if I’m working on a script as an actor or if I’m planning for the next production as an administrator. Onstage or off, what’s the worst thing that has happened during a performance? I was working during a dance performance a few years ago in Indiana when one of the dancers fell and broke her arm. That was pretty bad because it was obvious to everyone from the moment it happened that she was seriously hurt. I’m glad nothing has happened like that for a while. What’s the best thing? I met my wife. What’s your favorite theater genre? Musical theater What’s one of your all-time favorite shows? As a performer, Violet. Every element — the cast, crew, music, set, direction, choreography, concept — was perfect. I could have performed in that show for years without getting tired of it. As an audience member, August: Osage County on Broadway. What’s one of your favorite local shows? Inspecting Carol at the Unicorn Inspecting Carol was a very funny show. As I recall, your wife was in it. Inspecting Carol was great. I saw it a couple of times, not only to see my wife but because I really enjoyed it. A nice holiday spoof is fun when mixing up tradition with new experiences.

E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

s ta g e

Funeral Home

By

De bor a h hir s ch

A Little More Alive, at KC Rep, is pretty much DOA.

M

don ipock

om is dead. The house is filled with acquaintances. So you head to the basement rec room and get high. Seems reasonable. But singing an upbeat pop song about smoking “Pot at a Funeral” — sample lyric: Pot at a funeral might seem unusual but so is today — while playing with an oversized childhood teddy bear and bouncing around on the furniture seems like maybe gilding the lily a bit. This is our introduction to at least one millennial’s state of mind in A Little More Alive, onstage at the Kansas City Repertory Theatre’s Copaken Stage. Nate (Van Hughes), a 28-year-old going on 15, lives at home with his dad, Gene (Daniel Jenkins), and was witness to his mother’s final illness. Maybe he’s letting off steam or indulging in denial, but the mood Hughes takes a swing at A Little More Alive. of this opening number doesn’t convince. The actors are capable, and they’re also fine “Pot at a Funeral” is just the first piece of singers. Jenkins, in particular, finds moments the puzzle that is this “world premiere new musical” (directed by Sheryl Kaller and writ- that allow him to briefly delve beneath the surface. But the musical jumps from song to ten by Nick Blaemire, who composed the song with little thread between, limiting such book, music and lyrics). “Stay 24 more hours,” opportunities for him and the rest of the cast. Nate pleads with Jeremy (Michael Tacconi), Several talented musicians (directed by Cian his younger and more successful brother, who wants to bolt home to another city. Jeremy has McCarthy) remain offstage and out of sight, playing songs that, despite some striking arthe right idea. The two-hour running time of rangements and a few that hit the mark, sound this play already feels like plenty. too similar over the course of the show. Home movies play at the back of the stage As is often the case with a Rep production, (video creation and projection design by Josh Lehrer), and we see the mother there. Gene, the star is the set (designed here by Wilson Chin). Configured in three tiers — the basealways behind the camera out of frame, documented the big events and minutiae of their ment, the living area and an upstairs — it’s visually appealing and splits apart to become lives. And as these survivors view the archive, a playground with hanging swings or a rethe remaining parent sees the past with difmote locale in Vermont (where a fifth charferent eyes than his boys, who carry an inexplicable anger at this man for something their acter, the too-cute Molly, portrayed by Kayla mother did. They discover just what when Foster, appears for two numbers). Video and set conspire best in Act 2’s “Driving,” when they find some letters in the attic — a cliché relied on here to set up the family dysfunction Hughes, Tacconi and Mendez sing on a bare stage with landscape whizpowering the plot. zing by behind them. The If only there were some ausensation of rootlessness thentic connections among A Little More Alive Through May 11 at KC Rep’s goes the furthest toward the characters. I tried but Copaken Stage, 13th Street making an impression, could find no reason to care and Walnut, 816-235-2700, some reason to give this about this family. It isn’t unkcrep.org thin, disjointed show any til the fifth number, “Nobody thought later. Tells You,” that the three men I’m not t h i s mu s iand a hanger-on hospice cal’s target audience, but I’d guess that the worker, Lizzie (Lindsay Mendez), express what 20-something set isn’t going to be fully satthe aftermath of this loss feels like. The delayed reaction may be Blaemire’s intention, but it’s isfied, either. When these family members finally express their joint sadness in “I Miss,” quickly followed by Gene’s “House to Myself,” it occurs too late in the game. Maybe with in which the middle-aged widower relishes some reconfiguring, this show, like the charbeing a bachelor and a slob again. acters’ relationships, can be put back together It’s all very flip — not taboo-busting enough and healed. to be edgy, not amusing enough to remember. The material is too inert to engage; even the show’s title fails to stick. E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

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mug moralizing, leaden irony, Old Testament punishments — yup, it’s Lars von Trier. Oh, and cocks. So many cocks. And vaginas. And whip-welted asses. And grim fucking. And solemn pronouncements about fucking. What else could this be but Nymphomaniac, the Danish writer-director’s visually brilliant, intellectually infuriating four-hour sexual Scheherazade? Well, nothing. Unless you count all the other formally thrilling but terminally dunderheaded Lars von Trier movies in which women are humiliated or beaten or violated. Which is … let’s see … all of them? That’s unfair and a little sweeping, but so is Trier. In his parochial cosmology, hellish evil lurks in every heart, with men in particular exhaling the stuff in atoms almost visible in the chilly European daylight. The kinder or simpler or more respectable-seeming the gentleman, the more likely he is to rape you. And to explain to you why, on this Godforsaken plane, you had it coming. It’s explanation, not sex, that drives Nymphomaniac, a mosaic of international genitalia arranged in varying states of penetration. The movie’s numbered, titled chapters are related in flashback as bruised Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg) tells virginal Seligman (Stellan Skarsgard) her life story — or, anyway, her vast sexual history. Seligman has found Joe halfconscious in an alley outside his cheerless flat, the victim of an attack. He brings her indoors and brews her some tea and coaxes her gently (uh oh) into conversation. He doesn’t judge her increasingly sordid confessions but instead filters them through dull, bookish metaphors — a conceit that, for the film’s first half, yields a few dry laughs. (Skarsgard is very, very good.) Just how Joe came to be assaulted on Seligman’s threshold is saved until almost the end. By that time, her tale’s manifold coincidences

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Gainsbourg, playing the afflicted. and absurdities (mainly her repeated intersections with a man called Jerôme, played mostly by a boy called Shia LaBeouf) have ceased to amuse or even much provoke. The second half of the story (Volume II) recapitulates key Trier memes, including a toddler endangered by a sex-distracted parent (last used to kick off Antichrist), and all of the director’s meta gesturing feels onanistic (ha?), if not just lazy. After a long run (“I discovered my cunt as a 2-year-old,” Joe says as she undertakes her autobiography), Joe’s vagina stops bringing her pleasure long about the third hour, and things get a little slow for everybody else, too. Even Seligman, who spends the first volume expounding on fly fishing (if only Izaak Walton could get royalties from this repurposing of his The Compleat Angler) and Bach and Fibonacci numbers, like Umberto Eco on a first date, starts to clam up. It’s probably better to plow through Nymphomaniac in one sitting, even as it darkens through a second half that gets away from the director and his cast. (It never gets away from Manuel Alberto Claro, whose often arresting cinematography on both parts almost betters his work on Trier’s previous movie — and his best — Melancholia.) The vignettes that make up Joe’s selective version of events hinge on a couple of recurring presences (besides Jerôme, there’s her father, played by a suddenly acceptable Christian Slater) but work best when she encounters someone who refuses to be part of the story. When a never-better Uma Thurman shows up, as a wronged wife using her three young sons as props, you almost wish that Nymphomaniac had been an HBO series. Then again, you could skip the whole thing.

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hen Lawrence chefs Rick Martin, Charlie Rascoll and Mikey Humphrey decided they wanted to open their own restaurant, they chose the location before the cuisine. The former La Parrilla space, at 814 Massachusetts, had been empty since that Latin American restaurant moved to 724 Massachusetts months earlier. Martin and his business partners liked the 19th-century building. What they found inside, less so. “It was in pretty rough shape before we moved in,” Martin says. “But the location was a real sweet spot for downtown Lawrence. It’s the real pivot point for downtown activity. The building’s owners, George and Judy Paley, wanted a tenant that they knew could bring a successful operation into the space.” Martin, Rascoll and Humphrey stand a good chance of fulfilling that mandate with Limestone Pizza Kitchen Bar, which they opened April 10 in a slick renovation of 814 Mass. All three owners are intimately familiar with the workings of downtown Lawrence. Wichita native Martin, 42, worked at Free State Brewing Co. for two decades (he left to teach culinary students), and Rascoll was one of the founders of the iconic WheatFields Bakery. Humphrey, who oversees the pizzas at Limestone, was the longtime head baker at WheatFields. Humphrey uses Kansas wheat flour to create what the partners call “Neoprairie” pizza: Neapolitan in style, Sunf lower State in ingredients. The pies are fired

in a 20,000-pound Le Panyol, a Frenchmanufactured white-clay oven that runs on wood. (Humphrey uses Kansas hedge wood because it’s a renewable resource.) The oven is encased in Kansas limestone. The restaurant’s menu is simple, dominated by six versions of 12-inch pizzas meant to change seasonally. Martin already has plans for a summer pizza of shredded zucchini and Gruyère. The recipes are light on tomato sauce, and the emphasis is on ingredient origin and quality rather than that usual pizza virtue: abundance. “You can’t put too much on these pizzas,” Martin says, “or they get globby. The heat of our oven extracts a lot of flavor from fewer ingredients. We want to focus on fresh, seasonal ingredients.” The single-page menu is heavy on housemade products, including tart sweet-sour pickles (potently spiced with garlic, allspice, clove and fresh dill) that are delicious folded into a feather-light slice of pizza. Among the other “Bar Bites” choices are hand-cut fries and house-made mozzarella, along with a startlingly fresh salad of micro greens with slices of fresh orange and grapefruit, chopped pistachios and nutty Taleggio cheese. If you ask Martin about the first time he tasted pizza — any pizza — he chuckles. Pizza Hut started in Wichita, and Martin fondly recalls the red-checked tablecloths and draft beers of the popular chain. Limestone Pizza Kitchen Bar is light-years removed from Pizza Hut, but the space exudes an appealing, small-

What the Flake? Spotted: a local version of the Cronut

A

Kronutz have corners.

round a year ago, New York’s Dominique Ansel Bakery launched the Cronut, the doughnut-croissant hybrid that quickly became one of the most talked-about pastries in the world. KC versions have begun springing up at local shops — and we spotted one at Edible Creations (5222 Blue Ridge Boulevard, Raytown). Name: Kronutz Price: $2 each (or “Kronut holes” at 25 cents each) Shape: Square (Those Kronut holes are shaped like tater tots.) Flavors: Original (glazed), maple bacon,

By

veterans open Limestone Pizza.

Ch a r l e s F e r ru z z a

angela c. bond

A Chip Off the Old ROCks

Three Lawrence restaurant

Fresh eggs, bacon, spinach and Gruyère top the Farmer at Limestone in Lawrence. town casualness. (And that small menu finds room for burgers, grilled cheese sandwiches, and a hefty plate of ham and beans.) “We plan to keep it as simple as we can, introducing a lot of specials as a way of testing new items for our menu and whatever the freshest produce we can obtain, from fresh corn to peaches to asparagus,” Martin says. “We want the pizza selection to evolve naturally.” Even the staffing so far has a certain sense of organic evolution about it. Martin, a former

cream cheese, cherry, pumpkin spice, hazelnut, German chocolate, chocolate, strawberry How Kronutz came about: Owner Taylor Holmes saw a story about the Cronut on Good Morning America. She was confident in the croissants she already offered, so she made the leap. She has been selling them since October. How the name came about: “I wanted to be different,” Holmes says. “I didn’t want to stick with that [Ansel’s] name. A good friend said, ‘Do it with a K and Z.’” Reaction: “Everyone loves it. No bad complaints.” Fun bakery fact: Holmes’ dad, James Holmes, used to own Napoleon Bakery in Westport. He helped her start Edible Creations. How they’re croissant-y: They’re buttery, and the flaky layers can be peeled off. How they’re doughnut-y: They’re fried in

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culinary-arts instructor for nearby Eudora High School who continues to teach cooking classes for the Lawrence school district, has hired several students from the latter program to work with him at Limestone. A graduating senior is the restaurant’s pastry chef. The 64-seat dining room serves food from 11 a.m. to midnight Monday through Saturday and from noon to 10 p.m. Sunday.

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com Charles Ferruzza’s Café review returns next week.

grapeseed oil. There’s a slight crunch from the glaze, and the interior is soft.

What The Pitch’s tasting panel thought of the original glazed: “It’s good, but it tastes like

a regular doughnut.” “It tastes like a croissant — it’s buttery. If you hadn’t told me it was a croissant, I might not have known.” “It’s like a glazed doughnut to me. Not to say I didn’t like it, but I don’t see the fuss.” “There’s more texture than a regular doughnut.” “I want to crawl inside of it and take a nap and, when I wake up, eat my way out.” Availability: The original glazed is available Tuesday-Saturday. The flavors are available in the store only on weekends but can be ordered for pickup during the week. Call the bakery at 816-388-0754 or send a message through its Facebook page. — Jen Chen

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23

fat c i t y

Down the hatch

Mary Roach passes through this week to talk about Gulp.

By

Charles Ferruzza

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t sounds so leisurely,” Mary Roach says. “Like sailing down the Danube — a picturesque adventure.” The journey she’s telling me about isn’t a river cruise, though, but a float trip down the alimentary canal. That’s the subject of the author’s most recent book, Gulp, newly issued in softcover. It’s the word canal that causes confusion, she says. That anatomical passage is a canal only in the most, you know, romantic sense. It’s really more of a fleshy tube that extends from your mouth to your anus and functions in the digestion and absorption of food and the elimination of waste. Just what happens along the alimentary canal is one of the adventures in fascinating (and occasionally gruesome) bodily functions that Roach traces in Gulp. Roach discusses the book — and the research behind its often hilarious anecdotes — at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 24, at the Kansas City Central Library (14 West 10th Street, 816-701-3400). Food, of course, is a primary passenger along the route, so Roach covers a range of culinary mysteries and answers some burning questions. Why is crunchy food so appealing? How much can you eat until your stomach bursts? Can constipation kill you? In fact, it’s just this kind of potentially embarrassing material that put Roach on the canal. She had gathered more research than you’d imagine possible for a magazine article about flatulence — or, more to the point, Beano, the over-the-counter enzyme that, the label assures you, “helps prevent gas before it starts.” “I had a lot of wonderful material that I didn’t use in the article,” Roach says. “I had it sitting in a file, and I thought, I could do something with this. So I did.” Roach’s Beano investigation makes up one of Gulp’s livelier chapters, “Dead Man’s Bloat,” in which she discusses the gas she produced — thanks to a hearty meal of chili — for a 1995 flatulence study. That tale is somewhat less ghastly (and way funnier) than Roach’s account of a 1968 nutritional sciences study held at the Berkeley campus of the University of California. Six young men there were sequestered in a metabolic chamber for two days, eating meals created for them from dead bacteria. “All of the subjects became very ill,” Roach says. “We’re talking vomiting, vertigo, nonstop bowel movements. They were being fed something described as a slimy slurry of aerobacter.” Shocker: It didn’t taste good. Which is the one way the body warns you not to take

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Chris hardy PhotograPhy

I

chances with slurry. There’s also smell, which heavily influences how we taste. “The tongue is much less important than the nose in terms of taste,” Roach says. “Did you know that we have two sets of interior nostrils? We can perceive five tastes — sweet, bitter, salty, sour and umami [a brothy sensation] — but an almost infinite number of smells. When you chew food or sip wine, gases are released, and as you exhale, these volatiles waft up through the nostrils.” Another discovery for Roach was the importance of tooth sensitivity to the dining experience: “We think of our teeth as these blunt, dumb mallets, but they’re actually exquisitely sensitive.”

Bodily functions are unexpectedly funny in Roach’s 2013 book, Gulp. Roach says her book might make a fascinating animated film. (“The book trailer online is animated,” she says. “With puppets!”). And certainly it does for the human digestive system what Raquel Welch and Stephen Boyd did for the circulatory system in the 1966 sci-fi movie Fantastic Journey. But the science in Gulp would stand Welch’s hair on end. Still, Roach’s sense of humor keeps the journey from mouth to anus a mostly upbeat affair. “I try not to be a downer,” she says.

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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25

MUSIC

Blonde AmBition

Various Blonde’s Josh Allen holds nothing back.

By

Natalie GallaGher

I

Zach Bauman

t’s 6:30 on a Sunday evening, and Various Blonde’s Josh Allen is a half-hour late to our interview. I don’t mind. We’re meeting at the Black & Gold Tavern, where there’s plenty of beer. Allen, who works as a bartender, is probably used to keeping Sundays to himself. Certainly he’s used to keeping Various Blonde to himself. Allen very much considers himself the proprietor of all that is Various Blonde, running the creative process and controlling as many of the remaining elements as he can. He has been known to joke that the only thing he has no influence over is the clothing his bandmates wear. When Allen does arrive, he flashes an apologetic smile and orders tequila before starting to brief me on what has changed since he started Various Blonde, in 2008. For one thing, there’s the lineup. These days, Allen has an experienced crew doing his bidding: drummer Mark Lomas, formerly of Black President, and bassist Evanjohn McIntosh, who spent years with Cherokee Rock Rifle. He has also recruited jazz pianist Eddie Moore, of Eddie Moore and the Outer Circle and Diverse. “When we jammed, when I heard him [Moore], I was like, ‘I need to make sure he’s never not jamming with me,’” Allen says. “When you’ve got a bunch of people that get along well, that are all really chill and love the genres that we’re pulling from, that’s great. abrasive, dissonant instrumental that doesn’t Everybody is comfortable with me trying to push past a minute and a half, but it’s one of mix up all of my interests.” There are a lot of interests. Allen designed the most interesting and demanding songs on the record. Various Blonde as a supercollider that conducts All of the tracks are dark and driving. Often all the music he has ever wanted to play. As he there’s a brief, ominous buildup — as on “In tells me about the upcoming Various Blonde album — Summer High, due in the summer — the Dark” — that leads to a venomous spasm of electric-guitar riffs. The new Various Blonde he lists the genres that make up his musical influences. It’s almost worrisome in its length sounds dangerous. You’d never get dangerous from Allen, and its disregard for sounds that traditionally though. He seems perfectly harmless: goodplay well together. humored, easy to talk to. When I ask him if “We’ll play a couple funk songs in a row — he’s afraid that blending so many different we’ll play a slow soul ballad, and then we’ll styles of music will result in an jam on some prog and jazz stuff,” imbalance, he’s ready with a Allen says. “I think when you’re Various Blonde counterargument. doing that, you have a better Sunday, April 27 “I think balance is easy,” he chance of holding people’s inat Czar says. “Some of the people that I terests longer, rather than, like, follow, they don’t set boundar‘We’re going to play all of this for the entire time.’ So many bands just pick one ies for themselves. Miles Davis always played under the big umbrella of jazz, but he did a sound, and I think we’re really good about exploring what we like and not setting limits.” lot of off-kilter things. He had people playing electric pianos and electric guitars and electric An early listen to some unmastered cuts from Summer High shows a surprising cohe- bass, and some people argue that that’s not sion. “Scripted Future” starts like experimen- jazz. You can’t say there’s no jazz essence there. “Flaming Lips get away with it, too,” Allen tal electronic jazz before Allen pushes some continues. “They can do a song like ‘Do You aggressive prog. “Falling Archways” is an 26

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Realize’ and then throw out a cover of King Crimson’s ‘21st Century Schizoid Man.’ That’s what I love. No one needs to be told, ‘Oh, we need more songs for teenagers. Write more of that.’” Allen’s conversation teems with examples like these. He drops references to artists both obscure and globally known, and he talks about sound with an audiophile’s authority. As the jukebox at Black & Gold rotates from Johnny Cash to Kiss, Allen’s hands move across the bar, playing an imaginary instrument in front of him. He understands that Various Blonde might frustrate listeners who like to know how to categorize what they hear, and he’s fine with that. “Doing what you want to do and having that come first is important to me,” Allen says. “Sometimes people want to tailor-make their songs, try to write what they think someone is going to like or make music they think they’re supposed to be making. But I’m OK with being like, ‘Hey, I like punk music. I’m going to write a punk song today.’ That’s cool. That’s fine. Music’s fun. And if it’s not fun, then fuck it.”

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

Allen: “Doing what you want to do and having that come first is important to me.”

J a z z B e at JErry HaHn Trio, aT GrEEn Lady LounGE

Recognized for his contributions to jazz fusion, guitarist Jerry Hahn has toured with the Fifth Dimension, and recorded with Paul Simon and jazz vibraphonist Gary Burton. These days, Hahn can be heard Sunday nights in the new downstairs listening room at Green Lady Lounge. From an intimate, red-draped stage with exquisite sound, you find yourself drawn in by his playing — blues, ballads and complex Bill Evans compositions. He’s accompanied by KC jazz veterans Joe Cartwright on piano and Bob Bowman on bass. — Larry Kopitnik Jerry Hahn Trio, 6–8 p.m. Sunday, April 27, at Green Lady Lounge (1809 Grand, 816-215-2954), no cover.

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27

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

music

Loop Back

A British psych-rock group returns.

By

Natalie Gall aGher

23: The Late Night Callers, Amy Ferrand & Claire & The Crowded Stage 24: Bill Kleoppel GL 24: Maria The Mexican & Rick Gibson Band 25: Jeff Bergen’s Elvis Show 25: Atlantic Express ft. Hal Wakes

SATURDAY, APRIL 26TH TRAMPLED UNDER FOOT

Jim Suhler & Monkey Beat, Cassie Taylor, Nick Moss, Outlaw Jim & more!

SUNDAY, APRIL 27TH Paul Thorn samantha fish The Nace Brothers, The Belairs and more!

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadshonkytonk.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

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a p r i l 24 -3 0 , 2 0 14

Tom Sheehan

APRIL:

I

that’s been nice, to come back and have a bett has been 24 years since the psych-rock band ter quality about everything, which is always Loop released its third and final album, the classic A Gilded Eternity. Right after Eternity interesting to me. Speaking of then versus now, the Loop rec­ hit the charts, the London foursome — founding lead singer and guitarist Robert Hampson, ords were influenced by 1960s psychedelia. You guitarist Scott Dowson, drummer John Wills were making that sound fresh and relevant two decades after it surfaced, from the ’60s to the and bassist Neil Mackay — abruptly called it quits. There was a simple explanation: The ’80s, and now I think of bands like the Black Angels and how that sort of psych­rock sound men were exhausted. Hampson and Dowson formed an experi- is cropping up again with new takes and sounds. Yeah, what goes around comes around. mental project called Main. But Loop haunted [Laughs.] Everything that you could possibly Hampson, and he says someone was always asking him to get the band back together. think of in music has already been done before, by someone somewhere. Whether it’s from Eventually he couldn’t find a reason to keep much more art-based or experimental-based saying no. or just pure down-the-line rock and roll, it’s Ahead of Loop’s reunion show at RecordBar Monday night — one stop on its first U.S. tour all been done before. I think it’s a way that you hinge those influences, in more than two decades — we and that’s what makes a band phoned Hampson at his PhilaLoop sound different than whatever delphia hotel room to ask him Monday, April 28, else is going on around. You about reopening Loop. can utilize those influences, The Pitch: Is it strange for you at RecordBar but in my mind, at least, you to go back to the music you were have to create something new making decades ago? For a num­ out of that. You can’t be so obsessed with your ber of years, you even gave up the guitar. Hampson: I was filled with quite a bit of influences that it becomes pastiche. So knowing that nothing is original or special, trepidation about it, but it’s actually turned out is that how you keep perspective? quite well. It’s like almost being able to relive Absolutely. If you really, truly believe that my youth because that’s 25 years ago now. I’m everything you’re doing is original and unique, considerably older now. But it’s working out well, and everybody seems to be very happy. sadly you’re living in a dream world. You have to accept those facts. I think it’s the way you It’s been really nice to come back and play for people that maybe didn’t have the chance to use that access, trying to create a different outsee us the first time around because maybe look from that perspective or from that periphthey were too young or possibly they discov- eral vision that you have of something. It’s like cooking — the way that you add different spices ered the band after we broke up. or different elements, you try to create someThe venues that we play now, they have much better technical abilities with their PA thing a little bit different. Personally, I’ve never sound systems and everything. The equip- disappeared up my own behind and believed that what we’re doing is completely unique. ment available to us now is much better quality How do you bring relevance or newness to than it was back in the day, so we’ve taken on a very sort of modernistic approach to things songs that are so far behind you at this point in your career? — in terms of technical aspects, at least. So

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Hampson: “I’ve never believed that what we’re doing is completely unique.” Well, you can’t go onstage and challenge the audience so much. Let’s face it: They’re there to listen to the music from years ago, and you have to give them what they want. I’m always interested in creating new material, but right now it’s not the time to do it. People that are buying the tickets and coming to see us, they want to hear those old songs. And I don’t have a problem with that at all, and so far the reaction has been so great. Everyone has been incredibly enthusiastic about it, so obviously we’re doing something right. Maybe in the future there will be some new music, but right now is not the time to think about that. It’s still very early days, and we’ve had to come back and prove ourselves all over again. It’s come right back to the year zero. I think the live representation of recorded material is always different anyway. We used to pride ourselves on that fact, and we still do. We play the songs, and everyone recognizes them, but there’s a slightly different edge to them live. That in itself is a creative force. I think there’s something still relevant in that material — I hope so — that people can still listen to it live and appreciate it, regardless of how old it is. If I look inwardly, I think I’ve always missed some of that, and now that I’m doing it again, I’m really enjoying it. I’m thinking, “Well, now, this isn’t as bad as I thought it would be for all those years.” Everything in life is ups and downs. For me, I think if I have been taken by surprise by anything, it’s the warm-natured, good response that we’ve had so far by audiences. We’ve won old fans over again, we’ve won new fans over, so there’s only good in that, right?

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

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n ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

Local Natives

After spending two months opening for Kings of Leon, L.A.’s Local Natives might be relieved to headline its own tour, which kicked off earlier this month. The five-piece specializes in a far more sensitive brand of indie rock, after all, with its three-part harmonies and gentle, washing melodies. Last year’s Hummingbird was a generally pleasing assembly of those things: a soothing sophomore album meant to show the world the band’s serious intentions. Go see for yourself Friday at the Granada. Friday, April 25, the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Arcade Fire

Arcade Fire’s Reflektor was one of the most highly anticipated albums of 2013. An epic, sprawling record — part dance pop, part indulgent art concept — it was instantly acclaimed as brilliant and adventurous while simultaneously demolished as unfocused and overachieving. I count three great songs on its latest effort (the title track is big and catchy and fits anywhere from your car stereo to a club playlist, and the Haitian beats are a nice touch), but I am among those who could do without the monstrous ambition to mean something deep. Not that any of that matters come Saturday, when Arcade Fire — determined to make the arena-rock experience a special one — encourages concertgoers to “dress up” and have fun. Saturday, April 26, Starlight Theatre (4600 Starlight Road, Swope Park, 816-363-7827)

FRI. 4/25 6PM THE DOO DADS 10PM DEAD GIRLS / ERIK VOEKS THE BELLES / NORTH OF GRAND The Hold Steady, Deer Tick SAT. 4/26 1PM KCYA SHOWCASE 7PM DRUNKARD’S DREAM 10PM SLANTED PLANET LARGE / BACON SHOE

By

In some ways, I’m kind of surprised that the Hold Steady still draws crowds. A decade ago, the Minneapolis-by-way-of-Brooklyn band made waves when it blended punk rock and slivers of 1990s grunge on Boys and Girls in America. On that album, lead singer Craig Finn shouts and spits his lyrics like a steroid-abusing Springsteen, offering a straightforward alternative to other vogue bands at the time (including Arcade Fire). Hold Steady’s latest release,

The Black Lips last month’s Teeth Dreams, has Finn doing more of what he’s good at — gruff vocals and punchy lyrics — but somehow, the band seems less relevant. Longtime fans probably approve of this lack of evolution. For everyone else, Deer Tick — and lead singer John McCauley’s irreverent wild side — should prove more than entertaining. Early birds of drinking age can catch the Hold Steady at a morning show at the Tank Room (1813 Grand) Monday, April 28. Monday, April 26, the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

The Black Lips

This week’s forecast is pretty heavy with bands that really, really want your approval. Arcade Fire tries so, so hard. Local Natives just wants to hold your hand while the sun comes up. The Hold Steady wants you to know it’s mature. It’s refreshing, then, that the Black Lips couldn’t care less what you think of them. After all, the Atlanta band has a history of putting on live shows that involve more outrageous stunts than even Miley Cyrus has pulled — vomiting, peeing, the occasional make-out session.

f o r e c a s t

(OK, that last one sounds a little like Miley.) The Black Lips’ latest album, Underneath the Rainbow, retains all the scuzzy, grimy, bluestinged garage rock that first gave the band its edge, so we can only assume that the band is still into bodily fluids. Wear a raincoat. Tuesday, April 30, the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Diana Ross

Say what you want about her, but Diana Ross deserves her status as a legend. She’s a diva’s diva, it’s true, but that’s really just one more reason to admire her. In March, the soul queen turned 70 — though you’d never know it with the way she struts, all decked out in feathers and glitter. And at this point in her career, Ross knows exactly what a crowd wants from her: the big hits, the sentimental ballads and the Supremes-era cuts that made her a household name. Onstage, Ross’ joy is infectious, and everyone in her age-spanning audience feels it. Sunday, April 27, the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

K e Y

Pick of the Week

 Costume Time

 Indie Rock

 Worth the Weeknight

 Bring Your Earplugs

 Sensitive Souls

If You Like Bruce Springsteen

Living Legend

 Diva

 Feather Boas

Canadian Imports

 Date Night

pitch.com

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? d n e k e e W n Go Gree 7621 TROOST AVE KCMO 64131 600 SOUTH 7 HWY BLUE SPRINGS

816.361.9555 • 816.229.8006 • 7THHEAVENONLINE.COM

TUESDAY APRIL 29 - 2014 - 7PM UPTOWN THEATER KANSAS CITY MO

800-745-3000

www.ticketmaster.com

www.redgreen.com pitch.com

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AGENDA

continued from page 15

Thursday | 4.24 |

ARCADE FIRE

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS Charlotte Street’s Open Studios Weekend |

L I T E R A R Y/ S P O K E N W O R D

6-10 p.m. Friday, 12-3 p.m. Saturday, Paragraph Gallery, 23 E. 12th St.

Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal —a public conversation with Mary Roach | 6:30 p.m.

Kansas City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St., kclibrary.org

Edgar Degas Pastels | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

COMEDY

Dressed Up | Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd., kemperart.org

Todd Bridges with Julie McCullough | 8 p.m.

Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

dy/nas/ty • Ebony G. Patterson | Nerman

Museum of Contemporary Art, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, nermanmuseum.org

The Recess Players Improv Showcase | 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Doug Stanhope | 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

FOOD & DRINK

Echoes: Islamic Art and Contemporary Artists | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

DAY SATU R

4.26

Final Friday Art Walk | Massachusetts between Seventh and 11th streets, Lawrence

Forks & Corks 2014 | Benefiting Harvesters, 6:30 p.m. Kansas City Convention Center, 301 W. 13th St. Herb Cocktail Party | 5 p.m., $35, Alexander Majors House, 8201 State Line Rd., wornallhouse.org

Final Friday Art Party | 5:30-9:30 p.m. Friday, Arcade Fire | 7:30 p.m. Saturday, at Starlight Theatre, 4600 Starlight Road (in Swope Park), 816-363-7827,

kcstarlight.com

Lawrence Creates Makerspace, 512 E. Ninth St., Lawrence

Final Friday Reception: Art Works, USD 497 MUSIC

An Acoustic Evening with Sevendust | 8 p.m. The

Friday | 4.25 |

Midland, 1228 Main

PERFORMING ARTS

Bombus, Alsatia, Merlin | 8 p.m. The Riot Room,

4048 Broadway

Miguel Mambo DeLeon and Carte Blanc | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Iron Reagan, Occultist, Vomit Assault | 10 p.m.

Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

The Magic Beans, Old Shoe | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck,

737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Manchester Orchestra, Balance and Composure, Kevin Devine and the Goddamn Band | 9 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

SHOPPING

Clothesline Sale | 5-8 p.m. Pembroke Hill School,

5121 State Line Rd.

Black House Collective debuts new compositions with flutist Mary Fukushima, plus a piece by Philip Glass, with mezzo-soprano Jennifer Weiman | 9:30 p.m. Charlotte Street Open Studios at

KCXX DIY Market | 7-10 p.m. Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway, kc-xx.com

Paragraph Gallery, 23 E. 12th St.

Diavolo: Modern Acrobatic Dance | 8 p.m. Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

Last Poet Standing | 7:30 p.m. Kultured Chameleon KC Street Art Gallery, 1739 Oak

MUSIC

Afentra’s Prom with Chvrches, Broods, Meg Myers and Architects | 7:30 p.m. The Midland,

1228 Main

Jorge Arana Trio, the Great Vehicle, OHKA | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

| 5 p.m. Friday, Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence, lawrenceartscenter.org

High Five : a collaborative thesis exhibition by Hannah Carr and Brittany Ficken | 7 p.m. Friday, City Ice Arts, 2029 Campbell History & Hope: Celebrating the Civil Rights Movement | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art,

4525 Oak

Home, Land: Paintings by Joshua Gann | 6 p.m. Friday, Kiosk Gallery, 3951 Broadway

In the Looking Glass: Recent Daguerreotype Acquisitions | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

COMEDY

Todd Bridges with Julie McCullough | 7:45 &

Book of Gaia | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

National Geographic Live: Jodi Cobb — Uncovering Hidden Worlds | 7:30 p.m.

Maria the Mexican, the Rick Gibson Band | 7:30

9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Cat-Astrophe, Ancient Creation, Stonehaven | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway

Craig Morgan | 6:30 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s

Maronzio Vance | 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Dead Girls, Erik Voeks, the Belles, North of Grand | 9:15 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Other Faces: Paintings and Drawings by Jane Mudd and Nora Othic | Thornhill Gal-

F E S T I VA L S

Dean Monkey & the Dropouts, Tele Novella |

p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Tesseract, Intronaut, Cloudkicker | 7 p.m. Aftershock Bar & Grill, 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam White Fang, Skating Polly, All Blood | 9 p.m.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Edwardsville Days Festival: carnival, BBQ contest,

parade, music, food and crafts, and more | noon-11 p.m. Edwardsville City Park, 690 S. Fourth St., Edwardsville SPORTS & REC

NIGHTLIFE

Titan FC 28: Brillz vs. Davis | Preliminary bouts RuPaul’s Drag Race: Battle of the Seasons | 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

begin at 8 p.m., $42-$163.25, Memorial Hall, 600 N. Seventh St., KCK, cbssportsnetwork.com

6 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

The Doo Dads | 6 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

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RAW Artists Kansas City presents SPECTRUM, with art, music, fashion, and performance | 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Uptown Theater,

3700 Broadway

Dr. Dilznik and the Last Rekrute album-release show with the Popper, DJ Cutswell, Nicolette Paige | 9:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Reality and Fantasy: Land, Town and Sea

Eboni Fondren with the Mark Lowrey Trio |

This American Life | Fridays and Saturdays,

9 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601 Broadway

continued on page 34 32

lery, Avila University, 11901 Wornall, avila.edu

| Nelson-Atkins Museum, 4525 Oak

Kemper East, 200 E. 44th St.

” e m i t e m “

st o m the t of e k ou Ma

f tio n o c e l al se ro du cts , t h av es , n o i t a p us ! A sens b ath eauty m s ag e oil s b & mas ™

www.banglingerie.com 8801 Truman Rd. Kansas City, MO 816.461.3150 3721 S. Broadway Wichita, KS 316.522.6409

9400 S 7 HWY Lee’s Summit, MO 816.774.3372 2315 NW Topeka Blvd. Topeka, KS 785.235.2122

8910 East 40 HWY 4732 SW Topeka Blvd. Kansas City, MO Kansas City, KS 816.461.1676 785.862.0200

1206 Grant Ave. Junction City, KS 785.762.4747

5053 State Ave. Kansas City, KS 913.287.1179 pitch.com

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33

TheaTer

DAILY MENU

SPECIALS

HAPPY HOUR

MONDAY-FRIDAY

UPCOMING LIVE MUSIC:

The Wry 4/25/2014 - 9:00pm Flannigan’s Right Hook 4/26/2014 - 9:00pm

Dates and times vary.

Czar, 1531 Grand

A Little More Alive | Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Copaken Stage, 13th St. and Walnut, kcrep.org

The Jacka, Joe Blow, HD, Ampichino, Lil RuE |

Contemporary One Acts/Discovery #2 | UMKC Theatre, Studio 116 of the James C. Olson Performing Arts Center, 4949 Cherry

Liv Stat, Damon Bailey, Irieplaceables, Sky’s Orchestra | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club,

3402 Main

Follies | The Barn Players, 6219 Martway, Mission, thebarnplayers.org

Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Musical of Musicals | Quality Hill Playhouse, 303 W. 10th St., qualityhillplayhouse.com

Nuthatch-47, Black on Black, Bottle Breakers | 8 p.m. Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway

Mystery Train: Funeral for Brother John | Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania, kcmysterytrain.com

Shades of Jade | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

The Rep & Rev Play Reading Series: The Experiment by Clinnesha Sibley | 4-6 p.m.

TILL 4AM

Sunday, Gem Theater, 1615 E. 18th St. jazzmuseum.org Schoolhouse Rock: Live | The Coterie Theatre, Crown Center, 2450 Grand, coterietheatre.org

4112

Steel Magnolias | Metropolitan Ensemble

816.960.4560 Mon-Fri 4p-3am Sat-Sun 12pm-3am

Water by the Spoonful | Unicorn Theatre, 3828

SERVING FOOD

Pennsylvania Ave

Theatre, 3614 Main, metkc.org

P SUMMER GUIDE

Main, unicorntheatre.org

ShOtgUN Start at 10aM Putting & cHiPPing PRoceeds benefitting:

TOURNAMENT

JUNE 5, 2014 bUy a

fOUrSOME fOr $400

gEt ONE frEE

P p

CALL

MUSeUM exhibiTS & evenTS Citizen Soldiers on the Prairie | Johnson

County Museum, 6305 Lackman Rd., Shawnee

Convergence: Jazz, Film, Dance and the Visual Arts | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St., , americanjazzmuseum.org

Cowtown: History of the Kansas City Stockyards | Kansas City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St. Hands-on History | 1 p.m. Friday, National

westportsaloon.com

GOLF

816.561.6061 OR VISIT

World War I Museum, Liberty Memorial, 100 W. 26th St., theworldwar.org

MINOr Park

11215 Holmes Rd, Kansas city mo 64131

4 - SOME INCLUDES: • Free Lunch • Straightest Drive contest • Closest to the Pin contest • Longest Drive contest • Free goodie bag with promos • Free dinner & drinks • Win prizes from P

p

SINGLE & PaIr PrIcE avaILabLE!

34

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7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Local Natives, Moses Sumney | 7 p.m. The

The Shoprags, the Culprits, Royal Dead, Straight Outta Luck, the Donner Diaries | West-

port Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

Stop Making Sense: Tribute to the Talking Heads | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence White Fang, Skating Polly | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge,

946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

NIGHTLIFE

APPEARING LIVE THIS WEEK THURSDAY, APRIL 24TH KASEY RAUSCH, TYLER GREGORY FRIDAY, APRIL 25TH PUNK VS. PSYCHO SHOW, THE SHOPRAGS, THE CULPRITS, ROYAL DEAD, STRAIGHT OUTTA LUCK, THE DONNER DIARIES SATURDAY, APRIL 26TH WHISKEY FOR THE LADY - DINNER SHOW, RURAL GRIT ALLSTARS MONDAY, APRIL 28TH C.W. AYON - DINNER SHOW, THE IMPERIAL ROOSTERS

816.960.4560

continued from page 32 Emily Forst, Month of May, Guy Jones | 6 p.m.

pitch.com

International Jazz Day | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Wednesday, American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St.

DJ Sike | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway Flirt Friday | 9 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Saturday | 4.26 | PERFORMING ARTS

Celtic Woman: The Emerald Tour | 7:30 p.m., $42-

$102, Lied Center of Kansas, 1600 Stewart Dr., Lawrence

Diavolo: Modern Acrobatic Dance | 8 p.m. Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park Gamelan Genta Kasturi with Balinese guests I Made Kartawan & Ida Bagus Surya Peradantha | 3 p.m. Oppenstein Brothers Park, 12th St. and Walnut COMEDy

The Land Divided, the World United: Building the Panama Canal | Linda Hall Library, 5109 Cherry

100 Years of Genocide | Friday-Saturday,

Todd Bridges with Julie McCullough | 7:45 &

9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Campanella Gallery, McAfee Memorial Library, Park University, 8700 N.W. River Park Dr.

KC Improv presents Fountain City Sketch | 10 p.m. Kick Comedy Theater, 4010 Pennsylvania, kcimprov.com

On the Brink: A Month That Changed the World | National World War I Museum, Liberty

Maronzio Vance | 7 & 9:45 p.m. Improv Comedy Club

Memorial , 100 W. 26th St., theworldwar.org

and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St. FOOD & DRINK

Outstanding Women of Missouri | Fort Osage Education Center, 107 Osage St., Sibley

The Discovery of King Tut | Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., unionstation.org/tut

14th Street Wine Walk | 2 p.m. Power & Light District, 14th St. and Main, powerandlightdistrict.com Taste of Park Place & Celebrity Chef Competition | 2 p.m. Park Place, 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

DIE FLEDERMAUS

Live Music Live Music 7 nights 7 nights a week

a week

DAY SATUR

4.26 ss in Strau us the ha

816.561.2444 www.erniebiggs.com nsas 4115 Mill Street West Port Ka

City

Die Fledermaus, the Lyric Opera of KC | 7:30 p.m. Saturday, at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcopera.org

F E S T I VA L S

Asian Cultural Festival, with martial arts demon-

strations, artists, dancers and musicians | 10:30 a.m. Blue Valley North High School, 12200 Lamar, Leawood

Ozanam’s Thyme for Kids Plant Sale | 9 a.m.5 p.m. Ozanam, 421 E. 137th St., ozanam.org COMMUNITY EVENTS

Chalk Walk in Historic Northeast | 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

AIDS Walk Kansas City | 10 a.m.-noon, Theis Park, Oak and 47th St., aidswalkkansascity.org

Edwardsville Days Festival | 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Edwards-

Aviation Day 2014 | 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Kansas City Aviation Center, 15325 S. Pflumm, Olathe

Kansas City Museum, 3218 Gladstone Blvd.

ville City Park, 690 S. Fourth St., Edwardsville

Parkville Microbrew Festival | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. English

Landing Park, First St. and Main, in Parkville

Troost Festival | Noon, 31st Street and Troost

A Walk for Education 5k | 9 a.m. Washington Square Park, Pershing and Grand, NSBEKC5K.com

Breast Cancer’s a Drag: A benefit for the Shawnee Mission Breast Cancer Clinic | 7:30-10:30 p.m. EventPort, 208 W. 19th St.

SPORTS & REC

Dine-in Theater: Sporting KC away game | 6:30 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, 1400 Main

Northland Recycling Extravaganza | 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Pursell Construction, 6305 N.W. Parkway Dr., Riverside MUSIC

Warrior Dash Kansas City | Circle S Ranch &

Country Inn, 3325 Circle S Ln., Lawrence

Megan Birdsall | 9:30 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club,

3601 Broadway

Garmin Marathon, half-marathon, 6k, kids’ run and team relay | 7 a.m. Garmin International,

Black on Black, Red Kate, Ebony Tusks, Sona |

SHOPPING

Citizen Cope | 6:30 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s

1200 E. 151st St.

Annual Herb and Wildflower Sale | 8 a.m. John

Wornall House and Museum, 6115 Wornall

Clothesline Sale | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Pembroke Hill School,

5121 State Line Rd.

Craft Collective Spring Show | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Greenhouse Culture Church (Masonic Temple), 1001 Massachusetts, Lawrence

10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Gardienne, Phil Leitner, Hurly Christian | The Brick, 1727 McGee

Katy Guillen & the Girls | 8 p.m. Trouser Mouse, 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

Angela Hagenbach | 6 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601 Broadway continued on page 36

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35

continued from page 35 Jazz Disciples with Luqman Hamza | 8:30 p.m.

The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Kadavar, Sons of Huns, Electric Citizen | 8 p.m.

Lawrence

The Faint | 7 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire,

Aftershock Bar & Grill, 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam

Lawrence

KJHK’s 20th annual Farmers’ Ball finals |

Linear Downfall, Various Blonde, Curtin |

Letlive, Architects, Glass Cloud, I the Mighty | 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Diana Ross | 7 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

10 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

Deadman Flats, Brody Buster Band, Rolling Foliage | 6 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts,

Rural Grit All-Stars | 9 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112

Pennsylvania

Scratch Track, LA Price, Sage N Sour | 9 p.m.

The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Slanted Plant, Bacon Shoe, Large | 10 p.m.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Upon This Dawning, the Browning, Phinehas, Anestria, Dayseeker, origins, To Speak in Whispers | 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Waka Flocka Flame, DeeJay Spinstyles | 8 p.m.

The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Monday | 4.28 |

Troubadour Retrievers | 9 p.m. American Garage Bar, 1 S.E. Fourth St., Lee’s Summit

Jason Vivone & the Billy Bats | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

Country TChoeldPitNcighhPtsrs, Hot oo Riff Raff @@R VoeonDts iot Room

Relay fo r rsents AuctionThLeifPeitBcahchPelor Room @R io ow@&RCo t Riff Sanff .

Dirty Stomp | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachu-

setts, Lawrence

for the Heart of America Shakespeare Festival | 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Sunday | 4.27 |

David Nail @ Uptown The as d Xatmer e t s i w T @ Indie

Upcoming Events

Warriors KC Roller uditorium ipal A nic @ MTuw isted Xmas @ Indie

4.26 - ShakesBEER Fest @ Uptown Arts Bar 4.26 - AIDS Walk @ Theiss Park 4.26 - Asian Cultural Festival @ Blue Valley North High School 4.27 - Trolley Run @ the Plaza

See more on the “promotions” link at p 36

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The Hold Steady, Deer Tick | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

The Imperial Roosters | Westport Saloon, 4112 NIGHTLIFE

ShakesBEER! 450th Birthday Bash: A benefit

Twiste d Xm @ Indie as

MUSIC

Pennsylvania

Leopold and His Fiction, Pullman Standard, the yellowbricks | 8:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand Loop, People’s Temple, Expo 70 | 10 p.m. Record-

Bar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Angel olsen, Promised Land Sound | 8 p.m. The

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

PERFoRMING ARTS

The Count Basie orchestra | 7 p.m. Yardley Hall at

JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

Northland Symphony orchestra’s April Concert | 3-4:30 p.m. Park Hill South High School, 4500 River Park

Dr., Riverside, northlandsymphony.org

L I T E R A R y/ S P o K E N W o R D

UMKC Friends of Jazz and Chuck Haddix’s “The Life and Music of Charlie Parker” | 4 p.m.

Broadway Jazz Club, 3601 Broadway

Plus Minus | 7 p.m. The Blue

More

Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

EvEnts

ine Onl

pitch.co

at

m

Rambler’s Songwriter Roundup with Gary Cloud

| 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Zoogma | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

NIGHTLIFE

Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia | 7 p.m. RecordBar,

1020 Westport Rd.

F E S T I VA L S

Chalk Walk in Historic Northeast | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Kansas City Museum, 3218 Gladstone Blvd.

Trivia with Matt Larson | 8 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Tuesday | 4.29 |

SPoRTS & REC CoMEDy

Trolley Run | 7:45 a.m. 75th St and Wornall MUSIC

Johnny Boyd and His Sensational Swing Lover Band with Victor & Penny | 7 p.m. Californos, 4124

Pennsylvania

open-mic comedy night | 9 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s, 101 Southwest Blvd.

Red Green’s How to Do Everything Tour | 6 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Amer ican

WWE SMACKDOWN

GaBArRage r:

happy hou

4 -7pm, M-F

Bike Nite Every Tuesday

w/ Live Music by Cover Me Badd

AY TUESD

RIDE OUT TO THE AMERICAN GARAGE AND PARTY WITH THE BEST PEOPLE AROUND!

4.29

1 SE 4th St. • Lee’s Summit, MO • 816.525.1121 americangaragebar.com

n l Brya Danie mp. as cha s n r u ret

WWE

CAT astrophe

WWE Smackdown | 6:45 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, sprintcenter.com

SPORTS & REC

SPORTS & REC

Royals vs. Blue Jays | 7:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium

Royals vs. Blue Jays | 7:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium

MUSIC

MUSIC

Bike Night with Cover Me Badd | 6-10 p.m. American Garage Bar, 1 S.E. Fourth St., Lee’s Summit

The Black Lips, Natural Child, the Conquerors | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Cloud Nothings, Protomartyr, the Ray-Tones |

Carswell & Hope, Wells the Traveller, Kasey Dawn Rausch | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Mobb Deep, Heartfelt Anarchy | 8 p.m. The

Ghost Mice, Bernay’s Propaganda, Destroy Nate Allen, Jib Jab Jones & the Indigo Circus, Nate Cartwright | 7 p.m. Art Closet Studios, 3951 Broadway

7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Gerald Spaits Trio | 7 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club,

3601 Broadway

Trampled Under Foot | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Vela, Herald the Spider, Sterling Witt | 10 p.m.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Grouplove, MSMR, Smallpools | 6 p.m. KC Live

Stage at the Power & Light District, 14th St. and Grand

Wednesday | 4.30 |

12th Street Jump celebrating the music of Mary Lou Williams with Joe Cartwright | 7:30 p.m.

May 2 - The Outtakes

May 23 - Bobby Smith Blues Band

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR FOOD SPECIALS & UPCOMING BAND DATES!

// karaoke @ grit happy hour 6-9 fri 4/25 c 10pm Sat 4/26 garardio mom, love & loo king, riala dienne, phil leit Wed 5/1 ohpurly chriStian ner, en mic 8pm fri 5/9 fri 5/16 JoShadeS of Jade hn mckenna, gardienne, fri 5/23 thcommon folk e B’dinaS, d ollS on th Sat 5/24 th e clementineS fire, e pedalJetS , the SafeS

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Broadway Jazz Club, 3601 Broadway NIGHTLIFE

Girlz of Westport | 8 p.m. Californos, 4124

Miguel Zaparolli, graduate cellist | 3 p.m. Graham

JoCo Dems happy hour | 5 p.m. Lucky Brewgrille,

War Fare: Chow Challenge: Celebrity chefs from four KC restaurants compete in a World War I-themed cooking competition | 5:30 p.m. National World War I Museum, Liberty Memorial, 100 W. 26th St.

Apr. 25 - Josh Vowell

May 30 - Allied Saints

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Pennsylvania

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Pullman Standards, Handsome As Sin | 9:30 p.m.

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Tyler Memorial Chapel, Park University, 8700 N.W. River Park Dr., Parkville

mon: rural

May 16 - Junebug & The Porchlights

PERFORMING ARTS

Die Fledermaus , the Lyric Opera of KC | 7:30 p.m.

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Let’s Use Teamwork, Bob Wayne and the Outlaw Carnies | Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

Ryley Walker, Rose & Louise, Adriana Nikole | 7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417

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Super Nerd Night | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

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9MAY FRIDAY

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E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

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cal and social disabilities (mostly unseen), his emotional maturity is closer to 14, though he is quite intelligent. After therapists, specialized ed, and other interventions, he is a freshman in college far from home. His dad and I are paying for his tuition, room and board, and books. He was expected to use his summer-job earnings for personal expenses. His lack of social skills makes him dependent on alcohol and cigarettes to form his social life, and that plus his immaturity means he went through his money quickly. But he is still drinking, smoking and getting high. I asked him how he affords to do this, and he wouldn’t tell me. I asked if it was safe and legal, and he said yes. After some snooping, I learned that he is using a webcam service for chats with men who offer “tips” for sexual viewing. I don’t know if he is putting himself at risk emotionally or if screenshots can be captured that can affect his future career, relationships, etc. I’m a longtime follower of your column, and I hope someday my son and I will be as close as you and your mother were. So tell me: What would Judy Savage do?

Worried Over Repercussions Regarding Incriminating Employment Deal Dear WORRIED: Webcamming — aka camwhoring — is widely regarded as the safest form of sex work. Webcammers aren’t in the same room with their clients, and cammers can instantly block creepy, rude or abusive viewers. But there are risks, chief among them how easily viewers can take screengrabs and record videos of a cammer’s sessions. So if your son is planning on a career as a teacher, cop or politician, pics and videos could come back to haunt him. But with so many people out there swapping dirty pics and videos, and with so many students camming their way through college, a time when everyone will have a few incriminating images circulating online is quickly coming. And they won’t be the career-ending scandal they are today. Now here’s what Judy Savage, my late mom, would’ve said: “You’re an adult, and I can’t tell you what to do. You are going to make your own choices and you’re going to make your own mistakes. But you do have to listen to my concerns. You owe me that.” Hesitating to hear her out would result in a single raised eyebrow and her asking if we would rather talk about her four C-section scars instead. We always chose to hear her out. So have a conversation with your son, but first familiarize yourself with camming. The New York Times published a story on its risks and rewards (“Intimacy on the Web, With 38

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By

D a n S ava ge

a Crowd,” September 21, 2013), and the first episode of HBO’s Real Sex reboot, Sex//Now, focuses on camming.

Dear Dan: My fiancée and I have a lovely GGG

relationship. Recently we discovered a shared fantasy of unconscious sex — one of us would be unconscious while the other would do whatever they like. Both of us are interested in both roles. How do we go about fulfilling this fantasy. Are there safe ways to put each other to sleep?

GGG to ZZZ Dear GTZ: Try C-SPAN. If C-SPAN doesn’t work, try golf — playing it, watching it, reading about it. If golf doesn’t work, try Ambien. Dear Dan: I’m a girl in my mid-20s living in a

large city. I decided to hop on Craigslist to see if there were any boys who might like to buy my used undies. I posted a few ads and got tons of responses. Money has been tight, so why not? I met up with a guy and exchanged a pair for $50. I went home and replied to a few more and met another guy the next morning for another $50. Both guys seemed nice, and I felt exhilarated after I walked away. But once I got home, I was paranoid about being followed. I was up most of the night looking out the windows to make sure no one was there. My boyfriend is OK with me doing this; he just wants me to be safe. I set up a separate e-mail account, and I met them in public in the daytime. My boyfriend offered to go with me and hang back where he wouldn’t be seen. But we work different schedules, so it’s not realistic. And I don’t think it would ease my concern. I looked into the sites that allow you to sell the goods online and mail them, but those don’t really work for me. I don’t have a lot of time to dedicate to this. I just want to do it every once in a while. Is there anything else I could do to feel a little safer?

Pensive and New to Intense Exciting Salaciousness Dear PANTIES: Thousands of women sell their

used panties online, and you never read about one being stalked or murdered by a collector, but the news is full of stories of women being murdered by their boyfriends and husbands. I don’t mean to downplay the risks, and most women aren’t meeting their customers face to face. But to sell your panties more safely: Get the Uber app on your phone and order a car after you make a sale. Having a driver drop you a mile away will cost you $5 or $10, but the peace of mind will be worth the price.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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Compliant Clinical Research, Inc. is currently enrolling people with moderate to severe acne to participate in a research study. Qualified participants will receive study related exams, study gel or placebo, and compensation for time and travel.

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The Pitch: April 24, 2014