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APRIL 3-9, 2014 | fRee | VoL. 33 No. 40 | PItch.com

n i Sk

k c i l F

p Akes u h s y r ity. ove y disc oo commun p e e r tt Ac cAl tA o l e h t

By

D av iD H u D n a l l

a p r il 3 - 9, 2 014 | V ol . 3 3 no. 4 0 E d i t o r i a l

skin f lick

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jen Chen, Liz Cook, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Lybarger, Dan Savage, Nick Spacek

a r t

Art Director Jeremy Luther Layout Editor Dillon Kinnison Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever

P r o d u c t i o n

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

a d v E r t i s i n g

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Sharon Donat, Megan Fletcher, Becky Losey, Alyssa Scaletty Director of Marketing and Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland Digital Marketing Specialist Lisa Kelley

A creepy discovery shakes up the local tattoo community. b y dav i d h u d n a l l

c i r c u l a t i o n

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

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B u s i n E s s

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

s o u t h c o m m

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Chief Operating Officer/Group Publisher Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales and Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

n a t i o n a l

The oT her ed Johnson County’s Ed Peterson wants to unseat Ed Eilert. b y s t e v e vo c k r o d t

a d v E r t i s i n g

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VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

d i s t r i B u t i o n

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

The people’s animaTor Bill Plympton’s work has never been just for kids. b y da n ly b a r g e r

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c o P y r i g h t

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2014 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher.

The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

on T he c oVer

5 7 8 11 12 13 15 16 19 20 22 28 34

Questionnaire news feature agenda art fashion stage film café fat city music d a i ly l i s t i n g s savage love

meanwhile aT piTch.com IllustratIon by Jeremy luther

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ANDy’S FROzEN CuSTARD is coming soon to Westport. JOHNNy JO’S PizzERiA owner John Milone plans to open a second location. City Council advances STREETCAR ExTENSiON to ballot.

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Questionnaire

Lacy Voight

Program director for the HALO Foundation

Girls Day Out O n

T h e

S q u a r e

april 12 • 10-6

Shopping passports at: theindependencesquare.com

Hometown: Jefferson City, Missouri

Artists in Action 11 Am to 5 pm meet the artists and watch them create

Current neighborhood: Downtown

Open: Tuesday-Saturday: 10am-5pm

What I do (in 140 characters): I oversee 11 international homes and two domestic learning centers for orphaned, homeless and at-risk youth in six countries through local nonprofit the HALO Foundation.

Historic independence square • 206 nortH Liberty st independence, Mo 64050 • 816.237.6974 • ugLygLass.coM

What’s your addiction? Travel. As soon as I get home from one trip, I’m ready to plan the next. with myself.

What’s your drink? Moscow Mule in a copper mug

s a b r i n a s ta i r e s

What’s your game? Yoga. It’s a competition

Where’s dinner? When I can’t get to France, Le Fou Frog provides the next best thing, and Justus Drugstore, just outside Kansas City in e r Mo Smithville, is worth the destination. Although at my most frequented e n i Onl .com place is Lulu’s; I could eat pitch Thai food every day.

would love to create a social enterprise to benefit HALO youth and other local at-risk youth with the goal of having more job training and employment opportunities for them. I’m also hoping that in five years I will see a lot of our HALO-supported youth thriving as successful adults.

I am fortunate to have become friends with Wilbur, as his studio is down the hall from my office, and at 89 years old, he still paints every day. Wilbur has a tremendous body of work spanning many years that is worth seeing. He currently has work up at Haw Contemporary Gallery.

What’s on your KC postcard? Probably the

Cards and vintage Twilight Zone.

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” House of

My soapbox: I moved to Kansas City initially

Q&As

West Bottoms. My office is located in the Livestock Exchange Building, and I’ve loved watching the neighborhood grow. It’s eclectic and a hub of creativity. It’s also home to some of my favorite local spots, including Amigoni Winery, Genessee Royale and Voltaire.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” We began investing in young entrepreneurs. I love Kansas City more every time I see opportunities for young people to grow their own business or ideas. We are fortunate to have the Kauffman Foundation here. I love that they foster events like 1 Million Cups, which is an amazing platform for entrepreneurs to share ideas.

“I can’t stop listening to …” I always love discov-

ering new bands, but my love of Neutral Milk Hotel has stood the test of time.

“I just read …” Zeitoun by Dave Eggers, about a family who survived Hurricane Katrina. Now I want to read anything and everything I can find by Eggers. The best advice I ever got: “Don’t take others’ advice too seriously. Trust your own instincts.” Worst advice: “Finding a career that’s finan-

cially rewarding is more important than job fulfillment.”

“Kansas City screwed up when …” We made families living in the city feel like they need to move out of town for their children to attend decent schools.

My sidekick: Any of my fellow HALO staff. Our

“Kansas City needs …” To revive the Savoy Hotel

and Grill, while keeping its charm intact. I love that place and want to see it get its luster back. If you haven’t stayed there, you should, even if just for the best breakfast in town.

is meeting my boyfriend, John Gordon Jr., who created the local nonprofit BoysGrow, a farming and entrepreneurial program for urban boys. It’s nice to be with someone who puts as much heart and soul into his job as I do.

“In five years, I’ll be …” Still exploring the globe,

My brush with fame: I completely admire local

but hopefully with a farm to come home to. I

team is small, so we’re like a family, and we always have each other’s backs.

My dating triumph/tragedy: My dating triumph

painter Wilbur Niewald, a Kansas City icon.

thinking I would live here for one year, then move on to another city or country. After seven years, I love this city more than ever. There’s an energy that’s exciting to be part of, and I’m happy to call it home. I love having friends visit from out of state who are always pleasantly surprised at how much this city has to offer.

What was the last thing you had to apologize for? Overcommitting to too many events and activities, spreading myself a little thin.

Who’s sorry now? People who doubted the possibility of incorporating so many of my interests into one career. I love that I am able to use my creative background in photography, international relations and interest in working with youth all in one job.

HOW ABOUT

LUNCH

F O R

HALF OFF ?

My recent triumph: At our recent HALO Art Auction, one of my art pieces sold for $5,000, which directly contributed to helping kids in need. I am excited to be hosting an art exhibit of my work at Outpost Worldwide that will be opening First Friday in April with proceeds also benefiting HALO youth.

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The opening reception for Voight’s Illuminated is from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 4, at Outpost Worldwide, 1919 Baltimore.

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hat would you do if information came to light strongly suggesting that your boss was perhaps committing a crime? Would you quit immediately? What if you knew that he hadn’t been charged but might be under criminal investigation? How do you weigh the ethics of working for such a person against meeting your financial obligations? These are some of the questions that employees of the AKES UP OVERY SH C IS D Y P UNITY. A CREE OO COMM T T A T L A THE LOC

BY On March 8, Kansas City, Missouri, police were dispatched to 4101 Troost. A two-story building at that address houses Nu Troost Tattoo on the street level and apartments on the second floor. It’s owned by Rodney Sanell, a 47-year-old man who also owns the three Freaks locations. The call was placed by a 21-year-old woman who was both an employee of Sanell’s and a tenant in one of his second-floor apartments. She told police that she believed she had found hidden cameras in her apartment. What followed sounds like the plot of some lurid TV procedural. Upon removing a fake smoke detector in the kitchen, an officer found three wires that led up through the ceiling. He then found three similar devices — nonfunctional smoke detectors — in the tenant’s living room, hallway and bedroom. In her bedroom closet, he found a bundle of wires that led into a gray pipe. The pipe ran down through the floor. At that point, the officer contacted the sexcrimes unit and headed downstairs, where

D AV ID H U D N A L L

Nu Troost Tattoo does business. He located the gray pipe and followed it down another floor, into the building’s basement. “At the bottom of the stairs I observed a bundle of similar wires that ran along the North side of the basement to some shelves,” reads that officer’s report. “A couple of boxes were removed from the shelves, which revealed a computer monitor that had been sitting behind them. The computer monitor was off. After turning on the computer monitor I observed what appeared to be 7 more video screens of the interior of the victim’s apartment. There were 4 black screens apparently from the 4 cameras that had already been removed. To the right of the computer monitor on the shelf I observed a wooden box, with a lid facing the side. The lid was opened and I observed what appeared to be some kind of computer video machine. The machine was on and had wires running to it.” In all, police found 11 hidden video cameras in the apartment. Four had been in-

The tenant living above Freaks’ 4101 Troost location has moved out.

three branches of Freaks Tattoo and Piercing — Freaks on Broadway, Freaks on 39th, and Freaks on Noland — have had to consider recently, following one of the creepiest local stories in recent memory. stalled in the tenant’s bathroom, including one with a view of the shower and one facing the toilet. The tenant told police that Sanell had installed the smoke detectors while she was out of town last October. She also said Sanell had sexually propositioned her several times — advances she had rebuffed. Among the possible criminal charges that could be filed against Sanell is one for invasion of privacy: a Class D felony. He has yet to be arrested or charged, but the court of Freaks opinion seems to have reached its verdict. (Sanell did not respond to phone calls or e-mails seeking comment for this story.) Shortly after the police report surfaced, Freaks on 39th, Freaks on Noland, Freaks on Broadway and Nu Troost Tattoo closed. A March 13 post on the Freaks on Noland Facebook page reads: “We regret to inform all of our awesome and loyal clients, that Freaks on Noland has now closed its doors … ALL employees are innocent victims of this horrible crime. As we the artists spread to different shops in the area, you will soon be able to locate all of us … Our lives were all turned upside down over night, and I have barely slept in days. Thank you once again for all the years.” “This is a guy I would have stood in front of a baseball bat for, two weeks ago,” one longtime Freaks on Broadway employee tells me. The employee, who asks that I not reveal his name, is among a majority of Freaks employees who have already quit. “We’re talking about somebody we were all close to. We’re all just in a state of shock and don’t want it to be true. And obviously, we’re concerned about our reputations — none of us had anything to do with this, and we don’t want to be associated with any of it.” Last week, Freaks on Broadway reopened, and I stopped by to ask what the future holds for one of the biggest tattoo operations in

Kansas City. Four tattoo artists and two piercers were working in studios. Business looked steady. I spoke to two Freaks employees — Jean Pierre Voges and Zeke Hernandez, both of whom told me that they’ve worked for Freaks for more than 10 years — who are part of an effort currently under way to consolidate operations at the Broadway location. They are, they said, just trying to keep a wellrespected, 15-year-old business viable until a change of ownership can be executed. “There’s negotiations to purchase the business from him [Sanell], at which point he will be entirely out of the picture,” Voges said. “But obviously, that doesn’t happen overnight, and in the meantime, somebody has to keep the business going, and that’s all we’re trying to do.” “There’s an emotional aspect to this and a business aspect,” Hernandez said. “They’re two separate things.” Neither wanted to talk to me about what went down at 4101 Troost. Meanwhile, quite a few unemployed tattoo artists and piercers are scrambling to find work. Freaks on Broadway alone employed eight fulltime tattoo artists prior to the discovery of those cameras. Some have found temporary gigs at other shops, but many have parted ways with Freaks at the risk of their livelihoods. “We decided to stand on moral ground and bail on the thing,” another former Freaks employee told me last week. “Because when you boil it down, we don’t want money from our hard work flowing to a guy like that. Some of us had been with Freaks for over a decade. Some of us lived in his properties. We all put a lot of blood, sweat and tears into Freaks. I’ve been offered jobs and guest spots from some places since. But no matter where any of us go, it’s going to be a financial hit.”

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• • • • • • • • • •

The OTher ed E d P E t E r s o n wa n t s t o u n s E at E d E i l E r t • • • • • • • • • • By s tE v E vockrodt • Photos By chris mullins

O

n the morning of March 26, Ed Peterson — accompanied by his wife, Laura Scott, and Kathy Cook, director of Kansas Families for Education — appeared at the Johnson County Election Office in Olathe and filed papers to run for chairman of the Board of County Commissioners. The day before, Peterson’s campaign issued a media advisory, alerting local reporters that the longtime Johnson County politician would file for office, make a statement to the press and answer questions. The Pitch was the only media outlet that showed up. A few hours after launching his campaign, Peterson and 650 other people interested in Johnson County government watched incumbent chairman Ed Eilert deliver the annual State of the County address at the Ritz Charles Ballroom in south Overland Park. The first half of Eilert’s speech sounded like something from a chamber of commerce luncheon. Eilert lauded new businesses, economic-development projects and new housing permits coming into the mostly affluent county — growth not directly affected by county government. Only after showing a video lauding more projects that county government doesn’t really touch — a new IKEA in Merriam, industrial buildings in Olathe — did Eilert discuss the work that the county commission had actually done. Speeches on the state of the city, county or state tend to be upbeat, bombastic affairs — almost like stump speeches. They’re opportunities for mayors and county commissioners to get in front of television cameras and local power brokers to deliver the good news going on around them. But even Kansas City Mayor Sly James touched on some dour notes in his State of the City address — crime and struggling inner-city schools (even though he delivered the speech at Park Hill High School, far from either of those issues). For Eilert, who is coming up for election later this year, it was all positive. “County government has evolved over the past few years,” Eilert said, reading largely from prepared remarks. “It is leaner, more nimble, more responsive and more focused.”

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His first example: Keeping the county’s property-tax rate — the lowest in Kansas — level for another year. That tax issue will probably underscore the contrast between Eilert and Peterson in the county election. Peterson, former Fairway mayor and longtime county commissioner representing northeast Johnson County, is risking his political career by chasing Eilert’s seat and insisting that the county is headed in the wrong direction — resting on its laurels and not investing in its future. “There are a lot of things that we need to be looking at for the future that we’re not,” Peterson says. “The driving force and direction of the county at this point for the last few years is doing as much as we can without raising the mill levy.” Eilert, who seemed annoyed that Peterson tried to make a media splash on the same day as his annual speech, rejected Peterson’s position. “I disagree with him completely that the county is standing pat,” Eilert told The Pitch shortly after his speech. Eilert added that Peterson wants to increase the mill levy, and he painted his challenger as a taxer and a spender in a mostly Republican county whose residents recoil at the prospect of higher tax bills. “The biggest difference between Ed Peterson and myself is his first choice has always been to raise taxes,” Eilert says. Taxes don’t concern only GOP-minded Johnson Countians, many of whom live in the comfort of sculpted suburban subdivisions, but also a growing percentage of those who are struggling. The county is approaching 40,000 residents who live below the federal poverty line, bucking the stereotype of Johnson County’s universal affluence. Peterson disputes Eilert’s characterization that he’s jumping at the opportunity to increase the mill levy. But Peterson, a progressive (Eilert is a more traditional Republican), says discussing changes to the mill levy has to be part of the conversation if county government wants to keep delivering services to its residents.

During budget discussions, Peterson says, the county won’t even entertain the possibility of increasing taxes because a majority of commissioners won’t hear of the possibility of a mill levy increase. “We’ve basically got a fixed amount of reve nue year after year as costs go up,” Peterson says. “There’s no evaluation of things like, do we need to be investing in our arterials in the rural areas. There’s no discussion like that.” In his county speech, Eilert said the county has avoided a reduction of services, although that’s not entirely true. County finances have remained relatively stable in part from holding the line on such budget expenditures as libraries, transit and parks. “In the parks budget, all of their capital goes strictly for repair and maintenance,” Peterson says. “There’s no capital money for any kind of enhancement to a park facility.” Eilert says the county had to streamline as a consequence of the recession. But the county still gives residents the services they expect, he says, adding that Peterson seems to strain in order to find critical campaign issues. “He had to go a long ways to dig up that information,” Eilert tells The Pitch. Their differing tax positions may have more to do with political experience than talking points. Peterson was the Fairway mayor from 1993 to 2002, having previously served as a city councilman. While Fairway today is an appealing suburban hamlet very near the Country Club Plaza, it is a city that dealt with growing commercial blight in the late 1980s and early ’90s. While Peterson was mayor, the city issued bonds to fix declining areas, particularly the small but visible Fairway Shops corridor along Shawnee Mission Parkway, from Belinder Avenue to Mission Road. A temporary sales-tax increase, which Fairway voters passed, was designed to repay the bonds. The original bonds were supposed to be paid off within three and five years. Instead, they were retired in 18 months, and the sales tax went away. “My belief is, we need to do the government services well, and I think our residents expect to do them well,” Peterson says. “Where Ed and I probably differ is, he thinks the approach needs to be on how much you’re spending. My focus is on, are you doing it as well as it needs to be done.” Eilert, on the other hand, was mayor of Overland Park for almost a quarter century, from 1981 to 2005. He presided over the city’s transition from a sleepy suburb to the state’s second-largest city. All the while, the city’s property taxes remained low. Today, Overland Park has the lowest mill levy in Johnson County. But Eilert has acknowledged that the county could find itself in enough of a financial hole that even he would advocate for a tax increase.

The Kansas Senate passed a bill that would eliminate the mortgage registration fee, which assesses 26 cents from every $1,000 a Johnson Countian borrows to buy a house and sends it to the county’s general fund. Without it, Johnson County loses about $17 million a year. Eilert has gone on record saying that eliminating the fee could mean a tax hike or drastic cuts in services. “This bill would shift the cost of a business transaction that benefits the mortgage industry on to the general taxpayer,” Eilert says. Senate Bill 298 cleared the Senate on March 19 with support from Johnson County senators Mary Pilcher-Cook, Julia Lynn, Rob Olson and Jeff Melcher. It has since been referred to the House Committee on Taxation. The State of the County address would have been a good place for Eilert to take a public stand against the bill, but he didn’t bring it up. If Eilert is concerned, he’s keeping a poker face. That’s despite Peterson’s raising more money during the last campaign-finance reporting cycle. Eilert does carry a big brand name in Johnson County. “Eilert has been on the ballot since the beginning of time, running for something or the other,” says Larry Winn, a lawyer and prominent civic figure in Johnson County. “He would be difficult to beat, I think.” Eilert was elected to the Board of County Commissioners in 2006 for one of the three commission districts that include Overland Park. With that lofty Overland Park voting bloc, Eilert ousted Annabeth Surbaugh from the commission chairmanship in 2010. Surbaugh was a popular commissioner but couldn’t compete with Eilert’s name recognition. The 2014 race for chairperson will feature a primary with former state Rep. Patricia Lightner joining the race. Lightner is expected to court conservative votes from Olathe and western Shawnee. Peterson will attract progressive voters, but the primary election August 5 coincides with state representative primaries, meaning that Republicans will go to the polls en masse, making it difficult for the county-chairman race to rise above the noise of Statehouse contests. “It’s amazing to me that you have an elected position that hardly anyone knows anything about that controls a lot of money,” says John Segale, a former commissioner and Shawnee councilman who came in last in the 2010 chairman’s primary election. Still, Peterson says he’s upbeat about his chances. “I believe the response so far has been very positive,” Peterson says. “We out-fundraised Ed Eilert in the first funding session. In terms of getting the message out in these local campaigns, people don’t focus on those until you get closer to the election.” The general election is set for November 4.

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

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Nweew bsite!

sY A E , E E R F Ion t A R t s I REg s for walking! e get priz

2014 RELAY FOR LIFE OF KCMO benefiting American Cancer Society

SATURDAY May 3, 2014

12 pm-12 am Berkley Riverfront Park Grand Boulevard & River Front Road K A N S A S C I T Y, M O 6 4 1 2 0

To celebrate the lives of people who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost & ďŹ ght back against the disease. For more information on Relay For Life or to get involved, please visit us online at

www.relayforlife.org/kcmo & facebook.com/relaykcmo

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Thursday, April 17 7:00 p.m. Unity Temple on the Plaza Ticket Price $15, Students $5

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Major Harvest Sponsor:

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WEEK OF APRIL 3-9, 2014

Employers, prepare for an outbreak — or a lot of half-day requests — because the boys in blue are back. The Kansas City Royals’ home opener is set for 3:10 p.m. Friday, and businesses might as well consider Friday a citywide holiday. Your three-day weekend at Kauffman Stadium continues Saturday and Sunday with 1:10 p.m. first pitches. Tickets are still available.

Daily listings on page 28

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art

On thE VErgE Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

Kathy Griffin @ Uptown

n Tattoo Conventio n w @ Upto

Kansas City Fash ion Week @ Union Station

Upcoming Events

4.4 - First Friday in the Crossroads 4.4 - Amy Schumer @ Indie 4.4 - Mosaic @ 2020 Baltimore 4.9 - Dream Theater @ Uptown Theater 4.10 - The Pitch’s Bacon & Bourbon @ The Guild

See more on the “promotions” link at p the pitch

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your First Friday hit list.

By

T r a c y a bel n

C

Lorde @ The Midland

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Kids, causes and connections:

urious how the younger set is advancing? Peek at art by Kansas City Academy students Sydney Bernstein and Nicole Vescovi. The two are showing pieces at Main Street Gallery (1610 Main), the space upstairs from Anton’s Taproom, run by former Pi curator Jody Wilkins. Or head to the vast Locust Factory (504 East 18th Street), where six Shawnee Mission East National Art Honor Society members join 18 professional artists — including Nicole Emanuel, Barry Anderson and Gloria Feinstein — to benefit Change the Truth, which supports the lives of children in Uganda. There’s also an International Baccalaureate Senior Exhibition and another fundraiser, an arts-and-crafts show for the fire-damaged Bell Center Living Arts Community Center and Yoga Studio. Also at Locust, Kansas City Art Institute seniors Katie Roby and Emily Young present seniorthesis exhibitions: photographic prints by Roby and quirky comic-book quilts by Young. Todd Weiner Gallery (115 West 18th Street) has taken a mentor-student approach to curating Ghosts, a show that eavesdrops on artistic dialogues between Misty Gamble and Ross Redmon in ceramics, Michael Wickerson and Aaaran Schmidt in sculpture, Kelly Clark and Robert Howsare in printmaking, and Hugh Merrill and Krystal Kuhn in printmaking and painting. Front/Space (217 West 18th Street) continues its Civilian Stories project with an intriguing look at Kansas City’s dead space: neglected and abandoned houses and the vacant tracts of land they become. Students from the University of Missouri–Kansas City’s Urban Planning and Design program have been researching vacant land to see it billed as “an opportunity for ecological urbanism,” according to advance materials for this show. Central to tonight’s opening is a presentation of the short film Virgil’s House, about the home of composer Virgil Thompson, at 2629 Wabash, which was torn down last September. If you’re in need of a little levity after that, hop over to Windhorse Art Galley (1717 Wyandotte) for a selection of fresh work by KC’s Matt Hawkins, along with a selection of international names such as Toungi, Marko Zubak and Jonny Chiba. The Skate DSM Deck Alliance show here supports the efforts of the Des Moines Regional Skatepark, planned to be the largest free outdoor park in the country. The five emerging artists at Garcia Squared Contemporary (115 West 18th Street) have “experienced the complex journey from Cuba to the United States and back again,” according to press materials. Anthony Lester Blackhood, Alejandro Figuerado, Amanda Linares,

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From Garcia Squared Contemporary: (top) “The Form As Natural Result From Function” by Anthony Lester Blackhood; (above, from left) oil on canvas by Jorge Rios and “The Vagabond” by Yali Romagoza. Jorge Rios and Yali Romagoza use a show titled Threshold One to explore transitional spaces in a variety of media — including one item that just made it out of customs a week ago. It’s good to see the curatorial hand of Cara Megan Lewis back in town. If you’re in a donating mood, head to the Center for Architecture and Design (1801 McGee), where the headquarters for the American Institute of Architects–KC also houses one of the area’s snazzier event spaces. Tonight, Peace Christian Church, a group that meets here Sunday evenings, puts on a fundraiser for the Justice Project, which provides

legal and social-service navigation for women in poverty. The event (7–10 p.m.) includes artwork by Rhoda Powers, Jana Luetje, and Artspeak Radio’s co-host and producer Maria Vasquez Boyd; tunes by Eli Chamberlain and Alex Holsinger; and refreshments. Finally, Natalie Abrams stops by between residencies (at Escape to Create in Seaside, Florida, and the Golden Foundation in New Berlin, New York) to put up a solo exhibition called Beneath the Fold at City Ice Arts (2015 Campbell).

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fa s h i o n

TrunkFul oF Friends

By

L e sL ie K in s m a n

Utilitarian Workshop spends First Friday palling around.

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Left: a mineral necklace by Megan Roelofs of Feather Springs Art and ceramic bowls by Object Enthusiast; above: a piece by Kylie Grater of Early Jewelry. With Grater back in KC to return the favor, the trunk shows have begun. The first featured local vintage collector is Michael Lais of Gent & Scholar. Now Grater herself ohn Anderson and Nicole Williams say their Utilitarian Workshop remains in “full is laying out work, along with printmaker steam ahead” mode, even as they add to their Jeffrey Isom of Pre Sense Form. Grater, maker business duties with a few other responsibili- of Early Jewelry and co-founder of the Ladies of Lawrence Artwork show, has put together ties: recent homeowners and new parents. So it has been a busy eight months since the new items especially for this weekend’s event, couple opened this storefront and showroom including horsehair earrings and antler pieces. at 1659 Summit. And at least one day a month Isom, who is stocking original art and prints, created the Barn Light’s logo, so, yes, he’s yet is fuller still. another familiar face in this growing network. “People were always asking us what we’re “Everyone has a local connection in one doing for First Fridays,” Anderson tells The Pitch. “I’d say, ‘We’re not doing anything for way or another,” Anderson says. “It’s basically friend or friend of friend in here. The idea with First Fridays. We’re open every Friday!’ But the trunk shows is to create that interest for we started talking about what we could do vendors. Someone like Katie [Ashmore, of Toro every month. Kylie was really instrumental Designs], my cousin, is kind of just getting in organizing designer-specific trunk shows.” started with her brand. I’ve That’s Kylie Grater, a longalways seen this as a plattime friend of Anderson’s and Early Jewelry & form or venue to definitely Williams’ who has stepped Pre Sense Form develop, so it offers people a in as an interim manager Trunk Show physical-form opportunity.” for Utilitarian’s West Side 6–9 p.m. Friday, April 4, For those of us who don’t space, which Anderson and and 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Saturday, make things, utilitarian or Williams also use as an ofApril 5, at Utilitarian otherwise, it’s just April’s fice for their growing design Workshop, 1659 Summit, utilitarianworkshop.com first opportunity to buy firm. What Anderson started some cool stuff. And May’s as a furniture-building busiand June’s, too — Omaha’s ness in 2006 led, after friends introduced him to Williams, to collaborations the Object Enthusiast and jewelry designer with Port Fonda, Second Best Coffee, Thou Kira Terrey bring their trunks in May, followed the next month by Level Projects (June 6), Toro Mayest, Little Freshie and Hammerpress. Anderson also designed and helped build the Designs (June 21) and LunaSol (of Portland, Oregon, also June 21). Barn Light, the Eugene, Oregon, coffee shop and bar that Grater founded with her boyfriend, Dustin Kinsey. E-mail feedback@pitch.com

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They Feel lenny

MTH is more than a little bit in love with Bernstein.

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De bor a h hir s ch

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ike a carnival barker, a cast member yells, “It’s 8:02!” Co-stars singing out of sight in a side aisle join musicians and actors slowly gathering onstage. But where’s George Harter? No opening remarks adding context and history to this Musical Theater Heritage show? Finally he appears and says simply, “This isn’t a rehearsal!” It’s not a rehearsal but it’s clearly a party. This start to Bernstein’s Broadway seems more nightclub gig than formal performance, but Leonard Bernstein wasn’t your typical musical-theater composer. And we learn this without Harter’s introductory comments because he does one better. He narrates throughout this revival of MTH’s show, first performed in 2008 (and written by Harter with director Sarah Crawford). MTH’s translucent fourth wall and Harter’s repartee invite us into this professional and polished production. A widescreen TV in the lobby silently plays one of Bernstein’s televised educational Young People’s Concerts, his voice’s deep tonality simulcast In typical MTH style, cast members perinside Off Center Theatre. As the evening form at a row of standing microphones. The wears on, we’ll become better acquainted five leads — Alison Sneegas Borberg, Jacob with the famous musician, composer and Aaron Cullum, Ben Gulley, Justin McCoy conductor, who designed a “Broadway sound and Stefanie Wienecke — take star turns, in in symphonic terms.” both solo and ensemble pieces. The seven Bernstein’s 1957 West Side Story is his bestknown contribution to musical theater, but supporting singers are also strong, especially Tyler Eisenreich, Megan Herrera and Robert he was a star long before it. As a 25-year-old Hingula. assistant conductor for the New York PhilThe standout moments are too many to harmonic, he was called at the last minute, mention, but a few to note: Wienecke and in 1943, to fill in for an ill guest conductor. Cullum as the taxi driver and the sailor on The result of Bernstein’s Carnegie Hall debut, leave in On the Town’s humorous “Come Up broadcast live over the radio, was a frontpage story in The New York Times. (“I didn’t to My Place”; Wienecke’s witty “100 Ways to Lose a Man”; Borberg know he would grow up a nd Wiene c ke’s f u n ny to be Leonard Bernstein,” Bernstein’s Broadway “Ohio” (Wonderful Town); his father reportedly said, Through April 13 at Cullum’s “Jet Song” (WSS); finally accepting his son’s Musical Theater Heritage, and Borberg’s “A Little Bit choice of career.) Off Center Theatre in Love,” which feels like a Bernstein’s Broadway in Crown Center, warm breeze. also deserves attention. 2450 Grand, 816-221-6987, Songs caressed us — or Here, Harter is a conductor mthkc.com increased our heartbeats. of sorts, his insertions addMcCoy, w it h a voice ing insight to what would otherwise be a smattering of show tunes. In that’s full and rich, executes a touching addition to West Side Story, Bernstein com- “Lonely Town” (On the Town) and articulates deeply felt longing in “One Hand, One posed the music for On the Town, Wonderful Heart” (WSS). Town and Candide, each with a distinctive Gulley’s operatic tenor is mellifluous and and varied musical style, a ref lection of his classical training. (Candide combines versatile, in songs ranging from “Lucky elements of Mozart, opera and Gilbert & to Be Me” (On the Town), “Conga” (Wonderful Town), and the Gilbert & Sullivan– Sullivan.) The exceptionally talented singers inf luenced “Bon Voyage” (Candide). His and musicians here give new life to songs from these shows. Some are familiar, others time-suspending “Maria” kept the audience entranced. not so much, yet we’re engrossed in all their West Side Story gets the most attention lyrical renderings.

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The MTH cast belts out Bernstein. in this show, closing Act 2 with 10 songs and providing a final opportunity to appreciate these singers’ ability and charisma. Crowd-pleasing group numbers include “The Quintet,” “America” and “Gee, Officer Krupke.” The musicians here also have starring roles. Assistant music director Jeremy Watson plays a lively and dynamic piano, switching from subtle accompaniment to spotlight moments worthy of a concert hall. He’s joined by the able Brian Wilson (upright bass) and Kyle Brown (drums). Crawford gives a View-Master look to the staging with a setup that’s stereographic in its dimension. The lighting design (Shane Rowse) augments this appearance, often bathing the musicians at center stage in a warm red light and making effective use of shadow and spots. (The only technical complaint: some occasional microphone distortion.) Three large photos of Bernstein at different stages of his life hang as backdrop. As the show progresses, he becomes less a stranger, less remote. We’ve come to understand him through his music and his many creative collaborations. And when he died in 1990, at age 72, his work may have ended but not his legacy. MTH ensures, through this celebration, that the man and his talent aren’t forgotten.

E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com pitch.com

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film

The PeoPle’s AnimATor

Bill Plympton’s work has

By

never been just for kids.

D a n Ly b a rger

Six to See at KC FilmFeSt Cheatin’ Bill Plympton’s latest animated feature is a wordless love story between a woman named Ella and a gas-station attendant named Jake, whose romance goes sour when she’s falsely accused of being unfaithful to him. Plympton’s movies are always great to look at, but there’s a poignancy to Cheatin’ that makes the movie weirdly heartwarming despite its sordid subject matter. Plympton takes part in screenings and presents some of his sketches. Ralph Bakshi Retrospective At 75, Ralph Bakshi (Fritz the Cat, The Lord of the Rings) has made a career making cartoons safe for adults. KC FilmFest is presenting his 1970s classics Coonskin, Heavy Traffic and Wizards at the Alamo Mainstreet. Bakshi’s son Eddie will attend all the screenings, and Bakshi himself will answer audience questions via Skype.

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ill Plympton has spent the past few de- Ella and Jake's faltering marriage cades redefining what an animated film is reflected in their bed in Cheatin’. can look like and what kind of subject matOnce we moved in together, little bits ter it can tackle. His Plymptoons became reof problems started cropping up. And we liably wittier than the music videos they ran between on MTV of the 1980s and ’90s, and started verbally fighting, and it got so bad that at one point I wanted to strangle her, his shorts “Your Face” (1985) and “Guard yet I still wanted to have sex with her. And I Dog” (2005) brought him Academy Award nominations. His cartoons have taught his- thought it was interesting with that duality tory (a segment of the History Channel’s 10 of love and hate in the same relationship, Days That Unexpectedly Changed America) and I wanted to portray that in the film to extremes, obviously. and instructed us not to rip off music (the A lot of your features have been paid for video for Weird Al Yankovic’s “Don’t Downfrom the money you’ve made from other load This Song”). Plympton presents his latest animated projects. With Cheatin’, you actually went to Kickstarter. feature, Cheatin’, at 7 p.m. Friday, April What happened was the style, the tech11, and 4:30 p.m. Saturday, April 12, at the Alamo Mainstreet. (Tickets for the Kan- nique that we decided to use, had a digital watercolor look. It’s very similar to the sas City FilmFest screening cost $10; see kcfilmfest.org.) While he’s in town, he’ll style of illustration I did before I got into also lead a master class at the KCP&L En- film. This was a style I loved so much. I ergy Center (1200 Main) at 1 p.m. Saturday, did illustrations for Vanity Fair, Playboy, Penthouse. So I loved this style. UnfortuApril 12. Cheatin’ joins a festival roster that nately, we had to hire four includes a Ralph Bakshi or five artists to create this showcase. “He’s my godfatechnique because it was ther,” Plympton says of the Kansas City so labor-intensive. A nd legend behind Coonskin, FilmFest April 5–13 because we had to hire Heavy Traffic and Wizards. At various locations, these artists, I ran out of Plympton spoke with see kcfilmfest.org money very quickly. We The Pitch by phone from for film information, were four months into the his home in New York. schedule and tickets. film, so we went to KickThe Pitch: Even without starter so we didn’t have to words, Cheatin’ captures fire everybody. We asked the overwhelming euphoria that accompanies the beginning of a re- for $75,000, and we got over $100,000. It was very cool. lationship. The style in a lot of your cartoons often Plympton: It’s based on a true story of a romance that I had about 15 years ago, and resembles woodcuts or other illustration techI thought that this was the love of my life, niques that aren’t usually seen in animation. This is pencil on paper. It’s very basic, that we’d live together forever. pitch.com

Rich Hill Shot primarily in a small Missouri town (1,400 people) 76 miles south of Kansas City, Rich Hill follows three teenage boys as they try to make their way through economic and social challenges. The sobering but moving documentary earned the Grand Jury Prize at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, and co-director Tracy Droz Tragos will be on hand to present it. Blood of Me It has been awhile since Tim De Paepe presented his engrossing documentary Shades of Gray (which concerns gays in Kansas) at the Kansas City Filmmakers Jubilee. His latest short, a horror entry presented as part of Heartland Late Night, suggests what a dental practice might be like if run by Bram Stoker and Edgar Allan Poe. It won’t make you feel better about getting your teeth cleaned. Gore Vidal: The United States of Amnesia The author of the historical novels Lincoln and Burr, the play and film The Best Man and a large portion of the screenplay to William Wyler’s Ben-Hur, Gore Vidal was a child of the American establishment but labored all of his long life to thumb his nose at it. He lived an openly gay life and wrote explicitly about homosexuality when it was a taboo subject. This new documentary does a decent job of encapsulating his sometimes complicated and dynamic philosophies and captures him at his acidic best. Executive producer Chad Troutwine will attend a Q&A. A Fragile Trust: Plagiarism, Power, and Jayson Blair at The New York Times In 2003, The New York Times devoted several pages to debunking the reporting of its own Jayson Blair, who was caught plagiarizing and fabricating dozens of stories. This new documentary spends a little too much time with Blair himself, who has little more to say than “and then I lied.” But it does a thorough job of explaining the culture at the Times that enabled his toxic journalism to flourish. — D.

low-tech stuff. I do all the stuff myself. There’s about 40,000 drawings in the film, and it took me about a year, a year and a half to do all the drawings. In fact, if people come to my show in Kansas City, I will give everybody a little sketch. I’ll do a little cartoon on a postcard. You’ll get a free drawing. I can turn out these drawings pretty quickly. Then, I have somebody in my studio scan the drawings on a digital file and then do a watercolor effect on Photoshop on top of the drawing. It’s really gorgeous. I love the mistakes. I love the imperfections, the peculiarities with the artwork and the humor. It’s like going to a museum and going to see a piece of art done by an impressionist. That’s worth something. That’s fun to watch. People often think that animation is only to amuse children, but you’ve done things like re-enact Shays’ Rebellion, which took place after the American Revolutionary War. This is something I’ve been fighting against since my first feature film, The Tune. And that is the stereotype that America has, that animation is computer and that it is only for children. And I disagree with that very strongly. First of all, the computer is very expensive, so it’s a very cold, machinelike look. And number two, that animation can only be for children. I can’t make More films that compete with Pixar or DreamWorks. I don’t have the money or at ine the time. Onl .com pitch So I wa nt to ma ke another category: animation for people like me, people my age. Because I think about love, passion, jealousy, revenge, that kind of stuff. These are my day-to-day thoughts, so why should I make films about children playing games with animals? That’s not really what I’m concerned with. I’m hoping that this film breaks that stereotype. It’s not the audience. The audience loves animation for adults. They look at The Simpsons or South Park or Family Guy. These are really adult topics. It’s the distributors that are really fearful that there’s no audience for this. How tough was it to come up with a wordless but credible female point of view? I don’t know if it’s credible or not. A lot of women come up to me and say they love the character. In fact, almost all the people want me to draw Ella, so she does seem to be very compelling, and visually she’s an interesting character. In the beginning of the film she’s very independent, and then she accidentally discovers love, and that scene where the camera goes looking for her heart is something that everybody thinks is one of their

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Bill Plympton self-portrait favorite shots because everybody wants to find their heart and find love. I think that’s why women really respond to Ella discovering her romantic side. Her heart gets bigger and bigger and bigger, and now she’s a true romantic person. I should also say that the film harkens back to the Hollywood ’40s, film noir look: the fashion, the architecture, the automobiles, the lighting, the shadows. Also, I was influenced by James M. Cain, the guy who wrote Double Indemnity and all those really hard-boiled romances that turned ugly and turned violent. When you listed your influences, you mentioned some traditional favorites like former Kansas Citians Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks. How did you go from watching them to making something like Cheatin’? As a young kid, I was a fanatic for Disney. Disney was the only company at the time making animation of any consequence. But then when I got to high school and college, obviously my hormones started kicking in. I was starting to do more cartoons that were about the opposite sex or more violent stuff, more adult stuff, and I just kept doing it. Every image in your movies, from backgrounds to characters to effects, is drawn by you. How do you avoid repetitive stress injuries? My hand feels great at the end of the day. Sometimes, I draw 10-12 hours a day, and I feel so relaxed and comfortable after drawing all day. It’s like therapy, actually.

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At LAst

Westside Local is finally as good as

By

Ch a r l e s F e r ru z z a

its fans have always insisted it was.

Westside Local • 1663 Summit, 816-997-9089 • Hours: 11 a.m.–3 p.m. and 5–9 p.m. Tuesday–Thursday and Sunday, 11 a.m.–3 p.m. and 5–10 p.m. Friday–Saturday • Price: $$$

he first time I reviewed Westside Local, back in 2009, I couldn’t recommend it. Some of my friends already loved the new restaurant unconditionally, grateful to have such a business in this hip neighborhood. But I found the service arrogant and inept (a glaringly bad combination) and the food inconsistent. These things I blamed on original managing partner Troy McEvers, who seemed like an indulgent parent, looking the other way as his staff provided minimal service and maximum attitude. I had written off 1663 Summit, but those same friends — along with a growing number of other people — eventually talked me into trying it again. Well, they were right. Westside Local now deserves its status as a KC-chic urban boîte (one that has earned some kind of most-favored-nation status among Charlotte Street Foundation types and others of the art set). What has changed? For one thing, McEvershas left the building (his interest in the restaurant purchased by other partners in 2010). Not coincidentally, the least talented servers have also moved on. The managing partner is now Brandon Strick, and he has assembled a smart, attentive serving staff and has imported chef Sam Jones, a veteran of the kitchens at Blue Bird Bistro and Anton’s Taproom. Jones’ current menu, which changes soon, keeps a few of this venue’s original dishes, in forms reconditioned to accentuate his strengths. The fries, good before, might be e r Mo the best in the city now. Deviled eggs have appeared on more menus at e n i Onl .com since the Local’s early h pitc days, but the ones here are fresher-tasting than those elsewhere. And the Summit Burger (made with ground, hormone-free rib-eye) is superlative, fully justifying its $12 price tag. Some of Jones’ additions are elegantly simple. He marinates a flaky, moist Troutdale Farms trout in buttermilk and dredges the fish in cornmeal and sautés it in butter until its exterior is just delicately crispy. It’s an old-fashioned version of a classic, down to its side order of glazed carrots, and the plate I ordered completely seduced me. Jones says he’s planning to change how he makes that and a couple of the other entrées I tried and loved. I’m in favor of evolution — especially here — but I hope he doesn’t lose the recipe card for that trout. It’s the kind of dish that

Café

angela c. bond

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a much-abbreviated (but wildly improved) dessert list. Jones uses that sourdough for the restaurant’s fine grilled cheese sandwich makes someone a regular, like those friends of (another holdover from the original menu mine who insisted that I return to the Local. that’s better than ever) and scatters sourIf the chef wants to experiment, he might dough breadcrumbs over one of Westside work on the pork chop. I tried to love this thick, juicy cut, which practically gleamed Local’s signature dishes: a satisfying bowl of cavatappi and cheese sauce under a shiny orange-juice(made with Shatto white and-brown-sugar glaze and Westside Local cheddar). The other breads was sumptuously moist. But Local cheese plate.......... $16 and crackers served here saltiness dominated the Pint of fries ........................$6 are from Farm to Market meat to a distracting degree. Kale salad, small ...............$8 Bread Co. The server outlined the Westside mac & cheese .$13 This is a restaurant that brining ingredients by endPork chop ........................ $26 credits, in detail, its local ing with “just a little bit of Chocolate dome .............. $10 and regional vendors on kosher salt” — and thereby the front of the menu and making the understatement within the descriptions of each dish. That’s of the evening. (Jones is indeed tweaking how I knew to seek out more Cottonwood that dish as well.) River Cheddar, for instance, from the heart Westside Local now has an interesting connection to Sasha’s Baking Co., which of Kansas. And it’s how you begin to decide how to custom-build your own cheese tray or opened earlier this year on Ninth Street. Sasha’s co-owner Jeremy Schepmann was charcuterie platter from the offerings listed in the “Localities” section of the menu. The once a waiter at Westside Local, and he and most recognizable name might be Shatto, his wife, Michelle, purchased a percentage of the restaurant before opening their down- which provides the exceptionally fine Plattsburg and Winstead Reserve cheeses. town business. Schepmann now supplies the My favorite starter here, though, is the sourdough bread and the baguettes to Westside Local, as well as the featured item on “pint of fries,” perfectly crispy, perfectly

The sweet-potato-quinoa burger shows up other veggie sandwiches.

seasoned (a little Parmesan, a dash of parsley), dipped in one of the house-made aiolis (roasted-garlic, a punchy roasted-poblano). Jones makes the ketchup, too, but it’s not much less bland than the bottled stuff. I assuaged my guilt by ordering a kale salad to accompany the potatoes. As inexplicably trendy as this onetime garnish has become, the kale gets a flamboyant treatment here, adorned with shaved Brussels sprouts, fried shallots, slivered almonds, grated Parmesan and some gratuitous but tasty bacon slices. The potpie is tasty — as it should be for $20 — but the house-made “puff pastry crust” described on the menu was neither puffy nor flaky when I tried the dish. The vegetables, Windhaven Farms roasted chicken and cream sauce were fine, but that crust kept what should have been a sure thing from being memorable. I could be equally crabby about the Westside Reuben, which boasts “house corned beef” and the kitchen’s own sauerkraut but lacks Thousand Island dressing. I’m a standyour-grounder about this. A good Reuben requires that dressing’s sweet note as a counterpoint to the tart kraut, and the version here subs in a jalapeño-dominated dressing that’s just plain discordant. Not all sandwich innovations rub me the wrong way. The Local’s veggie burger is one of the city’s best, with a sweet-potato-andquinoa patty that nicely balances those two components — along with cannellini beans and expertly deployed peppers — so that no single flavor overwhelms. You can taste the Emmenthaler, the bun stays together, and you can have it with those glorious fries. The two-item dessert list includes a house-made bread pudding (it did, at least, the evenings I ate here), but why sample anything but Sasha’s “Chocolate Dome”? I wasn’t sure if I should stick a fork into this luscious, mammary mound of chocolate mousse (sunk into chocolate ganache) or lick it. Service is slick now, infinitely more polished than it used to be. On weekends, a reservation is pretty much mandatory. I arrived, with a friend, at 5:30 p.m. on a Saturday and found almost all of the tables off-limits, held for people who had planned ahead. Within an hour, the intimate dining room (it seats about 65) was packed. Five years ago, that might have surprised or confused me. Not now.

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WHICH CA ME FIRST, THE CHICKEN OR THE EGG? DOES IT M ATTER?

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ansas City Chiefs offensive lineman Jeff Allen was a stranger to the barbecue egg roll, and I’d never eaten one, either. When we agreed that it was time to try one, we headed to lunch at Smokey’s on the Boulevard BBQ, the Overland Park storefront of father-andson barbecue team Rob and Jason Harris. (The 19-month-old business is in a strip center at 14521 Metcalf, 913-897-7427.) First we worked through a tray filled with smoked meats and ribs. Then Rob Harris popped out of his kitchen with a relatively petite offering: a plate that held a pair of the egg rolls. “Here’s something you’ve never seen in a barbecue restaurant before,” he said. Very true. Allen and I each now had before us a pocket stuffed with beef-brisket burnt ends and freshly cut vegetables. (They come two for $3.99 here.) “It’s a weird twist on barbecue,” Rob said, “something we came up with when we were bored one afternoon.” Allen was intrigued. He took a bite. “That’s awesome,” he said. “I love egg rolls.” Rob and Jason Harris have been smoking meats with hickory wood for almost two years. The younger Harris was working at another barbecue joint when his father stopped in for ribs. He wasn’t a fan, so he asked his son if he thought he could do better — and make some money, too. It was easy enough for Jason to answer yes. He didn’t think his father was serious. “He called me the next morning and said, ‘Put on your big-boy pants. We’re going to find a location,’” Jason told me. On this March day, I had met Allen at Smokey’s following one of his offseason workouts. I hadn’t seen him since the Chiefs’ playoff run ended abruptly in Indianapolis. “We had a good year, but it didn’t end the way that we wanted it to,” Allen admitted. “Even if we’d won that game, we’d have been hurting going into the next one.” Still, Allen insisted that he and his teammates had started 2014 “hungry,” “humble” and ready to make another run this coming season. He has been exercising twice a day — lifting, running, doing position work. The Chiefs’ offensive guard was also fresh off AdvoCare’s “24-day challenge,” a 10-day cleanse followed by a diet of meat, fruits and veggies (and a minimum of carbs). “I lost, like, 7 pounds,” Allen said. “I’m working on changing my body composition.” The goal: Get ripped and become a better football player. “If you aren’t doing the things to get better, you’re going to get replaced.” Our lunch at Smokey’s was part of how Allen spent the diet’s cheat day. He had managed to

A peek inside Smokey’s barbecue egg roll avoid barbecue since our last meeting, in late November (“Shack Attack,” December 5), but at Smokey’s, he stared down that pile of smoked meats — tender strings of pulled pork and thick strips of brisket and turkey — and saved room for meaty ribs; crunchy onion rings; crisp fries; and cups filled with pit beans, coleslaw and cheesy corn. “Everything we do here, we do in-house,” Rob Harris told us. “We cut our own meat. We smoke our own meat. The only thing that we don’t do is fries and the onion rings.” And the creamy sauce in little to-go cups was his own “Boulevard” concoction: a barbecue glaze that sets aside sweetness. “There’s no sugar in it at all,” he said. “It’s good for my diet,” Allen said. He stuck a fork into the smoked meat. “That would definitely be a good sandwich. I’m not going to be eating any bread, though. Allen dipped a forkful of meat into the sauce, having established that it was glutenfree. “It was different. I wouldn’t say that I’d eat it again. It’s probably good on a sandwich.” I stuck to Smokey’s regular sauce, dipping some burnt ends into it. They were a little too chewy, but Allen didn’t mind. Rob Harris stopped back by the table to check our progress. “What do you think so far?” he asked. “I like the ribs,” Allen said. “The smoked meat’s been the best part so far.” But this was all before Rob brought out the egg rolls. “It’s got a little spice to it,” Allen said after his second bite of the roll. “I take it back. The egg rolls are the best thing. Premium barbecue. I would come back.”

E-mail justin.kendall@pitch.com

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ig Rip Brewing Co. founders Josh Collins and Kipp Feldt love horror movies. You can tell as soon as you step into their taproom, at 216 East Ninth Avenue, in North Kansas City. Posters from Friday the 13th, Evil Dead and Aliens hang on a wall, along with an “I want to believe” UFO poster that should look familiar to anyone who watched The X-Files. A glance up at the skylight reveals a translucent biohazard logo from 28 Days Later. And those are just the decorations. Big Rip’s brews also make reference — sometimes obscure — to twisted cinema. The Pennywise Sweet Potato Ale is named for the sewerdwelling killer clown of Stephen King’s It. Franklin Road Coffee Porter name-checks the cemetery road in Night of the Living Dead. And the pale ales call back to Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead trilogy, especially Army of Darkness. Collins and Feldt have even named their tanks Mulder (for David Duchovny’s X-Files hero), Ash (Bruce Campbell’s boomstick-toting Evil Dead protagonist) and Ripley (Sigourney Weaver’s alien-slaying badass). And those names are carrying over to Big Rip’s new fourbarrel brewing system — an upgrade from the two-barrel system they started with last May. “We’ve been maxing out what we can produce,” Collins tells The Pitch. “Even though we’re only open three days a week [Friday, Saturday and Sunday], we’ve been selling out of beer. So we had to shut down a few times to keep up.” The new system arrived March 20, and within a few days, Collins and Feldt were already brewing a batch of hefeweizen. The increased production also has meant more spent grain needing disposal. Big Rip donates it to a local farmer, who uses it to feed her cows and chickens. “Now that we’re growing, she’s actually planning on expanding her farm,” Collins says. “She’s never had pigs, and I guess they eat a lot. So now she’s going to get some pigs because we’ll be able to provide her with twice as much grain.” The naming system may be consistent, but Big Rip’s beer list is all about change. The only staple is the brewery’s flagship: Hathor’s Sweet Brown Ale. “We just like making a variety of beers,” Collins says. He and Feldt brew whenever they can find time away from their day jobs (in Web design and programming). “We’ve done over 20 recipes since we opened. Anytime you come in, there’s going to be new beers.” Collins says they plan to brew a banana cream ale and a bacon beer in future batches,

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Mulder, Ripley and Ash are ready to brew. possibly in time for Big Rip’s anniversary party and brew fest May 17. From 1 to 5 p.m. that Saturday, they’re promising regional brews, local wine and liquor, tasting glasses, live music and a few other vendors. Breweries include the High Noon Saloon, Rock and Run, Green Room, Tallgrass, Cinder Block, 23rd Street, 75th Street, Weston Brewing Co., McCoy’s, Defiance Brewing Co., S.D. Strong Distilling and KC Bier Co. Tickets may go fast, though; Collins says they won’t oversell the event, limiting sales to 200 tickets ($25 for “Mug Club Members” and $35 for everyone else).  “We’re going to keep it small because no one really likes waiting in line,” Collins says. “I think we’re going to limit it to 15 or 20 people per brewery that attend.” Before the party, there’s still work to be done. Big Rip’s exterior had already been painted a dark, blood red by the time The Pitch visited in late March. A beer garden was under construction near the brewery’s back door. Collins expects the beer garden to be finished by mid-April. But the patio, meant to seat about 50 people, won’t open until Big Rip’s upgraded liquor license is approved. Once the garden opens, the idea is to book bands every month. And soon Big Rip’s patrons will be able to eat Mexican food from El Burrito Loco, which is opening in the former KC SmokeShack BBQ space. If all their bright ideas are this sunny, Feldt and Collins may finally run out of terrifying names to call their endeavors. But probably not.

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21

music

Big Eight down easily to a soothing alto, but she’s still hard to ignore. — Natalie Gallagher

La Guerre Rare and Collectible Spirits

oLD sounD Rain Follows the Plough

Let’s face it: The whole synth-pop-frontedby-a-delicate-voiced-female-singer thing is a niche genre on the verge of being pummeled to death by a bunch of would-be sensitive starlets who believe that distortion makes up for quality. It’s a shame because, at one point, I had great love for Oh Land, Beach House, Lana Del Rey, Cults and Lorde. Then Top 40 swooped in, crushing everything good and pure in its greedy jaws. Some artists remain outliers on that musical trajectory, which was once so promising. Local singer-songwriter Katlyn Conroy is one of them. When she isn’t providing backup vocals for Cowboy Indian Bear, Conroy is busy crafting thoughtful songs for her solo project, La Guerre. The latest effort is Rare and Collectible Spirits, a full-length collection of ambient songs that seep out of speakers like mist from the edge of a forest. Spirits is synth-heavy, but Conroy isn’t patching potholes with electronic filler. There is real substance here: purposeful and ref lective lyrics. Check me out like a library book/Read the summary and be done with me, Conroy sings mournfully on “Feel It.” The album title is derived from “Not People,” on which Conroy delivers her sinister thesis: a desire to collect spirits, devour them and leave a hollow person behind. She interlaces these intangible ideas with references to real places and dates, but nothing ever quite lines up; the song “Lawrence, Kansas” seems to refer more to a state of mind than to the town itself. Spirits soars smoothly — almost too smoothly. With 15 tracks, Conroy runs the risk of sameness. Playing in the background, Spirits can sound repetitive over 35 minutes. Yet Conroy’s voice saves her. She exhibits an astounding vocal power, pushing skyward on “I Remember” and nearly to a breaking point on “Feel It.” She scales 22

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a p r i l 3 - 9, 2 0 1 4

Get to know these local releases.

assuages any headache, calms any painful maladies and stirs you out of any dusty depression. — N.G.

TrucksTop Honeymoon The Madness of Happiness

Family of Six,” a tongue-in-cheek warning to any concertgoers who might be willing to offer them lodging for the night. Separately, they are excellent singers; together, the Wests are dynamite. Mike has a comfortable, tavern-born throatiness, a perfect complement to Katie’s fiery, top-of-themountain voice. Between that and the array of instruments — banjo, mandolin, upright bass, glockenspiel and plenty more, all in a terrific jumble — the songs on Happiness seem designed for barroom sing-alongs and family-friendly picnics. Before you know it, the album’s 49 minutes are past, your detour listening to the tales of Truckstop Honeymoon over — until you press Play and enjoy the ride once more. — N.G.

my oH my Old Sound is dead-set on making music that sounds, well, old. The three members — mandolin player and guitarist Grady Keller, bassist Greg Herrenbruck and guitarist Chad Brothers — have been playing together for more than a decade, and though they are far from retirement age, they seem to relish a musical style that predates them. The band’s debut record, Rain Follows the Plough, opens with 20 seconds of vintage circus sounds before fading into “Shell Game,” a cryptic ballad with Keller handling the lead vocals and Herrenbruck and Brothers harmonizing on his heels. The sparse strings and echoing lyrics have a Celtic energy to them — a mood that is ripped apart two songs later, when “Two Midnights” breaks into fast-paced fingerpicking madness, aided by producer Phil Wade’s banjo. Where Rain Follows the Plough could lumber along on old-timey, town-square-ready songs, Keller and company offer a few surprises. The hissing cicadas that fade in and out on “Little Wrecking Ball” set up the desolate melody beautifully (thoughts of Miley Cyrus are far from the mind), and Brothers’ singing falls to a hushed, rough whisper. The rain and wind chimes on “Train Station” give way to handclaps, foot stomps and Herrenbruck’s rumbling bellow. It’s the picking style, though, that sets Rain Follows the Plough apart from a host of other folk albums. Keller’s mandolin playing is masterful — at times, he seems to be playing a different instrument entirely — and Brothers’ chords lap over one another like waves in a cheerful stream. It’s a nuanced collection of drugstore remedies: Plough

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Your Heart Not Mine Bluegrass-driven husband-and-wife teams are a dime a dozen in folk, but Lawrence’s Mike and Katie West, of Truckstop Honeymoon, have very few cares about what other people are doing. They’re plenty busy in their own world — and it’s a quaint, cozy one, filled with inside jokes, homemade fun and a few mean guitar riffs. That’s what you’ll find on the duo’s latest full-length, The Madness of Happiness. The track listing practically speaks for itself, with songs like “Home Is Not a Hotel,” “Watching the Weather” and “Sunday in Ponca City.” It’s a delightfully idiosyncratic collection, and the Wests know it. The Madness of Happiness is filled with stories about what it means to love with heart and humor — something that the couple has in spades. They isolate moments of marital drudgery and turn them into something fun and joyful, as in the album opener, “List of Chores,” in which they simultaneously warn each other: Don’t look at me like I’m just one more thing you gotta do on your list of chores/I’m the one you love, the one you adore. Later, on “Home Is Not a Hotel,” the couple note the differences between their usual roadside housing and their actual one: If you break something, no one will bill you, but no one will fix it unless you will, and will you? Where other, less creative souls might find these subjects dull, Truckstop Honeymoon sees a deep pull of material. Truckstop Honeymoon tours often, and the Wests take their four young children along for the ride. They discuss the mania of living on the road with a troupe like that in “Couch Surfing With a

There are quite a few things that My Oh My does very well on its debut, Your Heart Not Mine. Lead singer A.M. Merker has a certain booze-drenched roughness to his voice, the kind that always sounds so good when paired with a rollicking piano and some driving guitar chords, of which My Oh My offers plenty. It’s an album made for warm weather and drinking with the windows open. Christin Kuchem-Logan and Sarah Dolt are the backup singers, and sometimes their additions work — as on the powerful title track, “Your Heart Not Mine,” an anthemic show closer if there ever was one — and sometimes they’re unnecessary. On “Whiskey Pillow,” the oohs and ahhs feel out of place in an otherwise rollicking tune. This is a small complaint and one that is easily forgiven; overall, the women are a perky reinforcement in songs that might otherwise be lost to wallowing and dirt kicking. The lyrics on Your Heart Not Mine aren’t anything we haven’t continued on page 24

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23

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

APRIL:

2: The Crayons 3: Kris Lager Band 3: Merle Haggard Tribute Show 4: Tab Benoit w/ Katy & The Girls 5: Damon Fowler w/Joe Moss 5: The Howlin Bros - GL 8: Butch Hancock 8: Whiskey Shivers - GL 9: Major Trio & Connie & The Blueswreckers 10: Jeff Black - GL 10: Hamilton Loomis

continued from page 22 heard before: drinking too much, loving too hard and trying to get life right. It’s everything you’d expect from a band that has no qualms branding itself as an Americana act. To that end, My Oh My accomplishes everything it sets out to do in creating a feel-good, alt-country album that evokes the sepia-toned summers of the 1970s, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Don’t we often wish for times past? And My Oh My hands them over with a reassuring smile. — N.G.

June Igloo

oilS Total Oils USA

(Split release, cassette and digital)

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For more info & tickets: knuckleheadshonkytonk.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

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a p r i l 3 - 9, 2 0 1 4

Up All Night

cS luxEm

FRIDAY, APRIL 11TH

24

kiRStEn paludan

The recordings on both sides of this cassette from Lawrencians CS Luxem and Oils are warm as sunshine. The seven quietly beautiful songs on Luxem’s side of the tape manage to pack a lot of power into simple arrangements. Opener “For Now” is a drone of instruments and voices that lead into the magical harmonies of “Goat Ghost.” Several of the other songs follow this quiet-power formula, although “Born Down Bobby” and “With the Dogs” change things up a pinch — the former with a great loping bounce, the latter with Soweto rhythms and guitar. CS Luxem’s closing song, “Bank Robbing Son of a Bitch,” eschews everything but unaltered vocals and guitar, and leads well into the first cut of Oils’ Total Oils USA side, “The Town,” which leaves in the “check, check” opening of the recording. It’s as if the musicians wanted to provide as open a recording as possible. Oils’ side, though, isn’t nearly as interesting at first as CS Luxem’s. It’s a shame, considering that the band is known live for stretching out and making the most of sonic textures, but the recordings here are pretty straightforward — until you hit the end of “Rain.” It’s a psychedelic fadeout that sets up the sheer wall of feedback that opens “Big Bear,” which proceeds to warp your mind and fade out in another wail of fuzz. — Nick Spacek

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For her second album, Kirsten Paludan didn’t just drop her keys in a fishbowl and hope for the best. She carefully distributed them among her trusted colleagues and former Olympic Size bandmates, who, in turn, helped her transform her rich, lush vocals and sensuous songwriting skills into beautifully crafted nuggets, ripe with heartache and contemplation. Tempowise, Up All Night is a well-balanced effort. On the whole, though, the selections lean heavy on the feminine side. Paludan channels a mature, controlled Tori Amos on the Wurlitzer (“Siberia”) and a throaty Kelley Hunt (“You’re Not the One”). When I played the album for my male friends, they were all reminded of Sarah McLachlan. What sets Paludan’s work apart is the careful arrangement and attention paid to the detail in everything from the backup vocals to the pedal steel. There are surprise gems, too, like the horn parts on opening track “Born to Lose,” a piece written with Paludan’s frequent collaborator, Billy Smith. Overall, Up All Night is a polished effort from one of the region’s most underrated songwriters. — Berry Anderson

bE/non Ran

Be/Non has always been a musical chameleon of a project. Anytime you listen to one of its releases, you’re never certain what you’ll get. The first few tracks on Ran are basic indie

pop, and for the first few minutes, it seems that Ran is going to be the tamest Be/Non album to date. Ever so gradually, however, the tracks evolve. Be/Non introduces tape loops on “No Plaster,” then briefly rocks a Black Sabbath breakdown on “Rainforest Sweep.” Then, halfway through, you’re listening to the super-Ween-y “Staring Contest With a Psychic Cow.” It’s a fun tune, coming after the psychedelic jam “More Than Enough.” But when one considers the ominous throbbing bass of “Euro (Moi Ou Toi)” and “God, When It’s Lovey Dove” that follows, “Psychic Cow” can be seen only as a harbinger of dark things to come. Tracks for Ran were recorded between 1998 and 2006, with “More Than Enough” recorded between spring 1998 and summer 2004. That’s six years for one song. It all makes sense, though, when you listen to album closer “The Moisturizing Aquifer Resurfaced,” which is layer upon layer of synths, guitar, bass, and vocal effects. It helps if you consider Brodie Rush to be Kansas City’s Frank Zappa — he’s a man who’s never content with what he has done, and what’s coming next is always best. You just have to keep up. — N.S.

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

J a z z B e at Rob SchEpS and Eliot Zigmund, with thE maRk lowREy QuintEt, at thE bRoadway JaZZ club

Big and burly, in presence and sound, saxophonist Rob Scheps visits Kansas City a couple of times a year. On each trip, he brings a New York musician whom Kansas Citians have little chance otherwise to enjoy. Joining Scheps this time: Eliot Zigmund, who, for more than 50 years, has drummed with such jazz stars as Bill Evans, Stan Getz and Jim Hall. But Scheps’ music is reason enough to listen: In addition to playing tenor sax, he’s lyrical on flute, and his solos are always surprising in their imagination. Scheps and Zigmund join Mark Lowrey’s quintet Friday at the Broadway Jazz Club. Sunday afternoon, they give both a concert and a clinic with pianist Roger Wilder and bassist Bob Bowman at Take Five Coffee + Bar. — Larry Kopitnik Rob Scheps and Eliot Zigmund with the Mark Lowrey Quintet, 9 p.m.–1 a.m. Friday April 4, at the Broadway Jazz Club (3601 Broadway, 816-298-6316), $10 cover; Rob Scheps/ Eliot Zigmund 4tet clinic and concert, 2–4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 6, at Take Five Coffee + Bar (5336 West 151st Street, 913-948-5550), $10 cover; $20 includes clinic.

OFFICIAL BEER

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THURS: TheRIFLE Colourist * NightNOISEFM Terrors of 1927 ROCK BAD IDEAS Twinsmith * Ings * Actors & Actresses * GENTLEMANSAVAGE APPROPRIATE GRAMMAR ANDREAPERDUE FRI: Fanfarlo * Lillies on Mars * Milagres Chambers Oils SUN. 3/10* Supernaughts MON.*3/11 8PM DESERT NOISES SAT: Why? * Spirit Is The Spirit * La Guerre * ALATURKA MELISMA TICS Carolina Smith * Good Graeff Nathan Phillips CD RELEASE SO COW Your Friend * Katy Guillen & The Girls (IRELAND) Eyelit PARTY * Gracie Schram * Ruddy Swain * LA Price 3/12 WED.PRESENTS 3/13 SUN.TUES. 4/6 JEFF HARSHBARGER MIDWEST GOTNEXT OFF WITH THEIR HEADS THE PEOPLE’S LIBERTATION BIG BAND TWO4ONE TEENAGEBOTTLEROCKET DOMCHRONICLES MON. 4/7 KARAOKE W/ SENOR DOS LA PANA MASKEDINTRUDER PETER SENSAY TUES. 4/8 7PM KAOPECTONES KILL NOISEBOYS STEDDYP 10PM AUSTIN MILLER/SCOTT SCHUMAN UPCOMING WED. 4/9 REACH4/8 PRESENTS 3/14 EXPENDABLES FU MANCHU 3/18 DARWIN DEEZEBEAT 4/16 MOWGLIS LET THE BUILD 3/19 LYDIA LOVELESS 4/23 BLACK MT. THURS. 4/10 THE MELODIC/SCRUFFY & THE JANITORS 4/3 THAO& TGDSD 4/30 DEVIL MAKE 3

Middle of the Map takes over Westport this weekend, but you can escape the fray for a different kind of madness at Center of the City. Thirty-five KC punk and hardcore bands spend three nights battering two stages at Vandals — the remodeled indoor stage at the Black & Gold Tavern and an outdoor courtyard. The lineup is intimidating: Red Kate, the Bad Ideas, Stiff Middle Fingers, Bummer, and Black on Black are just a few highlights, along with a few regional acts that play Kansas City somewhat less often. Eardrums will be blasted. Beer will be spilled. Prepare yourself for a sweaty, gnarly good time. Thursday, April 3, through Saturday, April 5, Vandals at Black & Gold Tavern (3740 Broadway, 816-561-1099)

Elephant Revival

Five-piece Colorado band Elephant Revival keeps enough instruments among its members to be considered a tiny traveling orchestra. Lead singer Bonnie Paine plays the washboard and the saw, and there’s no snubbing a woman who can coax music out of those “instruments.” Last fall, the band released These Changing Skies, a collection of songs that incorporates some delicate Celtic slivers into field-ready bluegrass. None of that explains a band name that, at a glance, gives false hope of a circus coming to town. Lawrence’s Olassa opens. Saturday, April 5, the Bottleneck (737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483)

album, Sunswimmer, the band recasts Americana with elements of psychedelic rock and lengthy (like, stretching into the 10-minute mark) instrumentals. Don’t let that scare you: New Madrid has opened for plenty of larger acts — the Avett Brothers and Dead Confederate among them — and by now should be used to formatting their lengthy tunes for a live audience. Tuesday, April 8, Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

New Madrid

Chick Corea and Béla Fleck

The four boys who make up New Madrid are, somewhat disappointingly, not from Spain. They’re from Tennessee and now call Athens, Georgia, home. Their sound is more inspired by early 1990s guitar rock than any perceived soundtrack for the running of the bulls. No one can fault them for romanticizing the exotic, especially in the band-swallowing genre of Americana. On New Madrid’s latest

OPENDAILY SUN. 12PM-12AM MON.TUES.SAT. 4PM-1:30AM

WED-FRI 12PM-1:30AM KITCHEN OPEN LATE

WWW.THERECORDBAR.COMFOR FULL SCHEDULE

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Renowned jazz pianist and composer Chick Corea and banjo master Béla Fleck would make for excellent concerts on their own. The chance to see both artists share a stage and collaborate on pieces, well, that show is on another level. With their 2007 collaborative album, The Enchantment, Corea and Fleck expanded the minds of jazz and bluegrass fans with their brand-new fusion. They don’t

f o r e c a s t

WEEKLY

SUN. 12-5PM BARTENDER’S BRUNCH & BLOODY MARY BAR MON. 7PM SONIC SPECTRUM MUSIC TRIVIA TUES. 7PM HONKY TONK SUPPER CLUB WED. 7PM BOB WALKENHORST & FRIENDS THURS. 7PM TRIVIA CLASH

Elephant Revival

get together for concerts terribly often, so we suggest seizing the opportunity and catching a set that will challenge whatever you think you know about these musical styles. Sunday, April 6, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7222)

Tab Benoit

If you like searing and smoking blues, look no further than Tab Benoit. The Louisiana singer and guitarist swings into Knuckleheads Friday with his own sound — big helpings of Delta blues with a healthy side of Creole culture. After his 1993 debut album, Benoit released an album a year, until his last full-length in 2012, Legacy: The Best of Tab Benoit. He does indeed have quite a legacy in the national blues community, thanks in part to the startling breadth of styles at his disposal. Local blues star Samantha Fish opens. Friday, April 4, Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

K e Y

Pick of the Week

Bring on the Blues

 Living Legends

Wear Your Earplugs

A Gift From Louisiana

Cheap Beer

Duets

Nothing About Elephants

 Americana

Punk-Rock

 The Lady Plays the Saw

 Sounds of Spain?

pitch.com

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27

AGENDA

continued from page 11

Thursday | 4.3 |

AMY SCHUMER

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS Barred Meadows, oil paintings by Rachel Gregor | 7-11 p.m. Friday, Subterranean Gallery, 4124 Warwick, Apt. B., subterraneangallery.com

COMEDY

ABCs of Improv | 6:30 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill, 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee

dy/nas/ty • Ebony G. Patterson | Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, nermanmuseum.org

Josh Alton | 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Brian Dunkleman | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

en bloc, by Jorge Garcia Almodovar | UMKC

The Recess Players Improv Showcase | 10 p.m.

In the Looking Glass: Recent Daguerreotype Acquisitions | Nelson-Atkins Museum, 4525 Oak

Gallery of Art, 5015 Holmes, Room 203

The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

FRIDAY

4.4

MUSIC

Jorge Arana Trio, Glimpse Trio | The Brick, 1727

o r To u a ck D o The B KC . in s p sto

McGee

MCC-Penn Valley Student Art Show & Sale | Carter Art Center, Penn Valley Community College 3201 Southwest Tfwy.

r

Other Faces: Paintings and Drawings by Jane Mudd and Nora Othic | Thornhill Gal-

Carswell & Hope | Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Mas-

lery, Avila University, 11901 Wornall, avila.edu

sachusetts, Lawrence

Dirty Fences, Lazy | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Front Porch Night with KC Rain Dogs and the Wall Talkers | Coda, 1744 Broadway Good Morning Bedlam | 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

NIGHTLIFE

F UNDR A ISING PA RT Y

Feel Good | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire,

Spinning Tree Theatre hosts “A Weekend in the Country,” with hors d’oeuvres and desserts, an open bar,

Lawrence

Music trivia bingo | 9:30 p.m. The BrewTop Pub &

Guttermouth, American Discord, Six Percent | 7:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main Merle Haggard tribute show | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads

Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Ernie Krivda Quartet | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616

Patio, 6601 W. 135th St., Ste. A1, Overland Park

Oh My Gawth — Goth and New Wave Dance Party | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Friday | 4.4 |

Good Ju Ju | 9 a.m.-7 p.m., 1420 W. 13th Terr. Liberty Belle | 8:30 a.m.-8 p.m., 1320 W. 13th St., libertybellekc.com

PERFORMING ARTS

Kris Lager Band | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Middle of the Map Music Fest, featuring Actors & Actresses, Ings, Twinsmith, Night Terrors of 1927, the Colourist | 7:30 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Middle of the Map Music Fest, featuring

Schwervon, Ings, the Belle Game, Ski Lodge, Snowmine, Small Black, Total Slacker, Various Blonde, Is Paris Burning, Shy Boys, Rooms Without Windows, Loose Park, Spinstyles | 7 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Middle of the Map Fest, featuring the Clementines, Olassa, Molly Gene One Whoaman Band, Billy Beale, John Velghe and the Prodigal Sons, the Electric Lungs, Wells the Traveler | Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania Mike Stud, IamG, Matt Easton, That Kid Ty | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

The International Center for Music Van Cliburn Tribute Concert | 7:30 p.m. Kauffman Center for the

Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway

Kansas City Ballet presents New Moves | 6 p.m.

Todd Bolender Center for Dance & Creativity, 500 W. Pershing Rd., kcballet.org

a p r i l 3 - 9, 2 0 1 4

Reality and Fantasy: Land, Town and Sea | Nelson-Atkins Museum, 4525 Oak

Re-Tread: Matthew Dehaemers | Studios Inc., 1708 Campbell, thestudiosinc.org

Rag and Bone | 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., 1412 W. 12th St., ragandbonekc.com Restoration Emporium | 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m., 1300 W. 13th St., restorationemporium.com

Urban Mining Vintage | 9 a.m.-9 p.m., 3924 Walnut

Thieves Guild Drink and Draw | 7 p.m. Monday, Fatso’s Public House and Stage, 1016 Massachusetts, Lawrence This American Life | Fridays and Saturdays, Kemper East, 200 E. 44th St. The Tyranny of Good Taste | La Esquina, 1000 W. 25th St., charlottestreet.org MUSIC

Josh Abbott Band, Kyle Park | 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

COMMUNITY BENEFITS

Lawrence Ballet Theatre presents Emergence

| 7:30 p.m. Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence, lawrenceartscenter.org

Seventh Annual Books & Boutiques | 10 a.m.

COMEDY

FILM

Brian Dunkleman | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy

Filmmaker David Kaplan presents Particle Fever | Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania

Corey Holcomb | 8 & 10:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

SPORTS & REC

Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Todd Rundgren | 6:30 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City the pitch

live music and silent auction | $75, Camelot Castle, 10000 N.W. 75th St., 816-569-5277, spinningtreetheatre.com

by Melissa Powlas, Jeanne Rittmueller and Lisa Rogers | Friday-Saturday, Kiosk Gallery, 3951 Broadway

SHOPPING

E. 18th St.

28

Polychromatic: An Exhibition in Color, works

Amy Schumer | 7 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

pitch.com

Overland Park Convention Center, 6000 College Blvd.

Tab Benoit with Katy Guillen & the Girls | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Boogaloo 7 | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand Center of the City, featuring Dead Deer, Plug Uglies,

Royals vs. White Sox | 3:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium

5 Star Disaster, Stinkbomb, Four Arm Shiver, Bombs Over Broadway, the Haddonfields, Documentary, American Dischord, Smash the State, the Shidiots, the Uncouth | 6 p.m. Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway

Mammoth Life, Haunt Ananta, Talking Mountain | Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence continued on page 30

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BUY LOCAL HALF OFF

TheaTer Dates and times vary. Bernstein’s Broadway | Musical Theater Heritage, Off Center Theatre, Crown Center, 2450 Grand, mthkc.com

First Friday Play Readings | 8 p.m. Potluck

Productions, at Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

.com EATS

The Frowning Vajayjays of Shady Pines

| Just Off Broadway Theatre, 3051 Central, kcmeltingpot.com

Race | Starting Friday, the Living Room, 1818 McGee, 816-553-5857, thelivingroomkc.com

Oak 63: $40 deal for $20 TeOcali: $10 deal for $5 JOe’s Pizza: $20 deal for $10 The Dubliner: $40 deal for $20 Duke’s On GranD: $20 deal for $10 em chamas: $30 deal for $15 HUDDLE HOUSE lucky brewGrille: $20 deal for $10 $12 TO huDDle hOuse FOR ONLY $6 nica’s laGniaPPe: $20 deal for $10 wOODsweaTher cafe: $16 deal for $8 QuinTOn’s walDO bar: $10 deal for $5 Green rOOm burGers & beer: $15 deal for $7.50 OPera hOuse cOffee anD fOOD emPOrium: $20 deal for $10 PhO GOOD: $15 deal for $7.50 OPen fire Pizza: $20 deal for $10 huDDle hOuse: $12 deal for $6 llywelyn’s Pub: $20 deal for $10 kOrean resTauranT sObahn: $20 deal for $10 Pickleman’s: $15 deal for $7.50

Citizen Soldiers on the Prairie | Johnson County Museum of History, 6305 Lackman Rd., Shawnee, jocomuseum.org

GOODS

Hands-on History | 1 p.m. Friday, National

LIVING synerGy fiTness sTuDiO, 4 Interval Cross Training Workouts for $13.50 nexT level fiTness, Two Personal Training Sessions for $22.50 missiOn bOwl: $30 deal for $15 The PiTch, Pitch Passport for $45 synerGy fiTness sTuDiO, One Month of Cross Training for $29

Double Discount Days four interval cross Training workouts

the Coterie Theatre, Crown Center, 2450 Grand, coterietheatre.org

Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike |

$27 deal for $13.50

$6.75

Supernaughts, Chambers, Milagres, Lilies on Mars, Fanfarlo | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Middle of the Map Music Fest, featuring the Great

American Canyon Band, Little Legend, Drop A Grand, Dots Not Feathers, Those Darlins, S. Carey, Forrester, Jorge Arana Trio, Monta At Odds, Sleepy Kitty, Wolf Eyes, Dosh, BODY2BODY | 6 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Middle of the Map Fest, featuring the Ready Brothers, the Konza Swamp Band, Victor and Penny, the Naughty Pines, Howard Iceberg, Wayne Hancock, Rollfast Ramblers | Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania Muddy Waters’ birthday show with Crosseyed Cat | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St. Rubber, Model Airplanes | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck,

737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

The Sluts, Psychic Heat, Black Stacey | 10 p.m.

Spencer Theater, UMKC, 4949 Cherry, kcrep.org

Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence,

War Horse | Music Hall, 301 W. 13th St., theaterleague.com, ticketmaster.com

Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

MUSeUM exhibiTS & evenTS

Commemorating the Rwandan Genocide — Workshop & Lecture | 2 p.m. Sunday,

National World War I Museum, Liberty Memorial, 100 W. 26th St.

Convergence: Jazz, Film, Dance and the Visual Arts | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St., , americanjazzmuseum.org

Family day: Optical Antics & Illusions |

1-3 p.m. Sunday, KU Natural History Museum, 1345 Jayhawk Boulevard, Lawrence

World War I Museum, the Liberty Memorial, 100 W. 26th St. theworldwar.org

7Th heaven: $50 deal for $25

synergy fitness studio

Schoolhouse Rock: Live | Starting Tuesday,

continued from page 28 Middle of the Map Music Fest, featuring Oils,

Sterling Witt, Godzillionaire | 10 p.m. The Uptown

Saturday | 4.5 | PeRFoRMinG ARTS

Kansas City Ballet presents New Moves |

7:30 p.m. Todd Bolender Center for Dance & Creativity, 500 W. Pershing Rd., kcballet.org

Lawrence Ballet Theatre presents Emergence

| 7:30 p.m. Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence, lawrenceartscenter.org CoMedy

Brian dunkleman | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Corey Holcomb | 7 & 9:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St. exPoS

100 Years of Genocide | Friday-Saturday,

Honey dews Baby expo | 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Deer Creek Golf Course, 7000 W. 133rd St., Leawood

On the Brink: A Month That Changed the World | National World War I Museum, Liberty

Knitting in the Heartland 2014, featuring internationally recognized designer, instructor and author Fiona Ellis | 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel, 12601 W. 95th St., Lenexa, kithkc.com

Campanella Gallery inside McAfee Memorial Library, Park University, 8700 N.W. River Park Dr.

Memorial , 100 W. 26th St., theworldwar.org

SHoPPinG

Outstanding Women of Missouri | Fort Osage Education Center, 107 Osage St., Sibley

Good Ju Ju | 9 a.m.-7 p.m., 1420 W. 13th Terr.

Take Five Tours | 6 p.m. Thursday, American

Liberty Belle | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 1320 W. 13th St.

Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St.

The Discovery of King Tut | Union Station, 30

W. Pershing Rd., unionstation.org/tut

Rag and Bone | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 1412 W. 12th St., Restoration emporium | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 1300 W. 13th St. Urban Mining Vintage | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 3924 Walnut

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THE SONATA PROJECT WITH THE OWEN/COX DANCE GROUP

SATUR

DAY

4.5

CHRIS MULLINS

with Revel Ravel.

The Sonata Project, featuring the Bach Aria Soloists with the Owen/Cox Dance Group and cellist Susie Yang | 8 p.m. Folly Theater, 300 W. 12th St., follytheater.org

BECOME A

SERVING FOOD

TILL 4AM

4112

Pennsylvania Ave

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Downtown Dog Day | 8 a.m. Downtown Overland Park Farmers Market, between 79th and 80th streets on Marty

Kansas City Metro MS Walk | 8 a.m. Sporting Park, 1 Sporting Way, KCK

Project Blue River Rescue, includes breakfast and lunch, T-shirt, tools and supplies | 8 a.m. Lakeside Nature Center, 4701 Gregory Blvd., lakesidenaturecenter.org Walk for Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish Missouri | 8 a.m. Crown Center, 2450 Grand Blvd SPORTS & REC

COA Mid America Nationals | Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, coacheeranddance.com

Royals vs. White Sox | 1:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium Sporting KC vs. Real Salt Lake | 7:30 p.m. Sporting Park, 1 Sporting Way, KCK, sportingkc.com MUSIC

Arm the Poor, Preston Hall & DF Dub All Stars, Nowlege, DJ Shitty Ranx | 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand Bruiser Queen, Chambers | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge,

946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Center of the City, featuring Deco Auto, Dead Ven, the Itch, Donner Diaries, Scene of Irony, KC Thieves, Molotov Latte, Red Kate, Bottle Breakers, Hipshot Killer, the Bad Ideas, Iron Guts Kelly | 6 p.m. Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway

Henry Clay and the Full Grown Men: Tribute to Muddy Waters | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Culprits, Dollar Fox, the Great Vehicle | The Brick, 1727 McGee

Deviator, Last Night’s Regret | 7 p.m. The Uptown

Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Elephant Revival, Olassa | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck,

816.960.4560 Mon-Fri 4p-3am Sat-Sun 12pm-3am

INSIDER MIDDLE OF THE MAP SIGN UP FOR OUR T H U R S . 4 . 3 T O S A T. 4 . 5 F E AT U R I N G

NEWSLETTER WAY N E

HANCOCK

737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

F R I DAY • A P R I L 4 T H

Damon Fowler with Joe Moss | 8:30 p.m. Knuck-

FOR FULL MUSIC LISTINGS VISIT:

leheads, 2715 Rochester

Middle of the Map Music Fest, featuring LA Price, Ruddy Swain, Gracie Schram, Eyelit, Katy Guillen & the Girls, Your Friend, Nathan Phillips, Good Graeff, Caroline Smith, La Guerre, Spirit is the Spirit, Why? | 2 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Middle of the Map Music Fest, featuring Black on

Black, Psychic Heat, CS Luxem, Josh Berwanger Band, the Sluts, Upset, Bummer, Maps for Travelers, Ghetto Blaster, White Mule, Hammerlord, Reggie and the Full Effect, Mime Game, Dead Girls, Bears & Company, Anna Cole & the Other Lovers, Scruffy & the Janitors, Conchance, Heartfelt Anarchy, Steddy P, Stik Figa, Shabazz Palaces, lowercaseKANSAS DJs | 1:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

MIDDLEOFTHEMAPFEST.COM OR WESTPORTSALOON.COM

http://www.pitch.com/kansascity/NewsletterInfoRegistration/Page

816.960.4560

westportsaloon.com

Live Music Live Music 7 nights 7 nights a week

a week

Middle of the Map Fest, featuring the Vi Tran Band, Maria the Mexican, the Philistines, Rev Gusto, Pedaljets, Let’s Use Teamwork, Beau Jennings, Loaded Goat, A.J. Gaither,TwentyThousandStrongmen,theHootenHallers, Jack Oblivion | Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

Louis Neal Big Band | 8:30 p.m., the Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St. continued on page 32

816.561.2444 www.erniebiggs.com nsas 4115 Mill Street West Port Ka pitch.com

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City

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31

3611 Broadway KCMO 64111 6 - 1:30 Mon-Sat

Fri Apr 4 • 10:00 pm • $5

Fri Apr 18 Sat Apr 19 8:00 pm • $5

Live Music

8pm • $10

us on

$10 acebook

9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Jen Harris Daisy Buckët Mercury Mad Vigil & Thieves alongside some of KC’s top spoken word artists

POETRY SCOTT HRABKO and The Rabbits

continued from page 31 Til Willis, Erratic Cowboy, King Washington |

NighTlifE

DJ Thundercutz | 10 p.m.

More

is a DRAG

a gender-bending blend of poetry, music & art

See Our Full Calendar at uptownartsbar.com

EvEnts

Onl

ine

MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

at

m pitch.co

le geek Cest Burlesque | Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Mas-

sachusetts, Lawrence

Jerry hahn Trio | 6-8 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809

Grand

Mindless Self indulgence, the Bunny the Bear, Death Valley high | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Mas-

sachusetts, Lawrence

The People’s liberation Big Band | 8 p.m. Record-

Bar, 1020 Westport Rd.

razihel, Skullender, AudioMattic | 8 p.m. The Riot

Room, 4048 Broadway

Magic 107.3 Saturday groove Party | 7 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Sunday | 4.6 | PErforMiNg ArTS

Chick Corea & Béla fleck | 7 p.m. Kauffman Center

NighTlifE

halcyon Diversified with DJs rod & Jed | 9 p.m.

Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway

Neo-Soul lounge | The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Monday | 4.7 |

for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway ExPoS

Knitting in the heartland 2014, featuring designer,

SPorTS & rEC

royals vs. Tampa Bay rays | 7:10 p.m. Kauffman

Stadium

instructor and author Fiona Ellis | 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel, 12601 W. 95th St., Lenexa ShoPPiNg

liberty Belle | 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 1320 W. 13th St. rag and Bone | 11 a.m.-5 p.m., 1412 W. 12th St.

mon: ru

// karaokral grit happy h e our 6-9 thu 4/3 @ 10pm Jorge ar ana tr Sat 4/5 glimpSe trio - 9 io, p CulpritS !, Dollarm t h e g reat Veh FoX, Fri 4/11 Sat 4/12 ShaDeS oF JaDeiCle the QuiVe rS C Sat 4/19 SChWerVon, thD releaSe, e truCkSto p honeymBaD iDeaS oon CD r eleaSe

ND

APRILLE2R’S GUILD TRAVE

RD

APRIL 3 H TRACK TC DJ SCRA

RYAN

TH

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SPorTS & rEC

pitch.com

Broadway

Sam’s Club Karaoke | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946

Massachusetts, Lawrence

Trivia Mondays with KC Move to Amend | 7 p.m.

The Cashew, 2000 Grand

Trivia with Matt larson | 8 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Tuesday | 4.8 |

943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Crotch, Black on Black, the Biff Tannens, the Hemorrhoids, the Protesters, Stiff Middle Fingers, the Rackatees, Bummer, the Death Scene, Ghetto Blaster | 5 p.m. Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway

WIFI NOW AVAILABLE!

Jazz Disciples | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

NighTlifE

Center of the City, featuring Sister Mary Rotten

CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

3402 Main

Speed rack KC | 3 p.m. Madrid Theatre, 3810 Main

931 Broadway

Arm the Poor, lion Spirits | Jackpot Music Hall,

PATRIC

hit Maker open-Mic Singer-Songwriter Showcase with gary Cloud | 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown,

Jazz brunch | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant,

MUSiC

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417

Brother John’s Motivational r&B/Soul Showcase | 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Pharaoh: Seeking the Crown, Skatterman, Don Juan, Mid range Music, King Pen Coalition, Blaklava, Bucc$, Ben Wayne, Cam B, Soul Servers, DJ rockwell | 9 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048

City Market | 8 a.m.-3 p.m., 20 E. Fifth St.

royals vs. White Sox | 1:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium

TH

Antique Scream, rocket Blue opera, Sextonic Plates | 9:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

fooD & DriNK

Grand, coacheeranddance.com

6 UNPLUGGED APRIL C & ASEY APRIPLAT9RICK IMMING

Urban Mining Vintage | Noon-5 p.m., 3924 Walnut

CoA Mid America Nationals | Sprint Center, 1407

TH

COLBY

restoration Emporium | Noon-5 p.m., 1300 W. 13th St.

MUSiC

40 Watt Dreams, Wells the Traveler | 6 p.m.

Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

fooD & DriNK

Slow food Kansas City Spring Wine Dinner |

7-9 p.m. Blue Bird Bistro, 1700 Summit, slowfoodkc.org SPorTS & rEC

royals vs. Tampa Bay rays | 7:10 p.m. Kauffman

Stadium

Photos © Brinkhoff/MögenBurg

war horse

War Horse | The Tony Award-winner is onstage through Sunday, April 6, at the Music Hall, 301 West 13th Street. Tickets start at $25; see theaterleague.com or ticketmaster.com.

UMKC vs. Kansas Softball | 5 p.m. UMKC Campus, 5000 Holmes

MUSiC

Dream Theater | 7 p.m. The Uptown, 3700 Broadway MUSiC

All Time Low, Man Overboard, Handguns | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Bram’s B-3 Bombers | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Butch Hancock | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester Brandon Hudspeth Duo | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Hermon Mehari Trio | 6 p.m. Majestic, 931 Broadway Austin Miller, Scott Schumann | 10 p.m. RecordBar,

1020 Westport Rd.

Folkicide, Mikal Shapiro, rabbitt Killer | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

G-eazy, rockie Fresh, Tory Lanez | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Good Time Charley, B’Dinas, the electric Lungs | 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand Jana Kramer, Canaan Smith & Austin Webb | 7 p.m. Kanza Hall, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park Let the Beat Build 5 | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020

Westport Rd.

Major Trio, Connie & the Blueswreckers | 7:30 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

New Madrid, Captiva, A Gecko Named Terrance | 7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand Open Blues Jam with the Coyote Bill Boogie Band | 9 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania Whiskey Shivers | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715

Rochester

Wednesday | 4.9 |

The Werks, Brother Bagman | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence NiGHTLiFe

B.A.r.T Wednesdays with DJ G Train | 10 p.m.

MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

poetic Underground open mic | 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

FiLM

Kansas City FilmFest | 6:15 p.m. Cinemark Palace

Trivia | 7-9 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

at the Plaza, 500 Nichols Rd., kcfilmfest.org SpOrTS & reC

royals vs. Tampa Bay rays | 1:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

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S ava g e L o v e

Disclosing Dear Dan: My boyfriend of three months,

“Marcus,” told me last week that he is a trans man. He has performed oral sex on me and fingered me, but he never let me reciprocate and told me that he didn’t want to have penis-in-vagina sex yet because that was a large commitment. We go to college in a conservative part of the country, and almost no one here knows. He worried that if I found out, I would expose him to our friends and peers and perhaps even press charges (because we had sex when I did not know he was trans). Had I known, I don’t think I would have had sex with Marcus. Before I found out he was trans, I was deeply attracted to him and was falling for him. Now, I no longer feel either of those things and do not know if I can continue dating him. I feel like a small-minded bigot that my romantic feelings about Marcus are based on something as randomly distributed as a penis. Marcus wants to continue to date and to have sex to see if my feelings can change. I’ve never been in this position before, and I don’t know anyone who has, so maybe this is a growing experience?

No Clever Acronym Dear NCA: “NCA is clearly struggling,” said

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M. Dru Levasseur, a trans activist, lawyer and co-founder of the Jim Collins Foundation, an organization that funds gender-confirming surgeries for trans people. Levasseur recommends exploring your feelings. “Does NCA not see Marcus as a man now? Is she sure he doesn’t have a penis? Trans guys have amazing dicks that are different from cis guys’ dicks (surgery or no surgery) — how does she know she won’t like it or even prefer it? Is she afraid of social rejection if people were to find out? If she wants to explore this, she could talk to a therapist, read some books, or join a support group online (where she won’t risk outing Marcus). Who knows, Marcus could be the best sex and biggest love of her life.” I believe that Marcus should have told you he was trans before you hooked up, and disclosing was in his own self-interest. But messing around with someone you wouldn’t have had you known is a common experience, one that most people bounce back from. There are worse forms of nondisclosure. “There are lots of reasons why trans people might be stealth (or not out) like Marcus,” Levasseur added, “for example, the rate of violence against trans people or the overwhelming statistics of discrimination. There are many people out there who think trans men are the ideal guys.” OK, let’s say you’ve decided that you don’t want to keep seeing Marcus. Are you a bigot? “It’s OK to have a preference,” Levasseur

By

D a n S ava ge

said. “If trans guys are not her thing, no harm done. I would just hope she is kind when she lets Marcus go.” Levasseur wanted to close with a message to any trans men reading this. “To the Marcuses of the world who will read NCA’s letter and see it as just another message of rejection to add to a daily list of transphobia, body shame and internalized self-loathing that fuels the staggering trans suicide attempt rate: Don’t go there. Trans men are hot and deserve to be loved for the amazing men they are. They did not have their masculinity handed to them. They earned it — often through journeys that take unbelievable resilience and courage. An intentional man. The full package. And we deserve not to settle for someone who doesn’t appreciate our bodies or our histories. Find someone who wants the full you.”

Dear Dan: I’m a 32-year-old pansexual woman. I date a lot of people (mostly guys these days) and have recently started seeing a 22-year-old het male. The thing is, he’s in a serious (but open) relationship with a 26-year-old woman. He has asked me if I’m into playing around with both of them. I’m into it on principle alone (who wouldn’t want to fuck a girl and a guy at the same time?!?), but I’m not sure if it’s a good idea. I don’t want to deal with the awkwardness around it, let alone have their relationship suffer (and mine with the guy) as a result of playing together. Toronto Poly Virgin Dear TPV: Who wouldn’t want to fuck a girl

and a guy at the same time? I wouldn’t because I’m gay, gayer, gayest. But I don’t see why you — pan, panner, pannest — wouldn’t jump at the chance. (After you’ve met the other girl in person, established a mutual attraction, and negotiated the terms of your surrender.) Could it end awkwardly? Billions of two-ways have ended awkwardly over the centuries. The addition of a third person means a 33 percent greater chance of someone feeling awkward after it’s over. But there’s a 100 percent chance of having a three-way, which is awesome.

Dear Dan: I’m sure you’ve received a million

e-mails about this, but the correct answer, according to my wife (who was raised Baptist but — thank God — is Baptist no longer!): A Methodist will say “hi” when they see you in the liquor store.

Just Thought You Should Know Dear JTYSK: Thanks for sharing, and send my love to the wife.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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The Pitch: April 3, 2014