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W

hen Union Station CEO George Guastello fired Kansas City Museum director Christopher Leitch on June 9, the dismissal caught most museum supporters by surprise. “You could have knocked me over with a feather,” Northeast News publisher Mike Bushnell told The Pitch that day. At least one person might have seen it coming: Amy Hull, a retired Kansas City police detective who has served on two boards overseeing the Kansas City Museum. She’d written a memo to Leitch, dated October 18, 2011, recounting a conversation she believed indicated that the longtime museum director’s job had been in jeopardy. In 2011, Hull was a member of the Friends of Kansas City Museum board, a membership wing of the Northeast Kansas City institution. On July 29, 2011, she met with fellow

board member Pam Lipari and with president Katrina Henke to discuss the Friends of the Kansas City Museum’s potential merger with Union Station. According to Hull’s account of the conversation, Henke mentioned conversations she’d had with Leitch, who is openly gay, about Leitch’s “bringing too many gays” onto the Friends board, and how that “discouraged other people” from joining. At some point, Guastello caught wind of Henke’s remarks to Leitch and told her that she had “made a mistake with Christopher” but, according to Hull’s memo, “George said it was okay, he would find some other reason to get rid of him [Leitch].” “Because of this statement, I could only assume that President Henke and Guastello had been in conversation about this and Guastello reassured President Henke that he would get ‘rid of’ you,” continues Hull’s memo.

Hull’s recollection of the conversation triggered a Union Station human-resources investigation, the results of which are unclear. Lipari recalls the conversation differently. She says Hull was opposed to the Friends’ merger with Union Station and came into the conversation with an agenda. Lipari doesn’t recall Henke making remarks about gay people. “I honestly don’t recall anything being said regarding Christopher bringing too many gay people in,” Lipari tells The Pitch. “There was never that conversation.” Hull insists otherwise. “It was an off-the-wall conversation,” Hull tells The Pitch. “Part of it was just the fact that I was hearing this, and the second part of the shock was that she would tell me this and the fact that anybody would entertain those kinds of attitudes.” Henke, now a Union Station board member and executive with Milbank Manufacturing,

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tells The Pitch that Hull’s contention is “ridiculous” and has declined to comment further. In a written response to questions delivered to his office by The Pitch, Guastello says, “We will not comment on allegations, hearsay and innuendos, nor will we comment on the misinformation that is being publicly reported by others without regard for, or interest in, the truth.” Leitch declined to comment on the matter. Leitch was in charge of city-owned Corinthian Hall but was a Union Station employee, reporting to Guastello, due to the 2000 merger of the Kansas City Museum and Union Station. That merger arrangement, now widely considered clunky and impractical, was struck at a time when Union Station was receiving $118 million in tax revenue from the Bistate Tax — a sales-tax increase that drew from Jackson, Clay and Platte counties in Missouri, and Johnson continued on page 6

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Disunion Station continued from page 5

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County in Kansas, to renovate the decaying edifice at Main Street and Pershing Road. Union Station officials were under pressure to fix up the old train depot and make it a viable financial operation. That emphasis made many Northeast residents feel that one of its own visible treasures — Corinthian Hall and the Kansas City Museum — had unfairly taken a backseat. Leitch was regarded as a passionate museum advocate, and his dismissal represents a spike in an already uneasy and complicated relationship — one that the city is trying to figure out a way to split. Even if Kansas City removes Corinthian Hall from Union Station’s management and assumes control of the constantly underconstruction mansion at 3218 Gladstone, the future of the Kansas City Museum is murky. How will the city raise the $20 million to finish renovation of the Northeast estate? How will City Hall manage a collection of 70,000 artifacts, most of which Union Station claims to own? And if those things can be figured out, who will be in charge of the Kansas City Museum?

K

ansas City lumber magnate and philanthropist R.A. Long built Corinthian Hall in 1910 for $1 million (roughly $23.6 million in today's figures). The Beaux Arts mansion became his family’s home until his death in 1934. Long’s survivors went on to found Longview Farm in Lee’s Summit, eventually resulting in a vacant Corinthian Hall in limbo. It wouldn’t be the last time. Pressure from the Great Depression prodded the Long family into deeding Corinthian Hall to the Kansas City Museum Association to display the city’s history. But the association discovered that the museum was not a profitable enterprise. In 1948, the museum association sold the property to Kansas City for $1 but still held title to the collection of artifacts in the first of many vaguely worded contracts that would bedevil the ownership of the city’s historical collection, a problem that persists today. In 1976, the last of three efforts to move the Kansas City Museum out of Corinthian Hall and into Liberty Memorial or Union Station failed. But one thing passed that year: a mill levy that would direct property taxes for the Kansas City Museum, which remained in Corinthian Hall. Today that mill levy raises about $1.4 million a year. By the 1990s, the restoration of Union Station became a major civic priority, enough so that a sales-tax increase was passed on both sides of the state line to fund the restoration. Again, the Kansas City Museum was slated for a move to Union Station to become the refurbished depot’s lead tenant. The thinking at the time was that an interactive science museum (Science City) would draw huge crowds, more than a collection of the city’s history would.

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THE PITCH THURS: 10/31/13 4 COLOR

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Museum Advisory Board member Schieber thinks an audit makes sense. That led to a 2000 merger between the Union Station Assistance Corporation and the Kansas City Museum Association, creating Union Station Kansas City Inc. The combined organization’s articles of incorporation do not reference the Kansas City Museum or Corinthian Hall; it reads more like the description of a real-estate development company than a museum entity. Meanwhile, the city considered turning Corinthian Hall into the mayor’s home or perhaps a conference center. However, the Kansas City Museum remained there. Union Station’s renovation lost money early on. Science City didn’t attract nearly the number of paid visitors that were projected. The focus on Union Station while Corinthian Hall — a building that needed $13 million in work — languished irked Northeast residents and revealed cracks in Union Station’s relationship with Corinthian Hall. Former Kansas City, Missouri, Mayor Kay Barnes convened a task force to, among other things, figure out how to raise money to renovate Corinthian Hall. That led to the formation of the Kansas City Museum Advisory Board, a city-appointed group of volunteers that would oversee how the $1.4 million in annual property-tax revenues were spent and advise the city on upgrading Corinthian Hall. The KCMAB didn’t work well with Union Station, waging turf battles over Corinthian Hall’s future. Union Station argued that it was doing what it could with Corinthian Hall, while the KCMAB believed that it was being neglected. The behind-the-scenes tensions became public in 2006 when former City Council member Deb Hermann discovered that Union Station had sought to trademark the phrase “Kansas City Museum.” Hermann introduced an ordinance instructing the city manager to secure the trademark for the city. The entire Kansas City, Missouri, City Council supported Hermann’s idea, except for Barnes, who sided with Union Station.

The trademark dispute revealed another rift: Who owns the collection of Native American artifacts and other historical items in the Kansas City collection? Union Station argued that it owned everything except Corinthian Hall; Kansas City’s lawyers disagreed. In 2007, Kansas City and Union Station reworked the museum-management contract. The new, 20-year deal said Union Station owned or was a trustee of any artifacts received on and after October 5, 1970; Kansas City retained ownership of everything acquired before that date. Even with that clear delineation, though, few agree on who owns what. According to a 2009 inventory, Union Station believes that it owns 90 percent of the collection; others interpret the results as more like 60 percent. The new agreement still had the $1.4 million in property taxes for the museum going to Union Station, whose spending of the proceeds had been — and remains — a point of contention. But the contract left a bizarre governance structure over the Kansas City Museum. It put a private entity (Union Station) in charge of a city-owned asset (Corinthian Hall) that was managed by a Union Station employee (Christopher Leitch), whose boss (George Guastello) determines how public funding (from the mill levy) is spent on the Kansas City Museum (which doesn’t necessarily mean Corinthian Hall), which is overseen by a city-appointed board (KCMAB) that doesn’t have any authority. It’s little wonder that the arrangement hasn’t worked.

G

eorge Guastello grew up in Columbus Park, not far from Corinthian Hall. The tall executive carries himself with the blunt, no-nonsense manner favored by civic leaders. Some KCMAB members find him condescending. Guastello started his career in banking before moving on to marketing positions with the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce and Starlight Theatre. He later led the Ameri-

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1 YEAR SHELF LIFE can Royal for five years before being hired to run Union Station in late 2008. At the time, Union Station was hemorrhaging cash and depleting its endowment. Guastello has received much credit for quickly shoring up Union Station — and doing it his way. “When you put George in a contentious position, he’ll fight back,” said City Council member Jan Marcason at a June 12 KCMAB meeting, according to the minutes. That meeting was held when discussions about separating the Kansas City Museum from Union Station were reaching a critical point. Guastello wasn’t at that June 12 meeting, but he was present October 14, the last time the KCMAB met. After that meeting, a Pitch reporter approached Guastello to discuss several issues related to Union Station and the Kansas City Museum. Fourth District City Councilman Jim Glover joined the conversation. Days earlier, Glover had spoken with The Pitch for 90 minutes about Union Station, the Kansas City Museum and Corinthian Hall. One of the topics discussed was a significant mold outbreak, in 2011, in a storage facility that Union Station was using to house some of the Kansas City Museum’s artifacts. Mold had covered exposed surfaces of artifacts placed in the Northland underground storage facility. A mold-remediation report from 2011 indicates that cleaning mold off the collection cost $130,000. It also says Union Station leadership rejected recommendations to install equipment that may have prevented the mold problem. A separate report documents other instances when water pipes leaked in rooms where artifacts were stored. Glover, who is a KCMAB member because his council district includes Corinthian Hall, was unaware of the mold outbreak. He asked Guastello about the matter after his conversation with The Pitch. Guastello said October 14 that he would discuss the mold problem and other issues with The Pitch but has since put off numerous interview requests. He eventually responded in writing to only a few of the questions posed in a letter hand-delivered to his office in October.

With regard to Union Station’s responsibility for the museum’s artifacts, Guastello’s written response to The Pitch says the station has built more than 35,000 square feet of storage space to manage and preserve the collection. He does not address specific questions about the mold outbreak. Glover says the remediation of the mold issue is a feather in Union Station’s cap. “That’s a lot of artifacts to maintain,” he tells The Pitch. “From what you said, that speaks in their favor. They found it out and cleaned it and resolved the problem.” To others, storage problems are nothing new. “An issue like that did occur even before then, and this is back in the 2004, 2005 time frame,” says City Councilman Scott Wagner, a longtime member of the KCMAB. “There were storage issues outside of Union Station, where some of the remote storage locations did not have good temperature control, did not have good humidity issues.”

L

eitch’s firing isn’t the only flashpoint drawing scrutiny to Union Station’s relationship with the Kansas City Museum. The interminable delay of an audit of that relationship has stoked museum backers’ suspicions. On January 17, 2013, the City Council passed a resolution instructing the city’s auditor to look into the museum’s management agreement with Union Station. The city asked the auditor to examine how Union Station shares expenses with the Kansas City Museum, how it manages the museum’s collection, and how the $1.4 million in annual mill-levy revenues is spent. After the resolution passed, the City Auditor’s Office interviewed people close to the museum. But the auditor’s findings haven’t been made public, and the presentation of a scope statement, explaining in greater detail what the audit will cover, has been delayed several times by the City Council. City Auditor Douglas Jones, who has worked

From left: Union Station, Corinthian Hall for the city since 1994, says he never encountered such a protracted delay in his time with the city. “This one is kind of an outlier,” Jones tells The Pitch. “I can’t recall that this has happened before.” The audit has been eagerly awaited by museum enthusiasts who suspect that Union Station spends mill-levy funds to pay its own bills. Will Royster, a former member of the Friends of Kansas City Museum board and KCMAB, was interviewed by audit staff in March. He tells The Pitch: “They asked me a lot of things in general. Did I have any suspicions? Had I felt that anything was not aboveboard? If I felt anything was going on behind the scenes? I said, ‘Yes, we’ve always suspected these kinds of things,’ which gave rise to the museum advisory board in the first place and justified making it into a commission.” Royster says he has never received an exact accounting of mill-levy spending. Wagner echoes that sentiment: “For me, it has always been a challenge to know. I think in the past, although recently it has gotten better, having a clear understanding of how the mill levy was budgeted has always been for me a little elusive.” The Pitch filed an open-records request with the city, to obtain actual mill-levy expenditures. Kansas City produced occasional budgets and income statements from its general services department but included no itemized expenditures. One document shows mill-levy expenses shared between Union Station and the Kansas City Museum. These include human-resources costs, information technology, and marketing, as well as 10 percent of Guastello’s annual salary. His base salary in 2011 was $215,903, but that year he received $292,475, counting bonuses, deferred compensation and benefits. An exact accounting of how Union Station spends the mill-levy money remains unclear in the public record, pending the city’s audit. Marcason says the audit’s delay is due to ongoing negotiations on a continued on page 9

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Disunion Station continued from page 7 new museum-management contract between the city and Union Station. “We don’t want it to be adversarial,” Marcason says. “We want to look to the future. I know some of the neighbors are suspicious. If there was anything uncovered, we would look at what the issues were, we would have looked at that. The neighbors should be excited that the city is looking for Corinthian Hall to be a sustainable community asset.” But without an audit, how can anyone know how the money is being spent? “From a good-stewardship standpoint, it makes sense to do regular audits,” says Adam Schieber, a Northeast Kansas City resident who chairs the KCMAB’s audit committee.

S

ince 2007, the Kansas City Museum had enjoyed about $10,000 in annual support from the Francis Family Foundation. Union Station (above) and the KC Museum Named for Parker B. Francis, who founded members could donate only to Union Station the Puritan-Bennett Co., the foundation is and that they would have no control over their carried on today by his children. artifacts and would not be able to display them In 2011, the foundation ended its support of the Kansas City Museum. One reason given at police facilities in the future. Union Station’s relationship with the Kanwas the national recession pinching the founsas City Museum has also complicated the indation’s balance sheet. But the foundation did not look warmly upon Union Station’s regard stitution’s accreditation. The museum used to be accredited by the American Alliance of Mufor the needs of the Kansas City Museum at seums, a distinction that helps with fundraisCorinthian Hall. In a letter to Leitch dated November 29, ing and grant proposals. The AAM rescinded that accreditation in 2007, citing Union Sta2011, Francis Family Foundation executive tion’s record of financial instability and the director Jim Koeneman writes: “[N]egative spending down of a $40 million endowment comments included Union Station Board of to support operations. Directors’ lack of attention “Another concern is the to the needs of Kansas City “It doesn’t make a lot need for maintenance, repair Museum at Corinthian Hall, especially advocacy on your of sense in the long run and renovation of the Kansas City Museum at Corinthian behalf with the city regardfor Union Station Hall, and the resources to ing timing and completion to be a curator.” adequately maintain this of renovations.” historic facility and ensure Corinthian Hall needs collections stewardship $20 million to finish renovations that started in 2008. The initial work there,” the AAM letter reads. Glover says accreditation is an unimportcost $10 million and was funded by the city, ant designation held up by museum supportmostly through its Public Improvement Adviers as a means to criticize Union Station. Few sory Committee. museums, Glover says, are accredited. The Other supporters, the kind with artifacts to Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art is accredited; donate to the museum’s collection, have shied away from the Kansas City Museum because the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial and the Harry Truman Library and they’re unsure who will end up using their Museum are not. donations and how they will be presented. Dewey Blanton, a spokesman for the AAM, On June 10, the KCMAB Collections Comsays a little more than 1,000 of the 17,500 mumittee discussed instances in which donors were reluctant to give to the museum because seums in the United States are accredited. Glover worries that museum supporters’ of confusion over ownership. Examples incriticism of Union Station puts Corinthian cluded photographs that depicted Kansas City Hall’s progress at risk. in 1870; that collection was sent to the Jackson “What I don’t like seeing happen is people County Historical Society “rather than having it will into the hands of USKC [Union Station] throwing stones at Union Station,” he tells and possibly be separated from Kansas City The Pitch. “It actually hurts our efforts in the community to raise funds for Corinthian Hall. Museum in the future,” according to minutes Some of the people who are throwing these of that meeting. hand grenades are really throwing live mortars Those same minutes describe how the Kansas City Police Historical Society was told its at Corinthian Hall. It’s a small community,

and we need to have everyone pointing in the right direction to fundraise for a public-private partnership.”

T

he difference in the upkeep of Corinthian Hall and Union Station tells the story of an ineffective contractual relationship on its way out. Union Station is nearly spotless. Once a lonely building that was good for testing echoes, it now bustles with people visiting, eating a meal at one of its restaurants, or working for institutions that have leased office space there, including the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce. Corinthian Hall today looks more like a museum of plywood. Fences cordon off public access to areas ostensibly under renovation. Hard hats are worn in some spaces. Kansas City and Union Station are negotiating a change to the 2007 management contract, which otherwise would last until 2027 (with Union Station’s option to extend it for another decade). One of the leading proposals would extract Corinthian Hall from Union Station’s management and put it under the Kansas City Parks and Recreation Department, which manages the American Jazz Museum, the Black Archives and the World War I Museum. City Manager Troy Schulte tells The Pitch that the parks department, under director Mark McHenry, has a proven ability to raise funds from the civic community — funds that Corinthian Hall badly needs. The 2007 contract with Union Station does not put it in charge of funding major renovations for Corinthian Hall — that’s the city’s bailiwick. But Union Station would still look after the collection’s 70,000 items. Schulte says the city doesn’t have the capacity to maintain and curate the collection, so Union Station would still be allocated some undefined portion of milllevy money to carry out that responsibility. Guastello won’t directly comment on the negotiations. “We have a strong working rela-

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tionship with the city,” he writes to The Pitch. The Union Station board of directors, filled with well-known business leaders and elected officials such as Bank of Blue Valley CEO Bob Regnier and Leawood Mayor Peggy Dunn, has discussed the Kansas City Museum situation once since Leitch’s firing, according to R. Crosby Kemper III, a board member and CEO of the Kansas City Public Library. “My feeling expressed in the board meeting is Union Station as a station is a different kind of entity than a museum,” Kemper says. “And though they do museumlike things and have good storage space, it doesn’t make a lot of sense in the long run for Union Station, which is a presentation venue, to be a curator. The other side of that is the city has been a — how shall we say — an inconsistent curator itself.” Kemper adds that the question over who owns the collection — an unresolved matter likely to be a sticking point in the city’s contract negotiations with Union Station — is silly. “Ultimately, from a city point of view and a civic point of view, it should be irrelevant who legally owns it,” he says. City officials believe that a new deal could be struck by the end of the year. Most sides seem to agree that the new contract shouldn’t resemble the shotgun wedding that constituted the 2000 merger. “In terms of the big picture, I don’t think there is a whole lot to it other than supporters of the museum, patrons of the museum and the general public that pays for the museum and the ongoing renovations of the building want to see a successful Kansas City Museum,” says KCMAB member Adam Schieber. “And that’s what everyone is seeking. How do you get to that? What are the obstacles? One obstacle is a management group that isn’t able to fully give their professional attention to that success. If it’s broken right now and we can start at a zero point, that is the best way to move forward.”

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

october 31-november 6, 2013

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october 31-november 6, 2013

pitch.com

Week of october 31-November 6

Form and Foam

Christina Larkins

The P itch’s arts-and-beer fest happens Saturday. See page 15.

Daily listings on page 30 pitch.com

october 31-november 6, 2013

ď‚ś

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L i z C ook

The Lawrence Arts Center’s slow Sweeney Todd needs sharpening.

october 31-november 6, 2013

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T

here’s no sugarcoating it: Stephen Sondheim is hard. And Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street might be the composer’s most exacting show, requiring straight-razor musical precision. So kudos to the Lawrence Arts Center for taking on a serious dramatic challenge with its production of the bloodthirsty classic. Director Ric Averill has gathered a capable cast to meet the capricious harmonies and punishing rhythms head-on. Mark Rector stars as the brooding barber, returning to London after 15 years’ banishment to avenge himself against crooked Judge Turpin, who captured his wife and daughter. He’s joined by optimistic young sailor Anthony and Mrs. Lovett, a struggling Fleet Street meat-pie proprietress Partners in crime: Anderson and Rector ready to turn Todd’s bloodlust into a business Pirelli’s scene is symptomatic of a larger opportunity. He’ll cut the throats of his choicest customers and send the corpses down to problem. The cast’s prodigious vocal talents are undermined by blocking that frequently her shop to be used as pie filling. Rector is a competent Todd, but the show appears scattered and unfocused. With the notable exception of Anderson, the company unequivocally belongs to Jill Anderson, whose mills lethargically around the stage. Mrs. Lovett is equal parts tender matriarch Set designer Mary Nichols does an admiand deranged pragmatist. Anderson plays the rable job creating diverse staging opportunibackstabbing baker as a comic queen, riffing in a pinched Cockney air while she commands ties, but they go largely unexploited. Scenes are frequently stretched across the wide apron the stage with her commitment and preciin undefined playing areas. Late in Act 1, Todd sion. From her auspicious entrance in “The jumps through the imagiWorst Pies in London” to Act nary fourth wall of his barber 2’s “By the Sea,” the actress Sweeney Todd: shop into Mrs. Lovett’s chopinfuses each song with the The Demon Barber house below. A power pose, energy and specificity that of Fleet Street to be sure, but one that leaves Sondheim’s masterwork Through November 2 at the us pondering the logistics of demands. Lawrence Arts Center, this space a little too long. The young lovers are sim940 New Hampshire, The production seems at ilarly strong. As Johanna, Lawrence, 785-843-2787, lawrenceartscenter.org times to have been designed Julia Geisler performs a with a much larger space in wistful rendition of “Green mind, from the overworked Finch and Linnet Bird” in her clear soprano. Joe Winans lends his rich, follow spots that dwarf Art Kent’s evocative operatic voice to her paramour, Anthony, with stage lights to the harsh contour lines of Tobias’ and Todd’s makeup. (Steffani Day’s costumes a full vibrato that occasionally overwhelms work at this scale, though, infusing the produchis consonants. (That issue may have been compounded by a microphone problem during tion with Victorian gothic flair.) The Free State Liberation Orchestra brings last Friday’s performance.) Company players Sondheim’s difficult music to life under Joe Carr and Alex Goering are strong as well, Patricia Ahern’s skillful conducting. “Not attacking the prologue and expositional numWhile I’m Around” is a notable highlight, and bers with crisp, expressive singing. the orchestra beautifully underscores stunning Gender-blind casting is increasingly common, but talented soprano Amelia Rollings work by Anderson and Jacob Leet (as Tobias). The Lawrence Arts Center’s production may seems miscast as Todd’s tenor adversary, not have hit its stride yet, but strong compoAdolfo Pirelli. The directing choices in Pirelli’s nents suggest that subsequent performances, opening scene don’t help the comic moments in the spirit of Mrs. Lovett’s pies, could refine land — in an attempt to suggest a London crowd, the small company clumps around the recipe into a meal worth sampling. her in the center of the stage, playing havoc with sight lines. E-mail feedback@pitch.com AngelA C. Bond

OFFICIAL SAUDI ARABIA ENTRY

Not YEt FlEEt

By

art

Big Toh

By

T r a c y a bel n

And the rest of your All Saints Day First Friday

N

o need to abandon your Halloween costumes for All Saints Day: The closing reception for Día de los Muertos at Mattie Rhodes Art Gallery (919 West 17th Street) coincides with the true week of the Mexican holiday. To celebrate, the gallery has special music and, at 8 p.m., a Calaca Parade led by StoneLion Puppet Theatre with giant glow-in-the-dark figures including “Dead Betty.” At 9, Resistencia Indígena performs Capulli Iskali, a fire ritual dedicated to the god of the Aztec underworld, Mictlantecuhtli. Pop Up Art Gallery (2100 Grand) presents the second part of Anson the Ornery’s PLZ! Despoil My Art!!!, and includes artwork by the Kansas Art Therapy Association and a late-night (10 p.m.-midnight, $5) Day of the Dead costume party and carnival. For those of Celtic heritage, this is Samhain, and Krzyz Studio (1800 Locust) is putting on a party with the Kansas City Irish Center, featuring photography by Barry Hendrickson, Fionan O’Connell and Dave Shaughnessy. Down in the West Bottoms at Blue Djinn (1400 Union Avenue), Doc Snyder presents the culmination of a years-long journey into Native American history, culture and design. Inspired by a visit to South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Reservation (where the high school dropout rate is the highest in the country), Snyder’s Bad Medicine Wheel is a 10-color serigraph shown with multimedia works intended to raise awareness about the state of American Indian poverty. A portion of sales benefits the Oglala Lakota College and Red Cloud Indian School. Leedy-Voulkos Art Center (2012 Baltimore) has a lot going on. The KC Textile Studio showcase and holiday sale features pieces from the

“Big Hair Kind of Day” by Toh Columbus Park collective, and works by four up-and-coming ceramists are in KCAI Undergrads Underground. There’s also an unexpected presentation of works by Salvador Dalí, curated by Christine Argillet from her father’s collection and experience as a chronicler of the dada and surrealist movements (these are normally part of two French and Spanish museums). Perhaps most exciting, though, is Momentary Longing, a new series of works on paper in which Heinrich Toh combines a number of printmaking techniques with layers of images culled from Eastern and Western sources. The results speak to the complexity of memory and ancestry. City Ice Arts (2015 Campbell) is the perfect white box for Gerry Trilling to explore what she calls a “shift in scale” with In Site. Taking some of her favorite materials, including plastic fencing, Trilling constructs woven paintings that are heavily accretive, both physically and visually. Finally, showing together for the first time are colleagues whose relationship began more than a decade ago when Caleb Taylor was the student of Armin Mühsam. For Land:Mark, at Greenlease Gallery (1100 Rockhurst Road), they riff off each other and off architectural ideals, trying new things with works on paper, paintings, photo collages and sculptures (some made of paper). Hear about it at 6:30 p.m. on First Friday, followed by one of the night’s nicer reception spreads.

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S I ! Y H T A D R U T A S

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SHOP LOC AL!

NOVEMBER 2, 2013 @ 11a-6p UPTOWN SHOPPING CENTER 36th & Broadway, Kansas City, MO

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Interested in sponsoring Crafts and Drafts arts and crafts fair? Contact us at jason.dockery@pitch.com or call 816.561.6061 for additional information. 14

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october 31-november 6, 2013

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Shop Girl

W

hen beer brings on a shopping craving — or shopping makes you thirsty — The Pitch’s first Crafts & Drafts has you covered. Saturday’s event features close to 60 artsand-crafts vendors ready to complement the local and national beers on tap. The vendor list for this free event makes drinking and browsing your weekend’s one-two punch. You’ll find handmade jewelry, such as Wildfire’s penny pendants; niche items, including guitar straps by Jaykco and vibrant bow ties from Haberdash: Wit + Style; and food, such as vegan and gluten-free cookies from Rawxies. Many of the vendors squeeze in their crafting as a day job allows. But ceramics artist Meredith Host has been able to devote herself full time to Foldedpigs, her quirky dinnerware line. Thanks to what she calls the accidental success of her venture (the name comes from what she once called her version of ponytails), she ditched all three of her regular jobs a few years back. The first unintentional break came in 2007, when she was attending Ohio State University and working on a master’s degree in ceramics. For the student clay club’s Valentine’s Day sale, she screen-printed some witty puns and simple decals on restaurant ware. “I love you more than zombies love brains” read a bowl that pictured an anatomical brain. Another piece pictured an anatomical heart with the words “Eat your heart out.” A blizzard canceled the sale, so she created an online shop on Etsy to offload the items. “They sold really fast, and then, shockingly, I had all these requests for more,” Host says.

cool goods and cool beer

S a b r i n a S ta i r e S

Crafts & Drafts hearts Foldedpigs.

By

N a Nc y Hul l R igdoN

S a b r i n a S ta i r e S

Form and Foam

Crafts & Drafts:

business that offers hoodoo spellwork, hex She wound up as a featured vendor on the popular online marketplace. Next, na- breaking, psychic readings, graveyard magic and, soon, séances. tional magazines, including Country Living What may catch an outsider by surprise, and EveryDay With Rachael Ray, highlighted though, is the cheery atmosphere in Good her line, and she struck wholesale deals with Luck: A Kansas City Conjure Shop (4009 boutiques in California and New York. Central, 816-756-5551). Bright-yellow walls Today, she works full time from her Kansas and color abound. City studio, fulfilling Foldedpigs orders and “Everything we do here making her own thrownis about healing, and that’s porcelain dinnerware for a The Pitch’s a very happy process,” says line bearing her name. “I’ve Crafts & Drafts Matt Deos, who opened the lucked out — big time,” she 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Saturday, shop with Julia Valdivia says. November 2, at the Uptown this summer. Other vendors have also Shopping Center, 36th Street The shop represents tasted national success. Tad and Broadway, free the pair’s religion – vodou Carpenter and Dan Padavic, (something much different of indie printer Vahalla Stuthan voodoo). Confused? Vodou practitiodios, made concert posters for more than 164 Myspace Secret Shows in a three-year period. ners are Christian and believe God created In their Kansas City, Kansas, space, they focus spirits to help us. To enlist those spirits, they turn to folk magic. That’s where the on fine-art screen- and letterpress prints for shop’s techniques and products, including artists and designers — a fulfilling experience. oils, herbs, candles and crystals, come in. “Everything coming through here is going Deos and Valdivia tell numerous, powerto be cherished by someone at some point,” ful stories about how healing through selfCarpenter says. empowerment results from their work. But the shop isn’t just for the devout. Penis and vagina candles are fodder for bachelorette parties and girls’ nights. The Westport’s Good Luck: A Kansas items, Valdivia points out, are also used to combat health issues and address relationCity Conjure Shop is spellbinding. ship problems. Valdivia makes oils — with names such as t sounds like the ultimate freaky Hal“Hot Raunchy Mess” and “Milkshake” (the loween excursion: Go to a parking lot in type that brings all the boys to the yard) — Westport, walk in a back door and enter a

Who do vodou?

I

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Good Luck co-founders (from left) Deos, Ames Hall and Valdivia; above: magical oil that draw laughs while seeking to step up a customer’s romantic game. Deos holds up an oil bottle with a “Hot Fucker” label and says, “This isn’t for the love of your life. It’s for the love of your afternoon.” Deos and Valdivia say those in desperate need of a reversal of fortunes seek out the shop. There, the owners do readings to discover the root of troubled customers’ angst and offer help. This means candles, incense, herbs and body products with names including “Lady Luck” for gamblers who can’t shake a cold streak and “Court Case” for legal woes. The shop, Deos and Valdivia say, fills a need in the city, and they consider their business a complement to nearby spiritual shop Aquarius, which serves neo-pagans. (Good Luck targets Christians.) Deos’ research indicates that vodou was big in Kansas City in the 1920s. The shop honors that history by selling a pink booklet from the 1930s called “Kansas City Kitty Dreambook.” Have a dream about cut glass? The book tells you which lottery numbers to pick. Within a few decades, the work was largely taboo, yet many quietly continued. “We’re bringing it out of the shadows,” Deos says.

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Mesob Pikliz: hard to say, easy to enjoy.

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CH A R L E S F E R RU Z Z A

AngelA C. Bond

Mesob Pikliz • 3405 Independence Avenue, 816-920-5825 • Hours: Noon–9 p�m� Monday–Thursday, noon–10 p�m� Friday–Saturday, closed Sunday • Price: $–$$

I

f you arrive at Mesob Pikliz a shade before the sauce that arrives with them. It’s lemony, tart and as addictive as crack. After two meals in posted noon opening time and find the front this tiny restaurant, I wanted to dip everydoor locked, just keep knocking. Haitian-born chef Cherven Desauguste and his Eritrean- thing in the stuff and had to keep myself from adding it to the already very sugary Ethiopian born wife, Mehret, are still a little securitycoffee I ordered after dinner. conscious. Their 28-month-old business was The restaurant serves both the cuisine of robbed this month. “They came right through the front door,” Desauguste’s native Haiti and a dozen traditional Ethiopian dishes from his wife’s homeDesauguste told me last week. The thieves land. When the couple opened Mesob Pikliz, didn’t cause any damage to the interior of the pretty, pumpkin-colored dining room. “They they weren’t sure which of their culinary heritages would prove more only took the POS system popular. The familiar dishes that we use for credit card Mesob Pikliz of Eastern Africa — spongy sales,” Desauguste said. Vegetable plate ������������������� $13 injera bread, doro wat, beef “And all of the liquor.” Akra ���������������������������������������� $4 tibbs in clarified butter — Not all the beer, though. Beef sambusa ����������������������� $4 are much less exotic to local Desauguste was able to ofKabrit nan sos ��������������������� $13 diners nowadays, thanks fer a friend of mine a cold Kribish ����������������������������������$14 to the number of Ethiopian Stella Artois with her lunch Crème brûlée ������������������������ $5 venues that have opened the afternoon we stopped around the metro the past by. The cool brew made a soothing counterpoint to some of the spicier decade. The succulent goat stews and fried meats of Haiti, though, aren’t so common yet. fried starters on the menu, including the oily, More local Indian restaurants now have crunchy fritters called akra, made of grated taro root (and here deliciously seasoned with goat dishes on their menu, but often the meat is stringy, bony and less than flavorful. chopped jalapeño and cilantro). Also satisDesauguste’s is none of those things; it may fying were the golden pillows of pan-fried sambusas, which come stuffed with ground in fact be the most tender goat stew in the metro, a slow-cooked kabrit nan sos in a rich, beef or chopped vegetables. mahogany-colored sauce. All of these crispy, hand-held foods should “We’re selling many more of our Haitian be dipped in the glossy, deep-green cilantro

Marinated meats, crunchy plaintains and delicate sambusas are among the Ethiopian and Haitian foods at Mesob Pikliz� dishes,” Desauguste says. His customers are taking his advice and sampling both cuisines together. It’s an idea I can endorse. On one of my visits, I shared a trio of Desauguste’s favorite Haitian choices (including a very fine plate of kribish, sautéed shrimp blanketed in a topaz-colored and delicately seasoned chardonnay sauce) with my three companions, along with a platter of stewed Ethiopian greens, grains and cabbage presented as tide mounds on a shawl-sized round of airy injera bread. Fried plaintains were sensational with heaping spoonfuls of the colorful, discreetly spiced pickled slaw (pikliz), from the Haitian side of the menu — as they were with a dollop of the vinegary greens and the turmericscented stewed cabbage from the restaurant’s Ethiopian flavors. There’s also a good pork shoulder, marinated in orange juice and herbs before chef Desauguste chops the meat into chunks and flash fries it until the exterior is lightly caramelized. The result is light on the tongue, not chewy. Mesob Pikliz’s storefront has been tricked out with embroidered drapery panels and ceramic tiles, and the dozen or so little tables here are sheathed in crisp white linen. On my first visit to the dining room, the stereo was blasting Addis Ababa Top 40. The next day, the soundtrack was classic American R&B (I

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heard B.B. King and Bill Withers), which felt right. This is a meeting place, after all, for two international culinary traditions that have greatly influenced the American soul-food sensibility. The dishes that chef Desauguste prepares in his small kitchen are stewed, blackened, fried, braised, sautéed and simmered, using a more exotic panoply of spices than soul food’s African-American architects typically had on hand. But the concepts are the same. Because Haiti was, for many years, a French colony, Desauguste can whip up a sensational crème brûlée as a dessert, and the tiny cups of sugary coffee served as a finale are enticingly fragrant, if not easy on the teeth. “We have unsweetened coffee, too,” Desauguste told me cheerfully, bringing out a mug of a robust Ethiopian blend. “Our regular customers like to come in, eat very heartily and relax.” Mesob Pikliz may be one of the few places in the metro where relaxing is defined as eating a bit too much, finishing with a jolt of caffeine, and listening to B.B. King wail “The Thrill Is Gone.” Then again, anything less would be an anticlimax.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

october 31-november 6, 2013

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17

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Fat c i t y

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Actually, that’s about the last candy these three chefs want.

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efore you were into fantasy football or had to track your 401(k), the only trade that mattered was the con you’d pull on your friend after you were done trick-or-treating. When the bags got emptied, the score was simple: e r o M Swap a fistful of mysteryflavor Dum Dums (the mystery f lavor, to the t a ine Onl .com delight of some blackh c pit hearted lollipop executive, always being terrible) for just one Twix, and then eat that candy bar fast — before buyer’s remorse set in and your friend figured out she’d been had. We asked a few local candy connoisseurs to remember Halloweens past and tell us about the sweets they coveted (and those they were happy to release back into the wild).

Fat City

Chuck Baldee Owner, chef, Baldee’s Pizza Favorite costume: Twinkie

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What was the one piece of candy you would trade anything in your bag for? Snickers bar. My grandma in Manhattan, Kansas, always had Snickers and Coca-Cola in her fridge. So when I had one, it always reminded me of her. Snickers was the one thing I would look forward to, and everyone would always have Three Musketeers. What was your least favorite? I got really burned out on candy corn. It just seems like candy corn was always the cheapest and most plentiful. Everybody would just a throw a handful in your bag.

october 31-november 6, 2013

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One of the things that I really love that you never see anymore is the old-time popcorn balls that people would make and hand out. I think as a child of the ’70s and ’80s, people just got too scared and wouldn’t take anything that wasn’t wrapped or didn’t look like it came from a giant, industrial factory. What do you give out for Halloween now? In Prairie Village, for the last decade or more, we’ve been known as the Hostess House. I’m a Twinkie, and my wife is a Ding Dong. I’m an actual Twinkie, with my head poking out, and I usually wear a white T-shirt underneath so it looks like filling. We give out Twinkies, and everybody that comes to our house knows that they’re a full-size Twinkie, not some itty-bitty little thing. It just reminds me of when I was growing up, a close-knit community where you know all your neighbors.

Nicolette Foster Executive pastry chef, Baked in Kansas City Favorite costume: Mom-made Hershey’s Kiss

What was the one piece of candy you would trade anything in your bag for? Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups — there’s nothing better than chocolate and peanut butter together. The texture of the peanut butter filling is my favorite part. They’re even better really cold or frozen. What was your least favorite? My least favorite is definitely Tootsie Rolls. I don’t like the texture with the flavor of chocolate. What do you give out for Halloween now?

Chocolate: miniature Milky Way, Snickers and Twix. I get that bag because I don’t want any leftover candy I don’t like. The truth is, you don’t get many trick-or-treaters to highrise buildings, so that’s the bag of candy I take to whatever Halloween party I go.

Lisa Clark Owner, Cupcake A La Mode Favorite costume: punk rocker

What was the one piece of candy you would trade anything in your bag for? W hen I wa s you nger, my favor ite Halloween candy was the flavored Tootsie Rolls, specifically lime and cherry. I was a weird kid. Bit-O-Honeys were my second fave. Now I’m a huge fan of mini M&M’s. I think it has to do with how quickly they melt in your mouth and get into your bloodstream. What was your least favorite? Definitely Now and Laters. I ate one when I was younger, and it pulled a filling right out of my cavity, so I refused to give them another try. What do you give out for Halloween now? I’m actually not picky about what I give out today. I’ve learned to pick and choose my battles. I just shop for the candy with my kids and let each kid pick an assortment of candy at the store that they like, and then they take a little stash to their room when we get home, and the rest goes into the big green Halloween bucket for the trick-or-treaters.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

fat c i t y

ThE DEparTED

By

Ch a r l e s F er ru z z a

There might be a ghost at your table.

A

number of Kansas City restaurants are known to have patrons or former tenants materialize from beyond the grave, apparently unwilling to pass gently into the Great Beyond. Most of the haunted are older buildings with long and colorful histories. There’s Pierpont’s, for example, the upscale steakhouse carved from the bones of a former women’s seating lounge inside 99-year-old Union Station. Back in 2010, owner Rod Anderson insisted that he had heard unusual noises, late at night, when he was closing up the dining room. “I’m not one who believes any of that,” he said at the time. “But there are nights, when I’m closing up, that I really do hear some weird noises. I guess it could be the sound of the refrigeration equipment, but I’m telling you, I never heard any refrigerators sound like that.” The sounds might have unnerved Anderson, but when Zak Bagans and his team from the Travel Channel’s Ghost Adventures investigated the Pierpont’s space last year, they came away empty-handed. The only spirits they could conjure in the marble-tiled lounge were behind the bar — in bottles. The Ghost Adventures crew would have had more luck had they traveled to the historic Longfellow neighborhood, east of Union Station, where Beth Barden, owner of Succotash at 2601 Holmes, has a resident spirit left over from when the bruncheonette was the Dutch Hill Bar & Grill. A longtime regular at that saloon was a customer called Radar, who frequently sat at the bar nursing a cocktail and a cigarillo. When Barden was renovating the 100-year-old building, in 2009, she smelled those distinctive little cigars in the dining room. “It wasn’t an old-smoke smell,” Barden tells me. “It smells like he had just lit one up.” There’s supposedly a different ghost two blocks south, at You Say Tomato, the restaurant at 2801 Holmes operated by Randy Park and Mark Wingard. This spirit is believed to be a member of the Anello family, which ran a grocery store in the storefront space for decades. The specter makes his or her presence known by knocking things over or sending a stack of handmade greeting cards off the front counter. “It’s sort of shocking when the cards go flying off the counter,” Park says. “But we’ve gotten used to it.” But the lonely solo acts at Succotash and You Say Tomato are paltry presences compared with the ghostly gang at the Majestic Restaurant. Frank Sebree Jr. says his space, at 931 Broadway, has 16 different ghosts doing

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

Fitzpatrick’s Saloon their thing where the former Fitzpatrick’s Saloon once stood. (The uppermost floor of that three-story bar was reportedly a brothel during the Pendergast era.) Michelle Yates, a Missouri paranormal investigator, says ghosts aren’t particularly attracted to restaurants. If a hospitality business has a resident spirit, it’s probably an accident of history or the building rather than a dedicated haunting. Yates speaks with authority on this point, having owned, she says, a haunted restaurant. “I owned a barbecue restaurant outside of Cameron, Missouri, that was in a building that had once been a very busy railroad hotel,” she says. “So many people had come through that building over the years that there were many spirits still active in it. But the fact that it had been a restaurant was not an important variable in its paranormal history.” A few other KC restaurants with pedigreed phantoms include the space formerly occupied by Café Picardy, in the Muehlebach Hotel; the Webster House (a former 19th-century schoolhouse where a spirit called Charlotte likes to move things around); and the Savoy Grill. The latter is of course Kansas City’s oldest operating dining room (at 219 West Ninth Street), so its ghosts might also be the longest departed. The greatest variety of spirits might be found at the 85-year-old building at 5031 Main, which has seen life as a dry-cleaning joint, a gay bar, a jazz club, a Chinese buffet and, most recently, the short-lived Beacon. Now that the space is being transformed into an urban branch of the popular local Nick & Jake’s suburban chain, perhaps whatever otherworldly figures reside there can take a sabbatical long enough for the new owners to scare up a little business.

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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streetside MON: RURA THU 10/31 L GRIT 6PM // KARAOK E 10PM JIB JAB JON ES & FRI 11/1 CIRCUS, REAL SUGTAHE INDIGO SAT 11/2 FIRST FRIDAY ARTIS R, LAZY MOTEL T STORY TELL ING W/ MISEMILY DUKE “ T H E B O DY IN PAR S GINA K SAT 11/2 WED 11/6 TRUCKSTOP HONEYMTS”- 7PM DREW BLAC O K AND DIRT ON - 10PM K E N T Y, ELE U C KY FRI 11/8 JOHN MCKE KNIFE FIGHT CTRIC NNA, BLACK WED 11/27 BIRD REVUE THE HEARE RS

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TempTaTion island

Going it alone at a Halloween party for the young professional crowd.

I

keep agreeing to spend precious weekend nights covering events like Temptation at the Station, the annual sexy Halloween party for KC’s young-professional set that was held Friday, October 25, at Union Station. Why? I try not to think about it too much, but it obviously has something to do with hating myself and believing that I deserve to suffer. Do I dread these events? Yes. But that doesn’t really mean anything. I dread everything. It can take me up to an hour to work up the courage to get in the shower. I just stare at the wall, sighing and frowning and shaking my head. Getting to the grocery store is a whole other set of emotional gymnastics. You don’t even want to know. General-admission tickets to Temptation at the Station, which was presented by the philanthropic organization the Bacchus Foundation, cost $45. But in a rare show of extravagance, my boss agreed to splurge for an $85 VIP pass. “I want you to have the full experience,” he said. “You realize I’m just going to get drunk and lurk around, right?” I said. “I trust your process,” he said. The last time I attended an event at Union Station — Kansas City Fashion Week, about a month ago — I encountered a $10 parking fee. Last Friday, I pulled into the lot and again saw a sign informing guests that it would be $10 to park. “Fool me once,” I said, circling back out of the lot. I was prepared to park as far away as The Pitch offices, about seven blocks north. But I landed a spot a block away, across the street from the Westin. Would this stroke of luck prove to be the peak of my evening? The party was held in a long corridor north of the lobby inside Union Station. The GA tickets got you complimentary drinks for four hours at eight different drink booths. Some served mixed drinks and Bud Light drafts. Others ladled concoctions from industrial-size plastic jugs with labels on them like “rum runner punch,” “vodka lemonade” and “vodka cranberry.” But I had that VIP pass, so I made my way to the far end of the corridor, past some bouncers, and into a cordoned-off area. From outside VIP, you could see the silhouettes of half-naked women dancing on a stage. From inside, you could actually see the women. Very capitalistic that way. The two bars in VIP offered free call liquors, Monster energy drinks, Deschutes beer and champagne. “I’ll have a champagne,” I told the bartender.

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VIP livin’ “How many glasses?” she said. It dawned on me that champagne is not usually imbibed alone. “Just the one,” I said. “Just … one.” I spent something like $60 on an idioticlooking Cookie Monster costume for Halloween last year and could justify neither the financial nor the mental investment of finding something new, so I recycled it for Temptation at the Station. Shortly after arriving, I spied another Cookie Monster in the restroom. It was the exact same out-of-thebox costume as my own: fluffy blue top and fluffy headpiece with big, googly eyes. The package does not come with pants. I wore some faded light-blue slacks that are much duller than the Cookie Monster outfit. This son of a bitch had fluffy blue sweatpants that matched almost exactly. My resentment of this other Cookie Monster waned as I noticed how thoroughly drunk he was. In the restroom, he was having an argument with a guy dressed as a sheriff. A guy dressed as an airline pilot was separating them. “So why are you gonna take it out on me, then?” alter Cookie Monster said, loudly. I took a stroll through the GA section. Some costumes: Wayne and Garth; a really solid Kenny Powers; some Ron Burgundys; a guy I thought was supposed to be Richie Tenenbaum but was actually Will Ferrell’s character in that ’70s basketball movie; a guy with a chainsaw around his neck; a Superman in a wheelchair (in poor taste, except I’m pretty sure he actually needed

By

D av iD HuDn a l l

it); two guys dressed as “hip-hop hamsters,” which is apparently a reference to a Kia commercial; and dozens and dozens of women as sexy fill-in-the-blanks. I saw one woman wearing knee-high stockings, a skintight dress that exposed roughly 70 percent of her heaving breasts, and thick black glasses. She was a “nerd.” I went back to VIP for another glass of champagne. I drank it in about three minutes, ordered another one and headed out for the lobby. I wasn’t yet drunk enough to offer an honest assessment of the party. I settled in on a bench in a remote part of the lobby near the post office and caught up on Twitter. An extremely hot woman in a Pocahontas costume sailed down the escalator in front of me. I was reading on my phone about Nick Lowe’s upcoming Christmas album. It occurred to me that I should probably go speak to some humans. Out front, I chatted first with a Cleopatra, then a flapper. The flapper was making fun of all the slutty outfits at the party. “But flapper was the slutty outfit of its day,” I said. “Yeah, but not anymore,” she said. I still don’t know where I come down on that one. The alter Cookie Monster stumbled outside and parked himself inside a very tall planter near the curb. He crushed the entire bed of flowers, then found that he was unable to get out of the planter. He refused our help. So the flapper and I spent the next 10 minutes taking photos of him passing out and attempting to stand up. Back inside, the DJ was playing “Bubble Butt,” which is probably one of my favorite songs of 2013. It bled into “We Found Love” — the Rihanna one that goes, We found love in a hopeless place. Rihanna has never been to Union Station. I waited in line for another drink and spotted a $20 on the ground. I scanned my peripheries, seeing if anybody else had noticed. Then I stepped on it while I ordered, concealing it. Then I kind of dragged it 5 feet away with my shoe and picked it up. It was a fake $20. Sadly, that was not the first time in my life that this had happened to me. What should have happened at that point was somebody coming up from behind me and shooting me in the back of the head. Instead, I took it as a cue to leave. I drained my drink and made my way for the exit. On the way out, I saw the alter Cookie Monster passed out on a bench in the lobby. I made a growly Cookie Monster noise at him as I walked past, but he was out cold.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

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october 31-november 6, 2013

the pitch

21

Music

Back to the Point

Josh Berwanger returns to

By

music with Strange Stains.

N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

F

B r o o k e Va n d e V e r

ormer Anniversary singer and guitarist Josh Berwanger has crafted the most glorious man cave in the basement of his mother’s Leawood home. It’s an elaborate setup: Star Wars collectibles still in their original plastic, lava lamps, a bookcase stacked with vinyl, a jukebox, a samurai sword. There’s also a soundproof practice space and a bed for Berwanger’s bandmate, Michael Hutcherson, to crash on. This, you think when you see it, is a place where magic must happen. Lately, it has. This is where Berwanger came up with the music for his new solo record, Strange Stains, and it’s where he and Hutcherson practice and listen to records and eat pizza. It’s also the place where Berwanger rediscovered his love for making music after a long hiatus. “I had kind of taken a little bit of a break from music, just because I was tired,” Berwanger says. We’ve left the basement temporarily to eat pad Thai and talk about the musician’s recent history. “I wasn’t necessarily tired of He has left himself very little time to mess writing songs but just tired of being part of around these days. Berwanger has quit his a music scene, and I was just burnt out on coaching job and fully recommitted himself everything.” to music. Following the demise of the Anniversary, “Behind the scenes, Michael and I are in 2004, Berwanger started a new project, called the Only Children. In 2007, after the working our asses off,” he says. “Every day, Only Children’s second album, Berwanger we’re e-mailing and trying to work social media. We’re working really hard on it. stopped making music and started coaching We have goals, and we’re working our way high school basketball. Six years into that job, there. If you would have said that to me though, Berwanger started creating again. in the Anniversary, I would have just been Berwanger still has a few grumbles about the music business, but, at 35, he has learned like, ‘I have no idea what you’re telling me that the best defense against that wariness right now. We’re just going to go tour and write songs.’” turns out to be the work itself. “I was constantly Back in the basement, Berwanger digs out writing songs and wanting to perform again, a small metal box of old 45s. because I realized that that’s These are his most prized just what I loved,” he says. “It Josh Berwanger Band possessions, he says as he was realizing that the shit I with Margo May sifts through them with don’t like [about the music Thursday, October 31, careful fingers. industry] doesn’t matter, at RecordBar, and “I don’t think people because I don’t need to Friday, November 1, get what rock and roll is associate myself with those at the Replay a n y m o r e,” B e r w a n g e r things.” says. “People think that if Ref lec t i ng t hat new there’s no flashing lights or attitude, Strange Stains Margo May fog machine, or if Pitchfork isn’t like what Berwanger album release with Elias Abid doesn’t write about it, it did with the Anniversary Saturday, November 2, doesn’t matter.” He slips a or the Only Children. It’s at Front/Space record from its sleeve. “The upbeat, sunny rock and world is so strange. How roll with shots of doo-wop, can a band be on tour and a pop album that makes there are five people listening in a room and Berwanger’s sarcastic, often frustrated lyrics go down sweet. The songs run two to three they’re all on their phones and none of them go say ‘hi’ after the set or get a free sticker?” minutes each, and the album’s 11 tracks don’t Berwanger plays the single, a 1960s soul push past half an hour. song by Kenny Carter. He closes his eyes “I wanted to do more songs that get to the and smiles. point and don’t mess around,” Berwanger says. 22

the pitch

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Berwanger (left) and Hutcherson man the cave; May (above) goes tropical. “You should go and support the best stuff,” Berwanger says, leaning back. “You should love every aspect of what you do, and you should take it 100 percent seriously. And you gotta search for it.”

Pretty in PoP Margo May steps into dance music.

M

argo May is done folking around. The songwriter’s new record, set for digital release in early November, is a tropical-inspired set of dance songs titled Runaway Island. “I don’t know how people are going to receive it, but really, it’s so great that I do not care,” May says. On the eve of Island’s debut, she’s on the road with “five dudes in a van,” singing backup on Josh Berwanger’s U.S. tour. But her real journey started this past summer, with a guy fresh out of high school and plenty of shared musical ambition. “I made something that I love,” May says. “If people don’t like it, if they don’t receive it, I am totally OK with that.” May hasn’t abandoned her folk roots. She’ll always be the product of what she calls “hippie folk parents,” who raised her on the sounds of Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan. She has worked that genre since she was 12 — long enough that, at 27, she thinks of it as bedrock she can return to. Eventually. “Right now, I want to be performing this kind of [electro-pop] music,” May says. “This is literally all I’ve been listening to for the past three years.”

She wrote Runaway Island as she had composed all her other material, on guitar, but then partnered with producer Elias Abid, an 18-year-old from Kansas City who is now studying music business at Columbia College Chicago. The pair worked steadily th roughout the late sum mer, as May recorded vocals and Abid recorded and mixed the beats. Runaway Island isn’t a complete departure. The familiar cheery disposition is present in May’s voice, even as she sings of broken love. Even when the guitar has been replaced by electronics and a steel drum, there’s no doubt it’s her on “Dreamz Are Made of This,” in which she sings of doing everything in her life — telling lies, taking jobs, dancing — for one person, only to ask, “Why don’t you want me?” She cites Robyn and Grimes as inspirations for her new sound. May gently raps her fist on the table to punctuate her enthusiasm for Robyn’s ability to sing about “dark, sad stuff” over a danceable track. “It doesn’t have to be poppy, cheesy shit,” May says. “It can have substance. Life is really hard, and when I go dancing, that’s the kind of stuff I want to dance to.” She adds: “I think that’s what inspired me — you can do electronic dance music and not be controlled by a machine, you know? My goal is not to be a millionaire,” May says. “My goal is to pay my bills and do music for the rest of my life and be an artist.” — Adrianne DeWeese

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d t h n g i l a t o p B S

Not A Planet It’s been a big year for Not a Planet. The KC trio was nominated for an Independent Music Award for its song “Turn Me On.” It released its first LP, The Few, The Proud, The Strange, in the spring. And this summer Not a Planet was nominated for its first Pitch Music Award, for Best Rock Act. At the Pitch Music Showcase, in August, the band -- led by singer Nathan Corsi -- performed arguably the liveliest set of the festivities. A week later, Not a Planet took home its first Pitch Music Award. This Thursday -- Halloween! -- Not a Planet will play at the second installment of the Always Choose Adventure series, a joint production between The Pitch and Captain Morgan. The show is at RecordBar, and includes support from the Josh Berwanger Band and Akkilles (plus a costume contest). Be there or be square.

Introduce yourselves? Alphabetically by middle name: Nathan, guitar and lead vocals. Liam, drums and harmonies. William, bass and harmonies. You played your first Pitch Music Showcase and won your first Pitch Music Award this year. Tell us about it. We started as a touring band and really worked hard to travel as much as possible. We are also very proud of where we come from. It's nice to feel well liked in our hometown. We couldn't do much without the amazing support we receive from our fans here in Kansa City. Tell us about your recent projects and releases. We released The Few, The Proud, The Strange this past May. It is our first full-length record, and we couldn't be more happy with it. Everything from the song key down to the final artwork was created and chosen with purpose. Who are some musical heroes? Jeff Buckley, Paul McCartney, John Bonham, and anyone who paved a way for rock 'n roll. Anything special planned for the Record Bar show? We're thinking about showing up as the Kia hamsters. Thoughts on the current state of rock and roll in KC? The KC area has never had a shortage of talent. I think that's true now more than ever. Thanks to that, and groups like the Midwest Music Foundation, KC is gaining national notoriety again for the first time in years. You guys seem to play out of town a decent amount. How’s that been going for you? It's an awesome experience to play all around the country and be judged solely on performance. It's even better when you're found rocking. What’s next for Not a Planet? Lots of regional and national touring. Writing new songs. We'll keep working hard and trying to spread our music as far and wide as possible. pitch.com

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music

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By

Meow comes on with a roar.

N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

A

woman with a bright shock of long, hotpink hair smokes in the Team Auto Sales doorway. She laughs at something she hears from inside the office of this tiny, crowded used-car lot at 79th Street and Wornall. Sondra Freeman, director of promotions for the Midwest Music Foundation, stubs out her cigarette on the pavement and heads back inside. She sits down at a metal desk that’s busy with piles of paper, in front of a wall lined with concert posters. Across the desk sits Rhonda Lyne, MMF’s director of development, wearing a Shangri-Las T-shirt. This tightly clustered office is where Freeman and Lyne, two crucial organizers of the Midwest Music Foundation, often meet. The organization doesn’t have its own space, so Freeman — who co-owns Team Auto Sales — uses the room as a part-time headquarters and occasional storage space for MMF. Today, Freeman and Lyne are discussing Apocalypse Meow, the fundraiser scheduled for Friday, November 1 (at the Midwestern Musical Co.), and Saturday, November 2 (on two stages at Knuckleheads). The Saturday lineup includes She’s a Keeper, Not a Planet, Tony Ladesich and Betse Ellis, among others, but the weekend also has a notable absence. This sixth annual Meow is the first without Abigail Henderson. The MMF co-founder died of cancer in August, at age 36. When Henderson, a well-known area singersongwriter and member of four bands, was diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer, in 2008, Apocalypse Meow was her friends’ rallying cry. The first Meow raised nearly $20,000 in Henderson’s name, and part of that went to help her fight the insurance company that refused to cover her chemotherapy. “They [Henderson and her husband, MMF co-founder Chris Meck] had to hire an attorney,” Lyne says. “Otherwise they would have lost everything. You shouldn’t have to worry about money when you’re trying to fight for your life.” The rest of the money from that first Meow went toward forming MMF, and Apocalypse Meow has returned each year since. Now, everything raised goes into Abby’s Fund for Musicians’ Healthcare. “That money goes to help prov ide emergency funds to other musicians,” Lyne says. “Abby swore that night [at the first Meow in 2008] that she’d be back to help everyone, and as soon as she had her treatments and was healthy enough, there she was.” Freeman and Lyne are about the furthest thing from doe-eyed sympathy-seekers. MMF is a full-time job on top of their other full-time jobs. They are tough, the kind of

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Barrett emke

UPCOMING EVENTS

MMF’s sixth Apocalypse

women you wouldn’t easily approach at a bar. And the Henderson they remember was equally fierce. “The one thing I keep thinking is, ‘I really wish Abby was here to see this,’” Lyne says. “This was her passion, and she fought so hard even while she was fighting for her life, she fought so hard for music. She always believed it should be a legitimate career.” “Abby believed that music can take you to where you need to be and that it’s important, and the people that do that need to be taken care of,” Freeman adds. “Her role was to assist, in any way she could, in making being a musician a viable occupation.” Since its inception, Abby’s Fund has distributed more than $30,000 in aid to area musicians. But Henderson’s goals were always bigger, and Freeman and Lyne now hope to push MMF to the next level. With the help of the recently awarded ArtsKC Catalyst Grant (and, they hope, a winning vote count in Boulevard Brewing Co.’s latest 10% for KC Pils campaign), Freeman and Lyne have plans to expand MMF’s services for area musicians. “A lot of musicians in Kansas City are struggling to pay their bills,” Lyne says. “They may not be able to afford the ‘affordable care’ [of the Affordable Care Act]. We’re trying to help educate musicians. We’re partnering with Southwest Boulevard Clinic to do another well-woman [clinic], and … we want to bring in experts to do an affordable health care workshop to help musicians understand what their options are. We want to help them learn that there are ways to navigate the system.” Nonprofit work is rarely glamorous, but Freeman and Lyne are unshakable. Both say their allegiance to MMF is woven through their dedication to Henderson. “It’s been really horrible losing Abby,

Freeman and Lyne: “Quitting is not an option.” but the support of the community since we lost her has been amazing,” Lyne says. “I personally made her a promise. Toward the end, she was really struggling. She was on her oxygen tank, and one night I was putting her to bed, and she just kind of whispered, ‘MMF.’ And I was like, ‘I have it taken care of.’” “Quitting is not an option,” Freeman says. “It’s just absolutely not an option. Abby told me, ‘You’re here for a reason.’ And I think Midwest Music Foundation is that reason.”

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

J a z z B e at NEw Jazz OrdEr, at thE GrEEN Lady LOuNGE

In a city with at least nine big bands — ranging from the black-suited formality of the Kansas City Jazz Orchestra to the original mayhem of the People’s Liberation Big Band — New Jazz Order (NJO) stands out. While some large ensembles claim a musical niche, NJO’s jazz spans classic Count Basie to the more modern charts of Thad Jones and Maria Schneider. Led by trumpeter Clint Ashlock, these exceptional musicians riff tightly and solo loosely each Tuesday night. The first Tuesday of the month finds them at the Green Lady Lounge, where the environment is like stepping back into the big-band era. — Larry Kopitnik New Jazz Order Big Band, 9 p.m.-midnight Tuesday, November 5, at the Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand (816-215-2954)

104025.2 | The Pitch | 10-31-2013

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october 31-november 6, 2013

the pitch

25

10/28/13 11:15 AM

Music

Music Forecast

By

n ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417 you wear to a dub fest, right? Well, whatever you slip on, the room-shaking, synth-blasting sounds of U.K. sensation Flux Pavilion, along with Skism, Dirtyphonics, Fury and Roksonix, take over the Midland Saturday. You’re invited to dance, grind, and sweat the night away. The studded, glittered, heeled sneakers you drunkenly purchased online will come in handy, too. So will the edible body paint? Saturday, November 2, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9900)

Replay Halloween Party

WIFI NOW AVAILABLE!

CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

Need some

EAR CANDY?

It’s always a chore to coordinate your Hallow’s Eve schedule, between the parties and the shots and sneaking photos of kids in adorable costumes. This year, save yourself the trouble and head to the Replay for a night of ghoulish musical revelry. A smorgasbord of local bands is set to occupy the stage on that unholiest of holidays, featuring Spirit Is the Spirit, the ACBs, Dean Monkey and the Dropouts, and Stiff Middle Fingers. If you’re too old to trick-or-treat and don’t trust yourself enough to hand out the candy, this seems like a good excuse to party like a dead rock star. Thursday, October 31, at the Replay Lounge (946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676)

Mike Donovan

Sign up for MUSIC NEWSLETTER

IF YOU ARE GOING TO GO OUT, YOU MIGHT AS WELL GET PAID YOU MUST: * BE OUTGOING * BE RELIABLE * BE AVAILABLE NIGHTS & WEEKENDS * OWN TRANSPORTATION

When the Sic Alps broke up, back in August, the sound of heartbreak echoed throughout the garage-rock community. Tears were shed and many whiskey toasts were consumed as indie kids remembered almost a decade of strange experimental noise. Then, out of the ashes, came Sic Alps frontman Mike Donovan with a solo record and a reassuring nod, as if to say that the magic would, indeed, continue. Donovan’s debut, Wot, doesn’t reach the weird and spectacular heights to which Sic Alps ascended so well, but he does manage to burrow resolutely into your ear with a fresh batch of catchy garage pop. Friday, November 1, at FOKL (556 Central, KCK, foklcenter.com)

Straight No Chaser

Ten dudes walk into a bar and start belting out Adele and Lady Gaga songs. No, wait, that’s not right. Ten dudes walk onto the Midland’s stage and start performing intricately arranged and choreographed a cappella versions of popular songs. Yes, that’s the one — and that’s what you’ll get when a certain renowned a cappella group opens wide at the Midland for a rollicking Sunday. Guilty pleasure or flat-out joy? Some people

26

the pitch

Toro Y Moi definitely already know, because the matinee performance is sold out. Tickets are still available for the evening concert. Sunday, November 3, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9900)

Funny story about Deer Tick. About a year ago, I got on the phone with lead singer John McCauley for an interview. I’d heard things about how he could be a douche with the press, but I was confident in my angle. Turns out all my prep was for nothing. Seven minutes into the conversation, McCauley responded to one of my questions with, “I don’t know, I just don’t give a shit about music.” I concluded the interview and was not surprised when, a few weeks later, at the Deer Tick show, he spat beer at the first few rows. That doesn’t mean I won’t be at this Bottleneck gig. Saturday, November 2, at the Bottleneck (737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483)

The Deer Tracks

The Deer Tracks’ David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors refer to their music as “Northern light experimental electronica,” which would be pretty easy to make fun of if it weren’t strangely accurate. For nearly three years, the Swedish duo has been creating shimmering electropop that sounds like the soundtrack to a dark, dystopian fairytale — the kind of fairytale you don’t tell kids. Lindfors’ eerie, delicate voice is mesmerizing. This is one weeknight show you should definitely make room for. Monday, November 4, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Global Dub Festival

Toro Y Moi

Chaz Bundick’s stage name is synonymous with that whole “chillwave” subgenre that got popular for, like, a minute back in 2010. Why? Put on any Toro y Moi album and you’ll find yourself wanting to groove in slow motion to the relaxed electronic vibe that Bundick sends pulsing into the room. The latest Toro Y Moi release, Anything in Return, stays true to the 26-year-old’s smooth sensibilities, though there are plenty of new flavors, too. The chillwave movement may be on ice, but Toro Y Moi is still a hot pick. Tuesday, November 5, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Dust off your brightly colored spandex pants and dig out your glow jewelry. That’s what

f o r e c a s t

To find out more, check out or send your resumé to streetteam@pitch.com

Deer Tick

K e Y

Pick of the Week

 The Show Must Go On

It’s Raining Beer

 Locally Sourced

Garage Rock

 Pop

 Spooky

Mini-festival

 Synchronized Singing

Leave Your Kids at Home

 Dance Party

 Wonderful Weeknight

october 31-november 6, 2013

pitch.com

pitch.com

october 31-november 6, 2013

the pitch

27

The Pitch HALLOWEEN GUIDE

Twisted

8969 Metcalf Ave. Overland Park 913-642-8500

Halloween

Want to be part of the

IN CROWD?

Costumes Masks Wigs Make-up Home Decor

Guide 2013

Sign up for

PROMOTIONAL NEWSLETTER

TwistedHalloweenKC.com

Dare to BE DIFFERENT

HALLOWEEN Fri Nov 1

-

7 pm

Sat Nov 2 - 10 pm

Thu Oct 31

8 pm Mbird’s Artist Showcase featuring Megan Birdsall

•Pizzas• •Paninis• •Hummus•

Drink Specials

Comedy Night 10:00pm NO COVER!

TWO HAPPY HOURS 6-8 & 12-1 EVERY DAY

1325 Odd Fellows Rd., Liberty, belvoirwinery.com. The Beast Haunted House | 7:30 p.m. Thu.-Sun., $27, 1401 W. 13th St., 816-842-4280, kcbeast.com.

KC CABARET Burlesque &

1100 Santa Fe, 816-474-3845, chambersofpoe.com. The Edge of Hell Haunted House | 7:30 p.m. Thu.-Sun., $27,

Spectacular! Spectacular!

3611 Broadway • KCMO Variety Show 6 - 1:30 Mon-Sat $10

acebook

A Nightmare at Oddfellows | 6 p.m., Thu., Oct. 31, Belvoir Winery,

The Chambers of Poe Haunted House | 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., $27,

& The Bridge - $6 MONDAYS

Costume Contest

us on

NEW MENU

Elaine McMilian

10:30 pm Playe Hip Hop/Rap DJ Dance & Fashion NO COVER!

Halloween

1300 W. 12th St., 816-842-4279, edgeofhell.com. Reserve our private party room for your special engagements

See Our Full Calendar at uptownartsbar.com

There’s a NEW game in town!

Family Fall Festival & Pumpkin Patch | 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Sat.-Sun., $8. Hickory Creek Ranch, 20220 S. Lackman Rd., Spring Hill. hickorycreekranch.net. Frankenstein | 3:45 & 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 31, Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania, 913-383-7756, tivolikc.com. Macabre Cinema Haunted House| 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., $27, 1222 W. 12th St., 816-471-2250, macabrecinema.com. Pandemonium at Firefly | 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 1, and Sat., Nov. 2, Firefly Lounge, 4118 Pennsylvania, kchalloween.com. The Pitch and Captain Morgan present Not a Planet, the Josh Berwanger Band and Akkilles, with costume contest

KC’S ONLY FM SPORTS STATION!

10 p.m. Thu., Oct. 31, RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Pumpkin Patch and Corn Maze | Includes hayride, straw fort, Sunflower Slide, farm animals, teepees. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Thu., 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri-Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sun., $8 (children under 3 free), Louisburg Cider Mill, 14730 Hwy. 68, Louisburg, 913-837-5202. Screenland at the KC Symphony presents The Phantom of the Opera

SPORTS RADIO 102.5 THE FAN LINEUP:

5AM-8AM: Tiki Barber, Brandon & Dana

8AM-11AM: John Feinstein 11AM-2PM: Jim Rome 2PM-5PM: Doug Gottlieb 5PM-9PM: Chris Moore & Brian Jones 9PM-1AM: Scott Ferrall 1AM-5AM: D.A. - Damon Amendolara 28

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october 31-november 6, 2013

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Live organ accompaniment to the 1925 silent film. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 31, Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway, 816-994-7200, kcsymphony.org. Terror on the Plains Horror Festival | 6 p.m. Thu., Oct. 31, Alamo Drafthouse, 1400 Main, drafthouse.com/movies/halloween/kansas_city. 3rd Street Asylum Haunted House | 7 p.m. Fri.-Sat., $18, Third and Cedar streets, Bonner Springs, 3rdstreetasylum.com.

The Pitch HALLOWEEN GUIDE

pitch.com

october 31-november 6, 2013

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29

AGENDA

continued from page 11

Thursday | 10.31 |

THE SQUIDLING BROS. CIRCUS SIDESHOW

EXPOS

35th Annual Gem, Mineral, Jewelry & Bead Show | 10 a.m.-7 p.m. KCI Expo Center, 11728 N. Ambassador

PERFORMING ARTS

Dr., showsofintegrity.com

Jordi Savall | 8 p.m. Folly Theater, 300 W. 12th St.

FRIDAY

1 1 .1

LITERARY EVENTS

Midwest Poets Series: Adam Zagajewski | 7 p.m. Mabee Theater, 1100 Rockhurst Rd. (Sedgwick Hall, Rockhurst University), rockhurst.edu

y wait elly Bo Your J . is over

FOOD & DRINK

La Chalupa Farmers Market | 2-6 p.m. Mattie Rhodes

KC Black Expo | Bartle Hall, 301 W. 13th St.,

kcblackexpo.com

FOOD & DRINK

First Friday Lunches | 11:30 a.m. The American Restaurant, 200 E. 25th St., theamericankc.com

Friday Farmers Market at BadSeed | 4-9 p.m. The

Northeast, 148 N. Topping Ave., mattierhodes.org

BadSeed, 1909 McGee, badseedkc.com

FILM

R E C R E AT I O N

The Body | 7:30 p.m., Glenwood Arts, 9575 Metcalf (east

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 6 a.m.; $6 ($3 for skate

MUSIC

SHOPPING

The Delta Saints | 9 p.m., $9-$11, the Bottleneck, 737

Good Ju Ju | 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. , 1420 W. 13th Terr.

Dropout Boogie Halloween Party | 10 p.m., free,

Liberty Belle | 8:30 a.m.-8 p.m., 1320 W. 13th St., libertybellekc.com

side of Metcalf South Shopping Center), Overland Park

rental), 2450 Grand, crowncenter.com

New Hampshire, Lawrence

MiniBar, 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281

Rag and Bone | 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m. , 1412 W. 12th St., ragandbonekc.com

Dumptruck Butterlips, Deadman Flats, Tokengrass | 9 p.m., $10. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

MORE

EVENTS

ON

AT LINE

PITCH.CO

M

Restoration Emporium | 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m., 1300 W. 13th St.

Jerry Garcia Cover Band, Sweet Knievel | 9 p.m. Jack-

Urban Mining Homewares and Co. | 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,

pot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

3924 Walnut

SPORTS

Jib Jab Jones and the Indigo Circus, Real Sugar, Lazy Motel | The Brick, 1727

McGee

Latin Jazz Night with the Feo Band | 7 p.m. The

Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

The Squidling Bros. Circus Sideshow | 10 p.m., $10. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Ultimate Blue Corner Battles | 6:30 p.m., $32.50$87.50. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, voodookc.com MUSIC

Lazy, Sleazebeats | 10 p.m., free. MiniBar, 3810

Zero, Counterfeit, Prydial, Wuzz, Plague, Underwater Knife Fight | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

#RIP #LOL with DJ Sheppa and guests | 8 p.m.

Backroad Anthem | 8 p.m. Kanza Hall, 7300 W. 119th

Mark Lowrey, Dominque Sanders and Ryan Lee | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

NIGHTLIFE

30th anniversary party for Michael Jackson’s Thriller | Sol Cantina, 408 E. 31st St.

David Basse/Curtis Lundy Quartet | 8 p.m., $15.

Broadway

Finesse Mitchell | 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Not a Planet, Josh Berwanger Band (album release), Akkilles | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

KC Live Halloween Fest | 8 p.m. KC Live! Block at the Power & Light District, 14th St. and Grand

Little Block of Horror | One Block South, 7300 W.

Czar, 1531 Grand

Friday | 11.1 | PERFORMING ARTS

119th St., Overland Park

St., Overland Park

Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park

Josh Berwanger Band record-release show with the Dead Girls | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Motown Halloween Party with Atlantic Express | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Kansas City Symphony: Love, Death, and Transfiguration | 8 p.m. Kauffman Center for the Performing

Arts, 1601 Broadway, kauffmancenter.org

The Bus Company, Kasey Rausch and Friends, the Ready Brothers | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New

9 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Playe | 10:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway.

Carrie Newcomer | 7:30 p.m. Lied Center of Kansas,

Michael Carvin Experience | 8:30 p.m. The Blue

Sunu, DJ Proof | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts,

Adam Richmond | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867

Story slam and dramatic readings | 8 p.m. The

The Devil, the Sluts, Mace Batons, Across the Earth | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Spirit Is the Spirit , the ACBs, Dean Monkey & the Dropouts, Stiff Middle Fingers, DJ Cruz |

Lawrence

30

the pitch

Village West Pkwy., KCK

october 31-november 6, 2013

pitch.com

1600 Stewart Dr., Lawrence, lied.ku.edu

Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway.

Hampshire, Lawrence

Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

VERMEER AND MUSIC

DAY SATUR

11.2

ow into A wind al Nation ’s n o d L on y Galler

Vermeer and Music | 11 a.m. Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania, tivolikc.com

THEATER

Día de Los Muertos with Maria the Mexican | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Dates and times vary. Robbie Fulks with Dallas Wayne & the Railers |

8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Junebug & the Porchlights | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside

BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

King Osiris, Dutch Newman, Dom Chronicles, Sir Adam | 9 p.m. Jackpot, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Ain’t Misbehavin’: The Fats Waller Musical Show | Spinning Tree Theatre, Just Off Broadway

Theater, 3051 Central, spinningtreetheatre.com

Carrie: The Musical | Egads Theatre, Off Center Theatre, 2450 Grand, egadstheatre.com Dracula: The Journal of Jonathan Harker |

Lamb of God, Killswitch Engage, Testament, Huntress | 7 p.m., $32/$35. The Midland, 1228 Main

The Coterie Theatre, Crown Center, 2450 Grand, thecoterie.org

Levee Town | Trouser Mouse, 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

The Foreigner | KC Repertory Theatre, 4949

Elaine McMilian & the Bridge | 7 p.m. The Uptown

Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway.

Finesse Mitchell | 8 & 10:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club

and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Jason Vivone and the Billybats | Coda, 1744 Broad-

way, 816-569-1747.

Cherry, kcrep.org

Forever Plaid | Chestnut Fine Arts Center, 234 N. Chestnut, Olathe, chesnutfinearts.com

Rumplestiltskin | Paul Mesner Puppets, 1006 E. Linwood Blvd. , paulmesnerpuppets.org Seminar | Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main. unicorntheatre.org.

Y(our) Fri(end), Author, Valaska, Clairaudients | 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

NIGHTLIFE

The Blackout with DJ Evil One | Hotel, 1300 Grand Cicadaween | 8 p.m. Abe and Jake’s Landing, 8 E.

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street | Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence, lawrenceartscenter.org

Three Viewings | Muehlebach Funeral Home, 6800 Troost, kcactors.org

Sixth St., Lawrence

Cinemaphonic with DJ Cruz & Cyan | MiniBar, continued on page 32

3810 Broadway

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october 31-november 6, 2013

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31

continued from page 31 Foxy by Proxy Burlesque Revue’s Halloween Hoopla | 9 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts,

Rag and Bone | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 1412 W. 12th St.,

ragandbonekc.com

Restoration emporium | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 1300 W. 13th St.

Adam Richmond | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Com-

saturday swap meet | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Cowtown Mall-

Saturday | 11.2 |

room, 3101 Gillham Plz.

Urban mining Homewares and Co. | 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,

3924 Walnut

CommUnity events $25-$30, Polsky Theatre at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, jccc.edu

Kansas City symphony: Love, Death, and Transfiguration | 8 p.m.; Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway, kauffmancenter.org

Vermeer and Music | 11 a.m. Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania, tivolikc.com

dJ thundercutz | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway global dub Festival with Flux Pavilion, sKism, dirtyphonics, Roksonix and more | 8 p.m. The

Midland, 1228 Main

KC Cabaret variety show | 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts

PeRFoRming ARts

Pat Hazell’s The Wonder Bread Years | 8 p.m.,

Art Exhibits & EvEnts

nigHtLiFe

Lawrence

edy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

truckstop Honeymoon | 10 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee

Fall 2013 Used Computer drive | 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, 4801 Rockhill Rd., connectingforgood.org

Bar, 3611 Broadway

magic 107.3 saturday groove Party | 7 p.m. Voo-

Doo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

great Pumpkin smash | 9:30 a.m. Kansas City Zoo, 6800 Zoo Dr., kansascityzoo.org

Adam Richmond | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

guns and their effect in Johnson County | 9 a.m.

storytelling with miss gina K | 7 p.m. The Brick,

St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, 6630 Nall, Mission, LWVjoco.org

exPos

1727 McGee

Sunday | 11.3 |

About Face | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

Charlotte Street presents We’ll Make Out Better Than Okay by Curator-in-Residence Danny Orendorff | 6-9 p.m. Friday, La Esquina, 1000 W. 25th St., better-than-okay.tumblr.com

Día de los Muertos/Day of the Dead , featur-

ing Scribe | Mattie Rhodes Art Gallery, 919 W. 17th St., mattierhodes.org

Echoes: Islamic Art and Contemporary Artists | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak Impressionist France | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org Kaws • Ups and Downs; Dylan Mortimer • Illuminate | Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

mUsiC

35th Annual gem, mineral, Jewelry & Bead show | 10 a.m.-7 p.m. KCI Expo Center, 11728 N. Ambassador Dr..showsofintegrity.com

KC Black expo | Bartle Hall, 301 W. 13th St.,

kcblackexpo.com

PeRFoRming ARts

Apocalypse meow with sister mary Rotten Crotch, the Philistines, Howard iceberg, Betse ellis | 6 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

| UMKC Gallery of Art, 5015 Holmes (Room 203), info.umkc.edu/art/umkcgallery/exhibitions

Jason Boland and the stragglers, shane smith & the saints | The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts,

Vermeer and Music | 11 a.m.Tivoli Cinemas, 4050

East, 200 E. 44th St., kemperart.org

1228 Main, midlandkc.comdf

Lawrence

City market Farmers market | 6:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Chilliott | 7 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

downtown overland Park Farmers market |

9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

grand Court Farmers market | 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Grand

Lawrence

Wicked Wine Walk | 3-6 p.m., $25/$30. Power & Light

Clairaudients, y(our) Fri(end), valaska, Author |

6:30 a.m.-1 p.m., on Marty between 79th and 80th streets

Court Retirement Center, 501 W. 107th St.

District, 14th St. and Main

R e C R e At i o n

Crown Center ice terrace | 10 a.m.-11 p.m., $6 ($3 for skate rental), 2450 Grand, crowncenter.com.

Wilderness Run | 9 a.m. Shoal Creek Living History Museum, 7000 N.E. Barry Rd., kcmo.org

American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St.

Jeff Harshbarger Quintet, Jazz in the Jungle Afterparty | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W.

LeCtURes

Music Is My First Love: Lupe M. Gonzalez Dance Orchestra | Kansas City Museum, 3218

King King | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E.

inside the West Wing with donald Rumsfeld, Bob Kerrey and more | 6 p.m., $10, Unity Temple, 707 W.

Shoppes, 3600 Broadway

32

the pitch

Dr., showsofintegrity.com

expo.com

151st St., Overland Park

85th St.

Lazy, Little Big Bangs | Replay Lounge, 946 Mas-

sachusetts, Lawrence

Bryan Lee | 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Chante moore | 8 p.m. Folly Theater, 300 W. 12th St.,

The Pitch’s Crafts & drafts | 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Uptown

James Turrell: Gard Blue | Spencer Museum of Art, 1301 Mississippi , Lawrence

KC Black expo | Bartle Hall, 301 W. 13th St., kcblack-

deer tick | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire,

sHoPPing

Liberty Belle | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. , 1320 W. 13th St.

exPos

MUsEUM Exhibits & EvEnts

Finesse mitchell | 7 & 10 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

good Ju Ju | 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. , 1420 W. 13th Terr.

Pennsylvania, tivolikc.com

Nomads: Traversing Adolescence | Kemper

35th Annual gem, mineral, Jewelry & Bead show | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. KCI Expo Center, 11728 N. Ambassador

Zero Prostate Cancer Run | 8 a.m. Kansas City Urology Care, 10701 Nall, Overland Park

Knock Loud, I’m Home + Dog and Pony Show

straight no Chaser | 2:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. The Midland,

Star Montessori, 6321 Wornall

205 E. Fifth St.

kauffmancenter.org

Javonne French | Opening reception 4:30-6:30 p.m. Friday, Box Gallery, 1000 Walnut

1616 E. 18th St.

david Basse Cd-release show | The Blue Room,

Food & dRinK

Brookside Farmers market | 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Border

Kansas City symphony: Love, Death, and Transfiguration | 2 p.m. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway,

KC Swing: Jazz Photography, by Diallo

nuthatch-47, maria the mexican, Jake Wesley Rogers | 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Gladstone Blvd., kansascitymuseum.org

47th St., trumanlibrary.org

R e C R e At i o n

Cliffhanger 5k/8k | 8 a.m. Kansas City University of

solid gold easy | 7-9 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway

october 31-november 6, 2013

pitch.com

take Five tours | 6 p.m. Thursday, American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St.

Medicine and Biosciences, 1750 E. Independence Ave., cliffhangerrun.com

ragandbonekc.com

Crown Center ice terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $6 ($3 for skate rental), 2450 Grand, crowncenter.com

Restoration emporium | Noon-5 p.m. , 1300 W. 13th St., restorationemporium.com

the Lung Hill Run | 7 a.m., free-$35, Liberty Memorial, 100 W. 26th St., lungevity.org/lunghillrun sHoPPing

Ben Rector | 7:30 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Real Pirates | Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd.

good Ju Ju | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. , 1420 W. 13th Terr. Liberty Belle | 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 1320 W. 13th St.

Rag and Bone | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. , 1412 W. 12th St.,

Urban mining Homewares and Co. | 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,

3924 Walnut

CommUnity events

day of the dead Family Festival | 1-4 p.m., NelsonAtkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

LYLE LOVETT

MUSIC

Crystal Antlers, Various Blonde | 10 p.m. Replay

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Y S U N DA

Rex Hobart’s Honky Tonk Supper Club | 7 p.m.

11.3

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Knifecrime, Twinsmith, Forrest Whitlow & the Crash | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

y mebod Did so at? h is h touch

Shameless Management Showcase | 9 p.m. The

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Soular | 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway. Toro Y Moi, Classix | 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Mas-

sachusetts, Lawrence

Yo Gotti, Zed Zilla, Shy Glizzy, Ca$h Out | 7 p.m.

Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Wednesday | 11.6 | Poetic Underground open mic series | 9-11 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway.

FOOD & DRINK

City Market Farmers Market | 8 a.m.-3 p.m. 205 E. Fifth St.

FILM

Caroline Glaser, Mel Washington | 7:30 p.m. The

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

MUSIC

Chilliott | 7 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st

St., Overland Park

Periphery, Born of Osiris, Dead Letter Circus, more | 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence NIGHTLIFE

Finesse Mitchell | 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

The Nace Brothers | Trouser Mouse, 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

The People’s Liberation Big Band | 8 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Shlohmo, XXYYXX, Sigrah | 8 p.m. The Granada,

1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Wooden Indian Burial Ground, Be/Non | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Monday | 11.4 |

Films For Action KC presents Free the Network | 7 p.m. Open Fire Wood Burning Pizza, 3951 Broadway MUSIC

Ivan & Alyosha, the Falls, Bearface | 8 p.m. The

Rex Hobart’s Honky Tonk Supper Club | 7 p.m.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Open-mic comedy night | 9 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s, 101 Southwest Blvd.

Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia | 7 p.m. RecordBar,

1020 Westport Rd.

Team Trivia with Teague Hayes: 8:30 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747.

Trivia | 8 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main, 816-421-4799.

Tuesday | 11.5 |

FALL!

CHECK OUT THESE DECKS & PATIOS FOR GREAT OUTDOOR DINING & DRINKING ACCURSO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 4980 MAIN, KC,MO ACCURSOS.COM BLACK & GOLD TAVERN 3740 BROADWAY, KC,MO 816-561-1099 FACEBOOK.COM/ BLACKGOLDTAVERN BLUE BIRD BISTRO 1700 SUMMIT, KC,MO 816-221-7559 BLUEBIRDBISTRO.COM BOJO’S BAR AND GRILL 5410 NE ANTIOCH, KC,MO 816- 455-3344

PERFORMING ARTS

Lyle Lovett and John Hiatt | 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

FIND THE PERFECT PLACE TO ENJOY

Josh Abbott Band, Bryant Carter Band | 7 p.m. Kanza Hall, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

August Burns Red,Blessthefall, Defeater, Beartooth | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence,

The Browning, This or the Apocalypse, Honour Crest, Tear Out The Heart, Myka Relocate | 6 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Drew Black and Dirty Electric, Kentucky Knife Fight | The Brick, 1727 McGee Grayskul, Farout, Sir Adams, Prettygirlhatemachine, Eiman | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Katie Guillen and the Girls | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

JEL, Sole |ReplayLounge,946Massachusetts,Lawrence Kathleen Holeman, Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern | 5:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand,

CHEZ ELLE 1713 SUMMIT ST, KC,MO 816- 471-2616 CHEZELLE.COM CZAR 1531 GRAND BLVD, KC,MO 816- 221-2244 CZARKC.COM THE DUBLINER 1701 E. 14TH ST, KC,MO THEDUBLINERKC.COM THE GREEN ROOM BURGERS & BEER 4010 PENNSYLVANIA , KC,MO GREENROOMKC.COM KNUCKLEHEADS 2715 ROCHESTER, KC,MO 816-483-1456 KNUCKLEHEADSKC.COM LE FOU FROG 400 E. 5TH ST, KC,MO 816-474-6060 LEFOUFROG.COM MIKE KELLY’S WESTSIDER 1515 WESTPORT RD, KC,MO 816-931-9417 POWER & LIGHT DISTRICT 13TH AND MAIN, KC,MO 816-842-1045 RECORD BAR 1020 WESTPORT RD, KC,MO 816-753-5207 THERECORDBAR.COM

MUSIC

COMMUNITY EVENTS

The Blind Pets, 88er, the Family Bed | 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Swope Park Soccer Village & Big 12 Women’s Soccer Tournament Kick-Off | 3 p.m. Swope Park

Terraplane Sun, Middle Twin | 7:30 p.m. The Riot

TEOCALI AUTHENTIC MEXICAN 2512 HOLMES, KC,MO 816-221-4749 TEOCALI.COM

FOOD & DRINK

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

403 CLUB 403 N. 5TH ST, KC,KS 913-499-8392

The Deer Tracks, Middle Twin | 10 p.m. RecordBar,

1020 Westport Rd.

Fall Comedy Competition hosted by Norm Dexter | 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway.

Soccer Village, 63rd St. and Lewis

Merry Edwards wine dinner | 6:30 p.m., $100 per person, Bluestem, 900 Westport Rd., bluestemkc.com

Room, 4048 Broadway

pitch.com

october 31-november 6, 2013

the pitch

33

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pitch.com

Dear SISTER: Your sister may not be facing HIV

alone. She could have confided in friends; she could be seeing a great HIV doc and attending a support group. And if your sister were in good health, I would encourage you to run with those assumptions. It’s generally good to err on the side of respecting a sibling’s right to privacy while also respecting your sister’s specific right to control who she tells about her HIV status. But it doesn’t sound like your sister is in good health. While it’s possible that she’s facing unrelated health problems that you’ve wrongly attributed to her HIV infection, that could be a risky assumption. You wanna show respect but you don’t wanna respect your sister to death. If there’s a chance your sister hasn’t sought treatment because she feared it would get back to your family or because there’s some other issue that prevented her from accessing services (language barriers, cultural barriers), I’m going to urge you to err on the side of speaking up. Tell your sister what you know and tell her how you found out. If you don’t tell her how you learned about her HIV diagnosis, your sister will worry that rumors are spreading and that other people already know. Then tell her that you love her, that you’re worried for her, and that you want to make sure she’s getting both the medical care and the emotional support she needs. She may be upset (or furious) that you know something she wanted to keep secret, but you can point to the last two years as proof that you can be trusted to keep her HIV status confidential.

Dear Dan: I’m a youth who identifies as asexual.

I was born female, and I’ve been binding for a while and identify as gender-neutral. But I’m afraid to tell others that I’m gender-neutral

By

D a n S ava ge

for fear of being told I’m wrong because I wear dresses. Does wearing skirts and dresses mean I’m not gender-neutral? I think I look better in dresses than flannel.

Gender Neutral Asexual Youth Dear GNAY: Wear whatever you like, identify

however you like, and refuse to engage with idiots who think they have a right to critique, dictate or overrule your gender identity.

Dear Dan: I’ve been reading your column for years, and that helped me as my husband’s kinky side began to emerge. We’ve recently started flirting with “same-room sex” with other couples. We want a couple to watch us have sex, and we want to watch them have sex, but there would be no physical contact between the couples. We’ve had a difficult time finding couples that do not want a soft or full swap. I’ve decided to surprise my husband with a prostitute who will watch and video us but not have contact with either of us. What are the dos and don’ts? I’m totally naive about sex work and sex workers, and I’m also afraid I could get jealous since there would be no other man in the room for me!

Monogamous Voyeurs and Exhibitionists Dear MVAE: “Surprises are generally unwel-

come when it comes to sex, and especially to sex work,” says Siouxsie Q, a Bay Area sex worker as well as the creator and host of the WhoreCast (thewhorecast.com). “There are plenty of escorts who do ‘doubles’ with other escorts,” Siouxsie says. “Take the time to do the research and find a provider who offers doubles with a male escort or a partner — some providers even specialize in this! Communicate about it with your husband and embark on a sexual adventure together. The process of looking through ads and picking out people you both find attractive may even be fun.” Siouxsie recommends booking at least two hours for a session like this and to respect your sex worker’s quoted rate, i.e., no haggling. “When your providers arrive, communicate your boundaries and expectations clearly so everyone is on the same page,” Siouxsie says, “and you and your husband should agree in advance about either of you being able to call a timeout midsession to re-establish boundaries or talk something out. This sounds like a really fun session that most providers I know would be stoked to book!” Dan secures sex advice from a mortician at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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The Pitch: October 31, 2013