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MAY 9–15, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 45 | PITCH.COM

— Senior—

FORTRESS BY STEVE VOCKRODT

The Tutera Group isn’t getting much resistance to its plan to wall off a chunk of Prairie Village for the Medicare set.

M AY 9 –1 5 , 2 0 1 3 | V O L . 3 2 N O . 4 5 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, Jonathan Bender, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Chris Milbourn, Nancy Hull RIgdon, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel Editorial Intern Katie Miller

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Lynn Collins

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Collin Click, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

SENIOR FORTRESS The Tutera Group isn’t getting much resistance to its plan to wall off a chunk of Prairie Village for the Medicare set. B Y S T E V E VO C K R O D T

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C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

CRACKING ZIPPERNUT Harl Van Deursen is a real card. BY NANCY HULL RIGDON

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VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

Double draggin’ into two places, each trying to do two cuisines.

D I S T R I B U T I O N

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C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2013 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

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QUESTIONNAIRE NEWS FEATURE F I LT E R STAGE PAGES CAFÉ FAT CITY STREETSIDE MUSIC NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

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KC’s newest record store, MILLS RECORD CO., is open on Westport Road. THREE PIGS BBQ is a nice pit stop in Blue Springs. KANSAS CITY STREETCAR is still in litigation limbo.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

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QUESTIONNAIRE

TERESA JOHNSON Occupation: Executive director and chief life-

p

CEO, Kansas City Pet Project

What TV show do you make sure you watch?

saving officer at the Kansas City Pet Project. My organization operates the largest and only open-admission animal shelter in Kansas City, which includes the KCMO Animal Shelter (behind the stadiums on Raytown Road) and a new Pet Adoption Center in Zona Rosa. We are committed to operating Kansas City’s animal shelter as a no-kill facility.

The Walking Dead. Most recently, I’ve been downloading all the episodes of Homeland, and I’m totally hooked.

Hometown: Columbia, Missouri

What movie do you watch at least once a year?

take up a lot of space in my iTunes:

Lots of hard-rock tunes. I’m a big fan of Southern rock, including my extensive collection from the Allman Brothers. Every Halloween, I make homemade pumpkin soup and watch George Romero’s 1968 Night of the Living Dead. Classic horror is the best.

Current neighborhood: Near Mill Creek Streamway Park, in Lenexa

Q&As

Who or what is your sidekick? My dog, Oscar. He’s

an 8-year-old SheltiePekingese mix that I adopted from a local shelter. He’s totally devoted to me and never leaves my side when I’m at home. ONL

INE

center. I love organized chaos — fast-paced, long, crazy days are my thing!

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? The veggie burger at Houston’s is absolutely the best.

Where do you drink? A glass of wine when I get home makes me happy right now. What’s your favorite charity? The Kansas City

Pet Project, of course! We are the animal shelter for the city of Kansas City and care for nearly 8,000 lost and homeless pets a year. Even pets with severe injuries or illnesses, or innocent victims of cruelty or neglect that are brought in by animal control. We’re the safety net for animals in Kansas City.

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Barbecue in Kansas City. This is coming

from someone who has been a strict vegetarian for many years. But I love a good sauce!

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? Shawnee Mission Park, the farmers market in downtown Overland Park, and, of course, the Plaza.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” It lowered the city licensing fees for

“KC screwed up when it …” Began talking about

needing light rail and a new airport. Those are “nice to haves” at a time when critical improvements are needed all over the city.

“KC needs …” A new animal shelter. The exist-

ing shelter was built in 1972. It’s old, outdated, institutional, and not nearly large enough to care humanely for the number of needy animals in our community. Citizens of Kansas City, Missouri, should be demanding a modern animal shelter be included in the 2014 budget.

“People might be surprised to know that I …”

Have one dog and one cat. Most people think you have lots of pets if you work in animal welfare. I see 300-plus animals every day at work.

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? I haven’t been “on a date” in a long time. I can guarantee I’ve had embarrassing moments, but I spent a lot of time in therapy blocking those memories.

“On my day off, I like to …” Jump in my jeep,

crank up the radio and drive my dog, Oscar, over to Wendy’s for an egg sandwich. He knows when it’s Saturday morning and he can hardly wait to go!

“In five years, I’ll be …” Better at golf. I’m one of those people who signs up for lessons for everything. Unfortunately, I never have any free time to pursue those interests.

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Hillary Clinton. We’d bond over

funnel cakes, and I’d encourage her to run for president in 2016.

Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter:

Simon Sinek. “It’s not what you do; it’s why you do it.”

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: This weather. Winter has lasted way too long this year. I’m ready for a long stretch of warm, sunny days.

What subscription do you value most? KC

Spaces magazine. It’s beautiful, informative and inspires me to try new decorating ideas.

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Last book you read: Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead.

Favorite day trip: Back to Columbia for a walk through campus. I’m a Mizzou gal. Interesting brush with the law? Does my parking ticket received downtown while in a meeting with the mayor count? Describe a recent triumph: Running the KCMO Animal Shelter as a no-kill facility! It has never been done before in the history of this city. Opening a second Pet Adoption Center in Zona Rosa the first year of our operation has also literally been a lifesaver for us and has helped us find new homes for more than 425 dogs and cats in just the past four months from that location alone. Overall, we found homes or other placement for nearly 6,000 animals in 2012, and adoptions are up 35 percent over the same period last year. We are committed to creating a no-kill Kansas City!

sas c an ycl ity K rc es er o t

ice

Stuff in Brookside. I can’t go in that store without buying a new piece of unique jewelry.

pets and implemented the “Free Ride Home” program. Lost pets found with current city tags are eligible for a free ride home from Animal Control, which keeps them from having to come to the shelter.

v

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: I love

Instead of carrying your keys in your purse, carry them on you, such as in your pocket or clipped to a belt loop. This way, if your bag is ever stolen or lost, you will still have the keys to your residence and car!

It’s not officially the holiday season without it.

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What career would you choose in an alternate reality? I would be a doctor in an ER trauma

May Safety Tip:

What local tradition do you take part in every year? Seeing the Plaza lights during Christmas.

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NEWS

WIRE TAP

BY

STEVE VOCKRODT

Google Fiber bails out North Kansas City’s fiber-optic misfire.

N

MidAmerica Neuroscience Research LeAnn Cannon 913-894-1500 ext 151

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orth Kansas City’s fiber-optic network is finally coming up for air. LiNKCity, the Northland enclave’s attempt to run its own high-speed Web infrastructure, made it Missouri’s fastest city until Google Fiber showed up. Since service began, in 2006, it has also been a deficit magnet. Now, though, a deal struck with Google seems to put LiNKCity within striking distance of breaking even. North Kansas City’s April 16 City Council meeting was primarily notable for the swearing-in of a new mayor and a new slate of council members, ones who had largely campaigned on a plank against the notion of selling North Kansas City Hospital. (A détente is well under way on that matter, now that the city and the hospital have entered into settlement negotiations.) But also on the agenda that day was a $3.2 million deal for Google to lease the LiNKCity system’s “dark fiber.” “I don’t even know what dark fiber meant,” Mayor Don Stielow tells The Pitch. It’s unused fiber — and LiNKCity has it in abundance. Google’s lease doesn’t make North Kansas City one of the communities sprouting up to grab Google’s gigabit-fiber coattails. (Shawnee and Raytown are the latest.) “This doesn’t mean we’re delivering Google Fiber service to the city of North Kansas City,” Google spokeswoman Jenna Wandres tells The Pitch. “It just means we’re using their fiber as a pass-through to get to surrounding areas.” So the coattails in this instance belong not to Google but to LiNKCity. The Web giant needs North Kansas City’s unused fiber infrastructure to build out in the Northland without the annoyance of setting up new infrastructure, as it has done elsewhere in the metro. Google’s lease payments are expected to help shore up the LiNKCity bottom line, which has sagged since its inception. North Kansas City spent $10.5 million in gaming money, the revenue that comes from Harrah’s Casino, to build the network. It was supposed to be an attractive amenity to residents and a lure to outside businesses to move to North Kansas City. It was also set up as an enterprise fund, a segment of the city’s budget that’s supposed to operate as a business and generate its own profit. But projections for LiNKCity’s popularity proved overblown. LiNKCity had the advantage of building its network without longterm fi nancing, but its market penetration into residences and businesses reaches about a third of the city. Soon LiNKCity was running less like a busi-

Google hops on the Northland’s dark fiber. ness and more like the federal government during the last 12 years. Former North Kansas City Mayor Gene Bruns liked the idea of building a fiber-optic network, having seen a similar advent in Provo, Utah. But iProvo’s speed didn’t prevent a similar ledger struggle, and other cities might look to both Provo and North Kansas City as cautionary tales. (Google also bailed out iProvo recently with the announcement that it would take over that infrastructure and sell its Fiber service there.) In 2009 and 2010, LiNKCity lost a total of $1 million. The city went to the gaming fund, North Kansas City’s version of a mint, to cover the shortfalls. This didn’t help Missouri State Auditor Tom Schweich’s opinion of the enterprise. In a 2011 audit, he pointed out that residents already had ways to connect to the Internet, and he said the city should think about whether it ought to continue on the LiNKCity path. The same year, North Kansas City also contracted a consultant to look at the operation. That report reached similar conclusions about the network’s financial viability. The consultant recommended raising prices, digging deeper into the market with the service and putting current users on more expensive plans — oh, and that the city try to sell its dark fiber. LiNKCity director Byron McDaniel has told city officials that the Google deal — which is good for 20 years — finally puts the network on better footing. “He reported with this — it all of a sudden becomes maybe not profitable, but it’s at least breaking even,” Stielow says. “We might even be able to turn a profit on the thing.”

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

NEWS

RADIO-FREE

BY

BE N PA L O S A A R I

KKFI 90.1 adds news from Al Jazeera.

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out of life

A

l Jazeera’s Newshour is live on Kansas City’s airwaves. The Qatari network, whose reporting was described as “vicious, inaccurate and inexcusable” by former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld in 2004, broadcasts on KKFI 90.1 at 9 a.m. Thursdays. Al Jazeera has come a long way since Rummy’s rant. The news organization has expanded to more than 60 bureaus worldwide (and has announced plans for 12 bureaus in the United States) that offer television and radio programs, including an English-language version. Rumsfeld even did an interview with Al Jazeera in 2011. However, the network has yet to fully shed its early-aughts reputation as the favored media outlet of Osama bin Laden’s publicity team. Since Al Jazeera English’s launch, it has struggled to find distribution for its television programming in the United States. In an effort to get onto satellite and cable systems, the network purchased Current TV, the relatively unwatched but widely distributed news channel owned in part by Al Gore, in January. After the deal, Time Warner Cable, the United States’ second-largest cable provider, dropped the station. Now, Al Jazeera has found another way to reach American news consumers: through community-radio stations. Pacifica Radio Network, one of the nation’s largest distributors of syndicated programming to community stations, began offering Al Jazeera in 2010. That’s how Al Jazeera found its way onto KKFI. Mark Andruss, chairman of KKFI’s programming committee, says his station wanted to add a news program to its schedule, and Al Jazeera’s Newshour was available. He says the once-a-week airings are a test to see how listeners react to getting their news from the occasionally controversial network. “Our listeners, we felt, were unlikely to be bothered by Al Jazeera, at least in the ‘it comes from the Arab world, therefore it’s not worth listening to’ reaction,” says Andruss, who hosts Foolkiller Folk on the station. “If our listeners like Al Jazeera, if we can hold the Democracy Now! audience, then I think we have to think about making it a Monday–Friday, one-hourlong news segment.” Of approximately 180 stations affi liated with Pacifica, 35 air Al Jazeera. KYRS in Spokane, Washington, airs it twice a day, and WGDR at Goddard College in Plainfield, Vermont, plays it every morning. Pacifica Affiliates Coordinator Ursula Ruedenberg says the show has been a hit for

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$50 off any treatment radio stations since it began distributing the program three years ago. “It was immediately pretty popular,” she says. “We didn’t design it this way, but by coincidence, we finalized our negotiations, which had been going on for quite a few years, right when Egypt happened and the Arab Spring started. “Among those stations, some of them aired it with a little trepidation, and they had great results,” Ruedenberg adds. In general, the audience of community-radio stations tends to be interested in Middle Eastern news topics, she says. “I think that because of all of the political changes in the Middle East, it’s very exciting to have a newscast that’s literally there on the ground and can report very accurately and immediately,” she says. Andruss believes that KKFI listeners will be sharp critics of the show, when necessary. “For our listeners, the deeper question may be, ‘Does Al Jazeera have the editorial independence to point a spotlight on human-rights abuses in Qatar?’ ” Andruss says. “I did a little digging on that, and while I maybe wouldn’t give them an A, I would at least give them a B-minus or something.” Adding Al Jazeera to the station’s lineup didn’t arouse much debate within KKFI’s programming committee, Andruss says. “The mission of Al Jazeera might as well be the mission of KKFI,” he says. “They say they’re interested in telling untold stories [and] provoking debate. But if you read our mission statement, we’re basically about the same thing. If there had been a perception that Al Jazeera didn’t play the news game reasonably straight by current standards, then I think we might have had issues.”

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The Tutera Group isn’t getting much resistance to its plan to wall off a chunk of Prairie Village for the Medicare set.

—S E N IOR—

FORTRESS BY STEVE VOCKRODT

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Still, Tutera thinks its only a “very small isolated group” that opposes his plan. Some of that group showed up to an April 25 neighborhood meeting in the cafeteria of Prairie Elementary School to learn more about Mission Chateau. The Satterlees were among 40 people who listened to jocular John Petersen, a fixture in the Polsinelli law firm’s real-estate practice who is frequently called upon by clients to help smooth over development projects both controversial and routine. This puts him in front of neighborhood meetings like the one April 25, as well as before various city councils in Johnson County. That night, he spoke on behalf of the Tutera Group with Tutera himself looking on and occasionally speaking up for his project. About an hour into Petersen’s swashbuckling, Satterlee seemed to have had enough. “We are very unhappy,” she told Petersen after a night of peppering him with questions. “We wanted to work with you.” Satterlee tells The Pitch that the main

Tutera says there’s not a market for standalone senior villas. “The draw to the villas is the access to the services here,” Tutera says. He points to a map of the independent living and nursing facilities that would replace the old middle school. Construction is another matter for neighbors, with the project estimated to take as long as two and a half years to fully build out. And while Petersen spent much of the meeting telling the crowd that the Tutera Group had changed the plan to accommodate some concerns, Tutera says that seniorliving communities are what he does. “That’s the one thing we can never change,” he says.

T

his is the biggest parcel we’ve dealt with in a long time,” says Dennis Enslinger, Prairie Village’s assistant city administrator, who has attended many of the community meetings for the $50 million Mission Chateau plan. Unlike nearby Somerset Elementary,

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renda Satterlee’s house rests on almost three acres in an ideal setting in Prairie Village. She’s close to some of the suburb’s better-known shops and amenities. She’s also near the former Mission Valley Middle School. And that’s why she and her husband, Craig, might sell their house. “Even if we lose our shirts,” Satterlee tells The Pitch. Satterlee’s home is a few hundred feet south of the now-vacant middle school at 8500 Mission. The Shawnee Mission School District board voted in 2010 to close Mission Valley as part of a large belt-tightening maneuver. The district had spent the recession like many others: grappling with declining state aid and stagnant or dropping property valuations. In 2011, the school board approved the sale of the school building and its ample surrounding fields to MVS LLC, an entity held by Kansas City’s Tutera Group, for $4.3 million. (The property appraised at $3.2 million in 2012, according to Johnson County land records.) Since then, the Tutera Group has fanned out into the community with a handful of meetings in an effort to win over Prairie Village residents with a proposal to turn the former school into a sprawling, 18-acre senior-living community called Mission Chateau. If approved, it would become one of Johnson County’s biggest development projects this year. Despite meetings put on by Tutera, named for the well-heeled Kansas City family that runs the company and other business enterprises, Satterlee isn’t likely to change her mind.  That’s because while Tutera has made some changes from the original design of the project, it’s fundamentally different from what Satterlee and some of her neighbors think is appropriate for the site. “We’re a very low-density neighborhood,” she says. “To cram this kind of facility is just …” Her voice trails off in half-resigned frustration. Joe Tutera, CEO of the Tutera Group, says he has tried to keep up with demands from concerned neighbors such as Satterlee and an ad hoc neighborhood group that has formed to oppose his project. He says retail, originally considered a possibility to adjoin the senior-living facility, was eventually left out of the proposal by the Tutera Group. He thought that would assuage concerns, but he was surprised when it turned out that Chateau opponents don’t want the seniorliving community, either. “The Mission Valley opposition came out in full force with ‘no retail’ signs,” Tutera says. “It wasn’t until such time that we proceeded to make public, or get with the city and get the guidelines and started preliminary meetings with staff that we’re going senior living … it wasn’t until we literally announced that, that all of a sudden there was a big concern that senior living would be a disaster.”

issue she has with the project is its density. The plan seeks to replace the 100,000-squarefoot middle school, and its surrounding soccer fields and the like, with 387,244 square feet of senior-care center. Along the boundary of the development are residences, many of them single-family homes. For perspective, Mission Chateau would be larger than the 253,000-square-foot, 10-story office building under construction for Petersen’s Polsinelli firm near the County Club Plaza. But Mission Chateau’s footprint won’t be slim and vertical. Instead, it will be spread across a large, three-story building incorporating living space, a separate “skilled nursing and memory care” center and six so-called villas (sort of like duplexes for seniors). Roughly 360 residents would live there at any one time. The Satterlees and others at the meeting say they’re not against development. But why, for example, couldn’t the proposal be all villas?

which was mostly closed for a number of years before becoming an assisted-living facility, Mission Valley Middle School announced its impending closure and subsequent sell-off in relatively short order. Mission Valley closed at the end of the 2011 school year, about half a year after the board voted to close it. Prairie Village’s comprehensive plan — a kind of a guide for how development should unfold over a given period — hadn’t anticipated the possibility of the school’s closing. But enrollment had dropped to about half the capacity for the school, prompting district administrators to put the building on its endangered list. Ron Shaffer, mayor of Prairie Village, acknowledges an emotional connection between the city and its schools. “Schools are very important to us in Prairie Village and to our citizens,” he tells The Pitch. Shaffer says the law obliges him not to publicly state his opinion on the project un-

til it has been formally presented to the City Council. That won’t happen until this summer; it might be as late as August before the plan moves through at least a pair of Prairie Village Planning Commission meetings and is ready for prime time before the council. The Tutera Group has a few advantages so far. For one, the current zoning on the property, while designated as single-family residential, allows for special-use permits for things like senior-living communities. The City Council will make its ultimate decision based on a recommendation from the Planning Commission, which will scope the project for technicalities such as setbacks and codes. Neither body, though, audits the developer. “We don’t vet them, but we’re aware of Tutera’s history and that they have been successful in this type of project across the United States,” Shaffer says. Brian Lee, a nursing-home watchdog, says the Tutera Group’s record isn’t all success. “We see a track record here, and it’s a mixed track record,” says Lee, executive director of Families for Better Care, in Tallahassee, Florida. “It’s not the best and it’s not the worst, either. I think it’s leaning toward not good. You have [among Tutera’s holdings] a number of facilities that are below average.” Lee had f irsthand experience w ith Tutera-owned nursing facilities in central Illinois where he worked as an ombudsman. (The Tutera Group owns eight facilities in Illinois.) Nursing represents 25 percent of Mission Chateau. Lee was hired in 2003 as the state ombudsman for nursing homes in Florida, a role that, as an advocate for residents’ rights, caused him no small amount of friction with the nursing-home industry in the Sunshine State. He was pressured to resign on February 7, 2011, lest he be fired by Florida Gov. Rick Scott, according to a March 10, 2011, Orlando Sentinel article. Federal and state laws forbid the imposition of political pressure on ombudsmen. That same Sentinel story also reports that the Administration on Aging (in the Department of Health and Human Services) launched an investigation into the circumstances of Lee’s resignation. Underpinning Lee’s assertions about the Tutera Group are records of inspections conducted by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, regulators of nursing homes because the federal program is the preferred insurer for senior citizens. The Pitch reviewed hundreds of records for Tutera-owned properties and found varying results. Some facilities score quite well, others squarely in the middle. Others, though, bear low marks. In some cases, the Tutera Group has been fined, or Medicare payments have been denied. Joe Tutera says some of the low ratings can be ascribed to having taken over distressed facilities from continued on page 9

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Plaza Manor in Kansas City is one that Tutera developed, and it scores at or near the top. “If you take any operator with enough product,” Tutera says, “it’s like, sure, you can look to an individual instance and find ‘What about this deficiency or what about that deficiency?’ ”

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struggling previous owners. Others, he says, are facilities that, because they deal in specialized care, can attract low scores based on Medicare’s rating rubric. “We end up with a certain portion of our portfolio that we end up operating that we’re digging out of the depth of troubles, and they’re in very distressed environments,” Tutera says. He adds that his company has been a caretaker for more than 250 facilities, called upon by state regulators or in legal proceedings to act as a receiver for the property. Some of those the Tutera Group acquires, making the facility part of the company’s portfolio. “Predominantly, we have developed an area of expertise of taking over tough facilities,” he says. “We’re the guys somebody would call right before a facility is about to get shut down by the state.” A few of the low-scoring nursing homes in Tutera’s ownership portfolio are properties that the company has had for 10 years or longer, according to company records supplied to The Pitch. The Pines Rehabilitation & Health Care Center in Lansing, Michigan, was taken over in receivership by the Tutera Group in 1993. In its most recent inspection, Pines scored one star for health inspections — ratings garnered from inspections of the facility itself — and two stars overall. (Medicare uses a five-star system to rate nursing-home facilities; one star designates “much below average” and five indicates “much above average.”) In 2011, Medicare fined Pines $101,335. Records also show a denial of Medicare payment on March 30, 2012. (Medicare records do not list what triggered the fines or payment denials.) “That means the care was pretty bad, when I see $100,000 in fi nes.” Lee says. A Medicare survey dated August 5, 2011, describes how a Pines resident, whose name and medical condition are redacted, died after facility staff waited nearly eight hours to call for emergency medical treatment following “an acute change of condition.”

Tutera calls Mission Chateau a “crown jewel.” “These deficient practices place all 110 residents at risk for serious harm, injury and/or death,” that 2011 survey says. The Tutera Group disputes Medicare’s report on the death, insisting that the patient had been looked after by facility staff, her doctor and the local hospital. Privacy laws, the company says, prevent it from sharing more information. The Tutera Group says deficiencies cited by Medicare at the Pines were later cleared, and that the facility serves a “specialized complex care population” in Lansing. In all, 10 of the 23 nursing homes listed in the Tutera portfolio have current Medicare ratings of two stars or fewer for health inspections. “Those are the most independent, verifiable information because health inspection scores are coming directly from regulators,” Lee says. (Other aspects of Medicare ratings, such as staffi ng and quality measures, depend in part on self-reported data.) Still, the Tutera Group nursing facility portfolio’s average number of deficiencies found by regulators is 15 percent fewer than the national average of 7.93 per facility, according to a report by the American Health Care Association. But Tutera says Medicare scores alone

don’t reflect a complex business. For example, the Meridian Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Wichita, which the Tutera Group took over from a distressed nonprofit in 2000, remains a low-scoring facility in some respects. Tutera says that facility deals in specialized care, a type of practice that might not easily achieve high scores under Medicare’s rating guidelines. “That facility takes care of a medically complex population, and it specializes in psychiatric care,” he says. “It’s a high-risk, fringe type of care facility where the resident population is constantly in transition.”

“We see a track record here, and it’s a mixed track record.” Some of the facilities that the Tutera Group has taken over have worked their way into good standing, according to Medicare. In 2008, Tutera assumed control of the Carlinville Rehabilitation & Health Care Center in Carlinville, Illinois. Today, it scores well in Medicare’s rating system.

s now the right time for the Tutera Group to invest $50 million in a new senior-living community while it continues to turn around troubled facilities? Tutera says yes. He adds that the company plans to pour $8 million into existing properties in its portfolio. He tells The Pitch that Mission Chateau represents the company’s “crown jewel” after involvement in more than 300 nursing, assisted or independent-living centers. The Mission Valley Neighbors Association, a collection of Prairie Village residents opposed to Mission Chateau, doesn’t want that crown jewel in its backyard. In a statement to The Pitch, the association declares its opposition to Mission Chateau because of its “massive change in use” from when it was a school, its proximity to expensive homes in Prairie Village, the loss of green space and concerns about flooding. “We are not anti-development,” says the Mission Valley Neighbors Association in its statement. “We would be supportive of single-family residential that is compatible with the existing homes in the area. We would also be supportive of churches, schools or public parks.” While the Kansas City Christian School in Prairie Village, which is nearing capacity at its current location at 79th Street and Roe Avenue, had previously expressed interest in buying Mission Valley not long after the Tutera Group’s MVS entity bought the building, Tutera plans to move ahead with his project. He says he wants to win over all of Prairie Village’s residents, but he knows he won’t. “Our mission and our goal is to provide senior housing in the community we serve,” Tutera says. “That is my mission. To the extent that someone is not interested, well, I can’t change that.”

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

THURSDAYS 7pm pitch.com

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WEEK OF MAY 9–15 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

STAGE Coping in the Living Room

22 PAG E

FAT C I T Y Blue Springs: burger Americana

28 PAG E

MUSIC FORECAST Tech N9ne comes home.

T H U R S D AY | 5 . 9 | LOOKIN’ GOOD IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

After browsing numerous fashion websites, we can claim with certainty that doctoredup denim, rejuvenated jackets, frosty furs, pinks and plaids are going to be popular this fall. For an expert opinion, go to the annual Ready-to-Wear Trend Presentation Fall 2013, courtesy of the KC branch of Fashion Group International. The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (4525 Oak, 816-751-1278) hosts an evening of cocktails and networking, with a peek at 2013 Fashion Week runway shows around the world, in the Atkins Auditorium. Tickets for the 6 p.m. event

A NEW WAY The “urban labyrinth,” according to Charlotte Street curator-in-residence Jamilee Polson Lacy, is full of artists and thinkers constantly trying to activate and connect the city’s dynamic spaces. “I think the city presents a plethora of choices — some exciting, some banal, some dangerous — so it’s nearly impossible not to think of it as a labyrinth,” says Lacy, of Chicago. For the final show of her residency, she has organized Rises Zora, a multivenue visualand performance-art project that brings together 35 artists and “labyrinthine thinkers” to perform and to explore public spaces, such as Loose Park, downtown parking lots and the East Bottoms. “Charlotte Street Foundation and Kansas City’s artists have guided me through the labyrinth, showing how this city’s culture is particularly interested in maximizing the possibilities of the urban plan — the weird and wacky parts of it, really — and playing it like a game. It’s great because anything can happen,” Lacy says. Rises Zora opens tonight at 6 at La Esquina (1000 West 25th Street, 816-221-5115). Admission is free. For more information about the project, see riseszora.virb.com. We caught up with Lacy to learn more. The Pitch: Whom is this project for? Lacy: Everybody! Rises Zora has been developed to show that artists’ ideas and productions shift and change society’s courses not only from the white cube gallery. Artists determine reality out in the streets across the city, throughout the labyrinth. cost $20 for FGI members and $30 for nonmembers. Buy them at kansascity.fgi.org.

GREEN ART

Actual vintage postcards painstakingly recombined to depict unreal places, pokerfaced video interviews with the purported offspring of fictional characters, an ethereal installation made of souvenir photo-slide viewers — Judith G. Levy’s visions seem to arrive from an art Bizarro world. (That’s why we like her; The Pitch gave her a MasterMind award in 2012.) Her latest project, a 50minute movie called NV in KC, turns yet another world on its head: the local art scene. It’s a work of continued on page 12

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Hopefully, this project gives everyone — artists and nonartists alike — the opportunity to witness and participate. What kind of patterns did you find in the KC labyrinth? Kansas City was designed on a grid, which is society’s attempt at ordering the labyrinth. So there are lots of beautiful right angles that repeat from street level into the

design of enormous buildings. But what is more interesting are the random parts of the city, which don’t conform to the guiding grid. Places where the highways meet and tangle up, or where the parks and the rivers and new construction are great examples of how the labyrinth can’t be controlled by a grid or a society. The labyrinth, the city, is a living, breathing organism.

S AT U R D AY | 5 . 1 1 |

MOTHER’S DAY

T

he inaugural Listen to Your Mother, the nationally performed series of live readings by local female writers about their mums, stages at Unity Temple on the Plaza (707 West 47th Street, 816-561-4466) at 7 p.m. KC’s version features 12 up-and-coming bloggers and authors talking about the number one lady in their lives. Tickets cost $12 and can be bought at listentoyourmothershow.com/kansascity. pitch.com

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F R I D AY | 5 . 10 | GARDEN PARTY

THE WELL & LEW’S CELEBRATE CRAFT BEERS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD! * * * * * * *

continued from page 11 fiction (one with an appealingly Louie-like aesthetic), but it chews on some real feeling. And its cast makes it the It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World of KC cinema, with De De DeVille and Jaimie Warren (among many other recognizable local figures) playing characters, and Sherry Leedy and Julián Zugazagoitia (among several other museum leaders) as themselves. The Rocket Grant–funded movie screens tonight at the Lawrence Arts Center (940 New Hampshire, 785-843-2787). The free event starts at 7 p.m. — SCOTT WILSON

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If there ever was a good day to call in sick, today is it. It’s National Public Gardens Day, and there are some in the center of the city that are free and open to the public: the Laura Conyers Smith Memorial Rose Garden and the Stanley R. McLane Arboretum at E R O M Loose Park (51st Street and Wornall) and the Linda Hall Library T A INE ONL .COM Arboretum (5109 H PITC Cherry). However, the metro’s crown jewel of cultivated earth — Powell Gardens — is about 30 miles southeast of KC (1609 Northwest U.S. Highway 50, in Kingsville, 816-697-2600). Powell Gardens celebrates its beauty from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. with free tours, cooking demos, live music and a 1:30 p.m. workshop titled “The Art of Bonsai.” Admission is $10 for adults and $4 for kids between the ages of 4 and 12. See powellgardens.org.

EVENTS

CORPORATION FOLKS

In 1886, the Supreme Court equated a person with a corporation when citing the 14th Amendment in the case of Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad Co. Now, the nonpartisan group KC Move to Amend is looking to change 127 years of history by hosting today’s 4:30 p.m. rally for independence from corporations at the J.C. Nichols Fountain (47th Street and J.C. Nichols Parkway). “People should get onboard May 10 because the Supreme Court claims corporations are people and gave them constitutional rights,” Mary Lindsay, the group’s spokeswoman, writes in an e-mail. “The Court is wrong. We, the real people, must join together to overrule the Supreme Court. Corporations are not people!” The event wraps up with a march on the Plaza at 5:30. Learn more at kcmovetoamend.org.

S AT U R D AY | 5 . 11 | LOVE ON WHEELS

“Essentially, Bike Prom is prom for people that love and ride bikes,” says Rachel Krause, communications coordinator for

Bike Walk KC and Kansas City B-cycle. With this second-annual “gala event” during Bike Month, the member-supported organization is working to make the city’s streets safer and more accessible for those not in cars. So get the mud off those gears, repair that hole in the seat, and get your ride gussied up for photos and possibly a new match. “We are doing bike speed dating again, which essentially means individuals can go for a bike ride around the block with another attendee and see if it’s a match made in cyclist heaven,” Krause says. Bike Prom begins at 8 p.m. at EventPort 208 (208 West 119th Street). Tickets cost $15 in advance or $20 at the door (Bike Walk KC members get a $5 discount).See bikewalkkc.org.

GETTING UGLY FOR HUNGER

Last summer, Downtown Outreach estimated that it had served 180,204 hot meals and distributed 75,189 sacks of groceries for its 10th year of helping Kansas City’s hungry. Hoping to keep up the good work, the 501(c)(3) throws its Second Annual Gaudy Ball at Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456) at 8 p.m. Dress tacky for a night of music from Gas House Gorillas and Billy Ebeling and the Late for Dinner Band. With a food donation, the $15 admission includes a 24-ounce PBR. Search “Gaudy Ball 2013” on Facebook for more info.

S U N D AY | 5 . 1 2 | MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH

Before her death, Anna Marie Jarvis — the founder of the holiday we call Mother’s Day — had become embittered by the commercialization of her great idea. Instead of honoring moms with poetic tributes, people were just mailing off pretty cards. Or candy. “You take a box to mother and wind up eating most of it yourself,” she griped. Forget the candy and take Mom to brunch today so that everyone gets something to eat. The new Milbourne’s Food & Drink Co. (6409 North Cosby, 816-3833850) debuts its Sunday brunch, a $15.95 buffet from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Bristol (51 East 14th Street, 816-448-6007) hosts a $26

T U E S D AY | 5 . 1 4 |

Y S U N DA

5 .1 2

ur els: yo Micha n io at inspir

brunch from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., reservations encouraged. The intimate dining room at Café Provence (3936 West 69th Terrace, Prairie Village, 913-384-5998) serves Mom and company from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. And the bountiful buffet at Gaslight Grill (5020 West 137th Street, Leawood, 913-897-3540) is from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., $24.95 for adults and $12.95 for children, who can splurge on desserts instead of candy. — CHARLES FERRUZZA

LOSING IT

At the conclusion of The Biggest Loser’s 14th season, grand-prize winner Danni Allen had dropped 46.9 percent of her body weight. Her trainer was Jillian Michaels, author of six books, star of more than 15 DVDs and distributor of tough love. “It’s an incomplete representation of who I am … but the yelling makes better TV,” Michaels told CBS’s Sunday Morning in March. Get a kick in the pants at 6:30 p.m. when Michaels appears at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921) for her Maximize Your Life Tour. Tickets start at $29.50. See midlandkc.com.

M O N D AY | 5 . 13 | WALDO RHAPSODY

What’s more awesome than the paintings of naked women on the walls at the Piano Room (8410 Wornall, 816-363-8722)? The weekly sets by the six-piece Waldo Jazz Collective that the bar hosts every Monday. The young musicians from UMKC and MCC-Penn Valley play mostly standards, but baritone saxophonist Aryana Nemati tells us that they’re always open to a jam or two. “A lot of our songs are from musicals, and we do a lot of Gershwin.” It’s smooth, kind of sexy and not so loud that you can’t have an intimate conversation. Also, Stoli cocktails cost just $4.25. Listen, play along or hang out from 7 to 10 p.m. For more information, see pianoroomonline.com.

SPIN CITY In a city where the mic is king, the DJ is a loyal servant to its followers. And to the early-in-theweek beat. Name: Brandon Noone DJ alias: DJ Highnoone Hometown: Kansas City, Kansas Previous residencies: Blonde, NV, Raoul’s Velvet Room, Mosaic, Aura, Ernie Biggs, Indigo (Wichita), Smash Boxx (Scottsdale, Arizona) Current residencies: Sol Cantina, Hotel, Tengo Sed Cantina, Empire Room and Z-Strike Beat vehicle: Technics 1200s with a Rane 62 mixer and V-MODA headphones Description of set: “I am an open-format DJ that has no boundaries. I spin hip-hop, house, party rock, throwbacks and much more. It really just depends on the club and the crowd.” Current Top 5: “Get Lucky” by Daft Punk featuring Pharrell Williams, “Tuna Melt” by Tommy Trash and A-Trak, “Hijack’” by Tyga featuring 2 Chainz, “Pick Up the Pieces” by Average White Band, “Twerkin’ Me Down Beat” by KStylis DJ Highnoone spins Tuesdays (with DJ Ashton Martin) from 10 p.m. to close at Sol Cantina (408 East 31st Street, 816-931-8080).

AIDS KC Artists Against

pr oudly pr es en t

W E D N E S D AY | 5 . 15 | THE AGE OF EXPLORATION

Remember how exciting life was when you realized there was much, much more outside your bubble? Or perhaps you know someone who still hasn’t figured this out? Either way, take in Nomads: Traversing Adolescence at Kemper East (200 East 44th Street, 816-753-5784). The exhibition, with works selected from the Kemper Museum’s permanent collection, runs through November 15 and takes you back to the days when the world was your oyster. The museum is open today from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Find out more at kemperart.org. E-mail submissions two weeks in advance to calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

a benefit for

E, n of AUNTIE MAM ! ng A brilliant recreatio di en -b gender crashing, slashing & | Unicorn Theatre May 9 through May 26

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PRESENTS

CD RELEASE TIMES FOUR LIVE MUSIC BY

BARBECUE, DRINKS AND CDS FOR SALE

THURSDAY, MAY 23RD, 7-10PM $5 ADVANCE, $8 DAY OF SHOW ADVANCE TICKETS: KKFI.ORG KKFI PARTY ROOM 3901 MAIN, 2ND FLOOR

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See the full week of exciting activities and benefits at nelson-atkins.org Sign up is required, and card will be activated at the Info Desk in Bloch Lobby. Purchase discount benefits only good on purchases made May 12–19, 2013. Claes Oldenburg, American (b. Sweden, 1929) and Coosje van Bruggen, American (b. The Netherlands, 1942–2009). Shuttlecocks, 1994. Aluminum, fiberglass-reinforced plastic, paint. Purchase: acquired through the generosity of the Sosland Family, F94-1/3, 4.

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5/1/13 10:38 AM

S TA G E

nger, confusion, denial, isolation, longing — anyone dealing with grief knows these emotions. So do most people who have been in love. Lanford Wilson’s 1987 Burn This tells, through its effluent talk, a story of love conceived in grief. Four characters inhabit Burn This, but Wilson is mostly concerned with two of them: Anna, a dancer and choreographer, and Pale, a restaurant manager. Their disparate lives overlap by one degree of separation — Robbie, her friend and his brother, who has just died in an accident. The grief that binds them at times feels overwhelming. But it’s sorrow that meets us at the start of this rambling two-act, now at the Living Room and directed by Scott Cordes. Anna (Vanessa Severo) has returned from the wake and funeral of her gay roommate and performance partner. She tries to concentrate on her work, piecing together a dance in front of her mirrored wall (Severo is also choreographer for this production), but she can’t focus. She’s too distracted by despair — which the actress makes palpable — to accomplish anything. She is attended by her boyfriend, Burton (Bruce Michael Hall), a well-to-do, well-paid and well-known screenwriter who believes “there are no good movies,” and by her other roommate, Larry (Alex Espy), a graphic designer who likens his work for an ad agency to whoring. All three artists say they want to produce something meaningful, something lasting. “I thought everything important to the future of dance was going to happen in this room,” Anna says of

smoldering Burn This

DE B OR A H HIR SC H

quiet, leave me alone?” Larry asks Anna. “Or maybe talk about it and cry? You know me. I’m always willing to drape the joint in crepe.” It’s easier for them to remain preoccupied with surface than with what’s below it, reflected perhaps in their frequent stops, sometimes for a moment, in front of Anna’s mirror. Or maybe they’re looking for something. We don’t meet Pale (Rusty Sneary) until well into Act 1, when he crashes into the scene, a force of nature. His arrival changes the characters’ lives, and the story. Where Burton comes from wealth, a family he calls “comatose,” Pale is part of a clan that goes on “for days,” whose men Anna says are “gorgeous” in a “blue-collar, working-at-thesteel-mill kind of way.” Pale doesn’t edit his speech or hide behind it, doesn’t let decorum get in the way of expressing himself. Severo and Sneary, in sync His raw energy and emotions, his lack of control, frighten Anna. But the man isn’t her work with Robbie. Burton is drafting a without refi nement, and he fi nds a path to screenplay, a love story, but can’t grasp what her, too. Their need to connect is intense, “that power” is, the thing that’s “felt much and the actors give off a deeper than we know.” It’s pheromonal drive. Sneary easier not to delve. Burn This unleashes rapid-fire monoAnna and Larry have Through May 26 log ues t hat c ha rge t he been mourning now for at the Living Room play, and the room. Severo days, but Burton has just 1818 McGee makes Anna vulnerable learned about the accident. 816-533-5857 thelivingroomkc.com and sensitive but also plays They share a circuitous her as a woman searching conversation that mostly for her center. eludes their sadness. And The Living Room stages this play on the this is how the human psyche often deals with loss; it forgets for a while, wandering third floor of its downtown warehouse, setting it in the script’s loft apartment. The charaway on tangents before landing again on acters move freely around this large space the raw sore that must be tended. “You want

BRIAN STUBLER

A

BY

(including use of the freight elevator and a couple of out-of-view areas), lending authenticity to the world of these 1980s New Yorkers and giving the action a circularity that mimics the story’s telling. The scale sometimes slows the play’s momentum, but it doesn’t blunt the ultimate emotional power.

E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

U M KC T H E AT R E

LAURA BARRIOS

HOME FIRES

The Living Room’s open-spaced,

Above, from left: Vincent Wagner, Jessica Biernacki Jensen and Logan Black star in UMKC Theatre’s Burnt by the Sun, Peter Flannery’s stage adaptation of the 1994 Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film. The play, which debuted in 2009, takes place in Stalin’s brutal USSR in the 1930s. Tom Mardikes, chairman of the UMKC theatre department, directs this UMKC season closer. See it through May 12 in Studio 116 of the Olson Performing Arts Center, 4949 Cherry, 816-235-6222, umkctheatre.org.

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Trivia: EVERY WEDNESDAY AT 7PM

PAGES

CRACKING ZIPPERNUT

Harl Van Deursen is a real card.

BY

N A NC Y HULL RIGDON

arl Van Deursen is the quiet, funny guy of the group. When you forget about him, he delivers a deft one-two punch. So it makes sense that Van Deursen is the voice behind Zippernut Press — a poetically irreverent greeting-card line that was making people laugh long before the Someecards that dominate Facebook gained in popularity. The Brookside shop Stuff began selling his cards eight years ago, and they quickly reached unprecedented popularity, especially the ones that dropped the F-bomb. The best-seller does particularly well at graduation. “Today is the first day of the rest of your life,” the front says. Inside: “Don’t fuck it up.” This month, Van Deursen takes his aftermidnight, home-based creative outlet to the next level. He’s debuting an art rework and a new website and expanding his line outside greeting cards and notecards. The latest products: notepads and sticky notes bearing zingers such as “Procrastination Agenda” and “Get this shit done,” along with journals. A national distributor once ordered 20,000 of Van Deursen’s cards and spread them to shops as far away as Bermuda. He’s now in the market for a new distributor — a trip to the annual National Stationery Show in New York City is lined up later this month to search for the right avenue to further his cards’ reach. If all goes well, the rest of the nation could soon join Kansas City in embracing Van Deursen’s outlook on life. “I see what bothers people — especially things that don’t really matter in the big picture or are beyond their control,” he says. “I really don’t see the point in being morose about things that are inevitable. Things that happen happen and have to be accepted, and it’s often easier to accept things with a bit of humor.” Van Deursen, 49, set out to write not greeting cards but music. He was a musiccomposition major at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, until he switched to computer science. He now works out of his Hyde Park home as a computer consultant, a trade in which he’s known for code-writing brilliance. Meanwhile, a friend kept telling Van Deursen to channel his sense of humor into greeting cards. His own card-aisle frustrations eventually prompted him to heed the advice. “So often, the big card companies put out these cards that are supposed to be funny, but the result is, you feel like you do when your uncle tells a joke and you laugh because you have to,” he says. In trying to avoid offending

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

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someone, he adds, the writers of those cards miss people’s real thoughts and instead land in puddles of sap and smarm. His ideas started flowing late at night, after his brain had turned off life’s obligations. One of the first cards, in what has grown into a line of more than 300, goes: “I can’t believe you just turned a year older. Looks more like ten.” (He avoided foulmouthed cards at first but changed course when the profanity he threw out stuck.) That early card asks others to adopt his view on age. “I’ll be 50 in September, which I know is something everyone thinks I should be worried about,” he says. Certainly, he adds, other people are too worried about their own age — so much so that many fail to enjoy life. “I will continue to do things as though my age were not a factor because, until I can’t do something because of my age, my age is in fact not a factor.” (Van Deursen is rarely seen without his favorite forever-young accessory: a Lego watch.) He dryly adds, “Besides, I know I still look like I’m 22, and I’m way cooler than I was when I actually was 22.” Those who know Van Deursen well aren’t surprised that he came out with an unorthodox product, because he’s not one for the status quo. He likes to do things his way — a quality that he says makes him unfit for an employee role. What he calls his analretentive tendencies have resulted in his doing virtually everything for his products.

Van Deursen: not your grandma’s greeting-card maker He made the zippered, bulging peanut logo (the name Zippernut comes from a nickname that Van Deursen and his wife gave their son, Dakota, when he was little) and created a font that resembles his handwriting. He holds the designs to bold yet sparse color to keep the focus on the words, and he serves as Web designer and webmaster. He does outsource the printing (to Soli Printing), mostly because demand for his cards outpaced his own printing and folding capacity. His wife, Sloane Simmons, and her sister, Casey Simmons, own Stuff, so Van Deursen’s pursuit of a place to sell naturally led to Brookside. (Stuff has sold an eclectic mix of artists’ creations since 1996.) The store began selling his cards on consignment in 2005. The next year, he launched Zippernut’s “Cancer Sucks!” line. The most popular card in the set reads: “Cancer. It just fucking sucks.” He donates a portion of his profits from the cancer line to the Susan Henke Miller Breast Cancer Research Fund at the University of Kansas Cancer Center. Henke Miller, who is in remission from breast cancer, and Van Deursen are former co-workers. “When I was battling cancer, there was nothing like Harl’s cards out there,” Henke Miller says. “I wish there would have been. Harl is brilliant for taking the risk.” At Stuff, Zippernut is not only the

No. 1 greeting-card line but is also among the store’s top-selling items overall. Casey Simmons says, “What is really remarkable is that out of the more than 300 artist sources we represent, he ranks up there with a fi neart painter and a jewelry artist. It’s so surprising to see cards up there. I never would have predicted his smart humor would manifest itself in this way.” When Casey Simmons is in her office in the shop, she knows when a customer has found the Zippernut display. The unexpected, genuine laughter gives it away, she says. And often, the sound accelerates into two people cackling. “It’s this contagious type of humor,” she says. Van Deursen knows the scene well. A selfdescribed introvert who loves attention, he can’t resist anonymously hanging out near the Zippernut display. The lurking has translated into lessons in human psychology. He knows now that people prefer masked flattery. For instance, you’d give this card of his only to someone you really like: “You have always been more popular than me, but I’ve learned to accept it and it doesn’t bother me so much any more. Bitch.” “I’ve determined people are buying these for the shock and awe,” he says. “It’s like giving someone a friendly little bitch slap. And the harder the slap, the more people seem to love it.”

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3611 Broadway • KCMO 4 - 1:30 Mon-Sat

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CAFÉ

JASMINE-SENT

Double draggin’ into two places, each trying to do two cuisines.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Jasmine Thai Restaurant • 11839 Roe, Leawood, 913-338-3988 • Hours: 11 a.m.–9:30 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–10:30 p.m. Friday, 11:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m. Saturday, closed Sunday • Price: $$–$$$ Jasmin Restaurant • 719 Main, Eudora, 785-542-9119 • Hours: 10:30 a.m.–9 p.m. Monday–Saturday, closed Sunday • Price: $–$$

Y

Pick from two cuisines at Jasmine Thai (left) or at Eudora’s Jasmin.

ANGELA C. BOND

ou can thank popular franchise operations like the Cheesecake Factory, T.G.I. Friday’s and even IHOP for expanding our American perception of international dining. In the 1960s, America’s best-loved dining chain, Howard Johnson’s, stuck to the tried-and-true: fried chicken, broiled steaks, chicken potpie. As corporate chains expanded, competition mandated that restaurants accommodate a wider array of tastes. Ethnic food went from an exotic frontier to a mainstay on laminated menus. By the 1970s, Kansas City upstart Houlihan’s was serving dishes that customers had to learn to pronounce: escargot, quiche, crepes. Generations later, an offshoot of that development is the restaurant that attempts two distinct cuisines. The idea is to offer twice as many choices — not always good choices, but you get the idea — to patrons who might otherwise argue about what they want. Mom craves Hawaiian chicken, but Dad wants tacos al pastor? They used to flip a coin, with the loser tion. A “mojito martini” turns out to be neither pouting. Now they can drive to Eudora. of those basic cocktails but an ersatz variation In this small Kansas town, about 35 minutes southwest of KC, the Ramirez family has op- on a traditional gimlet, without the fresh lime juice. The sugared rim, however, is welcome. erated the Jasmin Restaurant for more than a The Thai food is much better than the Chidecade, serving Chinese and Mexican dishes. nese dishes here, but the greatest hits of both Not to be outdone, the traditional Chinesecuisines are evenly represented. The spicy American restaurant known for years as the basil wings on the list of starters are more Golden Leaf has changed its name to Jasmine Thai and added Thai dishes to the Chinese glossy than crispy, thickly shellacked with a staples. There’s no connection between the succulent garlic-basil sauce. The miniature garlic pork ribs, which my two restaurants, even if both server suggested on one of serve lemon chicken and egg Jasmine Thai my visits, were fried that drop soup, but I found myself Restaurant day until every molecule of at both last week as though Spicy basil wings ...........$6.95 moisture had been removed. driven by fortune — the kind Miniature garlic To call them crispy would be found in a cookie. pork ribs ........................ $7.95 Panang curry ..................$8.95 an understatement. These At Jasmine Thai, there’s were petrified. a large, gilded Buddha head I foolishly allowed my mounted on the wall of the Jasmin Restaurant dining companion to pick dining room, gazing beatifiGuacamole ......................$4.50 the Chinese entrée, and cally at the customers. It’s Cashew shrimp...............$8.95 she ordered a dish — pana fitting metaphor for the Chile relleno....................$8.95 fried noodles — that I didn’t restaurant, where everyone like even as a kid, when my seems eager to respond to mother would assemble the Chun King superyour every wish. Are you allergic to nuts? What market version. Jasmine Thai’s version rises about eggs, MSG, gluten or seafood? Just say the word and one of the soft-spoken servers above what I remember being forced to eat, will make sure the kitchen eliminates any trace but it’s still just a gloppy chicken-and-vegetable mess spooned over a jumble of tasteless hard of the offending allergen from your order. noodles that stick up from the plate like deadly There are free refills on soft drinks and iced quills. Next time, I’ll insist on at least a coin toss. tea at Jasmine Thai, but not on the vanillaThe best thing I tried here was a silky Panscented hot tea or the thick, milky Vietnamese ang curry, from the Thai half of the menu, coffee. One of the employees is always around deliciously perfumed with kaffir lime, cocoto mix up a cocktail — there’s a long list of specialty drinks — but something is lost in transla- nut milk and peanuts. Like most of the dishes

here, though, it includes chopped green bell pepper as an ingredient — an intrusion, in this case. If that vegetable isn’t your thing, then I recommend developing a quick green-pepper allergy to report to your server. Green peppers play such an important role in this restaurant’s kitchen that the only dish that doesn’t have them is, I think, the chocolate-mousse rangoon. There’s not an overabundance of green peppers at the Jasmin, in Eudora, but there is an actual Jasmin: a pretty teenager who wears braces and works with her parents at the family’s 13-year-old restaurant. “They named the restaurant after me,” she announced to our table before handing us menus. It has become commonplace at Chinese buffets to offer a few Mexican dishes, but this is the first restaurant I’d ever visited where I found a wide array of both Mandarin dishes and Mexican combo plates. The emphasis on the latter seemed to back up a friend’s advice. “The Mexican food is much better than the Chinese,” the friend had told me. But Jasmin’s owner, J. Ramirez, has serious Chinese-restaurant experience. “He used to work at the Panda & Plum Garden in Lawrence,” his daughter told me. “Before we moved here.” Inside its long, narrow storefront, Jasmin’s dining room is painted a buttercream yellow, with a selection of sombreros and a colorful serape mounted on one wall and, across the room, one of those dramatic Asian-inspired murals made of molded plastic with gilded dragons flailing their spiky tails. It’s a weird

little restaurant, and it asks you to start making decisions before you even see the menu, offering a choice of cloth napkins or paper. Unfurling my cloth napkin across my lap, I made up my mind to go full train wreck and order both hot-and-sour soup and a side of guacamole. The former was very good, and the latter was very fresh (including, yes, chopped green pepper). For $4.50, though, I expected more than a dollop of the stuff. Jasmin is one of the few dining options in Eudora (population about 6,200), if you don’t count Sonic. No surprise, then, that it does an impressive carryout business. I saw plenty of people arrive in the dining room, and the majority of them picked up orders. My chile relleno dinner was just fine: two fat green peppers (just where I wanted them this time), stuffed with molten queso under an airy, crispy battered crust. It’s as close to a vegetarian meal as you’ll find on the Mexican menu here (the refried beans here are made with vegetable oil). There are more meatless options on the Chinese side, but just barely: mixed vegetables, tofu with mixed vegetables, and tofu with mixed vegetables in spicy sauce. Neither side of the menu is what you’d call elaborate, and the Chinese dishes veer toward the predictable: General Tso’s chicken, sweetand-sour pork, pepper steak. The spiciness index is dialed down to a mere trace, as though you might add salsa. The cashew shrimp, however, is quite tasty, as long as you don’t accidentally spoon any of it on your cheese enchilada. Now if only some enterprising restaurateur could come up with a venue that served nothing but grilled cheese sandwiches and chocolate-mousse layer cake.

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Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com may 9 - 1 5 , 2 0 1 3

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19

S

FAT C I T Y

BACH TO THE FUTURE Just as on other bottles, the Boulevard logo is now on the neck.

Boulevard gives its Pilsner a new name and a different look.

BY

JON AT H A N BENDER

The longneck has been shortened to the standard 12-oz. bottle size to fit in a new closed six-pack carrier. Boulevard researched the label from the George Muehlebach Brewing Co. and styled the Pilsner logo after it.

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Different shades of the same vintage coquille pattern are on the labels’ backgrounds.

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“Red is a good color for pilsner because it helps us distinguish this pilsner from many others on the market that are almost all uniformly red, white and blue,” Kelly says.

MON-SAT: 11-3PM SUN: 11-1:30PM

409 W. Gregory KCMO 816.444.1933 www.theclassiccookie.com

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M AY 9 - 1 5 , 2 0 1 3

K

C Pils officially replaces Boulevard Brewing Co.’s Pilsner on shelves this week. (Ten percent of the rebranded brew’s sales go to three local charities, selected on a rotating quarterly basis by popular Web vote.) Boulevard introduced its all-malt Pilsner in 2009 as a way into the yard-beer market. But it became apparent that the people drinking it were the same folks buying the brewery’s flagship beers. So two years ago, Boulevard began plotting a new direction for Pilsner, one that focused on Kansas City’s history rather than the regional tradition of brewing pale lagers.

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“I think it’s high time to wear the badge and be proud of Kansas City,” says Payton Kelly, Boulevard’s creative director. “We want someone to have a pleasant drinking experience and think of their hometown.” In addition to sharing a name with the city where it’s made, KC Pils was chosen for its “call-ability”: the idea that a bartender can easily hear someone asking for one in a crowded bar. As the brewery’s resident artist, Kelly designed the fi rst labels for Boulevard, and he has been a full-time employee since be-

ing hired away from Hallmark in 1995. He swung by The Pitch last week to talk about the new look for the fi rst KC-branded beer. Kelly likes to say he creates the “clothing that the beer wears.” And like fashion apparel, each brew has its own spot on the color wheel, with KC Pils sharing bright red with its predecessor. “I just entice you to try the beer,” Kelly says. “After that, the beer is good enough to carry itself on its own.”

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

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m ay 9 - 1 5 , 2 0 1 3

the pitch

21

FAT C I T Y

perfect place to

find the

BURGER MEISTER

Burgers American Grill’s Nathan Havercroft

T

owner last Thursday to find out more about him and Burgers. The Pitch: What makes for a good burger? Havercroft: You need good fresh stuff. You can’t shortcut it. Just don’t give me a burger under the heat lamp. Give me warm, wellseasoned meat, a toasted bun and crisp cool veggies on top. Besides your own place, where do you like to go out to eat? We go to Kobe in Independence. I just want to go out and relax and have somebody else cook for me. They do the teppanyaki and put on a little show. I just have to sit there and eat a medium-rare rib-eye. But one of my favorite places is my backyard. I’ll wear flip-flops and shorts, sit with friends, throw something on the barbecue and have a Hofbräu. What’s always in your kitchen? I have a ton of condiments. There’s always soy sauce because I usually have a stash of some old Chinese food f loating around. There’s usually ketchup because it doesn’t go bad. I have some Heinz 57 and A.1 Steak Sauce because then I can go buy something and throw it on the grill for a few minutes. What’s your favorite ingredient? When I was in fine dining, I really liked working with truffle oil. It’s such a subtle flavor, but nothing else tastes like it. Until you’ve had it, you can’t compare it to anything. My second is morels. Those are the king in the world of mushrooms. If we get some, I save those for my house. What’s one food you hate? I love sushi, but the first time I had sushi, I got salmon sashimi, and it was super pungent. I love salmon cooked, but raw it’s got a funky, oily taste that about ruined the whole thing for me. It tasted like salmon, just 100 times over. What’s one food you love? Peanut butter — you can put it on almost

likes warm meat and cold Hof bräu.

BY

JON AT H A N BENDER

Enjoy SUMMER!

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the green rooM burgers & beer 4010 Pennsylvania Kc,Mo greenroomkc.com

the beacon tavern 5031 Main Kc,Mo 816-960-4646 becaontavern.com

KnucKleheads 2715 rochester Kc,Mo 816-483-1456 knuckleheadskc.com

blacK & gold tavern 3740 broadway Kc,Mo 816-561-1099 facebook.com/ blackgoldtavern

le Fou Frog 400 e. 5th st. Kc,Mo 816-474-6060 lefoufrog.com

MiKe Kelly’s westsider 1515 westport rd blue bird bistro Kc,Mo 1700 summit 816-931-9417 Kc,Mo 816-221-7559 Power & light bluebirdbistro.com district 13th and Main bojo’s bar and Kc,Mo grill 816-842-1045 5410 ne antioch Kc,Mo record bar 816- 455-3344 1020 westport rd Kc,Mo cheZ elle 816-753-5207 1713 summit st therecordbar.com Kc,Mo 816- 471-2616 teocali chezelle.com authentic MeXican cZar 2512 holmes 1531 grand blvd Kc,Mo Kc,Mo 816-221-4749 816- 221-2244 teocali.com czarkc.com 403 club the dubliner 403 n. 5th st. 1701 e. 14th st. Kc,Ks Kc,Mo 913-499-8392 thedublinerkc.com 22

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he fanciest it gets here might be aioli,” Nathan Havercroft says on a Thursday afternoon as he watches the lunch crowd at his new restaurant. “And we could call that garlic mayo, but the truth is, we just need to give people good food at a fair price.” The food at Burgers American Grill isn’t fancy, but it’s also not the usual fast-casual. Havercroft, 31, is offering things like handshaken lemonades, milkshakes flavored with fresh fruit, and double-fried french fries. The former Saddle & Sirloin Club executive chef got into the burger business in Blue Springs for a simple reason: “I’m hoping I can work hard now for me, so that I’ll have more time to spend with my family,” he says. Havercroft grew up in Maize, Kansas, working shifts at the local Dairy Queen. He moved to Kansas City to enroll in the culinary arts program at Johnson County Community College, and competed on the team that won the American Culinary Federation national championship in 2002. While in school, he spent mornings apprenticing at Biscotti's, which made pastries for Dean & Deluca, and afternoons cooking on the line at the Milburn Country Club. He was just 22 when he was named executive chef at the Blue Springs Country Club. He spent five years there before moving on to the Saddle & Sirloin Club in 2009. For his latest venture, he has teamed up with Bill Cowden, the original proprietor of Don Chilito’s in Mission. Burgers American Grill opened February 1, in the space formerly occupied by a Tanner’s Bar & Grill. Havercroft expects to add a sloppy Joe, a Southwestern play on a Philly cheesesteak, maybe a banh mi over the next few months. Meanwhile, customers have asked for beer, so Havercroft says he’ll file for a beer and wine license. (He’s also planning to make his own root beer.) Fat City sat down with the chef and

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Havercroft has it his way. anything. I like peanut-butter milkshakes. It can go in Asian food. It gives body to a teriyaki sauce. I hated maple syrup as a kid, so I used to put peanut butter on waffles with honey. I’ll take old-school Jif, and I like both crunchy and smooth. But it’s crunchy if I’m having a PB&J, just so it doesn’t stick to the roof of your mouth. What’s your guilty pleasure? Sleeping in and staying out late — I enjoy the heck out of them because they happen so rarely these days. What’s your best recent food find? This isn’t a recent one — I found it a long time ago — but I still really love it. Pomegranate molasses has such an interesting flavor. You find it in a lot of Indian-food stores. I love to cook it down with port wine, butter and honey and make a glaze. I really dig orangeblossom water, too. That’s on the sweet side, but it gives pastry a nice floral hit. I don’t think about the newest, hottest thing. I just find different ways to use old things. What’s one book that every chef should read? Everybody should glance at Kitchen Confidential once or twice and have a copy of Culinary Artistry. It’s a good reference. It lays out seasonal ingredients and what goes with them. What’s your dream drinking or eating destination? I can’t even tell you the name of the place. I went to the Grand Caymans with my wife on vacation, and there was a little breakfast joint on the third floor. We drank mimosas and had fresh mango scones with guava jelly while looking at crystal-blue water and white sand. If money was no option, that’s where I’d be every day.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

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m ay 9 - 1 5 , 2 0 1 3

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23

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

MUSIC | STREETSIDE

STORE-BOUGHT

Mills Record Co. arrives in Westport with an unlikely pitch: new vinyl.

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

MAY: 8: The Crayons 9: Chris Thomas King

THIS FRIDAY

BJ Thomas

I

10: BJ Thomas with Etta Britt 10: Scott Kirby LR 11: Gaudy Ball w/ Gas House Gorillas, The 44’s and Billy Ebeling & TLFD Band CD Release Show, 11: Gurf Morlix LR 14: Tom Keifer of CinderellaFull Band Show 15: Eric Taylor, Sarah and the Tall Boys 16: Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers 17: The Rainmakers & the Nace Bros 17: Steve Forbert LR 18: Red Elvises & Hayseed Dixie 18: Hot Club of Cowtown LR

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

24

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f you pay even glancing attention to the sance and Zebedee’s, offer new LPs, but a big chunk of their real estate is occupied by movements of the music business, you’re used records and CDs. by now familiar with at least a few narra“We’re defi nitely going hard on the new tives. Nobody buys CDs anymore. Everybody stuff,” DeLine says. “That’s a huge part of downloads music from the Internet, usually our plan here. We think it offers a nice comillegally. Record stores are dying. But also: plement to working with the existing record Vinyl is resurgent! (Sales are up 17 percent stores in town, because that’s where they’re over last year, when more new records were kind of lacking. So if we can keep pushing sold than in any year since 1997.) What can be it and keep up sales, I think it’ll add a good gleaned from this confl icting information? piece to this city that’s missing.” For Judy Mills and Chris DeLine, the conThe store is also surprisingly cheap. If clusion was fairly simple: Open a shop that you’re like me, you want to support our lospecializes in new vinyl. Neither had any experience running a cal brick-and-mortars but have a hard time shelling out $19.99 for a new record when record store. Mills, a local, has a background you can get it for more like $15 online. I still in retail but has worked a corporate gig in recent years. When the company went belly occasionally pay the premium, either out of a sense of civic charity or because I happen up, she recruited her friend DeLine, who was to want some instant gratification. But I tend living in Nashville at the time, to come to Kansas City and help her open Mills Record to leave record stores wishing that buying new records was just a little less costly. Co. They settled on a Westport space — 314 I did not feel that way Westport Road, next door when I visited Mills Record to Dave’s Stagecoach Inn Mills Record Co. Co. on Saturday. I picked up — and, May 3, opened for 314 Westport Road a deluxe edition of the new business. 816-960-3775 Kurt Vile for $24.99 ($29.98 “Judy’s lived here a long millsrecordcompany.com on Insound); Christopher time and was in a situa11 a.m.–7 p.m. Monday– Owens’ new-ish solo album Thursday, 11 a.m.–8 p.m. tion where she felt like Friday–Saturday, for $10.99 ($12.14 on Amashe could try something 12–5 p.m.Sunday zon); and an old Walkmen new,” DeLine says. “The album, You & Me, also for pieces just seemed to fit. $10.99. The store’s system The shop is basically this for pricing seems to be that recent releases partnership between Judy and me. We’re are marked around $16-$17, but albums that rookies, but we’re longtime music fans and we thought it’d be fun to try a little adven- have been around a few years — Smith Westerns’ Dye It Blonde, the War on Drugs’ Slave ture here.” Ambient — are tagged in the $12-$13 range. Browse the racks at Mills Record Co. and As it turns out, that price drop is basically you notice a few things right off the bat. One the difference between my leaving a record is that they’re peddling almost entirely new records, heavy on Stereogum-style indie store empty-handed and my leaving $50 lighter. (How long they can sustain those rock. Other spots in town, like Vinyl Renais-

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Crate days ahead prices while keeping the lights on is another matter, but I’m rooting for them.) In Nashville, DeLine ran a music blog called Culture Bully, and part of his aspiration for Mills Record Co. is to establish an online presence. Not just online sales but also a newsletter; a local directory of venues, labels and bands; and a blog, on which he publishes a daily roundup of local-music news bites. He has spent the last few months brushing up on local music, and he hopes that Mills Record Co. can become a sort of hub for the KC scene. “All of our racks are on wheels, so we’re set up to do in-stores and events like that,” DeLine says. “We’re really trying to work on that community aspect. I’ve talked to a lot of people — a lot of people in punk bands lately — who don’t feel there’s a home for them in town. We want to be that spot.” Vinyl is the focus at Mills Record Co., but DeLine and Mills are making an exception for local acts. “It’s sort of unfair of us to expect everyone to have the means to print up their own vinyl,” DeLine says. “So we’re buying CDs and cassettes from local bands, in addition to buying vinyl from local bands. We also want to do some Etsy type of stuff — sell pottery and art in the store. “It’s not easy selling records in general,” he adds. “But for us, the fl ip side to that is we’ve spent a lot of time making sure that if we’re selling new records, we’re not going to do it half-assed. It can be done — doubledigit vinyl-sales increases across the board for the last three years. We think we can make it work.”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

pitch.com

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25

MUSIC

ROUNDUP!

Our take on new LPs from

BY

three local favorites

D AV ID HUDN A L L you’d name a version of Soft Reeds’ playing a bunch of songs like “A Hysterical Woman,” I don’t know — but, more, please.

FOURTH OF JULY Empty Moon (High Dive Records)

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he last few years have seen a mild exodus of longtime Lawrence musicians and acts. Some have landed in San Francisco, some Brooklyn, some just across the state line here in Kansas City. Not Fourth of July. For coming up on a decade, the group (now a quartet of brothers: Brendan and Patrick Hangauer, Brian and Brendan Costello) has lived in the thick of Lawrence’s scene, writing and performing clever odes to Free State, college parties and broken hearts (and the trappings of living in a place with an abundance of those things). More than any other current group, Fourth of July has woven itself into the tapestry of the town; it is hard to imagine Lawrence without Fourth of July. If you’ve been tracking the group since its 2007 debut, Fourth of July on the Plains, nothing on Empty Moon, its third LP, will surprise you too terribly. It’s a bit more raw than previous albums, but the general aesthetic is intact. Front and center in the mix is Brendan Hangauer’s droll baritone. The band rattles and clangs, a folk-rock outfit careening around at peak buzz; occasionally, there is a trumpet solo. And then there are those smartass lyrics. Empty Moon contains some of the life-in-a-college-town themes we’re accustomed to from the group. But they’re accompanied by a creeping weariness: Hangauer is getting older. “Eskimo Brothers” captures his feelings on the topic most succinctly. It has a semicrass, novelty title (when two guys have hooked up with the same girl, they are said to be “Eskimo brothers”) and an upbeat hook, but darkness sneaks in: Yeah I know I should probably move/ There’s just so many things I’m used to/Like wakin’ up, goin’ to work and goin’ out, and wakin’ up by myself/I think I just want to be alone right now. And later: And the stars remind me I’m in the middle of nowhere. Or on opener “Empty Moon”: This town’s not so charming when you never leave. Or on “Drinking Binge”: I’ve been told getting old doesn’t happen slowly/And I can feel it in my bones, getting old and lonely. Historically, an angry kind of lovesickness is present on Fourth of July albums. We don’t get the full story, but we gather that Hangauer is singing about a woman who moved to New York and France and possibly other European cities, and that he is not altogether pleased with the way that particular cracker crumbled. There are a few of those types of songs on Empty Moon, but they’re the least compelling for those of us familiar with the band. “Berlin,” for example, is a strong track that showcases 26

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COWBOY INDIAN BEAR Live Old, Die Young (The Record Machine)

I

Hangauer’s flair for cutting remarks: Say you’ve met someone else, you’re so proud of yourself/ Your head to the side and you’re rolling your eyes/Talking like someone I don’t recognize. But Hangauer has mowed over this patch of grass enough times already. Can’t we move past this old, failed relationship?  I prefer songs like the slow-gaited “Colorado,” in which we get a little beauty without the snarls (plus a gorgeous pedal-steel guest spot from Jeff Jackson). Ditto the last few minutes of “The Cost,” which builds to an expected, satisfying coda: Some things just seem right/Like the snow melting outside, Hangauer sings, a little hoarse. On these and a handful of other tracks — basically Side A of Empty Moon — there’s a new nakedness, a kind of soul that we’ve not seen before from Fourth of July. More smart than clever, and honest, but not too harsh about it. If Fourth of July writes songs like these for the next 40 years, I’ll keep driving to the Replay to listen.

SOFT REEDS Blank City (The Record Machine)

I

n 2010, Soft Reeds frontman Ben Grimes told The Pitch that the origin of his band’s name was a sort of mash-up of the Soft Boys and Lou Reed. “I always go back to ’77 Berlin,” Grimes said. “Brian Eno, David Bowie, Lou Reed, Iggy Pop.” You can hear those influences on Soft Reeds’ glammy debut, Soft Reeds Are Bastards. They’re less pronounced on the recently released follow-up, Blank City. A more appropriate name for the band at this point might be something like “Talking Gang of Four.” Or maybe just “Talking Headz”? It is not a development about which I am complaining. On Blank City, Grimes and his band do well by David Byrne and company,

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locking into groove after groove, all staccato bass, scraping guitars and nervy drums. Atop it all is Grimes’ quavering, occasionally tooaffected wail. “Moving in Time” is probably the Byrniest of the bunch. In addition to just sounding like the title of a Talking Heads song, it apes the bass-driven chord change in the “Psycho Killer” chorus. With its short, stuttering bass line, “Supper and Knives” comes on like “Crosseyed and Painless.” (Bassist Beckie Trost does a pretty great Tina Weymouth impression.) You could seriously plug “Supper and Knives” into a Remain in Light playlist and nobody would blink an eye. That’s meant to be a compliment. As an album, Blank City is smartly constructed — Grimes has good ideas about where to put each song. It eases in with “17,” more or less an instrumental track that goes on for a couple of minutes, with Grimes’ vocals humming in the distance. Fade-out closer “A Hysterical Woman” executes a bit of mystery, grabbing at some world-music touchstones and hinting at strange new directions. What

f Cowboy Indian Bear isn’t the hardestworking band in the area, then it’s at least in contention. The three-year wait for the Lawrence quartet’s new album, Live Old, Die Young, is not owing to idleness; the members have been touring their asses off, grinding it out at rock clubs up and down the United States. The nice thing about that level of commitment is that a band can really dial into its sound and refine it, and it’s clear from Cowboy Indian Bear’s recent live shows that the group has done just that. With Live Old, Die Young, Cowboy Indian Bear has tastefully translated its aesthetic to a recording. There are some hazards to taking your band really seriously. One is that your music can start to sound a little too, you know, serious. Live Old, Die Young is chockablock with adventurous song structures; confident songwriting; and progressive, textured production. It’s powerful — 13 tracks of epic, layered art rock. But it’s not exactly exploding with joy. There’s not a lot in the way of hooks, and the pace is generally unhurried. It’s in many ways a beautiful record, but it asks you to commit to it a little. If you don’t, the first two tracks, both of which clock in at around six minutes, might seem to drag on for about a hundred years. If you’re primed for some sober, sweeping indie rock, though, Live Old, Die Young delivers it in spades. Opener “Washing” kicks off with some militant percussion; Beau Bruns’ busy, gently dissonant drumming is a recurring motif. Second track “Does Anybody See You Out?” is a standout, an engaging balance of melody and momentum with Cowboy Indian Bear’s artier ambitions. Elsewhere, the echoes of popular indie-rock acts from the past decade are detectable: Radiohead’s dizzy mood pieces, the cold soar of Broken Social Scene, the grandeur of Arcade Fire. “I Want a Stranger’s Heart” has some tones I associate with Cass McCombs. “Seventeen” — another highlight — features a Bon Iver–like falsetto. And yet despite these clear influences, Live Old, Die Young sounds like nothing other than Cowboy Indian Bear. I can’t think of very many bands from around these parts that have carved out such a distinct identity.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

#19 – The Pitch – 05-09-2013

e FIRST FRIDAY

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Shy Boys Hidden Pictures Millions of Boys Oils Opossum Trot Akkilles

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June 16, 2013

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  LED DU E H SC TE RE DA

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July 11, 2013

September 21, 2013

UpCominG ShowS: 5/10 5/17

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5/2/13 4:11 PM

MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, M AY 9

Royce Diamond, Louiz Rip

Rappers tend to be our most prolific musical artists, and neither Royce Diamond nor Louiz Rip is an exception. Both released solo albums in the last year (Mirrors and Smoke and Joe Average, respectively), in addition to a host of collaborations with other local rappers and beat makers. The two come together Friday to celebrate the release of their recent five-song collaboration, Rhyme Dotte County. The EP is a winning effort, but there are a few things these performers bring live that a recording can’t quite capture. Rip’s hulking physicality (the dude is, like, 12 feet tall) almost contradicts how quick and funny he can be. And Diamond’s flow and energy seem to accelerate with every performance. Friday, May 10, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Martin Sexton

Martin Sexton gets lumped in with the folkies, which is fair — his acoustic guitar and elastic, soulful voice situate him somewhere between the bubbling folk of Ben Harper and the deft roots pop of John Hiatt. But Sexton’s songs tend to be more complex — both musically and lyrically — than those of Harper, Jack Johnson, Ray LaMontagne and the like. He’s also more overtly political, having expressed support for the Occupy movement and criticizing the Obama administration in ways it’s hard to imagine, say, John Mayer doing. In other words, he’s like an old-school folk singer, but with richer, prettier melodies. Friday, May 10, at Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Ra Ra Riot

My experience with Ra Ra Riot is that each of the Brooklyn-via-Syracuse act’s albums has one unstoppably addictive track — “Can You Tell” on the group’s 2008 debut The Rhumb Line; “Boy” on 2010’s The Orchard — surrounded by about nine inoffensive but forgettable chamber-pop songs. On this year’s Beta Love, the group has largely ditched the

F R I D AY, M AY 10 Bad Rabbits: 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Scott Kirby: 10 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Talib Kweli, Heartfelt Anarchy, Reach, Bizzy: 8:30 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. The Tenors: 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. B.J. Thomas with Etta Britt: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S AT U R D AY, M AY 11

cellos and violins for a synthier electro-pop sound. I have yet to find my jam, but I’m sure it’s on there. Wednesday, May 15, at Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Fabolous and Pusha T

Fabolous has been pretty quiet since 2009’s Loso’s Way, which netted him a hit with “Throw It in the Bag.” The sequel, Loso’s Way 2, arrives this summer, and he’s touring with Pusha T, formerly of Clipse, to support it. Pusha’s transition to solo performer hasn’t been exceptionally smooth — his 2011 mixtape Fear of God was just OK — but given the strength of Clipse’s output, he’s allowed a few missteps. I maintain high hopes for his official solo debut, My Name Is My Name (which I’m pretty sure is a reference to a Marlo line in The Wire), out in July on Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. label. Monday, May 13, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

Tech N9ne

For his record-breaking 2012 Hostile Takeover Tour, Tech N9ne played 95 shows in 104 days. With a mere 50 shows in two months, he’s

F O R E C A S T

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Ra Ra Riot taking it easier in the first half of 2013 — sort of. This tour, called the Independent Powerhouse Tour, caps with this performance in Tech’s hometown. Joining him on the bill are his Strange Music labelmates Brotha Lynch Hung, Krizz Kaliko, Kutt Calhoun, Rittz and CES Cru. “KC Tea” all night, baby. Saturday, May 11, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

Scammers

Former Kansas Citian Phil Diamond now lives in Los Angeles, but he’s still doing Scammers, the dark, crooning, one-man synth-pop project he started while living here. Actually, Scammers’ new album, Convention, is a lot better than his scuzzy, lo-fi KC recordings; it’s polished and relatively melodic, like a super-weird Echo and the Bunnymen album. Diamond is touring like crazy this spring and summer, and on Thursday, he’s back downtown, at the Brick, along with Otter and Umberto. Thursday, May 9, at the Brick (1727 McGee, 816-421-1634)

K E Y

.......................................................... Folk Singer

....................................... Possible Fabulousness

.........................................Record-Release Party

...................... Cute White People From Brooklyn

..................................................... Juggalo Vibes

................................................. Locally Sourced

......................................................Riots Unlikely

.....................................................Strange Music

.............................................................NPR Hero

......................Songs About Cocaine Distribution

.....................................................Punk Crooning

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The Gaudy Ball with the Gashouse Gorillas, the 44s, Billy Ebeling and the Late for Dinner Band: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Itals, Buffalo Soldier, Jah Kings Koffi: 9 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Gurf Morlix: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S U N D AY, M AY 12 The Dillinger Escape Plan, the Faceless, Royal Thunder, David Hasselhoff on Acid: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

M O N D AY, M AY 13 Wednesday 13, Vampires Everywhere, Vanlade, Night Creation: 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

T U E S D AY, M AY 1 4

..................................................Pick of the Week

the pitch

Casey Donahew Band: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Hanni El Khatib, Radkey, the Devil: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Chris Thomas King: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

Hanzel und Gretyl, the Pornhuskers, Panties Inferno: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Tom Keifer: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Sheepdogs, Mona: 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207.

W E D N E S D AY, M AY 15 Asking Alexandria, Whitechapel, Motionless in White, ChimairaI Killed the Prom Queen: 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Eric Taylor: 10 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

FUTURECAST THURSDAY 16 Rodney Carrington: The Midland FRIDAY 17 Jay & Silent Bob’s Super Groovy Cartoon Movie: The Midland SATURDAY 18 Alex Bugnon with Cindy Bradley: Gem Theater

JUNE SUNDAY 2 Guns N’ Roses: The Midland Limp Bizkit: The Granada, Lawrence TUESDAY 4 The XX: Uptown Theater

MON: RUR THU 5/9 AL GRIT 6-9, KARA OKE 10PM SCAMMER S, U FRI 5/10 OTTER - 10PM MBERTO, THE BODY , FAU SAT 5/11 LAZY CEMETARIALTFINDER, N - 10P ROOMS W JERAD BO ITHOUT WINDOWM ND & S, FRI 5/17 THE LUCKY THE TORNADOS, MOLLY GE NE, THU 5/30 CALAMITY CUBETESN FOOT POLE CA TS MALACHY PAPERS, CLIFF HIN ES

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GREEN ROOM BURGERS & BEER (KC) - 8:00PM RHYTHM & BOOZE (KC) - 7:30PM (new!)

BLACK & GOLD TAVERN (KC) - 8:00PM SAINTS PUB & PATIO (Lenexa) - 7:30PM SULLY’S PUB (Mission) - 7:00PM

CHARLIE HOOPER’S (KC) - 7:30PM SNOW & COMPANY (KC) - 7:30PM

THE CHESTERFIELD (KC) - 8:00PM

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Rock ‘n’ Rage 2013 // Sat. June 22 You pay $7.50 for tickets Rock ‘n’ Roll Dream Concert // Sat. July 13 You pay $7.50 for tickets Bachman and Turner w/ special guests Foghat // Sat. July 21 You pay $17.50 for a $35 ticket

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NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6775). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 9 B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus, 7:30 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Billy Ebeling. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Landon Leist, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Kris Bruder’s Freight Train, 7 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Shinetop and Hudspeth.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785832-1085. Drew Black & Dirty Electric, Stiff Middle Fingers, Trashing The Bird, 9 p.m.

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DJ FSTZ, J.A.H SECONDHAND KING, MISS CONCEPTION

5/12 : SUNDAY FUNDAY REGGAE PARTY 5/14 : GWD TRIVIA 8PM- CASH PRIZES 5/15 : DOCUMENTARY/ GET BUSY LIVING/ BDB (NO COVER) 816-561-1099 • 3740 BROADWAY KCMO

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WED. 3/6 THURS. 3/7 WWW.THERECORDBAR.COM 816-753-5207 LIQUORBUDDIES CAVEMANCOMPUTER HOTDOGSKELETONS MAGIC VEHICLES THURS. 5/9 FRI. 3/8 KILROY PRESENTS SAT. 3/9

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FRI. 5/10 SAT. 5/11 6PM DOO DADS MON. 3/11 1OPMSUN. ROYCE3/10 DIAMOND DAUGHTER JEREMY 8PMParty DESERT NOISES CD Release MESERSMITH ALA TURKA MELISMA TICS Louiz Rip/Stitch 81 CD RELEASE SO COW (SOLD OUT) DJ Tymelis PARTY (IRELAND) TUES. 3/12 WED. 3/13 SUN. 5/12 MON. 5/13 OFF THEIR HEADS MIDWEST GOTNEXT JEFFWITH HARSHBARGER TWO4ONE WAKEFEST TEENAGEBOTTLEROCKET PRESENTS DOMCHRONICLES MASKEDINTRUDER PRE-PARTY PETER SENSAY PHONOLOGOTRONIC KILL NOISEBOYS

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B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Ernest James Zydeco. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Slow Ya Roll, 7:30 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling and the Late for Dinner Band. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Cold Sweat. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 9 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Jim Kilroy’s Blues Wars, 8 p.m.

Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. DJ Soulnice. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Clockwerk & DJ Arch. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. AJ AllStars, DJ Eklectic, Joey the Cool, 10 p.m. Port Fonda: 4141 Pennsylvania, 816-216-6462. DJ Keenan, 9 p.m.

Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Brendan MacNaughton Band. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Justin Andrew Murray. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Howard Iceberg & the Titanics, 7 p.m.; Lunadaz, 9:30 p.m.

HIP-HOP/RAP

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. The Creighton Organization featuring Charles Perkins. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Eddie Moore and the Outer Circle, 8 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands and Joe Lisinicchia, 6 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Peter Schlamb and Hermon Mehari Quartet, 7 p.m.

COVERS The Dubliner: 170 E. 14th St., 816-268-4700. The Patrick Lentz Duo. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Gov’t Cheez, 10 p.m.

COMEDY/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke, 9 p.m. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, and DJ HoodNasty. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. The LOL Comedy Tour Presents Cocoa Brown, 8 p.m. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Skeeball league night, 8 & 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 9 p.m.

STEDDYP

WED. 5/15 TUES. 5/14 UPCOMING SCRIBBLING IDIOTS 3/14 EXPENDABLES FU MANCHU Cash4/8 Hollistah/Undergrad SHEEPDOGS 3/18 DARWIN DEEZE 4/16 MOWGLIS H.E.R.O.E.S. /DJ Ataxic 3/19 LYDIA LOVELESS 4/23 BLACK MT. MONA Reach MAKE 3 4/3 THAO& TGDSD 4/30 DEVIL

Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. The Biff Tannens, 6 p.m. Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Travelers Guild. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Lazy, Faultfinder, the Body. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. The Bourgeois, Monster, Night Flights, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Doo Dads, 6 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. The Rackatees with Unfun and the Shidiots, 10 p.m.

FOLK/ROOTS/JAM BAND

JAZZ/LOUNGE

1020 WESTPORT RD

R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

DJ

RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Ultimate HipHop Artist, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Playe, 10:30 p.m.

Get mini!

F R I D AY 10

EASY LISTENING Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. John Keck’s Devil’s and Angels, 8 p.m. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Drew Six. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Songwriter’s Showcase with M-Bird, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Shut Up and Rock Jam, 7:30 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jam night with Rick Eidson. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Thursday Night Patio Jam, 8 p.m.

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Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Not a Planet, Noah’s Ark Was a Spaceship, Month of May, Appropriate Grammar, 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Knife Crime, the Empty Spaces, Schwervon!, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. OILS, Dean Monkey & the Dropouts, CS Luxem, 6 p.m.

DJ Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. DJ Sam Blam. The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. DJ Leo Night Us. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. I <3 Gusto. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. Z Strike: 1370 Grand, 816-471-2316. Fabowlous Fridays with DJ Nuveau, 9 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Indigo Hour with BMW, 5:30 p.m.; the Doug Talley and Joe Parisi Quintet, 8:30 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Steve Lambert Trio, 6 p.m.; Mark Lowrey, 9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 4 p.m.; Joe DeFio, 5 p.m.; Bram Wijnands, Mike Herrera, Tommy Ruskin, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Allie Burik Quintet, 8 p.m.

WORLD/REGGAE Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Born in Babylon. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Making Movies.

COVERS The Bunkhouse: 17965 Hwy. 45, Weston, 816-640-0000. Mickey Finn Band. The Dubliner: 170 E. 14th St., 816-268-4700. Hi-Fi Cadillac. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. The Zeros.

COMEDY/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Trivia, 6 p.m. ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 & 10 p.m.

Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Christopher Titus, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Country dance lessons, 8-9 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 11 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Red Daughters, Books of Bokonon, 11 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Noah’s Ark Was a Spaceship, Karma Vision, 10 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Speakeasy.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shannon & the Rhythm Kings; Mama Ray’s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2-5:30 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Lonnie Ray MORE Blues Band. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Brody Buster Band, GS IN T 9 p.m. LIS AT INE Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., ONL M Overland Park, 913-239-9666. PITCH.CO Doghouse Daddies, 5:30 p.m.; Cadillac Flambe, 9 p.m.

CLUB

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rooms Without Windows, Jerad Bond and the Tornados. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. The Zeros. FOKL Center: 556 Central Ave., 913-207-9549. Motherboy #2 with Bummer, Edward Newgate, Johnny Switchblade, 8 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. James Ward Band. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Mistura Fina. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Midtown Quartet. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Parallax, 8 p.m.

WORLD/REGGAE Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Arm the Poor, Third Party, Totojojo, 8 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Making Movies, Mark Lowrey and Hermon Mehari, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. 77 Jefferson CD-release show with Josh Heinrichs, SkillinJah, Ro Hempel, DJ Jabberock, DJ S. Ranks, 9 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Backyard Twang with the Barnyard Stompers, Cowtown Playboys, Dsoedean, 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Caitlin Rose, Daniel Romano, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Quirk & Ruckus with Mikal Shapiro and Rachel Gaither, 10:30 p.m.

COVERS Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. 90 Sumptin. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Thunder Kats, 8 p.m. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Cherry Bomb. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. SKU Band, 8 p.m.

S U N D AY 12 B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors, 6-9 p.m.

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CAREER EDUCATION

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Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Jay Eudaly, 3 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Chris Aytes & the Good Ambition, Foxxy Cloxx, Werewolf Nebula, 9 p.m.

HIP-HOP/RAP The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Bassmint Pros, Thug, Miss Boomie from the Block, King, 8 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Bram Wijnands. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands and Steve Lambert, 10 a.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Phonologotronic.

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The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2-7 p.m. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night with Dennis Nickell, Rick Eidson and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816-322-2779. Rockin’ Blues, Brews & BBQ Jam, 4-8 p.m.

Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Open jam with El Barrio Band, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays’ Open Blues Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

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M O N D AY 13 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Umber, Wicken, Parydial, 6:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Wakefest preparty, 10 p.m.

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COMEDY/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

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COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco with Tommy Donoho, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Miss Major and Her Minor Mood Swings, 7 p.m.

Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo. Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Chill with Phil. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Bob Harvey, 6 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Phil and Gary, 8 p.m.

Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Truckstop Honeymoon, Signal Ridge, 6-9 p.m.

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Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Bram Wijnands and Laura Glaeser, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. John Blegen, 7:30 p.m.

Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Geeks Who Drink Trivia, 8 p.m. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. KU Theater Department stand-up comedy finals, 9 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. Duke’s on Grand: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Xtreme League Trivia, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Karaoke. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Robert Moore’s Name That Tune, 7 p.m. Tower Tavern: 401 E. 31st St., 816-931-9300. Trivia, 8 p.m. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Beer pong tournament, 9:30 p.m.

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The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Trivia with Matt Larson, 8 p.m. Green Room Burgers & Beer: 4010 Pennsylvania, Ste. D, 816216-7682. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. Moxie Bar & Grill: 4011 N. Oak Tfwy., North Kansas City, 816455-9600. Beer Pong Mondays with DJ E-Rock. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam’s Club Karaoke, 10 p.m. Rhythm and Booze: 423 Southwest Blvd., 816-221-2669. Geeks Who Drink, 7:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Uptown Comedy Night with Norm Dexter, 10 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Open Mic Night, 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Songwriter’s Scene Open Mic with Jon Theobald, 7 p.m. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816-322-2779. Acoustic open mic with Brad Allen, Mondays, 7-10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Blue Monday poetry and open mic, 8-10 p.m.

T U E S D AY 1 4 B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Trampled Under Foot. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Mark Montgomery. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Andy Dewitt.

W E D N E S D AY 15 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Midnight Ghost Train, Captains of Moderation, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Flannigan’s Right Hook, 9:30 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The Trainwreck Trio, Katy Guillen Trio, 8 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Dan Bliss, 6-9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Briar Blues Band, 5:30 p.m.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Robert Moore, 9 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Much Too Much with Ryan Shank.

HIP-HOP/RAP RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Scribbling Idiots, Cash Hollistah, Undergrad, H.E.R.O.E.S., DJ Ataxic, Reach, 10 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Sarah & the Tall Boys, 8 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. John Paul Drum & Bill Dye, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Bourbon & Bands Open Jam. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic jam session with Tyler Gregory. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground open-mic series, 9-11 p.m.

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S AVA G E L O V E

READING COMPREHENSION

Too Soon to Quit Dear TSTQ: I can’t tell you how much your

letter saddens me. Someone who started reading my column at age 16 — and that’s just the right age to start reading my column — should’ve known better than to marry a man she’d been dating for seven short months. And someone who has been reading my column for eight years should know what to do about a useless, unemployed, inconsiderate spouse: Call a divorce lawyer. But you’re not ready to give up on this marriage, so here’s my second-best advice for you: Move the fuck out. Tell your shitty husband that you’re not ready to divorce him but you refuse to live with a man who doesn’t have a job, doesn’t cook or clean, and isn’t interested in talking to a counselor and working on his marriage. Tell him you’re moving out to preserve your sanity and whatever small

34

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D A N S AVA G E

someone has to fuck some sense into ’em. Might as well be you guys.

Dear Dan: I’m a 24-year-old straight, married

female. I have been religiously reading your column in the Portland Mercury since I was 16. Thank you for explaining things that my parents wouldn’t and for helping me clear the hurdles of adolescence! I turn to you now for advice. Five months ago, I married the man of my dreams. He was driven, hardworking, loving and happy. We had amazing, cosmic and connected sex, and we enjoyed pleasing each other. We have been together for a little over a year. I realize now that it was way too soon to get married, but I let my romantic side get the best of me, and so here we are. We are miserable. Now when it comes to sex, it’s the furthest thing from my mind. When it does happen, it’s very one-sided. I rarely get off, and if I do, it’s on my own after he finishes because “it’s too much work” to get me off. That’s problem one. Problem two is that on our wedding night, he broke his foot and couldn’t work as a result. After his foot healed, he quit his job. He told me that he “didn’t want to do that kind of work anymore.” So now I work an exhausting full-time job, support both of us on a salary barely big enough for one, and come home every day to a filthy apartment. Here’s what my husband does all day: plays video games and jerks off to porn. Every time I broach the subject of his getting a job or picking up after himself, all hell breaks loose. I have brought up marriage counseling because neither of us lately is the best at respectfully communicating, and his response is, “You can go, but I’m not going.” I thought about withholding sex until he finds a job, but I don’t know how big of a threat that poses because we have sex maybe once a week as it is. I would appreciate any advice you have for making this work. I am not ready to give up.

BY

Dear Dan: I have an ethical dilemma. I’m an escort and a pro Domme. I have a ridiculous sex drive (it’s silly how much sex I want to have!) and I’m single. I’m also queer. But lately I find myself mostly hooking up with dudes for two reasons: 1. I think it’s important to also have nontransactional sex with dudes. 2. It’s easier to have casual sex with dudes because I rarely get emotionally attached to dudes. If I use protection and I’m getting tested every three months, do I owe these onetime players the truth about what I do for a living? Sexworker Troubled Intellectually chance this marriage has of succeeding. Once you move out, your husband can find a job and pay his own rent or he can sit on the couch until his landlord has him evicted. If he gets his shit together, maybe you can stay married. If he doesn’t, well, then maybe you’ll be ready to give up. All that said, the fact that you’re not ready to give up on this marriage ultimately doesn’t mean two squarts. Because your husband has given up on it. Your husband is making himself unbearable because he wants out. But instead of being an adult and asking for a divorce, your husband is doing everything in his power to drive you away. He doesn’t work, he doesn’t help pay the bills or clean the house, and he would rather play video games than fuck you. This is a man who — consciously or subconsciously — wants out of this marriage, and I predict that his shitty, inconsiderate behavior will escalate until he gets what he wants: out.

Dear Dan: My wife and I are bi and monogamish,

and we occasionally invite other swell guys, girls and couples into our bedroom. We’re crazy liberal hippies, and thus far have fooled around exclusively with similar folks. It’s difficult at the best of times to find couples where both members are bi, so when we find one, we tend to pursue them with wild abandon. We’ve recently been corresponding with a duo who seem perfect in every regard (bi, hot, intelligent). But in their last e-mail, they labeled themselves as “compassionate conservatives,” which set off our socially progressive warning bells. Do we move on? Or do we keep politics off the table and go for it? Friends don’t let friends fuck Republicans, right?

Bisexual But Bipartisan? Dear BBB: I used to take a hard line on sleeping with conservatives, but I’ve evolved. Today I support sleeping with conservatives … because

Dear STI: People who enjoy hooking up with

strangers — people who have casual one-night stands with people they don’t know and may not see again — should go into those hookups knowing these two things: 1. The person they’re hooking up with has probably done this before. As that’s the case, having sex in this context — i.e., in the context of a sleazy and fun hookup — carries a higher degree of STI risk than having sex in the context of, say, a committed relationship. Because duh. 2. They need to take all reasonable precautions while bearing in mind that condoms, even when used correctly, do not provide 100-percent protection. So as long as you’re using protection/ condoms, you’re doing right by your onenight stands. Your dudes are entitled to consideration and a reasonable concern for their well-being, and it sounds like they’re getting both. They are not entitled to your complete sexual history or your work résumé. If someone isn’t comfortable with the risks inherent in casual sex — if someone wouldn’t want to sleep with a sex worker, say, or an editor at Breitbart — that person needs to inquire as to whether the person they’ve just picked up is a sex worker or an idiot. The onus is on them. Publishers Weekly says my new book, American Savage, is one of the “Best Summer Books of 2013.” And amazon.com says American Savage is one of the best books coming out this month. Preorder it now! This week on the Savage Lovecast: Drag queens in Alabama, accidental anal skewering, and unwelcome drunk bachelorettes — listen at savagelovecast.com.

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The Pitch: May 09, 2013