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JUNE 13–19, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 50 | PITCH.COM

Inside: Your pull out guide to the 2013 Urban Grow n Farms & Gardens T our

New Roots for Refugees cultivates hope in a corner of the metro. ── BY JONAT H A N BEN DE R

JUNE 13-19, 2013 | VOL. 32 NO. 50 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Larry Kopitnik, Chris Milbourn, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Tessa Canon

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Collin Click, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

HOME LAND New Roots for Refugees cultivates hope in a corner of the metro. B Y J O N AT H A N B E N D E R

C I R C U L A T I O N

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Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

MOVING PIECES

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

Jessica Brandl gets a handle on Manifest Destiny and the Midwest. BY LIZ COOK

17

A D V E R T I S I N G

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

CORNER COMEBACK

D I S T R I B U T I O N

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The Westport institution returns a little pricier but worth every penny. BY CHARLES FERRUZZ A

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C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2013 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

ON TH E COVE R

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QUESTIONNAIRE NEWS FEATURE F I LT E R STAGE ART FILM CAFÉ FAT CITY MUSIC NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

M EAN WH I L E AT P I TC H . C O M

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARRETT EMKE

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NINE INCH NAILS is coming to the Sprint Center. YEASAYER heads to the Granada, plus rescheduled dates for EDWARD SHARPE and IMAGINE DRAGONS. Oak Street mansion is to be an ART HOTEL for midtown.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

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QUESTIONNAIRE

NICK BOLTON

Personal trainer, fitness model, sponsored athlete

Hometown: Des Moines, Iowa

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Who or what is your sidekick? My cellphone, with everything from my schedule to music to Internet.

1 YEAR SHELF LIFE

Where do you drink? Wherever my friends are. Anything from a laid-back sports bar to the occasional club. I enjoy changing things up. What’s your favorite charity? Susan G. Ko-

men (breast-cancer awareness) followed up by Alzheimer’s-awareness charities.

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Dick’s Sporting Goods or Best Buy. Unfortunately, more recently it’s been local grocery stores.

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? In the fitness world, I’d say CrossFit. Although there’s definitely a market and some very religious followers, it’s not for everyone.

Sprint Center or Power & Light District. I like to try and catch a good show or just see the city with friends.

What movie do you watch at least once a year? National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation

What local tradition do you take part in every year? I haven’t really gotten a chance to enjoy

the local traditions as much as I’d like. I’ve tried the Snake Saturday and First Fridays, but it hasn’t been an annual thing.

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: George Brett Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: Drivers in raining conditions

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” They renovated downtown to bring

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? Men’s Fitness

“Kansas City screwed up when …” It didn’t build

Last book you read: I’d say the most recent thing I’ve read would be the latest issue of Men’s Health.

more business there.

subway or light rail.

“Kansas City needs …” A professional sports

team downtown.

“People might be surprised to know that I …”

Finally saw the ocean for the first time last year, and have never left this country.

“On my day off, I like to …” Get a workout in, enjoy a movie or ride my motorcycle.

“In five years, I’ll be …” One of the biggest fitness personalities in the city or even the country.

What TV show do you make sure you watch? I’m a big movie guy. I’ll spend more time flipping through to the good movies. If it was a show I’d settle on, it’d be anything on ESPN.

take(s) up a lot of space in my iTunes:

Good mix of workout music. Nothing slow.

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Where do you like to take out-of-town guests?

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What was the last local restaurant you patronized? RA Sushi

often

Favorite day trip: I don’t have many chances for day trips. I do enjoy sneaking up to Iowa to see my family when I have time. Locally, I’ll hit up a lake in the summer. What is your most embarrassing dating moment? I was dating an identical twin and con-

...with a great smile from My dentist.

fused her for her sister in front of her family.

Interesting brush with the law? As a former firefighter, I try to avoid brushes with the law.

Describe a recent triumph: I’m getting ready to launch the largest Boot Camp for Breast Cancer in the city — at two different locations. This is a triumph because I’m generating awareness of an amazing cause and bringing people together to help them reach their fitness goals. See nickboltonfitness.com for more information.

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SUBURBAN

NEWS

BLISS?

OUT TO DRY

BY

S T E V E V OC K R OD T

Bass Pro Shops leaves two cities on the hook.

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t turns out that Missouri has another billionaire: Bass Pro Shops founder Johnny Morris. Bloomberg News on June 3 dispatched a rare profile of Morris, a 65-year-old who is not keen on media attention. In fact, Morris wasn’t keen on finding his way onto Bloomberg’s list of billionaires, with his estimated net worth of $2.8 billion. “Being included on your list is not my favorite thing,” Morris reportedly told Bloomberg in a handwritten letter. “But then again, things could be worse.” Things have, in fact, been good for the outdoor-gear retailer, which got its start in Springfield, Missouri, more than 40 years ago. That E MOR original location has since blossomed to 77, drawT ing a company-reported A E IN ONL .COM 116 million visitors a PITCH year. That’s good enough for Moody’s to estimate $2.6 billion in annual sales for Bass Pro Shops. Morris, in his note to Bloomberg, credits Bass Pro Shops’ lucrative earnings to an old American value: the free-enterprise system. But some of the chain’s success, and part of the reason that Morris is a billionaire, is due to a newer American value: large taxpayer subsidies doled out by municipalities eager for name-brand development. The Public Accountability Initiative, a nonprofit research group in Buff alo, New York, found in a 2010 report that, to that date, Bass Pro–anchored developments had been awarded more than $500 million in taxpayer subsidies. The elected officials who reward such subsidies almost always tout them as a means to promote greater economic activity. But the Public Accountability Initiative’s report indicates that such dreams don’t always come true. One store detailed in the report was supposed to bring in $5.7 million in sales-tax revenue annually but scraped together just $1.7 million over four years. A similar story has played out with the two Bass Pro developments in the Kansas City area. Olathe and Independence each opened a Bass Pro in 2007, to much fanfare by government officials in both cities. The Kansas store, on 119th Street near Interstate 35, was built with the help of tax-increment fi nancing, a tool not often used by the Johnson County suburb. In that case, bonds were sold in order to raise quick cash to build the project; the investors who

NEWS

Johnny Morris: billionaire, reluctant public figure bought the bonds were supposed to be repaid by the sales taxes generated by the Bass Pro development, as well as by increases in property taxes. But that revenue didn’t pour in as it was supposed to, and those bonds went into default in 2011. Olathe’s city leaders were wise enough to have avoided guaranteeing those bonds. Doing so would have forced the city to pay bondholders the difference between the money investors were told to expect and the slim revenues actually generated by the project. The default won’t hurt taxpayers directly, other than the loss of revenues redirected by the project’s TIF. But investors may think twice the next time Olathe comes calling with a bond issuance for a retail project. Independence leaders were not so prescient. The Bass Pro project there was guaranteed by the city, and it has not fared as well as projected. A memo in Independence’s current budget says the city will pay bondholders up to $4.6 million this year from its general fund. For context, that amount is more than half of the $7.4 million the city received the 2012–13 fiscal year in property-tax revenues. This isn’t the first year that Independence has had to dip into its budget to find money for Bass Pro investors. The year before, it was a $3.5 million price tag to keep the bonds afloat. So while Morris is certainly entitled to credit clichés like hard work as a means to his fortune, let’s not forget the assistance from the public trust.

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

NEWS

THE IDIOT BOX

Cooking? Traveling? Missing persons? Here’s what passes for ‘educational’ programming on local TV.

BY

BE N PA L O S A A R I

S

chool is out for Kansas City kids. And, in the grand American tradition, our young’uns will soon crank the air conditioning, grab a Capri Sun and plop themselves in front of the TV for hours of entertainment. Don’t worry about their brains, though. The Federal Communications Commission has them covered. The Children’s Television Act of 1990 mandates that broadcast stations air at least three hours of educational and informational shows each week. The FCC’s website explains that so-called “core programming” must be “specifically designed to serve the educational and informational needs of children 16 years of age and under, including the child’s intellectual/cognitive or social/emotional needs.” Each show filling those requirements has an E/I logo that appears onscreen. But tune into any of the four Kansas City network affiliates on Saturday or Sunday morning, when many of these programs are broadcast, and it’s easy to find shows carrying the E/I logo that are, uh, not so educational. Here’s a sampling from local stations that, in many cases, sent typo-filled filings to the FCC explaining their E/I choices. Examples from reports filed in April, covering last quarter, are below. Typos are all theirs.

Title: Food for Thought With Claire Thomas Airtime: KMBC Channel 9, 11:30 a.m. Saturday Why it’s educational: “Claire serves as a role

model for 13- to 16-year-old viewers by showing her passion for her family, life and healthy living by sharing stories in the kitchen.” The premise: The show doesn’t cast itself as a kids’ program. Rather, it’s a cooking show modeled after most cable cooking shows: attractive host in an immaculate kitchen making chicken potpies and vegetable pastries with curried ketchup. You know, stuff your average teenager is clamoring to make and show off to his or her home-economics class

next school year. There was a hamburger recipe once, though. Kids do love hamburgers. Dialogue sample: “I like to taste the meat, so I keep my ingredients on the spare side.” What we learned: Worcestershire sauce makes the burger!

Title: Missing Airtime: KSHB Channel 41, 1:30 p.m. Saturday Why it’s educational: “The program empha-

sizes taking active responsibility for personal saftey and promotes situational awareness, presented in a calm an non-threatening manner suited for teenagers.” The premise: It’s a sad infomercial for missing people. That’s a noble cause, but it’s not making us any smarter. Dialogue sample: “Missing … missing … missing … missing,” from the show’s terribly annoying and simple looped theme song. It sticks in your head for the rest of the day. What we learned: How to be depressed on a Saturday afternoon.

Title: Awesome Adventures Airtime: WDAF Fox 4, 10:30 a.m. Saturday Why it’s educational: “The aim of the pro-

gram is to educate viewers about the different people, environments and animals around the world and highlight the differences and similarities one encounters when traveling to new places.” The premise: Learn about the world while surfi ng and doing other awesome stuff; advertise for totally rad vacation hotels. There are some cool hotels in this show, kids. Dialogue sample: “I’m here at the Sheraton Maui Resort and Spa, and my friend Pono here” — points to a shirtless Hawaiian guy — “has an activity for us.” It’s stand-up paddleboarding. At the Sheraton! What we learned: Sheraton > Hilton. Totes!

Title: Laura McKenzie’s Traveler Airtime: KSHB Channel 41, too thirty pee-M Sundae (OK, these typos are ours.)

Why it’s educational: The real educational

value of this show is spotting the spelling errors in the description sent to the FCC. “This shows in-depth, high definition travle show offers entertaining, safe, educational and informational programming appropriate for children under 16. Through the use of on-site standups, voice over mono-

From left: Burgers, ritzy hotels and bad English — E/I television can teach you a lot. lougues, enviromental b-roll and pop up ‘Travel Tips’, Laura McKenzis Traveler provides an educational journey to significant destinations around the worl. Educational components of Laura McKenzie traveler are geogrophy, history, social enviroment, action and adventure, arts and entertainment, interviews with political leaders, transpotation, and more.” The premise: Host Laura McKenzie travels the globe looking for her dictionary. Dialogue sample: “Many travelers to this region have uncovered hidden surprises that amaze and delight them just beneath the surface of their expectations. There’s always a tinge of anticipation when visiting this part of the world.” Seriously? Beneath the surface of their expectations? Sit tight, McKenzie, we’re airmailing you our dog-eared copy of English Grammar for Dummies. What we learned: The rest of the world speaks English, so you don’t have to!

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com

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Home Land New Roots for Refugees cultivates hope in a corner of the metro. BY JONATHAN BENDER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARRETT EMKE

A

small pile of wood scraps and four green stakes stand guard over a water pump at the end of a driveway on a dead-end street in Northeast Kansas City. A few hundred feet onto the property, the driveway gives way to muddy ruts, still wet from late-May storms. A woman walks toward the backyard of a low-slung brick home. She wears green rubber waders that sink nearly an inch into the mud. Her fingers trace the air next to a dozen peachand cherry-tree saplings — signs of life at the beginning of this 3-acre farm, which backs up to nearly every house on the block. “Everything is very little,” says Beh Paw Gaw, who runs Ki Koko Farm with her sister, Pay Lay. She gestures to rows of kale, chard, cilantro and scallions. “But the sun comes. It will get better.” Pay Lay nods, holding the end of her sarong to keep it out of the mud. They stood in this same field two years ago, surrounded by thickets of discarded tree branches and enough illegally dumped tires to outfit a used-car lot. They hauled away the tires and burned the branches; three blackened piles remain in a triangle around the garden. A severe allergic reaction to poison ivy put Beh Paw Gaw in the hospital. Preparing this land hasn’t been easy for the Burmese sisters. But coming here, they’ve left behind something far more harsh: the refugee camp in Thailand where they fled following the civil war that tore through their home country. Gaw and Lay are two of the seven gradu-

ates of the New Roots for Refugees program, above), six or seven translators are often among the 20 people on hand during biweekly proba joint effort by Cultivate Kansas City and lem-solving sessions. Seed packets are labeled Catholic Charities of Northeast Kansas City to teach refugees how to farm and how to with pictures. People on the farm use their sell what they produce. Since the four-year hands for talking as much as for tilling, communicating in the shorthand of agriculture. program started eight years ago, it has grown “You put a farm and a bunch of people in into a nearly 9-acre training farm, with a the same place, and you can really accelerate $200,000 annual budget and a current enrollthe learning curve. By seeing what people ment of 17 farmers. do, you learn faster,” says Cultivate KanCatholic Charities estimates that, from 2007 through 2011, 2,218 refugees from 28 sas City co-founder and executive director Katherine Kelly. ethnic groups arrived in Johnson and WyanEach farmer works a quarter-acre plot; there dotte counties. Roughly half of those refugees also are 30 20-foot-square community-garden have come from Burma. Many of the male refugees are now part of plots. Atop a hill that runs the length of the the work force at Triumph Foods in St. Joseph, property is a shipping container that serves as a place for tool storage, a seed bank, and a Missouri. Hundreds of men, most of whom cooler for produce that has had never seen a factory bebeen picked for market. The fore they were hired at the “This bridges the gap farmers pay for nothing in slaughterhouse, make the their first year, instead traddaily 120-mile round-trip between refugees ing paper “Juniper bucks.” commute, returning home and Americans.” By the fourth year, farmers as late as 3 a.m. Their wives are covering their own costs, and sisters have found a from water to market fees, different path, with New using money they’ve set aside in a checking Roots, at the intersection of First Street and account (which New Roots has helped them Richmond. open). The farmers sold $125,000 of produce — “This bridges the gap between refugees radishes, dill, potatoes, hot peppers and other and Americans,” says Meredith Walrafen, vegetables and herbs, grown organically — at a 23-year-old program assistant with New market in 2012. Roots. “It uses the skills that people have, Farming aside, however, Juniper Gardens just in a different setting. You have all these is still best known as the largest publicdifferent communities and language groups housing project in Kansas. A series of vinylin one place.” clad structures bookend the gardens, which At Juniper Gardens Training Farm (pictured

sit on land that was home to identical housing only eight years ago. Twenty-four thousand dollars’ worth of organic compost and a regraded hillside have slowly turned this land into soil where something might grow, but not everybody in KCK knows the difference between a vacant lot and an urban farm. On a Wednesday afternoon in late May, Rachel Pollock has just received distressing news, but she tries to keep her voice light as she bounces her 9-month-old daughter on her hip. The 32-year-old program coordinator for Catholic Charities sits down at the lone wooden picnic table at the Juniper Gardens training farm. Her daughter plays with a set of keys. A motorcycle gang has ridden through a graduate farmer’s newly tilled fields, in the middle of New Roots’ busiest week — the start of farmers-market season and the community-supported agriculture program. (Walrafen coordinates the 58 CSA members who pick up their produce from 11 farmers at 11 different markets.) She now has a new item on her to-do list: Build a fence to keep bikers from turning a working farm into a dirt track.

N

ew Roots for Refugees can trace its own roots back to a second-floor bathroom at an elementary school. In 2005, Catholic Charities was searching for a way to give a group of Somali women a sense of home. Its members turned to what the women knew before they’d arrived in the United States: land. continued on page 9

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PORTRAITS BY CAMERON GEE

DAVEYON ROSS - Entrepreneur BETH NYBECK - Sculptor

CELINA TIO - Chef JEFF HARSHBARGER - Musician

Join the American Advertising Federation - Kansas City, the Kansas City Area Development Council, and Barkley for an evening of education, discovery and entertainment as we celebrate the passion and energy of Kansas City’s creative spirit. Learn more about the efforts to elevate and educate the world about America’s Creative Crossroads and hear firsthand from the entrepreneurs, artists and innovators that are making it happen. Panelists include: Beth Nybeck, Celina Tio, Daveyon Ross and Jeff Harshbarger

Home Land continued from page 7 Soon, the women were growing crops in a community garden, enough for their families and friends. The water for that garden came from a bathroom tap in the St. Benedict’s School on Eighth Street. The following year, Catholic Charities approached Cultivate Kansas City (then the Kansas City Center for Urban Agriculture) for help turning its gardeners into market farmers. And that’s how five Somali women found themselves behind a table with bunches of greens and no idea what would happen. “It was a couple of hundred dollars, but it was meaningful because it paid for an electric bill or got them out of the house,” Kelly says. In 2007, Pollock received a three-year, $300,000 grant from the federal government’s Refugee Agricultural Partnership Program. In the application, she laid out the framework for the training farm. It would be managed by Cultivate KC, with Catholic Charities providing support services to help refugees rebuild their lives, both on the farm and outside it. The project was set for Coronado Park, on Parallel Parkway, but when the KCK Housing Authority agreed to give the program a three-year lease (at a rate of $1 a year) on just less than 7 acres in Juniper Gardens, New Roots for Refugees had found its place. (Cultivate later acquired an additional 2 acres of the city’s land on the other side of Richmond Street.) Eight farmers sold at the Brookside Farmers Market in 2007. “We flooded that market,” Pollock says. “But it planted the seeds in our mind of what we could do.” New Roots came along at a good moment for Cultivate KC. Kelly had been working directly with farmers; now she hoped to construct an entire sustainable food system — one that would connect growers, markets, consumers and funding entities. While Kelly serves as an advocate for urban agriculture, Pollock helps the refugees in the program learn how to set up bank accounts, pay taxes and even drive a car. “To see our farmers from Burma get picked up in Juniper Gardens and then drive them through Mission Hills to the Brookside Farmers Market — they would ordinarily never be in Brookside. But they’re there and

Gurung, right, holds freshly picked cilantro. providing a service. There are people there that just love to get their food,” Pollock says. The land is helping farmers find their place.

S

itting on a black-leather couch with her granddaughter, Angel, balanced on one knee, Maku Gurung is surrounded by family. Gurung’s husband, Nar, who can’t work because of a bad back and diabetes, sits next to her in the townhome they share with her son and daughter-in-law. There are happy pictures on the walls, smiling relatives with arms around shoulders. But there are no pictures of Bhutan, the homeland she hasn’t seen in more than two decades. “She likes it here, but she loves her homeland,” says Bishnu Rai, Gurung’s daughterin-law, who is translating for her on a recent Friday morning. Nestled between India and China, Bhutan is a Buddhist kingdom that has been celebrated for its decision to adopt a goal of “Gross National Happiness” in lieu of a gross national product. In 2006, Businessweek listed Bhutan as “the eighth-happiest nation on Earth.” But that hasn’t kept its citizens from leaving, and its refugees have often been troubled. The Atlantic published a disturbing article in April

of this year, noting the high suicide rate of Bhutanese refugees resettled in the United States — 20.3 per 100,000 people, a rate well above the U.S. average of 12.4. Gurung, 48, says she had a happy childhood. She grew up in the southern part of the country, with a garden in sight of the Himalayas. She milked the cows in the morning and tended to the rice fields after that. Her family farmed. But Bhutan was riven by ethnic conflict before she could take her place in the family tradition. In the 1980s, the country sought to hold a census that would fix the definition of citizenship and stop immigration from bordering Nepal. As protests and arrests made news in cities, Gurung’s family decided to leave. She says the king said they couldn’t stay in their home. She walked for two days through the jungle to India. Her family was turned away at the border and spent another two days on a bus to Nepal, part of a stream of 107,000 refugees over the next decade. Her family settled in a camp run by the United Nations’ High Commission for Refugees. “In Bhutan, she had her own private home and garden,” Rai says. “In Nepal, she had no home but had a community garden.” She lived in a bamboo-and-thatch hut for the next 18 years, until the Nepalese government agreed to issue exit permits that would

allow refugees to leave the country beginning in 2008. Two years later, the United Nations approved her application for resettlement and sent her to Spokane, Washington. After a year, she was able to come to Kansas City to live with her son. A friend in the Bhutanese community told her about New Roots; in April 2011, she began farming at Juniper Gardens. “The garden gave her a chance to learn many things and make friends,” Rai says. “She loves being able to talk to people and take home money and fresh vegetables.” Gurung is in her third year in the program. Pollock says she is the farm’s hardest worker. She also works as a package handler for FedEx. She has a sister in Colorado, a daughter in Virginia and another daughter in St. Louis. She’s hoping that they can be closer together in the future. Gurung calls her father, her brother and her sister, who are still in Nepal, once a month. When they ask about life in Kansas, she tells them that everything is relative. “She says it’s better than there,” Rai says.

G

urung is part of KCK’s changing landscape — one that New Roots’ leaders envision as a patchwork of urban farms and farmers, strengthening the community. “We’re seeing blight in Wyandotte County o r v a c a n t h o u s i n g continued on page 11

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Home Land continued from page 9 turned into this vibrant place where people are working and contributing to the health of their community,” Pollock says. Off 14th Street and Central, there’s a Bhutanese community garden where 40 families have small plots. It’s one of three planned community gardens, each centered on a specific ethnic group. The nonprofit Somali Bantu Foundation just received the deed to a property on Third Street from a private donor. The Somalis there are cultivating a patch of ferns (they eat the curls) and blackberries. Another garden, run by Burmese farmers in partnership with a church on Parallel Parkway, is expected to break ground in a few weeks. “We’re changing the makeup and fabric of a neighborhood,” Pollock says. “Built space affects kids. When you integrate farms and gardens into neighborhoods, it changes the dynamic.” While those community gardens are intended to help New Roots identify its next crop of farmers, five working farms in Kansas City, Kansas, also have launched in the past two years. Gaw purchased the land in 2011 that would become Ki Koko (which means “two sisters” in Burmese), and her daughterin-law purchased the adjacent home. Sitting on the carpeted living-room floor

of her daughter-in-law’s house, Gaw says if From left, Lay and Gaw at Ki Koko Farm. she ever returned to Burma, it would be to and it would grow,” Beh Say says. “Here, you visit, not to stay. “She’s happy here because she has more really have to take care of it.” Now they care for broccoli and beets and freedom,” her daughter, Beh Say, translates. tomatoes, seed packets stored in an empty “Back there, she’d be in jail. But it’s hard not ice-cream tub to remind them what they’re to think about the way they had to leave.” A 60-year war between the Karen people growing. They sell at the Overland Park Farmand the Burmese government left the sisters’ ers Market on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and at the KCK Greenmarket on Mondays. family with little choice six years ago. They The fruit trees at the entrance to Gaw’s could flee into the jungle or stay and be killed. lot are her retirement plan. They left behind the garden When she’s older, she wants where their grandfather had “The people who helped only to tend the orchard. grown okra and rice and She’s 52, and that future areca nuts. her grow and gave her seems far off. Her days start The U.N. brought Lay to their time — she wants to at 6 a.m. and end close to 10 the United States in 2007; be able to help them.” p.m. She wants to see New her older sister followed a Roots grow, especially beyear later. Their husbands cause her younger sister is both found work at Tria new farmer in the program. umph Foods. “She wants them to be proud of her,” Beh In the sisters’ first year with New Roots, their crops struggled and so did their fami- Say says. “The people who helped her grow and gave her their time — she wants to be able lies. They had entered a new culture, one in to help them.” which the food was packaged. Gaw warned Gaw is helping Pollock. Her success can conher family not to eat cereal, fearing it was dog food. In time, they came to find catfish in the vince prospective farmers that what seems unattainable is only four years away, and Catholic Missouri River, and they learned to like Kelly Charities can point to Gaw when courting poClarkson. But nothing came easily, so they tential donors. The latter is important, given worked harder. “There, they would just spread the seeds, the project’s potentially shrinking budget.

When the Refugee Agricultural Partnership Program funds expired in 2009, Pollock applied for a grant from the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program. The farm incubator, managed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is designed to help kick-start fledgling growers (those with less than 10 years’ experience), who can eventually replace an aging population of farmers. New Roots received a three-year $150,000 grant; that’s set to expire this summer, and the final payment is in limbo because the Farm Bill (which includes funding for the BFRDP) has not yet been passed by Congress. Private donations and foundation funds ensure that the program continues to run, but Pollock expects to make some tough choices about the services offered. She has applied for additional grant funding, recently securing resources to offer Juniper Gardens produce to the Catholic Charities’ food pantry. “We are just at the start of something,” Kelly says. “Supporting farmers doesn’t have to come at the expense of the consumer. Urban agriculture and economic development don’t have to be mutually exclusive.” It’s a few minutes after 5 p.m. when several older-model sedans turn in through the gate off Richmond, their tires bouncing over the pitted gravel road. Pollock greets several farmers by name. In a few minutes, they’ll discover that hail from a thunderstorm has left their kale pockmarked. Women in long T-shirts and fleece jackets stoop to fill plastic shopping bags and white buckets with greens for their own dinner tables and those of their neighbors. Pollock stops for a moment at the top of the hill at the training farm and looks past the grain elevators that dominate the horizon. “Think of what people would pay for this view,” she says, pointing out the tree-framed skyline of downtown Kansas City, Missouri. The farmers don’t look up. They’re thinking about what people will pay the next morning at market. They hope to get home before the sun sets, and they know that their husbands are still five hours from being able to leave St. Joseph. After a few fleeting moments of sleep, the women will return to the fields as the sun begins to reflect off the downtown buildings.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

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Make your mark on

ArtWorkers: Creativity and America an interactive festival of the arts conceived by Kansas City artist Hugh Merrill sponsored by EaglePicher Technologies, LLC

PRESENTS...

3RD ANNUAL ALL CITY

Through July 7, 2013 in Joplin Saturday June 15 | 11am – 2pm You and your family become part of ArtWorkers! Bring family photos and swap stories in this entertaining session with artist-in-residence Hugh Merrill. See spivaarts.org for complete June 15-23 festival listings including: • The John Cage inspired “Create with Cage!” Saturday, June 22, 2pm • “Finding Lincoln” | Sunday, June 23, 2pm • Civil Rights era “History Alive!” | Sunday, June 23, 3pm

OPEN ACOUSTIC & ELECTRIC MUSIC GIANT JAM SESSION

222 W. 3rd Street at Wall | Joplin, MO 64801 417.623.0183 | www.spivaarts.org “It’s worth the drive!” CLOSED MONDAYS

BLUES, ROCK, BLUEGRASS, JAZZ, FOLK, AMERICANA & MORE.

ALL MUSICIANS & TALENT LEVELS ARE WELCOME

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WHEN: SUNDAY, JUNE 16 FROM NOON TO 7P.M. WHERE: KNUCKLEHEADS SALOON 2715 ROCHESTER KCMO SUGGESTED DONATION: $5.00 GENERAL OR $20.00 KKFI VIP TABLE FURTHER DETAILS: WWW.KKFI.ORG

Convention and Visitors Bureau

nelson-atkins.org 816.751.1ART

YOUN G F R IE ND S O F A R T

FRI 07.12 6PM

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SUMMER

W HIT E PA R T Y

Lidia’s Italy Kansas City 12

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Nelson-Atkins YFA SummerWhiteParty 1/2 Page Pitch.indd 1

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WEEK OF JUNE 13–19 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

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PAG E

DAY SATUR

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STAGE

s City: Kansa tation ation S Innov

The Mountaintop looms at the Unicorn.

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PAG E

ART Jessica Brandl remolds history.

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FILM Man of Steel: big cape, no soaring.

IDEAS THAT BEGAN HERE Kansas City has become a hotbed of innovators, patent lawyers and inventive ideas, and it didn’t get that way overnight. That’s The Idea! Patents and Inventions From the Kansas City Museum Collection

T H U R S D AY | 6 . 1 3 |

F R I D AY | 6 . 1 4 |

NEVER FORGET A FACE

COMEDY CAVE

M AT T H E W C O L L I N S

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MKC Theatre professor, professional clown and expert in Commedia dell’Arte Stephanie Roberts performs her one-woman show, Mask of the Broken Heart, a film-noir-style tribute to KC history in which she portrays 13 different characters. Through the use of masks, she spins the story of Ray Meridian, a private investigator who is working a case for the daughter of a local tractor baron. Sounds intriguing, no? The play runs through Saturday night at the Fishtank Performance Studio (1715 Wyandotte, 816-809-7110). Tonight’s performance begins at 8. Tickets cost $15; see brownpapertickets.com.

chronicles 100 years, beginning in the mid-19th century, of patent models, plans and applications for objects — an insurance vending machine, hair clippers and Teflon. The exhibit in Corinthian Hall is free to

Deep in the bowels of Westport — more specifically, the basement of the Westport Coffeehouse, next to Green Room Burgers and Beer — is the Kick Comedy Theater (4010 Pennsylvania, 816-533-5195), the entertainment district’s newest home of weekend laughs courtesy of Stand Upocalypse, aka Corey Weibel. “Stand Up Comedy is back and it’s not going anywhere anytime soon,” Wiebel says. “The shows are by invitation only for the comedians. This is not an open mic.” Tonight’s featured players include Adam Maxwell, Tai Fu Panda, Zack Smith, Patrick Moore,

peruse during hourly tours (from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.). The museum is located at 3218 Gladstone Boulevard in the Historic Northeast. See kansascitymuseum.org for more information. John Wagner, Dennis Chanay, Al Burnes and Patrick Ryan. Tickets cost $5 at the door, and show times are at 7 and 9:30 p.m. Search “Stand Upocalypse” on Facebook.

BEAUTY IN THE URBAN JUNGLE

The first Troost Art Hop was held October 11, 2011. “It was originally called a hop because we were encouraging art-meets-green-sustainability by ‘hopping’ on the Troost MAX or using a bike to go from location to location versus using a car,” says Franny Knight, founder and CEO of Emerald City and the lead curator for this month’s second-Friday event. Troost Art Hop runs from 31st to 55th streets and includes 10 gallery continued on page 14

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FRIDAY

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continued from page 13 spaces. A live art show with an anti-Monsanto theme, curated by Jessica Logsdon, is one of the featured exhibits. “I’m personally very much for it, and I want to see the momentum from the enthusiasm and activism from the March Against Monsanto continue,” Knight says. Soak up the vibes from 6 to 9 p.m. Search for “Second Friday Troost Art Hop #20” on Facebook.

FANTASTIC VOYAGE

All five of the artists — Chris Daharsh, Madeline Gallucci, Ben Harle, Will Preman and Maegan Stracy — in the Charlotte Street Foundation’s Urban Culture Project’s latest exhibition, Walkabout, are 2012 Kansas City Art Institute graduates. See the culmination of their latest endeavors at the Paragraph Gallery (23 East 12th Street). The show opens at 6. See urbanculturestudioresidents .wordpress.com.

S AT U R D AY | 6 . 15 | EXTENDED NAMASTE

FOR MORE INFORMATION

VISIT THECITYMARKET.ORG Brought to you in part by the Neighborhood Tourist Development 14

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Lululemon re-engineered the crotch fabric of its popular Luon pants, thank Buddha. Now those wearing them at this weekend’s Kansas City Yoga Festival have one less issue at the Guild (1621 Locust). Co-organizer Leah Morgan says the two days of lectures and movement are for all metro-area yogis, regardless of skill level. “We always encourage each person to honor their body and not try to ‘keep up’ or compete with others,” Morgan says. The festival starts at 8 a.m. and features four workshops (Bodymind: Your yoga practice as a means of whole self transformation sounds intriguing) with plenty of break time. “It’s not like marathon yoga,” Morgan explains. Tickets cost $45 for individual workshops or $160 for the weekend. See kansascityyogafestival.com.

NIGHT BREWS

Representatives from 33 local and national breweries are in the heart of Westport (4057 Pennsylvania) this evening from 5 to 9 for the Westport Summer Beer Festival. Be-

sides selections from Perennial Artisan Ales and Stiegl, look for appearances by members of Sporting KC. Tickets cost $25 in advance and $30 at the gate; see beerkc.com.

S U N D AY | 6 . 16 | WINE DAD

Established in 2012, the Great Northwest Missouri Wine Trail has eight stops, including Liberty, Osborn, Rushville and Rayville. This Father’s Day, the outpost on the westernmost point, Riverwood Winery (22200 Highway 45 North, Rushville, 816-579-9797), offers items more manly for the big man in your life than chardonels and brie: singlemalt scotch flights (with E R MO a 10 percent discount), cigars from Weston Tobacco, several craftT A INE beer selections and ONL .COM PITCH grilled Bichelmeyer brats and knackwurst. Enjoy the scenic Missouri River Bluff wine country from noon to 4 p.m. Admission to the tasting room is free. See riverwoodwinery.com.

EVENTS

DAD BEER

Reconnect with your pop via hops today when Jennifer Helber and her DIY beermaking business, Grain to Glass, take over the Farm to Table Kitchen (21 East Third Street) for a Homebrewing for Beginners course. “I’ve changed the class so that it is all-inclusive in one session, and both brewing and bottling are taught,” Helber says. Everyone takes home bottled beers from a previously fermented batch, so what’s brewed may or may not be the same as what’s bottled that day. Helber plans to brew Session IPA. Educate yourself on the process from 1 to 4 p.m. Tickets cost $50 and include a $10 discount on equipment purchases from Grain to Glass; see brownpapertickets.com and search “Homebrewing for Beginners.”

M O N D AY | 6 . 17 | ROUGH SEAS

In 2003, 13-year-old surfer Bethany Hamilton

S U N D AY | 6 . 16 |

SPIN CITY

vard and Oak Street). Tonight’s free season opener starts at 8. See kcshakes.org for information about preshow entertainment, food and drink options, and reserved seating.

W E D N E S D AY | 6 . 19 | FARMERS MARKET SPOTLIGHT: GOOD DOG 2 GO AT WALDO FARMERS MARKET

Last spring, Lana and Kyle Robison found themselves surrounded by food trucks and a dog parade on South Congress Avenue. “We thought what a great idea if there was something just for dogs,” Lana says. So they got to work making preservative-free, pooch-friendly treats with locally sourced ingredients like bacon-and-cheese bones, pumpkin-flaxseed bites and cinnamonscented Snickerpoodles. “We use ingredients that are all human-grade, so they are safe for us to eat as well as your pets,” she says. Other items include a glucosamine-rich Bowser Beer and Chew Gourmet dog bones. Hook your best friend up from 4 to 7 p.m. when Good Dog 2 Go is parked at the Habitat KC ReStore (303 West 79th Street) for the Waldo Farmers Market. See gooddog2go.com.

Fine Art, Modern Design & Unusual Collections • • • •

Ke Sook Lee George Timock Mark Knotts Michael Sinclair

• • • •

Peter Wilkin Phil Smith Karl Blossfeldt Patrick Clancy

• Plus Herman Miller, Ikea and More

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T U E S D AY | 6 . 18 | Oft-quoted and critically polarizing, As You Like It is the selection for the Heart of America Shakespeare Festival’s 21st season. Revisiting the Forest of Arden are stars Carla Noack (Rosalind), John Rensenhouse (Duke Senior) and Mark Robbins (Duke Frederick). Performances run through July 7 at Southmoreland Park (Emanuel Cleaver II Boule-

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lost her left arm in a shark attack off the coast of Kauai. A month later, she was back in the water, and a year later, she was winning national competitions. “If I have a bad attitude, then it’s not really gonna make anything better,” she told ABC News in 2005. Her story is chronicled in Soul Surfer, the third featured pick of the Kansas City Library’s free Surf’s Up! film series held Mondays in June. It stars AnnaSophia Robb, Helen Hunt and Dennis Quaid and starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library (14 West 10th Street, 816-701-3400). See kclibrary.org.

Shakespeare as you like him.

Kansas Ave/ Av Northgate

I

n a city where the mic is king, the DJ is a loyal servant to its followers. And to the early-in-the-week beat. Name: Garrett Hannon DJ alias: DJ G Train Hometown: Kansas City, Missouri Previous residencies: Goomba Rave at the Bottleneck, Gusto Lounge, Mission Lounge, Karma, ScionLab, Saints Pub + Patio Current residencies: Replay Lounge, Tonic, Eighth Street Taproom, Quinton’s (Lawrence) Beat vehicle: Rane 62, Ableton, and a variety of Akai MIDIs to make remixes and beats. Description of set: “It’s about to go down!” Current top five: “Rich As Fuck” by Lil Wayne featuring 2 Chainz, “Twerk It” by Busta Rhymes, “Switch Up” by Big Sean featuring Common, “Q.U.E.E.N.” by Janelle Monáe featuring Erykah Badu, “The Theme” by Tracey Lee Sunday Funday featuring DJ G Train is at the Replay Lounge (946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676) from 10 p.m. until close.

P

Parking

US Post Office

Park St Olathe Public Library

Loula St

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S TA G E

ELEVATION

The Mountaintop lifts MLK by

BY

taking him off the pedestal.

L I Z C O OK

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proves unusually prescient for a motel maid. Anyanwu soars in her passionate final speech, riffing, poetry-slam-style, on black entertainers and politicians and musing about what’s to come for civil rights and America. The fight doesn’t die with King, after all. “The baton passes on,” she assures him. In doing so, she also invites us to take a turn, pick it up and march on.

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PROJECT PLAYWRIGHT 2.0

CYNTHIA LEVIN

man’s speech rhythms in his own ultra-smooth s the Unicorn Theatre’s production of baritone. Whether he’s flirting with Camae, The Mountaintop begins, we’re treated to a memorable series of stage pictures. It’s the spunky motel maid, or phoning home to “Mrs. King” and the kids, Coppage’s King is Memphis, April 3, 1968, the stormy eve of charismatic and down-to-earth. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. The play’s structure (and the Unicorn’s stagWe watch as King enters his dark room at ing) keeps the focus on King’s final moments: the Lorraine Motel and sets down his briefone set, one night, two characters, no intercase, silhouetted by lightning fl ashes and street lamps beyond the open door. He stares mission. As King and Camae flirt, fight and wearily off into the distance, decompressing negotiate, the audience knows that this man is circling ever closer to his death. from the stresses of the day (among them Camae, however, has a few secrets to out the delivery of his famous “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech). He crosses the room before the curtain falls. Chioma Anyanwu gives the room-service maid pluck, and her in powerful strides that match the rhythm fiery speeches and sharp comedic timing drive of the rain slapping the pavement outside. the show. Her chemistry with Coppage is palHe takes a leak. pable, and as the terms of their characters’ Nervous laughter from the opening-night relationship change, Anyanwu picks up steam. audience followed. King seems like an untouchable figure to many of us — a prophet, a “Walking’ll only get you so far,” she says before launching into a fervid sermon of her own from martyr, a saint. the motel-bed pulpit. But he had stanky feet. Scenic designer Gary Mosby handles Katori Hall’s play, skillfully directed by Mykel Hill, is concerned with humanizing the atmospheric effects well, and Douglas Macur’s pulsing projections King, not further lionizing help weave the play’s superhim. So he pads around that The Mountaintop natural moments through motel room in holey socks, Through June 30 at the the action. The set’s f lat he curses, he shouts out the Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main back wall forces the actors door for Ralph Abernathy to 816-531-7529 into predictable blocking bring him some Pall Malls. unicorntheatre.org patterns, but that’s a small “I’m just a man,” King resacrifice for the sake of hispeats throughout the play, torical accuracy — the Unicorn’s set is almost trying to convince himself as much as us. indistinguishable from a photograph of the Walter Coppage succeeds in capturing both real room 306. From the vintage, salmonKing the man and King the magnetic orator. colored curtains to the fingerprint smudges Portraying an icon is a high-pressure role for any performer, but Coppage is up to the task. around the light switches, each visual detail feels meticulous and period-prudent. He avoids mere imitation, tapping into the

Anyanwu and Coppage get real in room 306. Properties designer Emily Swenson and costume designer Arwen Thomas further flesh out the era. Thomas’ costumes feel authentic and lived-in; small touches like Camae’s apron wings and King’s worn-out socks subtly flesh out character. Despite its attempts to humanize King with smelly feet, Hall’s play ultimately acknowledges that he was more than “just” a man. “You are a once-in-a-lifetime affair,” Camae tells him, and Coppage’s portrayal lives up to history’s hype. His final, dreamlike monologue is one of the most affecting and evocative on this season’s stage. To say more about the ending would spoil the surprise, but it’s safe to reveal that Camae

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OLATHE K A N S A S

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roject Playwright, in its second year, puts playwriting to the test. Aspiring local playwrights debut new works that are written, rehearsed and staged in less than 24 hours, then performed before a panel of judges and a voting audience. Participating writers get their assignments at 9 o’clock the night before their 10-minute one-acts are seen. Keep the coffee on. Winners from each round (the contest began last weekend) move on to a final round, in which one winner is selected. Featured playwrights are Stephanie Demaree, Jose Faus, Cynthia Hardeman, Michelle Johnson and Jonathon Peck. Be a critic for just $10 at the door. — DEBORAH HIRSCH Round three: 8 p.m. Saturday, June 15; final round: 8 p.m. Sunday, June 16. Both at Off-Broadway Theater, 3051 Central, projectplaywright.com.

Exile with SML

June 14

ART

MOVING PIECES

Jessica Brandl gets a handle on Manifest Destiny and the Midwest.

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essica Brandl’s functional ceramics explore a rural Midwest that’s not the usual picturesque farm scenes. Her Great Plains is a place racked by distinctly regional threats: F5 tornadoes, flooding along Interstate 29, rural blight. In one piece, a jar titled “Midwest of Oz,” a sinister twister curves toward a small farmhouse. Instead of lifting off to Oz, the house here is tied to the ground, straining against its tethers like a hot-air balloon awaiting launch. On the jar’s handle, a Plains Indian kneels in an iconic pose, drawing his bow. Brandl’s latest exhibition at Red Star Studios captures a Midwest reminiscent of Oz in many ways — sunny adventure scenes, rendered as if in Technicolor, play out E R O M against subdued blackand-white backdrops T of decay and disrepair. A E IN ONL .COM But unlike Oz, these H C IT P exploits aren’t fictional. The artist stages historical scenes of westward expansion and Manifest Destiny in deteriorating, present-day rural landscapes to tell a story of migration and conquest. The Pitch visited Brandl’s Red Star Studios work space, where she created all of the pieces in the exhibition, as she wrapped up her time as an artist-in-residence there. The Pitch: What inspired the connection between the doctrine of Manifest Destiny and abandoned modern homes? Brandl: It starts really simple, with a domestic set of questions: “How did I get to the Midwest?” I grew up in Texas, in a busy place right outside of Austin, during the silicon boom, and my parents thought it was too big, too fast. We moved to Nebraska to revive the Brandl Electric company, so I moved from extreme progress to extreme emptying out. I was really isolated, surrounded by a lot of vacant houses, and I could explore those empty spaces, pick up artifacts, and I had the desire to collect these little things, and I wondered why it was right to leave all of these spaces and artifacts behind. It really is about my empathy for the buildings and their lack of usefulness. Do you see that “emptying out” as a result of Manifest Destiny? It’s a natural outcome, a continuation. Manifest Destiny was depicted historically with a lot of optimism, but now there’s a lot of social guilt from pushing out indigenous peoples. The whole show is based on a movement of peoples. It’s a matter of organisms: One wants the other’s space. Tolstoy talked

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Brandl at work

working things out as a visual artist. So for me to rectify and save these objects I love about this with Europe in War and Peace. and make them useful again is important. The boundaries change marginally, but not And given the practical attitude of Midwestso much. Progress is a moving target. Our erners, things having a dual function is imcountry had a lot of progress and success, but portant. You have a piece of art, but you may that seems to have moved on to places like need to put snacks in it. China, where most things are made now. Not Or use one of the TV trays you’ve created. a lot is made in America anymore, so we’re The TV tray is an object that’s considleft pushing old things around, relocating ered very low-culture, and these were the and repurposing them, which gives them a kinds of objects I’d find in abandoned spaces. strange new identity. These were the objects I knew. On “Columbia You state on your website that your own Sleeps,” the handle of the jar is modeled after family history is included in this exploration. Yes. My family’s a part of Manifest Des- an artifact found in the walls of my house. Inside the wall was this little naked white tiny. My grandfather wasn’t going to inherit land in Germany, so he relocated to Nebraska figure, and I made a mold of her. I think it to receive land from the federal government. speaks to the moral, conservative ethics of the Midwest that this naAmericans were strategiked woman was hidden in cally placing tantalizers in Jessica Brandl the wall. Europe at the time to invite Through June 29 How do you decide which them over. He would get a at Red Star Studios scenes of expansion to stage land grant, build a crappy 2100 Walnut, 816-474-7316 in a particular place? sod house and some barns, redstarstudios.org I start w ith a photothen sell them to new imgraphic collection, like a migrants. He was fl ipping cultural anthropologist. Through collaging, properties while he looked out for the best more story is implied. I use image building land. He was doing exactly what I have anxito teach me the answers along the way. ety about. But I recognize that’s human naThe foreground of “Manifest” is derived ture. This was the land of opportunity. There was a lot of land, and people will take the from an old painting by the same name that was meant to drive people out West. It atopportunities they can. tracted them with a misplaced optimism. It Your pieces are all functional ceramics. Is was like propaganda. that important for the show’s theme? The bright pops of color in some of It is. I am a part of what I’m depicting. I’m

your pieces seem to capture that spirit of propaganda. I use high-contrast black and white because it’s attractive — if not pops of color, strong graphic implications. I’m using my own graphic tricks and techniques to attract an audience. You mentioned Leo Tolstoy as an influence. Do you draw from any other artists? A lot of writers. My smaller pieces are a lot like character studies. I work and think a lot like a writer. I love Steinbeck and Thornton Wilder — Our Town, particularly, because it’s so ordinary but beautiful in that universal ordinariness. That’s the nature of human existence, particularly in the Midwest. The Midwest looks simple but expresses something very complex about American life. For visual artists, Karl Bodmer. He was an expedition artist who explored the West with Maximilian right after Lewis and Clark, and did etchings of images so characteristically American and Midwestern: bison, big fluff y clouds. He had a great way of capturing what things look like right now. What are you working on now? I just started working on a platter inspired by the albatross in “Rime of the Ancient Mariner.” I love the poem, the theme of sins against nature. Along the way of researching my subject, I found that albatrosses are in trouble because they eat a lot of inanimate objects — plastic, cigarette lighters. The albatross has the same problem as me: too much stuff.

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17

“I’D SEE IT TWICE!” -Mary Pols, TIME MAGAZINE

Ethan Hawke

Julie Delpy

Before Midnight

WRITTEN BY

RICHARD LINKLATER & JULIE DELPY & ETHAN HAWKE DIRECTED BY RICHARD LINKLATER

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have an idea: How about nothing but tentpole icons for five years? As in: every U.S. movie devoted to a different franchise figure every summer. Like, say, an all-James Bond season, with Christopher Nolan making his big-ass version for one studio, and Steven Spielberg pushing out his take on the other side of town. Joss Whedon and J.J. Abrams would each cast their own superspies, with an indie or two thrown in from, like, the Duplass brothers. Exhausting? Sure. But if we insisted that certain fi lmmakers got a few things out of their systems while exploiting our enthusiasm for a given copyright-protected hero, maybe Hollywood could adjust its franchisedriven GDP. The best part: no more reboots. No more having to say the word reboot. If such a remedy were already in place, we wouldn’t now be forced to consider Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel, which reboots way hard, kicking you in the face again and again. That’s not just a product of the dim, ViewMastery 3-D, which makes goggled Clark Kents of us so that we can super-experience the inevitable destructo-porn falling debris of yet another ravaged urban area. It’s also because Snyder, as though reading my mind, has bolted together Man of Steel out of other directors’ tics and trademarks. Some things are borrowed fair and square. Christopher Nolan, architect of the Dark Knight trilogy, helped come up with the story here and co-produced. But Snyder’s magpie approach also draws from Michael

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BREAKFAST & LUNCH Bay, George Lucas’ Star Wars prequels and Spielberg’s War of the Worlds. Sets and costumes lift freely from H.R. Giger and the Matrix movies, and action sequences further amplify Abrams’ egregious lens flares and focus-pulling jump zooms. The result is all noise and no tone. Supes and Lois Lane still make X-ray eyes at each other, but stars Henry Cavill and Amy Adams share a glumly terrestrial chemistry. It’s a courtship (really a whole movie) without much humor, and Cavill’s shallow, inert performance doesn’t help. He looks right but projects little intelligence or wit; mainly he is called on to furrow his granite brow and let out howls of frustration or grief or exertion.

SANDWICHES

Cavill can’t cut loose.

SOUPS & SALADS 1821 WYANDOTTE

The rest of the actors do their own light shoplifting. Kevin Costner’s Jonathan Kent walked out of Field of Dreams. Russell Crowe’s Jor-El retrofits the actor’s Gladiator moves. Michael Shannon’s General Zod loads up a cart with generic evil. So much shouting: “Ready the laser hair removal! Pick up my cleaning! I will destroy your puppies!” All from a guy sent to the Phantom Zone in a little cock-looking spaceship. But then, Zod is from a Krypton with ridable dinosaurs, quacking laser guns and leaders who wear Cher-style headdresses. This society died for a reason. And Snyder isn’t doing its last son any favors, either. ■

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n 1995’s Before Sunrise, Richard Linklater cast Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy as two smug but intelligent 20-somethings who met on a train and spent a magical evening walking around Vienna before saying goodbye. The characters, Jesse and Celine, reconnected in 2004’s Before Sunset, a remarkable film that countered Sunrise’s focus on the intoxicating nature of possibility with a meditation on regret and paths not taken. This time, the characters walked around Paris, but the film ended on Jesse not leaving — skipping his plane home to his wife and child, staying with Celine. It was a more cynical and more romantic film than its predecessor. Now, in Before Midnight, Celine and Jesse are essentially (if not technically) married, with twin daughters. This time, their walk occurs in a small Greek town where an idyllic summer is winding down. Jesse regrets that

he’s not around to be a better father to the son from his broken first marriage; meanwhile, Celine has been offered a dream job in France. The film finds its groove, as Celine and Jesse finally find themselves alone, and their dialogue settles into a dance between the tender and the vicious. The surprise isn’t so much how imperfect that life is but rather how ordinary it is — and how such ordinariness breeds contempt. The question becomes whether a relationship, to survive, needs to maintain the illusions that it was founded on. We see the desperation in the face of the character who needs the illusion to continue, and the wariness in the face of the one who holds the power to shatter it. As with Sunrise and Sunset, Midnight’s final moment is both beautiful and more ambiguous than it might first seem. This time, however, the possibilities that it holds are potentially more poisonous than intoxicating.  — BILGE EBIRI

THIS IS THE END

S

eth Rogen and Evan Goldberg make their directorial debut with this comedy about the apocalypse coinciding with James Franco’s housewarming party. A who’s who of young talent, most of whom die before your eyes, are trapped in Franco’s new home. After the opening cataclysm, our survivors include Franco, Rogen, Jay Baruchel, Jonah Hill, Danny McBride and Craig Robinson. The funny film forces these and other celebrities to confront what exactly they contribute to society. And End offers enough to chew on that it might inspire similar parties — a chance to unwind with your favorite people and hammer out the specifics of what makes a person worth caring about. Let us hope that yours won’t end with demons and pits of magma. — JASON SHAWHAN

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19 - 7:00PM SCREENING AT ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE MAINSTREET ENTER-TO-WIN A COMPLIMENTARY TICKET! LOG ON TO GOFOBO.COM/RSVP AND INPUT THE FOLLOWING CODE: PITCHG0DT This film has been Rated R for teen drug and alcohol use, and for language including some brief sexual references. Please note: Passes are available on a first-come first-served basis. While supplies last. No purchase necessary. Limit one admit-two pass per person. Employees of participating sponsors are ineligible. Arrive early! Seating is first-come, first-served, except for members of the reviewing press. Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. Theater is not responsible for overbooking.

IN THEATERS JUNE 21

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CORNER COMEBACK

The Westport institution returns a little pricier but worth every penny.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

The Corner Restaurant • 4059 Broadway, 816-931-4401 • Hours: 6 a.m.–3 p.m. Sunday and Monday, 6 a.m.–1 a.m. Tuesday–Saturday • Price: $$–$$$

I

ANGELA C. BOND

t sounds crazy, but I know people — reasonable people — who won’t go back to the fiveyear-old Stroud’s in Fairway because, well, it’s not the old Stroud’s on 85th Street. The fried chicken tastes the same as it did in the original location, but I’ve had people scream at me that it doesn’t. Kansas Citians can be like that about their beloved dining spots. In 1980, Stan Glazer bought the iconic Wishbone Restaurant on Main Street and tinkered until the regulars stopped coming. Then he turned it into a nightclub. That failed, too. Modern Houlihan’s restaurants bear no resemblance to the quirky place that Joe Gilbert and Paul Robinson opened in an old Plaza haberdashery in the 1970s. That’s probably a good thing because a dozen corporate chains imitated the idea. For nearly two decades, I’ve heard people say they wished someone would open a restaurant like the Prospect of Westport, which was, to 1980s hipsters, what chef Michael Smith’s Extra Virgin is now (but with a very different menu). Every great restaurant has its day until, without warning, it becomes the culinary equivalent of Simon Le Bon or Huey Lewis. Simon who? The Prospect of what? That brings me to the Corner Restaurant, a news is that this month-old Corner is, in many ways, superior to the original. There’s a bar Westport institution for three decades, even if it serving fancy cocktails, and a chef with real had aged so badly by the time the doors locked credentials (Natasha Sears’ résumé includes for good in 2010 that the place looked like it had stints at Figlio and Plaza III) behind the line. last been cleaned when the cast from Saved By And the place has probably never been cleaner. the Bell was actually still in high school. The old Corner crowd has also been reThe space sat empty for three years when turning. On my three visits, I noticed that the the unthinkable happened. Two young restauclientele leaned heavily toward baby boomers. rateurs — Dawn Slaughter and Michael Pfeifer “We’ve been hearing a lot — revived the concept that of stories about the original Corner founder, the late Steve The Corner Restaurant Corner,” says Slaughter, who Friedman, had introduced in Eggs Benedict ........... $12.50 manages the dining room 1980: a laid-back, sexy diner Bananas Foster during the day. “Even Steve serving inexpensive homeFrench toast....................$12 Friedman’s family came in style dishes with decent Chicken and waffles....... $14 to check us out and told us lighting, good music and atHalf-order they loved it.” tractive servers. It was also Swoonin’ Biscuits ..........$6 Grilled-salmon BLT ........ $15 But the new incarnation very gay-friendly, which was of the Corner is also drawing something of a novelty in the the 20- and 30-somethings Reagan years, and welcoming of the most eccentric clientele, from drag who consistently patronize Westport’s shops and saloons. queens to religious fanatics. Slaughter and Pfeifer have painted the In the Corner’s heyday, customers happily stood outside for as long as an hour to get a dining room in earth tones (rust, clay, sand) and hung long burlap draperies at the pictable during the breakfast shift. In its last days, the staff would have been lucky to lure anyone ture windows. The sound system is tuned to an eclectic mix of music. (One afternoon, it into the dining room. When a restaurant has a long history filled with dramatic highs and was very folky, which a Birkenstock-wearing couple behind us really seemed to dig.) And lows, it becomes almost legendary. And legin shades of the old place, at least one of the ends (unless you’re talking about Cher or Mick servers is in a local band. Jagger) get only so many comebacks. The good

A fresh caprese salad is a summer cooler at the Corner. There has been some grousing that the new Corner’s prices are higher than its predecessor’s. They are. But the food quality is much improved, and I don’t think the prices are out of line. Still, even my nose got out of joint about forking over 10 bucks for an appetizer: five stringy stalks of asparagus wrapped in prosciutto and tempura-battered and flash-fried. They were tasty enough, but you couldn’t really share them. Slaughter has a reasonable retort for the menu gripes: “We buy our produce from local farmers. Our breads come from Bloom Bakery. We use farm-fresh eggs. We’re giving people really high quality, and we’re not a la carting everyone. Our breakfasts include potatoes and toast, and our sandwiches come with a side dish.” The dishes served at the new Corner are probably the best in a quarter-century. Portions are generous, and the bananas Foster French toast — fluffy, egg-and-vanilla-beansoaked brioche that tastes as light and comforting as the very best bread pudding in the city — is worth its $12 price tag. (There is, by the way, a brioche bread pudding on the dessert menu, but with cinnamon gelato instead of flambéed bananas.)

The sausage gravy on the Swoonin’ Biscuits may skimp on the sausage, but the creamy gravy is seasoned with an artist’s touch. And, yes, the Corner’s plate of chicken and waffles isn’t cheap, even by midtown standards, but the waffles’ wedges are exquisitely light, and the chicken wing and thigh are satisfyingly crisp. The eggs Benedict is offered with a choice of four toppings, but the best thing about this brunch standby is chef Sears’ simple, silky hollandaise — the first I’ve eaten in months that doesn’t taste like it started from a mix. The 21st-century version of the Corner is also much more sensitive to vegetarian and gluten-free diets. However, Slaughter seemed surprised when I asked if the eggs were cooked on the same part of the flattop grill as, say, the ham or the salmon fillet (used in the grilledsalmon BLT, which is very good, although the bitter radicchio isn’t an asset to the sandwich). “That hasn’t been an issue yet,” she said, “but we’ll discuss that with Natasha.” Last week, Slaughter, Pfeifer and Sears introduced dinner entrées to the menu, and Slaughter says they are “still tweaking that menu.” One dish that must never be tweaked: a first-rate burger, cooked to order and heaped with layers of boursin cheese, bacon jam and fried onion straws tucked between slices of toasted challah. It’s messy to eat but delicious. The savvy, cheery servers working here already seem to be on a first-name basis with many of the customers, including a couple of faces that I vaguely remember seeing in the 1980s — and they’re eating the same dishes they did back then. It’s a weird, culinary déjà vu, but the Corner was always a place where you expected the unexpected. It was 1985 while dining at a window table at the Corner when I nearly inhaled my cigarette (you could still smoke in the dining room) after overhearing a man at the next table ask his dining companion: “Have you ever killed somebody?” Because I had a massive hangover, I didn’t have the nerve — or the agility — to turn around to see who was sitting there. The new Corner’s tables don’t seem to be as close together as in the old arrangement, so my eavesdropping days may be as far away as the combination of scrambled eggs and a smoke. But if the food at the improved Corner stays this rewarding, then eating will be the primary entertainment.

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21

FAT C I T Y BY

— the hot, hot ghost pepper.

JON AT H A N BENDER

CHRIS MULLINS

GHOST HUNTING

Looking for local Bhut Jolokia

O

ne wing — how hot could it be? That’s what Nicolas Garcia told himself as he stared at the menu inside the Wing Dome a few years ago. The Seattle restaurant scores its chicken wings from one- to seven-alarm, with that highest a firehouse warning for your digestive system. “I realize now that it was probably the ghost chili,” Garcia says of that lone seven-alarm wing. “My mouth was on fire. It took three shots of ranch and five ice-cream sandwiches to cool off. The reason they call it the ghost chili is because you think you’re going to die.” Sitting on his porch in Waldo, the 31-yearold Garcia can laugh at his younger self, in part because the urban farmer has tamed what once bested him. On the patio table next to him is a collection of Mason jars filled with dried chilies, including the ghost variety, which he grew at his previous garden space, in Prairie Village. The Bhut Jolokia, better known by its spectral nickname, is the divine fire for heat fanatics. It clocks in at 1 million on the Scoville heat-unit scale (which measures the amount of capsaicin in a given pepper). A jalapeño typically tops out at about 8,000 Scoville units, and the pepper spray used by police begins at 2 million, which puts the ghost pepper somewhere between zesty table salsa and crowd control. The ghost pepper used to be available to

22

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Kansas City chiliheads only via the Internet (Craigslist had plants for sale for $3 last month), but it’s now in gardens and on shelves across the metro. Proceed with caution, though, because as one Bhutanese farmer told Cultivate Kansas City’s Ami Freeberg, “Three [ghost] peppers could kill an elephant.” Garcia, who is training as a line cook at the Farmhouse restaurant, purchased the greenhouse and adjacent home last December with his wife, Sarah. It sits on a little more than an acre near 81st Street and Main, and the couple have undertaken extensive renovations. Next year, it will be the base from which they launch their urban farm, Seven Seeds, where they will grow ghost peppers, tomatoes and leafy greens. In the past, Garcia has grown ghostchili plants at the Westside Local. (The urban garden that he maintains on a contract basis for the restaurant, at 17th Street and Summit, is a stop on Cultivate Kansas City’s Urban Grown Farms & Gardens Tour.) “We try and seek out things people aren’t growing, and that gets harder every year,” Garcia says. Urban Harvest, the aquaponic farm four blocks south on Summit, saw its first Chocolate Bhut Jolokia pepper appear last week. Farmer Eric Person has been tending to the plants at his indoor urban farm for the past two

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months; the peppers take 60–70 days to grow. “We’ve had lots of requests from the neighborhood to grow peppers,” Person says. “Anybody can grow jalapeños, so we wanted to grow stuff that’s unique.” The current crop of ghost peppers is destined for Rhythm & Booze, where it will likely find its way into the house salsa. But Person wants to continue growing peppers to sell to the public. He envisions people stopping by to get their hot-pepper fix at the farm’s open house on First Fridays. For those who can’t wait two months or don’t want to drop $5 on a packet of 10 seeds with only a 50-percent germination rate, Grinders introduced its Death Sauce in 2012. Contributing to its mouth-searing 337,000 Scoville units: ghost-chili powder, habanero mash and squid ink. (It also has inspired a series of bros-thinking-they’re-tough-only-to-discoverthey’re-not videos. Google it.) “I think people are becoming more adventurous eaters,” says Greg Dennis, Original Juan’s vice president of sales. “Heat is just something the American palate has gotten used to over the past decade. People were just using standard Louisiana hot sauce, but now they want some heat with flavor.” There’s no shortage of heat at Original Juan. The Source, which is pure pepper ex-

Sarah (left), Jesus and Nicolas Garcia tract, clocks in at 7.1 million on the Scoville scale. This is what you’d deploy against a pack of unwanted elephants. Regular human guests might prefer the Da’ Bomb Ghost Pepper Hot Sauce (22,800 Scoville units), made with habaneros and Jolokia powder. “Extreme hot sauces give you an endorphin rush,” Dennis says. “Your body’s natural reaction is to pump endorphins into your system when the pain hits your chemoreceptors. Some people call it pain. Some call it pleasure.” In search of the new hotness, Original Juan is experimenting with the Trinidad Scorpion, the world’s hottest pepper at 1.4 million Scoville units, and the Fatali pepper (as many as 300,000 Scoville units). Dennis says a few test bottles of the Fatali sauce are available in the sample store on Southwest Boulevard. Garcia, who continues to eat ghost-chili peppers (though not in wing form), has a word of advice for the uninitiated. “One ghost chili makes 3 gallons of chili pretty dang hot, 5 gallons of chili with a nice back heat, and 1 gallon of you’re-mad-atsomebody,” Garcia says. “A little goes a very, very long way.”

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MUSIC

G EE WHIZ

ee Watts doesn’t look like one of the two men sharing a blunt in the dugout of the baseball field at Parade Park, southeast of the intersection of Truman Road and the Paseo. But there’s nobody else in the park on this rainy Wednesday afternoon. Watts said he’d be here. Maybe the 22-year-old rapper looks older in person? “What you lookin’ for? Herb? Oxy?” says one of the men. “We got you.” Watts calls on the phone. “I see you, man,” he says, laughing. “I’m over by the basketball courts. Hold up.” The drug dealers saunter off down the park’s asphalt trail, and Watts emerges from a friend’s Ford Mustang. He’s skinny, with a bit of a baby face; in the park in the early afternoon, MORE he scans the area like a truant student cutting class. But in the world of T A INE hip-hop, where YouTube ONL .COM PITCH views, SoundCloud pages and Twitter cosigns function as blurry currencies, Watts is, at the moment, one of KC’s hottest rappers. In a sense, he got his start here, at Parade Park. “This one, the park at 11th and Olive, the park over off Spruce,” Watts says. “When I was 2, 3 years old, my folks would take me on Sunday afternoons, when the park was really jumpin’, and I’d stand on little milk carts and perform for people.” But it’s just in the past three years that Watts has gotten serious about rapping. He has had slots opening for Young Jeezy at the Beaumont Club and Nipsey Hussle at the Bottleneck. He also performed at the Nice Kicks showcase at South by Southwest in 2012, alongside Action Bronson and Rockie Fresh. But Watts owes most of his current heat to Kendrick Lamar, the Compton rapper whom MTV crowned the Hottest MC in the Game on its annual list earlier this year. Back in 2011, though — before Dr. Dre’s cosign effectively launched Lamar’s career — Lamar wasn’t on the radar of many people. Watts saw him in an interview segment about West Coast rap and tweeted at him, not thinking much of it. “Back then, he didn’t have many followers, or at least not so many that he couldn’t see my tweet,” Watts says of Lamar. “So he tweeted back at me, and ever since then, we’ve had a decent little relationship on Twitter.” In May 2011, Lamar tweeted a sort of cosign: “Follow this young boi. You’ll hear his name one day @gee_watts.” In 2012, Lamar came through KC on tour with Drake and A$AP Rocky.

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“He hit me up two days before the show and said he had some backstage passes for me,” Watts says. “So I go backstage, meet him, and he was like, ‘I got a song for you to hop on.’ Originally the plan was that he’d do a verse on one of my tracks. But after he blew up, it made more sense for me to hop on one of his. More people would hear it that way. “So I hopped on his tour bus, and he was like, ‘This is the track I want you on. Take it with you, live with it, marinate with it, write your 16 and send it back to me,’ ” Watts continues. “But I’m thinking, ‘There’s a good chance I’ll work on this, send it back, and nobody will ever hear it.’ I mean, Kendrick’s busy, he’s huge — he’s got a lot of shit going on. So I said, ‘I don’t need all day to write a bar. I’m a fuckin’ rapper. I’ll go write a verse and record it right here.’ So that’s what I did — wrote a bar in about seven minutes on that tour bus, then recorded it. And he [Lamar] listened to it and was like, ‘Damn, that’s hard.’ ” But when Lamar’s major-label debut, Good Kid, M.A.A.D City, arrived in October 2012, Watts’ track wasn’t on it. Watts had the finished product just sitting around in an e-mail file. “I pride myself on being a real man,” Watts says. “So I didn’t put the song out. You name me a starving artist that would have a song with one of the biggest niggas in the game just sitting in their e-mail and they don’t do nothing with it. “So fi nally, I was like, ‘This ain’t gonna come out, so I hit him [Lamar] up and was

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Gee Watts looks to turn a

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big cosign into a career.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

them by rote: “1608 East Spruce, 313 Jackson … .”) But for high school, he was able to use an aunt’s Lenexa address to get into Kansas public schools — he attended Olathe Northwest and graduated from Olathe North. “I was able to get an education outside the inner city,” he says. “And in doing that, I was able to see the other side of things, the nicer side of life, what life should be like for everybody. I’ve got homies pulling up to school in Lexuses and stuff. I’m getting dropped off in the hood in cars nicer than my mama and daddy have. So I learned how to maneuver in both circles, how to act and handle myself around that crowd and my everyday lifestyle.” Naturally, that seeps into Watts’ raps. “Premature Hate,” a standout cut, comes on like standard-issue ghetto rap: Money over bitches/We don’t love them hos/Bitches ain’t shit. But as the song progresses, it reveals itself as commentary on the insidious trappings of hood culture. “I feel like a lot of youth today are being conditioned to have hate in their hearts,” he says of the song. “When I was growing up, I was playHands up: Watts. ing video games like NBA Jam and shit. My 4-year-old cousin be loggin’ on to Call of like, ‘What’s good?’ and he didn’t say nothDuty. You know? ing, he’s busy,” Watts says. “So I bulled it. I Despite touring offers and attention from was like, ‘Fuck that, that song’s mine now.’ national hip-hop blogs such as Nah Right, So we added a chorus onto it, and it took off HipHopDX and 2 Dope Boyz, Watts says getdecently, and then when he [Lamar] saw it, ting traction locally has been frustrating. he gave us a little stamp of approval. So we’re “We go to California, Chicago, Atlanta, all good, he messaged me on Twitter, said he New York, and any new nigga that has a liked the track. But I left my song with the hottest nigga original verse on there, the in the game, their song is Gee Watts one from the bus, because gonna be played on the Thursday, June 13, at Czar I wanted the world to hear radio there,” Watts says. what I wrote that day on the “[Hot] 103 Jamz won’t even bus, and what he wrote, too. touch my shit. I got a track I wanted to go head-to-head with the nigga with Kendrick Lamar! What I need, Jay-Z? who’s supposedly the best right now and see You know what I’m saying? Who do we need, where I come out. And you know, even if I Tupac? didn’t out-rap him, I held my own at least.” “Ron Ron is the one of the hottest niggas Watts indeed holds his own on that song from around here. His video has 200,000 (“Watts R.I.O.T.”), though it’s far from the views,” Watts continues. “Why is Hot 103, strongest track on his new mixtape, Watts which is supposed to be the urban station, Up, released in April. Listening, it’s not hard not playing him when you can drive up and to see why Watts might have felt an initial down any block around here and hear ‘Hey aesthetic connection to Lamar. Lamar is Honey’? The radio around here needs to get neither a thug rapper nor a brainy conscious its act together.” rapper. He’s just a dude from Compton who But Watts isn’t deterred. He’s committed pens the kind of really insightful lyrics to music full time for the moment. It’s a daily about gang life and life in the hood that are grind. “Still here, still stuck, still broke. Still tough to create unless you’ve spent some … still, you know?” he says, walking to his time outside the hood. car. “That’s just the hood, I guess. But some Watts has a little of that going on. He has of us got to make it out this motherfucker.” lived at 12 different addresses, mostly on the north and east sides of the city. (He recites E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

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MUSIC

SHIPPING OUT

Hospital Ships make some big moves with Destruction in Yr Soul. Also: They’re literally moving.

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decade or so ago, shortly before Jordan Geiger joined the Lawrence post-rock group the Appleseed Cast on keyboards, the group did a West Coast tour opening for emo icons the Get Up Kids. The hope, as with all opening acts, was that an established group like the Get Up Kids could help expose a fellow local band like the Appleseed Cast to new fans. A few weeks ago, Geiger returned to Lawrence after another West Coast tour with the Appleseed Cast. He’s no longer in that band, though. On this trip to the Pacific states, the Appleseed Cast was the established group, and Geiger’s current band, Hospital Ships, was the one hoping to capitalize on its fanbase. “The crowds were really big, and they were really welcoming to us,” Geiger says in the living room of his Lawrence home, a bowl of roasted vegetables in hand and his beloved white cat, Marshmallow, not far from sight. “It [The Appleseed Cast] has a very loyal fanbase, and I think they know that [lead singer and co-founder] Chris Crisci brings mostly bands that he loves on tour. So they were really open to the band that opens up because they know that there’s a connection there.” Geiger describes Crisci and other Appleseed Cast members, both past and present Out of the woods: Hospital Ships. — Hospital Ships’ guitarist-vocalist Taylor Holenbeck and drummer Nathan Wilder are pants producer,” mixed the album in Dallas. members of the Appleseed Cast — as men- It’s being released by Graveface Records in Savannah, Georgia. The label is helmed by tors when it comes to touring. “I wouldn’t be Ryan Graveface, whom Geiger describes as doing music still without him or, like, have known how to keep going,” Holenbeck says an artist-friendly person interested in “making things that will last and that you would of Crisci. (The two musicians also worked want to last forever. He’s pretty much a huge together in the group Old Canes.) “If you’re big enough to make it out of supporter of the band and lets us do whatever we want, within reason.” Lawrence and tour, then you try to help your For example: the group’s recently released friends out,” Geiger adds. For the time being, Geiger, Holenbeck and video for “Servants,” a six-minute, avantWilder, along with bassist Nate Dixey, are garde mix of flamboyant costuming, foodcolored corn syrup and closer to home, where they homoerotic battle rituals. play a June 13 show at the Hospital Ships, with (One viewer on YouTube Replay Lounge in support of Cowboy Indian Bear summed it up pretty well: Hospital Ships’ third album. Thursday, June 13, “I feel sticky now.”) Andy Ahead of its June 18 release, at the Replay Lounge Byers, who received his Destruction in Yr Soul has alundergraduate degree in ready snagged accolades and ceramics from the Kansas City Art Institute, critical acclaim from Pitchfork and Stereogum directed the video and constructed most of for the epic, high-energy indie-rock track “If the costumes. It Speaks.” “I don’t remember exactly what was going It seems possible that Destruction in through my mind leading up to it, but I just Yr Soul could connect with audiences in a kind of had this flash of an idea one night,” broader way than previous Hospital Ships Geiger says. “‘Servants’ is a song about feeling albums. Well-known sound engineer and producer Ed Rose recorded some of the tracks defeated at the state of the world and wanting the end of the world to come, [which is] a (Geiger did the rest inside his Lawrence theme that’s recurring throughout Destruction home); Grammy-nominated John Congleton, a friend whom Geiger calls a “fancy- in Yr Soul. I wanted the video to be beautiful,

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uncomfortable, disgusting, funny — all of those things.” Since the release of Hospital Ships’ first two records, Geiger has traveled a lot, touring in the band Shearwater and living in New York; Austin, Texas; and Columbus, Ohio. Settling back into the Lawrence scene, he felt a sense of relief, he says. He could slow down a bit and work more with others on a well-polished final product. “You can’t write a record and have a band without consistency, without practicing, without seeing each other, without talking about the ideas,” Geiger says. “I hadn’t had that for years, and so, it was really nice to be able to build that. I mean, it’s just as much about building a relationship between the people as it is the music, allowing, hopefully, everyone to have their say and influence in the music.” The Lawrence stay isn’t for long. In two weeks, Hospital Ships departs for an East Coast tour. Pitchfork love hasn’t yet made touring any less of a grind — “$100 to $150, if you’re lucky,” he says of the upcoming gig paydays. “But it’s super-important,” Geiger adds. “I love recording and I love playing music, but another thing I love is traveling. I love playing music in other towns and stuff, but most of touring is traveling. You just see crazy shit because you’re in weird situations constantly. For instance, the van got broken into, but

A DR I A NNE DE W E E S E

then, like, two days later, we were sailing in the harbor in San Diego. It was one of the most beautiful days I’ve ever seen.” But is Lawrence where Hospital Ships ultimately wants to stay? Geiger smiles sheepishly. Yes, Lawrence has been a great home for many years, but the band is moving to Austin in the fall. “It seems like a really good opportunity for the band, like a larger bubble to throw ourselves into,” Holenbeck says of the move 700 miles south. “Also, we’ve gone down there a lot in this last year, and I’ve been falling in love with it.” Still, it’ll be hard to leave Kansas behind. “I love it here. I love the weather, the people here. I love the scenery and Lawrence. I love the music scene here,” says Holenbeck, a Manhattan native who has lived only in Kansas. “This place is where I’ve learned how to be in a band and was given the opportunity to do it. It’s going to be hard to leave that.” The new Hospital Ships record “is just the tip of the iceberg of this lineup,” Geiger says. “I think the next thing we do is going to be even more weird and sprawling. I just want to stretch out and get weird on the new stuff. “I’m not really sure what the future holds,” Geiger says. Holenbeck chimes in softly, “But who is?”

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J A Z Z B E AT THE RICH WHEELER QUARTET

He can be heard in the band Alaturka playing intimate Turkish jazz. He does time in the People’s Liberation Big Band, playing the most eclectic large-ensemble music this side of Mingus. He plays some of the weirdest music this side of the moon in Snuff Jazz. Rich Wheeler is one of the most versatile and in-demand tenor-saxophone sidemen in Kansas City today, with ideal tone and solo inventiveness that’s just right for each group. So it’s a treat to hear Wheeler fronting his own ensemble of original contemporary jazz. With T.J. Martley on keyboards, Bill McKemy on bass and Sam Wisman on drums, the Rich Wheeler Quartet takes command of Take Five Coffee + Bar Saturday night. The Rich Wheeler Quartet, 8 p.m. Saturday, June 15, at Take Five Coffee + Bar (5336 West 151st Street, Leawood, 913-948-5550) — LARRY KOPITNIK

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MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

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Other shows worth seeing this week.

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T H U R S D AY, J U N E 13 Josh Abbott Band: 7 p.m., free. KC Live! Stage at the Power & Light District, 13th St. and Grand. The Black Lillies Living Room Session: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Paula Cole, Johnny Bangs: 7 p.m., free. Town Center Plaza, 5000 West 119th Street, Overland Park. Hospital Ships, Cowboy Indian Bear, Lucas Oswald: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. J.T. Hodges, Dean Alexander: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band with Trampled Under Foot: Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

F R I D AY, J U N E 1 4

The Mountain Goats (left), Dwight Yoakam

Father John Misty

The best indie-rock breakout story of 2012 was Josh Tillman’s: He quit his gig drumming for Fleet Foxes, moved to Los Angeles, and released an album under the name Father John Misty. That album, Fear Fun, climbed onto a lot of year-end lists, and deservedly so — it’s full of smart, psych-tinged, alt-country songs with sticky melodies. He also gets points for his next-level stage presence, which is intense in a Neil Diamond–on-peyote way. Last time through Lawrence, Tillman was at the Bottleneck; he graduates to Granada status for this performance. Sunday, June 16, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

The Mountain Goats

The past 10 or so years have seen John Darnielle, lead Mountain Goat, move beyond the gritty, acoustic-guitar-and-four-trackrecorder aesthetic on which he built much of his fervent fanbase. These days, you’re likely to hear instrumentation like cellos and pianos alongside his guitar strums and earnest whine, but his gift with words is still as dazzling as ever. Opening here is the Baptist Generals, a ramshackle folk act from Denton, Texas, that shares a bit of Darnielle’s literary bent. The group just released Jackleg Devotional to the Heart, the long-awaited follow-up to No Silver/No Gold,

a 2003 record that’s getting close to qualifying for cult status. Wednesday, June 19, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Dwight Yoakam

A couple of years ago, a friend played me Dwight Yoakam’s “Ain’t That Lonely Yet,” which I have listened to approximately 700 times since. That discovery has prompted a fair amount of digging into Yoakam’s back catalog, an endeavor I highly recommend. Yoakam’s sound — a mix of Bakersfield classicism (Buck Owens, Merle Haggard), shitkicker country rock, and pop — peaked commercially in the late 1980s and early ’90s, but it has aged pretty damn well. His most recent album, 3 Pears, features collabs with Kid Rock and Beck, and I suspect we’ll see more and more younger artists finding inspiration in Yoakam’s work in the coming years. Sunday, June 16, at VooDoo Lounge (Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Drive, 816-472-7777)

The Reverend Horton Heat

The Reverend Horton Heat has been doing its rockabilly thing (or psychobilly or punkabilly or whatever ’billy niche you might deem the Dallas band to be in) since 1985. The group flirted with major-label success in the 1990s

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but has since settled into the road-dog lifestyle, and few summers pass around here without a show from the Reverend. The band is joined here by Dirtfoot, a rowdy bluegrass act that employs saxophones and banjos; local rockabilly act Rumblejetts; and the semi-local, cheerful roots-rockers Ha Ha Tonka. It’ll sound like summer in the Crossroads, that’s for sure. Friday, June 14, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 785-749-3434)

Mumford & Sons

Perhaps, given how dominant nostalgia fetishism has become in our culture, it should not be surprising that a group of British folksingers wearing old-timey vests and harmonizing bombastically over 4/4 thumps is one of the most successful bands in the world. But I’m still awfully floored by Mumford & Sons’ rapid, relentless ascent. I’ll say this: They’ve changed the music landscape more than just about any act in the last decade. I’ll say this, too: They’ve changed the quarterly reports at suspender-manufacturing companies. This show is sold out, obviously, but there’s always Craigslist and Stubhub. Monday, June 17, at Cricket Wireless Amphitheater (633 North 130th Street, Bonner Springs, 913-721-3400)

K E Y .................................................................. Twang

........................................... Lots of Cowboy Hats

............................................................. Stomping

................................................................... Vests

.................................Biggest Band on the Planet

......................................... Possible Pompadours

............................................... Legitimate Poetry

.................................................. So Many Beards

.............................................................Folk Rock

..................................................................Swoon

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Ben Kenney, Ask An Adult: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Think Floyd USA: 7 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454.

S U N D AY, J U N E 16

M O N D AY, J U N E 17 Everest, Old Lights, Dean Monkey & the Dropouts: 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

T U E S D AY, J U N E 18 Tedeschi Trucks Band, the Revivalists: 7 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454.

W E D N E S D AY, J U N E 19 Authority Zero, Ballyhoo!, Versus the World: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Bad Veins, the Rich Hands: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Kevin Heffernan and Steve Lemme: 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Popa Chubby and Duke Robillard: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

FUTURECAST

......................................................Living Legend

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S AT U R D AY, J U N E 15

The Flatlanders with Joe Ely, Jimmie Dale Gilmore & Butch Hancock: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

..................................................Pick of the Week

the pitch

Cartel, State Champs, the Strive: 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. D.J.P, DJ Clockwerk, HoodNasty, Kid Twist: The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Flobots, Wheelchair Sports Camp, Vertigone, the Abnorm: 7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Mundy: 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Saving Abel, the Art of Dying: KC Live! Stage at the Power & Light District, 13th St. and Grand.

THURSDAY 20 UMB Big Bash with Huey Lewis and the News: The Midland TUESDAY 25 Streetlight Manifesto: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 28 Grand Marquis CD-release show: Knuckleheads Saloon

J U LY MONDAY 1 The Rocket Summer: The Granada, Lawrence

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WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6775). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 13

JUNE:

12: The Crayons 13: Kenny Wayne Shepherd w/ Trampled Under Foot 14: Mundy LR Walking with Cash Atlantic Express 15: Making Movies The Rakin Twins LR

JUNE 16TH, 2013 flatlanders

joe ely, jimmie dale gilmore & butch hancock

R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Appropriate Grammar, Knife Crime, Electric Lungs, 9 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Big Medicine Gang, the Outer Circle. Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Rich Berry. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Kris Bruder’s Freight Train, 7 p.m.

HIP-HOP/RAP Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Gee Watts, OT, Bay Hamp, Jay Rel, Sanger Mimi, Stick Figa, DJ Cash, Riley, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. A 90’s Jam to Benefit the Oklahoma Storm Victims Hosted by Smokey Monroe with Dutch Newman, Zothejerk, DJ Nuveau, 10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Gerald Spaits Quartet featuring Charlie Perkins, 7 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Kathleen Holeman & Roger Wilder, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Michael Pagan, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC

nace brothers roots of steel 19: Duke Robillard & Popa Chubby 20: Cody Canada & The Departed w/ Outlaw Jim 22: Leon Russell Indigenous LR

Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. John Keck’s Devil’s and Angels, 8 p.m. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Drew Six, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Drew Freeland Band, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. M-Bird Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Phantoms of the Opry, Victor and Penny, 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Mike Smith & Friends, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Max Justus, Y(our) Fri(end). Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Angel Salazar, 8 p.m.

F R I D AY 1 4 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Going to Hell in a Leather Jacket, Groovethemasses, the Sluts, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Hammerlord, Troglodyte, Attack on Uranus, Marasmus, Koktopus, 10 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

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B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Doug Macleod. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Dirty Rhythm Band, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling and the Late for Dinner Band. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Cold Sweat.

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Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Atlantic Express, 8 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rick Bacus Trio, 5:30 p.m.; Justin Andrew Murray Band, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. J.P. Soars and the Red Hots, Junebug & the Porchlights.

DJ Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. DJ Josh Nehama. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. I <3 Gusto. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Nartan and the Record Machine, 10 p.m. Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816-679-0076. Marcus Shadden, Allen Michael. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Book of Gaia, 8:30 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Angela Hagenbach Trio: Strings on the Green, 4 p.m.; Max Groove Trio, 7-11 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816215-2954. Mark Lowrey, 9 p.m. E MOR The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Dan Doran, 7:30 p.m.; Chris Hazelton’s Boogaloo 7, 10 p.m. S G IN The Majestic Restaurant: 931 LIST E AT Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick IN ONL M O Gilbert, 4 p.m.; Joe DeFio, 5 p.m. PITCH.C The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Pat Adams Trio, 8 p.m.

CLUB

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Betse Ellis CD-release show with Adam Lee. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Bulletproof Tiger, Cowgirl’s Train Set. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Walkin with Cash, 6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Harmed Brothers, Calamity Cubes, 10 p.m.

COVERS Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Travelers Guild. The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. The Disappointments. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Love Pump.

VA R I E T Y Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. Karaoke with Jim Bob, 9 p.m. Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Earthquake, 8 & 10:30 p.m. Kick Comedy Theater: 4010 Pennsylvania. Adam Maxwell, 8 & 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Andrew Foshee CD Release Party, Lucas Oswald, 7 p.m., free. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Angel Salazar, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Comedy Night, 8 & 10 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 15 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Exit 54 Rock Showcase with 1.1.1, Ugly Americans, On the Fly, Uncle Jam, Baloney Ponyz, 2 p.m., free. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Marmalakes, Wild Child, Shakey Graves, 8 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Jason and the Punknecks, St. Dallas & the Sinners. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Red Velvet Crush EP-release show with I Am Nation, Fight the Quiet, the Amends, Root & Stem, 6 p.m.

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Loads of Hound Dogs, Darrel Lea, 8 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Hammerlord, Troglodyte, Attack on Uranus, Marasmus, Koktopus, 8 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray’s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2-5:30 p.m.; Mike Bourne and Atlanta Boogie. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Blackout Drunk. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rick Bacus Trio, 5:30 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Laurie Morvan Band.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Tiny Horse, Jessie Torrisi and the Please Please Me, Amy Farrand and the Gospel Sensation, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Netherfriends, Karma Vision, CS Luxem, 10 p.m.

DJ Ambassador Hotel: 1111 Grand, 816-298-7700. Gossip with Paul DeMatteo, Jeffrey B., Adam Bryce, Scott Kaiser, 8 p.m., free. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. DJ Martin Bush. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. #Cake with DJ G Train & Approach. The Jones Pool: 10 E. 13th St. Champagne Showers with Eric Coomes and Allen Michael. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Approach, 10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Sons of Brasil, 4-7 p.m.; Eboni Fondren Trio, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Rich Wheeler Quartet, 8 p.m.

COVERS The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Robe, 9 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Liverpool.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Brendan MacNaughton. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Rankin Twins, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Sara Morgan, 9 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. UFC #161: Barao vs. Wineland, 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Earthquake, 7 & 10 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Making Movies, Parranderos, Trio Atzlan, 9 p.m. Shark Bar: 1340 Grand, 816-442-8140. Shark Tank Party. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Angel Salazar, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. The Art of Miss Conception, 7:30 p.m. Uptown Theater: 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Girls with Guitars: Jen Foster, Kristie Stremel, Corday, Summer Osborn, Dirty Dorothy, 6 p.m.

S U N D AY 16 I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Nearly Flightless, 88er, Skypiper, 9 p.m.

DJ Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Bad Music Sundays with Brett Dietrich, 3:30 p.m.

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RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Generationals, Young Empires, 10 p.m.; Generationals, Young Empires, 10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE

DJ

Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Bram Wijnands stride piano, 7 p.m.; Paul Shinn Trio, 10 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill’s jazz brunch, 11 a.m.; Mark Lowrey jazz jam, 6 p.m.

The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Bring It Back Tuesdays with DJ G Train, 10 p.m., no cover. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Futuro with Sigrah, Nmezee and special guests, 10 p.m. Sol Cantina: 408 E. 31st. St., 816-931-8080. DJ Highnoone and DJ Ashton Martin.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. KC Bear Fighters, 2 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Nace Brothers annual Roots of Steel Father’s Day show, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Amy Farrand, Anna Vogelzang, Camilla Camille, 8 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Shakey Graves, Wild Child, Marmalakes, 7:30 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Irish Museum and Cultural Center: 30 W. Pershing Rd., Ste. 700, 816-474-3848. An Seisiun, a traditional Irish jam session, 1-4 p.m., free. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. KKFI All City Jam Super Jam, 1-6 p.m. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night with Dennis Nickell, Rick Eidson and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816-322-2779. Rockin’ Blues, Brews & BBQ Jam, 4-8 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke, 8 p.m. Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. Prestige Poker League, 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Earthquake, 7 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Angel Salazar, 7 p.m.

M O N D AY 17 I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Steady Breather, Josh Powell and the Great Train Robbery, Storm Circus, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Pressed And, My Rain in My Face, Avon Lady, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Fontaine Classic, Manbear, the Gypsy Bone, 10 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

Live Music Live Music 7 nights 7 nights a week

a week

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States, 9 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Open Mic with Jon Theobald, 7 p.m. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816-322-2779. Acoustic open mic with Brad Allen, 7-10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Jonny Green and Jake Stanton open mic and jam session, 8 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Opera Supper, 6:30 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Costume Night with Tanya McNaughty and Jadey McJuicy, 9:30 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. The Ben and Brad Show, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Coast 2 Coast Live, 7 p.m.

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R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

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I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L

Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sunday Funday with DJ G Train. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Sunday Soul with DJ Jochen, 10 p.m.

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Torn the Fuck Apart, Face of Oblivion, A Plague of Faith, Waltz of the Rabid, Damned by the Pope, 8 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Mount Moriah, Jesse Sykes, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Paramedic, One Year Later, Origins, Emperean, 8 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rick Bacus Trio. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m.

WORLD/REGGAE The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Irie KC — reggae night, 9 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Songwriter Showcase with Scott Ford, 7 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Jonny Green, 8:30 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Brendan MacNaughton.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Open jam with El Barrio Band, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays’ Open Blues Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

W E D N E S D AY 19 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Flannigan’s Right Hook, 9:30 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge with the Jodi Austin Band, 7:30 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 8 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Bourbon & Bands Open Jam. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Singer-songwriter jam session with Tyler Gregory. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground open-mic series, 9-11 p.m. Woodsweather Café: 1414 W. Ninth St., 816-472-6333. Blues Jam with the Dave Hays Band, 7-10 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Charlie Hooper’s: 12 W. 63rd St., 816-361-8841. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 7:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Weirdo Wednesday Supper Club with Annie Thrax, Diamond Dan, Doug Marshall, Terrance Moore, Quirk & Ruckus, 8 p.m. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. Karaoke. Snow & Co.: 1815 Wyandotte, 816-214-8921. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 7:30 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Brett Morin, 8 p.m.

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Army Wife in Training Dear AWIT: By giving yourself a break. You

did some shitty things, but you can look on them as unforgivable betrayals (and as pro-

j u n e 1 3 - 1 9, 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

logue) or you can look at them as important life lessons learned before making a formal and (hopefully) final commitment. Stay away from booze, get tested for STIs, and stuff those illadvised and booze-soaked experiences down the memory hole. fessional dominant. I was OK with it because I assumed all her clients were men. (We are lesbians.) It turns out that three different straight couples are regular clients. I feel she should have disclosed this information to me. Can I insist that she stop seeing male/female couples?

Dear Dan: I’m a lost little lesbian. I’ve been with my partner for four years. She’s 27, and I’m 26. My girlfriend deployed to Afghanistan, and I was an angel for the first four months. Then after an argument on Skype, I went to confide in a friend. We cooked dinner, drank and chatted. The next thing I knew, it was 5 a.m., and I was on the couch half-dressed. I never told my girlfriend. Seven months after my first slip-up, we found out that she’d be leaving again. During her second deployment, I was out with friends and heavily intoxicated. I slept with a random person. I did the same thing five months later. None of these people meant anything. My girlfriend is back, and we’re planning a wedding, and I can’t bring myself to break her heart. Many nights I find it impossible to sleep. I’ve identified that drinking is a major problem, and I’m finished with it. I know that the things I’ve done won’t happen again. How do I get past the mistakes I’ve made?

the pitch

D A N S AVA G E

just moved in with my girlfriend of 10 months. This is a great relationship, but here’s the thing: I like to smoke pot, and pot makes her uncomfortable. We’ve talked about it a lot, and I’ve been up-front with her. I don’t smoke that often, but I don’t like feeling guilty. I’ve considered banishing pot from my life, but I know that some part of me would always resent her for not letting me be who I am. To her credit, she doesn’t want me to stop smoking, but she gets angry and blames herself for the whole problem. I feel like I’m asking her to change a pretty fundamental belief and I don’t know how fair that is.

renders a person incapable of taking yes for an answer? (Or maybe it’s cunnilingus? Does Michael Douglas have the same problem?) Your girlfriend isn’t asking you to stop smoking pot. She recognizes that she’s the one in this relationship with a drug problem. She’s giving you a great big yes, and I think you should take it. But if you insist on viewing this as a problem — on being a couple of cliché lesbians who feel they have to operate their relationship on the consensus model or someone is being oppressed — then this issue will be an endless source of anxiety and drama. Better to agree to disagree, smoke when the girlfriend isn’t around, and return the favor by letting her enjoy something that you don’t without pitching fits about it.

34

BY

Dear Dan: My girlfriend of one month is a pro-

Dear Dan: I’m queer and mostly into women, but

with a severe attraction to one guy. We’re close friends and hang out all the time. A few weeks ago, he came back to my place, and we made out for 15 minutes before he said he’s not really attracted to me. We made out a little more. A few days later, he told me again that he’s not physically attracted to me. We’ve always been touchy (we’re shirtless around each other a lot), and I’m struggling to believe him. There also were two instances in which he moved in on a woman I had expressed an interest in. He said he won’t do it again, but doesn’t that say something about him?

Wants Hetero Affections Tamed Dear WHAT: This guy sounds like a narcissistic douchebag with a sadistic streak. Telling someone mid-makeout session that you’re not really attracted to them is cruel, getting half-naked with someone who’s into you when you’re not into them is cruel, and swooping down on girls whom your queer girlfriend has expressed an interest in is cruel and an asshole move. I’m sure this guy has wonderful qualities, and you don’t have to cut him out of your life. But you do need to be less open with him emotionally, socially and sexually — no touchy-touchy, no makeout sessions, no partial disrobing, no pointing out girls you’re interested in. Or express an interest in girls you don’t think are hot. Hear the Savage Lovecast, savagelovecast.com.

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REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL PROPERTY AUCTION Saturday, June 15, 2013 at 10:00am Home To Be Auctioned First

8842 Pine St, Lenexa

Park Apartments

First Class Living in Downtown Overland Park

2 BR/1 Bath in Overland Park

Only $655!

913.381.6666 • www.parkapartments.org theparkaptsleasing@yahoo.com 79th & Metcalf, Overland Park KS

Bring in this ad for $10 off application fee or deposit!

4 Bedroom 4.5 Bath Home in Woodland Reserve Property to be auctioned includes 30+ Guns, Knives, Bayonets, Coins, 2004 Escalade, Furniture, Collectibles & More. Visit website for details/photos. www.UCNRA.com

2, 3, & 4 BEDROOM HOMES FOR RENT in Midtown Kansas City.

Minimal qualifications for applicants.

No application fee. $250 deposit.

CALL TODAY FOR MORE INFO!

816.309.0993

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CAREER EDUCATION

Life’s good as a Medical Assistant

MON

8 MONTHS is all it takes! *

• Medical Assistant • Pharmacy Technician NEW! • Dental Assistant • Medical Office Administration We also offer training for: • Health Information Technology NEW Online Option! • Physical Therapist Assistant • Nursing • Practical Nursing • Dental Hygiene • Respiratory Therapy

y, June 15! Open House Saturda

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For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program, and other important information, please visit our website at www.concorde.edu/disclosures.

ARTICI DP PA

YELL

3239 Broadway • Kansas City, MO 64111 • www.concorde4me.com Accredited Member, ACCSC. *Program lengths vary. Military Tuition Assistance Program now available.

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1.888.665.4104

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Best Price Apts in Olathe! Torries Chase Apartments

1 BR starting at $575 2 BR starting at $675 913.782.8800 • www.torrieschase.com torrieschase@yahoo.com 139th & Mur-Len, Olathe KS, 66062

Bring in this ad for $10 off application fee or deposit!

ATTENTION: EX-OFFENDERS & AT RISK JOB SEEKERS Do you need job placement assistance? Do you need your criminal record expunged?

Vehicle & housing available for Felons & At Risk Job Seekers Printing and general office services available Wills, Divorces, Child Support, Civil & Criminal Motions Filed Contact: Beyond The Conviction for these and other career and life barrier removal services. (Some SeRViCe FeeS APPly)

816-842-4975 or 816-718-7423 • beyondtheconviction.org Sí Habla Espanol/Asian/Korean

HILTON PRESIDENT IS NOW HIRING u

Breakfast Server & Host u Valet Driver u Room Attendant u Cook & Dishwasher u AM & PM Host

Other Openings available, call our Job Hotline. 816-303-1696 Pre-screen Interviews: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday 8:30am - Noon & 1:00-3:00pm

1329 Baltimore Kansas City, MO 64105

how does half off sound?

BUY SELL RENT &

.com

Classifieds

Are you out of housing options? Have Credit Problems? Previous Evictions?

We rent to the rent challenged

Holiday Apartments Studios FREE Downtown Area

$126/WEEK $150/DEPOSIT*

* Restrictions apply

Month to Month Lease! On Site Loundry Facility

All Utilities Cable TV (816) 221-1721 Paid

APPLICATION WHEN YOU BRING IN THIS AD pitch.com

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the pitch

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APTS/JOBS/STUFF

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816.218.6702 816.218.6759

Every Personal Injury Case Deserves Focused & Personal Representation

SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606

PLAZAINJURYLAW.COM 435 Nichols Rd, Ste. 200 OFFICE: 816.977.2680 CELL: 617.938.8619 donovan@plazainjurylaw.com

Scared? Anxious? Confused?

Help Is Here!

DWI, Solicitation, Traffic, Internet Crimes, Hit & Run, Power & Light Violations.

CAREER EDUCATION

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Need PC Help? I'll Come To You! Zombie Free Computer Services Call Nick @ (913) 633-0538

FREE BANKRUPTCY CONSULTATION

KC MARRIOTT-Downtown

LAW OFFICE OF JENNIFER DODSON

Event Services(Banquet/Catering Exp. Req. Bar Manager-Front Desk Clerks-Restaurant Supervisor-Servers Apply In Person Anytime 200 W. 12th St.

We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code. The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertisement.

NOW HIRING

Life’s good as a

HOTEL ROOMS A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331

an niciian Pharmacy Technic

MON

8 MONTHS is all it takes! *

HBO,Phone,Banq. Hall

$37.06 Day/ $149 Week/ $499 Month + Tax

1.888.844.7127

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS! "KANSAS & MISSOURI AUTO ACCIDENT VICTIM'S GUIDEBOOK" Written by: Mike Sexton Missouri and Kansas Licensed Attorney

Rusty Gunner &

IS BACK

WITH A NEW SUMMER LINE

3239 Broadway • Kansas City, MO 64111 • www.concorde4me.com Accredited Member, ACCSC. *Program lengths vary. Military Tuition Assistance Program now available.

lifestylesofkc.com

House Parties Every Friday & Saturday Night. Hot Tub, Dance Pole, Live DJ, Pool Table 913-742-0022 ERICA'S PSYCHIC STUDIO

$10

RSK@KerleyCopyCenter.com • DeemDead.com

Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher 816-453-2240 www.bratcherlaw.biz

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program, and other important information, please visit our website at www.concorde.edu/disclosures. 13-10780_CON_ad_MOMKC-PW_PT_9MLG_4x5_4c_[01].indd 1

Reunites Love- Depression-Finances Success 100% Guaranteed Results !

816-965-7125

Readings

Attorney since 1976: 913-345-4100, KS/MO. Injuries, workers comp, criminal, divorce, DUI, traffic, and more. Low fees, Call Greg Bangs.

* DWI * * CRIMINAL * * TRAFFIC *

DUI/DWI, KS, MO

NEW AM! PROGR

Call 913-789-7477 For Your Free Copy Of

816.977.2763

W W W. J D O D S O N L AW. C O M

P.I.--Work Comp.--Bankruptcy

ay, June 15! Open House Saturd

INJURED IN AN AUTO ACCIDENT?

435 NICHOLS ROAD STE 200 KCMO 64112

THE LAW OFFICE OF DENISE KIRBY 816-221-3691

• Medical Assistant • Dental Assistant • Pharmacy Technician NEW! • Medical Office Administration We also offer training for: • Health Information Technology NEW Online Option! • Physical Therapist Assistant • Nursing • Practical Nursing • Dental Hygiene • Respiratory Therapy

6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd.

* PA Y M E N T P L A N AVA I L A B L E *

Practice emphasizing DWI defense. Experienced, knowledgeable attorney will take the time to listen and inform. Free initial phone consultation.

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816-221-5900 - www.The-Law.com David Lurie Attorney

99.7% Toxin Free w/n an hour We can help you pass Coopers 3617 Broadway, KCMO 816.931.7222

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LAW OFFICES OF DONOVAN DODRILL, LLC

IN AS

CALL MY CELL TO SPEAK WITH ME PERSONALLY RIGHT NOW - 617.938.8619

JUNE 13-19, 2013

6/4/2013 8:38:07 AM

CALLING ALL WOMEN!

Are you a healthy woman between the ages of 18-65? If so you may qualify to participate in clinical research trials at our clinic in Lenexa, KS You Can Help Advance Medicine! Call PRA Today! 913-410-2900

$99 DIVORCE $99

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Psychic Readings Palm Readings

[816] 965-7125

Tarot Readings Crystal Readings


The Pitch: June 13, 2013