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JUNE 6–12, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 49 | PITCH.COM

JUNE 6-12, 2013 | VOL. 32 NO. 49 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Larry Kopitnik, Dan Lybarger, Chris Milbourn, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Tessa Canon

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Collin Click, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

SPLIT PERSONALITY Kansas City Councilman Jermaine Reed juggles his public and private lives as challenges mount. B Y B E N PA L O S A A R I

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

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B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

GOLD RUSH The West 18th Street Fashion Show mints a Gilded Summer. BY NANCY HULL RIGDON

A D V E R T I S I N G

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VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

D I S T R I B U T I O N

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

COLLECTION NOTICE Hello, downtown? Celina Tio calling. BY CHARLES FERRUZZ A

21

C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2013 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

ON TH E COVE R

3 4 6 13 17 18 21 24 26 28 32 34

QUESTIONNAIRE NEWS FEATURE F I LT E R STAGE FASHION CAFÉ FAT CITY STREETSIDE MUSIC NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

M EAN WH I L E AT P I TC H . C O M PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRIS MULLINS MODEL: ANNIE LITTLEWOOD CREATIVE DIRECTION: PEREGRINE HONIG HAIR AND MAKEUP: CHELSEA HUFF NECKLACE AND BRACELETS: SARA CRAMER BLOUSE: SARAH NELSEN

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pitch.com

pitch.com

A story about GEORGE BRETT and a strip club. MANIFESTO and HARRY’S COUNTRY CLUB named to Esquire ’s Best Bars of 2013. SHATTO’S Cookies and Cream milk is out this week.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

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HIGH QUALITY SCREEN PRINTED

Are you

QUESTIONNAIRE

ERIC SADER

Executive director, Jana’s Campaign Inc.

INFORMED?

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Hometown: Salina, Kansas

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Who or what is your sidekick? My smartphone

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What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Dinner-theater co-owner

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What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Korma Sutra Where do you drink? Where the specials What’s your favorite charity? Obligated to

plug Jana’s Campaign Inc., but also a fan of Camp Wood YMCA and the Ulster Project.

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

scream loudest.

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Online, see above reference to where the specials scream loudest.

Santa Claus Conquers the Martians

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Stanford and Sons can be great when

What local tradition do you take part in every year? Lawrence Zombie Walk

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? Stereotypical, but Country Club Plaza, and Worlds of Fun for the younger at heart.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” The estates of William Rockhill

Nelson and Mary McAfee Atkins decided to team up.

“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Allowed

the Beaumont Club to close.

“Kansas City needs …” More places like Leila’s Hair Museum in Independence.

“People might be surprised to know that I …” Once

broke a Guinness World Record and also appeared in a Ripley’s Believe It or Not publication.

“In five years, I’ll be …” Hopefully finally

enjoying my days off geocaching and scoping out new experiences, tastes, sights and smells. Doing so in the company of friends would be the icing on the cake.

What TV show do you make sure you watch? Shark Tank, haha

take(s) up a lot of space in my iTunes:

Music created by my buds.

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Ian McKellen dressed as Gandalf Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter:

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More

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What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? The Review, my undergradu-

ate alumni magazine. A bit cheesy, but it’s nice to stay connected.

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you snag a deal, but at face value with minimum drink orders, the club will be the one laughing.

What movie do you watch at least once a year?

out of life

Last book you read: Employment Discrimination Law, to be perfectly honest.

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? Always remember PDA means the pub-

lic can see, no matter how seemingly remote you believe yourself to be.

...with a great smile from My dentist.

Interesting brush with the law? Worked as an AmeriCorps re-entry volunteer, helping prepare inmates for a successful transition back into the community.

Describe a recent triumph: Snagging a photo with original Munchkin Margaret Pellegrini at the last OztoberFest. Sader has been named executive director of Jana’s Campaign. The organization, named for Jana Mackey, a KU student who was killed by an ex-boyfriend in 2008, works to reduce domestic and dating violence.

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he Kansas City, Missouri, City Council spent two years working on ethics legislation, but you wouldn’t have guessed it based on what passed May 30. The new ethics ordinance says no city employee or official can accept gifts worth more than $1,000 from someone with a “substantial interest in any legislative or administrative action of the city.” That means such largesse can’t come from a person or organization that’s regulated by the city, gets paid for services by the city, is looking for a job from the city or will be affected by laws considered by the city. Fair enough. Kansas Citians might be surprised to know that before this new law, city employees and officials could accept gifts of unlimited value, just as long as they reported it once a year. But there was another caveat on the new gift-giving rules that gave at least one City Council member some heartburn: Council members or employees can accept gifts worth more than $200 but less than $1,000 on a single day from folks with substantial city interest, as long as they report it. (Council members now have to file their reports quarterly rather than once a year, as mandated by the old law.) “If I accept five $200 tickets to a single Royals game, that’s prohibited?” asked Ed Ford, a Northland councilman, at a May 23 council business session. City attorney Cecilia Abbott told him yes. That’s because those tickets, plus maybe a hot dog, would push the gift over the $1,000 limit. However, the new law would allow Ford to take a single $200 ticket to five games in a row during a Royals homestand because the gifts were spread across different days — again, as long as it’s disclosed in his quarterly report. (By the way, the only ticket that reaches the reporting threshold for Saturday’s game at Kauff man Stadium against the Houston Astros is a $250 BATS Crown Club seat behind home plate.) “In terms of this being a tough ethics legislation, if the only thing that’s prohibited is

Ford and Circo clashed on ethics reform. someone can’t give me $1,000 on a single date that has an interest in legislative activity, I don’t think that’s real tough ethics legislation,” Ford told other council members at the May 23 meeting, within hours of a scheduled final vote on the bill. Ford suggested that perhaps the gift limit be measured on a cumulative basis rather than in 24-hour increments. But Councilwoman Jan Marcason said the measure had been discussed and ultimately rejected in previous ethics discussions. “Now that everybody knows there’s quarterly reports, they will be looking,” said Marcason, who chairs the Finance, Governance & Ethics Committee, from which the ethics bill originated. “If you’re getting $1,000 contributions every week or $900 contributions from a single company, I think the reporters and constituents will question you.” The ethics bill excludes campaign contributions from the definition of gifts, so it’s OK for council members to keep getting those, even from folks with close ties to the city.  “Councilman Ford, I would remind you that today, we have unlimited amounts of money we can accept if we choose to do so,” said Mayor Pro Tem Cindy Circo, who was running the meeting due to Mayor Sly James’ absence. Circo seemed exasperated to be delaying the vote another week. “There’s a point in time where you pass something,” Circo said. “Now, if it’s the will of the body, I think it looks bad on us that we have spent two years on this process and hours and hours and hours of conversation on this process that we do not pass it this week. But it will look particularly bad on Kansas City if we vote it down.” So the council waited a week, made small changes and passed it largely true to form on May 30.

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

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JUNE 6-12, 2013

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SPLIT PE RSONALIT Y KANSAS CITY COUNCILMAN

JERMAINE TRIES

TO

REED

J UG G L E

HI S

PUBLIC AND PRIVATE LIVES AS

CHALLENGES

MOUNT.

BY BEN PALOSAARI | PHOTOGRAPHY BY SABRINA STAIRES

J

ermaine Reed points to the plot of land where the Horace Mann Elementary School once stood, on 39th Street overlooking U.S. Highway 71. The school, abandoned in 1979, burned in a December 2011 fire. Reed, the 28-year-old 3rd District councilman, saw the blaze as an opportunity to live out a childhood fantasy: tear down the school. In January, he sponsored a series of ordinances to do just that and usher in residential development and a senior living facility. “I remember as a kid thinking, Man, that should be down,” Reed says during a driving tour of the 3rd District on a gray Friday afternoon. “Now, as an adult and being kind of responsible for it being down and bettering the community, I have a sense of pride.” Reed, the council’s youngest member, wears a slick black shirt and jacket but no tie for the first time this week. He rides in the backseat of a white Chevy Impala from the city fleet while his legislative aide, Marcus Leach, drives. “There’s so much to show off,” Reed says. The 3rd District on the city’s east side is bounded roughly by Independence Avenue to the north, Brush Creek Boulevard to the south, Troost Avenue to the west and the city limits beyond Interstate 435 to the east. It’s the city’s second–smallest district by land area. Every couple of blocks, Reed tells Leach to pull over so he can point out a new development. There's the grassy area of Troost in the Beacon Hill neighborhood that is slated to become 123 units of student housing for the University of Missouri–Kansas City. He helped secure a $26 million grant for the project and sponsored a council resolution supporting the plan. He says a new 35,000-square-foot grocery store, a partnership between the city and Truman Medical Center, will be built at 27th and Troost, a long-awaited "oasis" in the heart of the Eastside's food desert. The next stop is Greg/Klice Community Center. The 20-year-old building at 1600 John “Buck” O'Neil Way is being renovated

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with new amenities and brought up to the Americans With Disabilities Act standards. Reed directed $600,000 of his district’s public–improvement budget to the sprawling complex, with a basketball court; a workout room; a boxing ring; a food-service kitchen; a new zero-entry swimming pool; and a hot tub, sauna and steam room. “This is the neighborhood I live in, and citizens would tell me about the improvements that were needed here,” Reed says. “I heard their voices loud and clear.” On his way out of the community center, he stops to chat with a surly former high school classmate in the lobby. “We’re getting it done,” Reed says. “It will be done in June.” “June?” The man scoffs and shakes his head. “Then you’re going to say August.” The Impala rolls on past boarded–up homes on 26th Street slated for demolition, giving way to the new headquarters for the Kansas City Police Department’s East Patrol and crime lab (46 of the city’s 108 homicides in 2012 were handled in the 3rd District by East Patrol). “It doesn’t look very appealing right now,” Reed says. “Unfortunately, this is an area that we had to uproot some citizens who lived here.” Not everyone was happy about being moved. Several residents complained about Reed’s support of the project. Black-and-white “Recall Reed” signs sprouted in yards across the district early in 2012. (Two attempts to recall Reed failed.) The Rev. L. Henderson Bell of Mount Pleasant Missionary Baptist Church publicly ripped Reed for not listening to constituents who didn’t want a police campus in their neighborhood. (Bell later recanted.) The Recipe, a local hip-hop duo, released a song titled “Jermaine Reed Infomercial,” with lyrics calling the councilman an “Uncle Tom” and a “lapdog swallowing KCPD seeds.” And then there was the March 19 State of the City address in which former Missouri House candidate Derron Black rushed the Gem Theater’s stage and interrupted Mayor Sly James’ speech with a profanity-laced tirade. Later, while being led away in handcuffs, Black ranted about Reed to reporters. “City Councilman Reed can’t even show up to city-appointed meetings,” Black said. “He can't even be there to govern his own fucking city.” Actually, Reed has attended more than 90 percent of his committee and council meetings. When discussing the recall effort and criticisms, Reed smiles and waves his hand as if to make his opponents vanish. “That’s how this game works,” Reed says. “You have to remain focused on the task at hand.”

J

ermaine Reed poses for a dozen photos with constituents at Arrowhead Stadium following an April 29 press conference announcing the inaugural Missouri Classic football game between historically black colleges Lincoln University and Grambling State. The councilman relishes the opportunity to be

photographed inside one of the few sources of good press in his district. He strides down a hallway in the stadium’s basement to a dining room for lunch. He stops and points to a member of the catering crew. “I remember you,” he says. “We met at that party a few months ago.” The flattered caterer can’t place the councilman’s name, though. Reed grabs a grilled–chicken sandwich, sits at an empty banquet table and reels off his biography to The Pitch as if he were still running for office. “Born and raised here in Kansas City,” he says. “Single mother. Five kids.”

“THERE ARE TIMES I REMEMBER WATCHING MY MOM STRUGGLE. IF THERE WERE LIGHTS OFF IN THE HOME OR GAS OFF … SHE DID ALL SHE COULD TO MAKE SURE THAT WE HAD THE BEST.”” Reed’s father wasn’t around, so his maternal grandfather, Kenneth Reed Sr., became the main male role model in his life. “I don’t know my father, so he [Reed Sr.] was a real father figure in my life,” Reed says. “The guy who taught me how to nail a nail in the wall, to change the brakes on the car, to stop talking when I needed to, how to tie my tie — he was that guy.” Reed carefully measures out his vulnerability. “There are times I remember watching my mom struggle,” he says. “If there were lights off in the home or gas off ...” He pauses. “She did all she could to make sure that we had the best.” Reed’s mother couldn’t always shield her children from the struggles. Two days after Christmas, when Reed was 14, his family lost their home at 2626 Denver Avenue, around the corner from the KCPD’s East Patrol. “We had a really good Christmas,” Reed recalls. “We had every gift that we had asked for.” He runs through the haul: a Sega Genesis game, a keyboard, clothes and shoes. Forty-eight hours later, two men knocked on his family’s door, asked for his mother and tried to evict them. Reed told them that his mother wasn’t home, and they must be at the wrong house. The men left to verify the address. Reed’s mother assured him that there was a mistake. “They ended up coming back an hour after that and said, ‘No. We have the right house,’ ” Reed says. “Hours afterward, all of our stuff was on the curb.” The Reeds split the next six months living

at relatives’ homes, a shelter and transitional housing through Community LINC, before finally moving into another home. Reed enrolled in Northeast High School and plugged himself into the Kauffman Foundation Youth Board, Alvin Brooks’ Ad Hoc Group Against Crime and his biweekly radio show, Voices From Midtown. He credits Brooks with teaching him city politics. He recalls being 14 years old and witnessing Brooks announce his run for the 6th District at-large council seat during a Voices From Midtown broadcast on KPRT 1590. “When we went off the air, I said to Mr. Brooks, ‘Why, sir, are you running for the 6th District? Because in my eyes, you’re No. 1. Why can’t you run for 1st District?’ ” Reed says, chuckling. “That was my introduction to politics.” (The next day, Reed, who now co-hosts Voices From Midtown, tells the same story verbatim to his listeners while celebrating Brooks’ 81st birthday.) “Seeing Mr. Brooks’ stature in the community, but then having come to know him, it was quite the rewarding experience,” Reed says. “He really, really took me under his wings.” Brooks, who served two City Council terms, says his protégé’s success stems from his ability to bridge old and new philosophies. “Anybody who’s old–time in politics, he meets with them,” Brooks says. “He hears them out. Some older people think they have all the answers.” Reed’s other mentor, David Ross, a nowretired former senior vice president at Bank of America, helped ensure that he got into the University of Missouri. Ross, 74, was drawn in by Reed’s natural speaking ability, which he showcased as a spokesman for Project AIM, a high school mentoring program sponsored by Ross’ bank. “Jermaine, as was his passion and skill, was really good at talking to peers,” Ross says. But he wasn’t close to the honor roll. “He had some shortcomings. He wasn’t educated properly. It wasn’t all the teachers’ fault; it was partially Jermaine’s fault.” Ross paid for tutors and pushed Reed to improve his ACT score. “I just basically became Jermaine’s education coach,” Ross says. “He needed a dictionary, so we bought it.” Reed’s ACT score improved, and Ross helped him find scholarships and student loans, and lobbied the University of Missouri’s admissions office on his behalf. “I told the university people when they were looking at taking him into the school, ‘He’s going to be voting on your appropriations in the future,’ ” Ross says. Reed graduated from Mizzou with a political science degree in May 2006. That August, he moved to Washington, D.C., hoping to find work on the Hill. (In 2005, U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver II had nominated Reed for the Congressional Black Caucus Institute’s political boot camp.) Reed parlayed his previous experience into a clerical job with the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. continued on page 9

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Split Personality continued from page 7 Reed returned to Kansas City in 2009, and in 2011 he ran in the 3rd District primary against incumbent Sharon Sanders Brooks and lawyer Michael Fletcher. The day before the February primary, an appeals judge ruled that Fletcher shouldn’t appear on the ballot due to the candidate’s primary residence being in Long Beach, California. Despite the ruling, Fletcher appeared on the ballot and finished second with 34 percent of the vote. (Brooks won with 38 percent.) Reed came in third but advanced to the general election because of Fletcher’s disqualification. “It was a rough race,” says Bianca TillardGates, Reed’s close friend from childhood and campaign treasurer. “I said, ‘I’ll support you no matter what. But don’t fuck it up.’ ” In the March 22 general election, Reed crushed Brooks, 65 percent to 35 percent. “If you look at the percentages, it almost looks like a landslide,” says Tillard-Gates, granddaughter of barbecue big shot Ollie Gates. “In my mind, I was expecting a much tighter race because people might be thrown off by his youth. I think that might have led to some people’s animosity. “You’ve got a district wrought with problems for years and people that have been determined to be the ones to change it,” she adds. “So you got this young guy coming up against somebody’s 30-, 40-year plan to change it.”

I

n the evenings, the Wendell Phillips neighborhood between Prospect and Brooklyn and 26th and 27th streets is as dark as London during the Blitz. The windows of dozens of homes on the block are boarded up, and signs warn pedestrians to stay away. The city plans to bulldoze 128 properties it bought or acquired through eminent domain to build the Kansas City Police Department’s controversial new East Patrol and crime lab

campus. (Demolition began on empty homes in early January.) Sixty-six of those properties had residents displaced. “They made the ultimate sacrifice for their community,” says Reed, who adds that the uprooted residents received a fair deal. Each property was given three appraisals, and the highest one was used as basis for a purchase price, plus a 25 percent premium. If someone owned the house for more than 50 years, another 50 percent was tacked onto the purchase price. The city also covered residents’ moving expenses. Homeowners were given three months to leave their properties once the city bought them out. Reed’s advocacy for the $57 million KCPD project — initiated under former Mayor Mark Funkhouser — poisoned him for some of his constituents. The affidavit initiating the recall effort against Reed was filed by seven residents on May 9, 2012. It listed six complaints against Reed, but the primary gripe was Reed’s support for the police campus. Half a mile south of the proposed crime–lab site, Carolyn Alexander is preparing to plant her summer flowers. A retired caregiver, Alexander rents a stonewalled home on East 30th Street in the Santa Fe Place neighborhood. The area, with flowerbeds, newer cars in clean driveways and recycling bins pulled

Councilman John Sharp: Reed has matured. to the curb, averages fewer than one crime report a week. On her shady front porch, amid flower pots and bags of soil, the 62-year-old explains how she went from Reed supporter to recall petitioner. “You can’t help being young,” she says. “But I would like to see him do something besides putting a Band-Aid on problems.” Alexander concedes that there was nothing Reed could have done to stop the crime lab from being built. “Once all the wheels are set in motion, I understand that he couldn’t stop it,” she says. “But these people were rushed out.” The recall fell hundreds of signatures short. Alexander, who knew four people displaced by the crime lab, says Reed heard the message from his constituents. “My problem with Mr. Reed is that we never see him out in the community unless there is a large publicity event,” she says.

“I

t’s malarkey,” Reed yells in the council chambers on the 26th floor of City Hall during an early May transportation–and–

infrastructure committee meeting. “This really gets me going. That’s a bunch of bull!” “If we’re going to argue, we’re going to adjourn,” committee chair Russ Johnson warns as other council members stare at their desks. Reed directs his anger at Kansas City Public Works Director Sherri McIntyre, who was explaining why traffic lights in the 3rd District had been converted into four-way stops. Earlier this year, the city turned off 16 traffic lights in the district deemed “unwarranted” by the Public Works department. Red lights were left flashing to indicate four-way stops. A week earlier, Reed and City Manager Troy Schulte held a community–outreach meeting to discuss the signals. Reed says Schulte agreed with residents to turn three of the signals into four-way stops, and return the other 13 to service. The lights, however, remained four-way stops. MacIntyre tells the committee that no promises were made. “Before we left, at the meeting, it was stated that this would have to go through legislative review,” she says. “Not true at all!” Reed interrupts. “Come on! That is not true!” He slams his fists on his desk. “OK, we’re adjourned,” Johnson says, striking his gavel and ending Reed’s outburst. Reed’s eruption is a rare flash of public emotion. Even in private, he rations out only a small portion of his personal life and feelings. “I’m a very private person,” Reed says. “You probably won’t get much out of me about my personal life.” Framed Kansas City Star articles, with his name highlighted, line the walls of his City Hall office. In 2000, he toured nationally with the anti-tobacco Truth Campaign, and he appeared on The Rosie O’Donnell Show as a representative of National Youth Service Day. In high school, he hosted a radio show, Generation Rap, Saturday mornings on KPRS 103.3. “I would say that I’ve always been a pretty public figure, though not always elected,” Reed says. “People will still continued on page 11

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Split Personality continued from page 9 come up to me and say, Hey, Generation Rap!” His strategy to keep his personal and public lives separate includes a well-maintained, if bland, online presence. He is the only council member with a Wikipedia page (his biographical information culled from campaign materials and mostly favorable news accounts). His Twitter timeline is filled with links to the city’s webcam for council meetings, and inspirational quotes (“Smile ... A smile is a curve that sets everything straight”). Even in long interviews, he carefully filters the details of his life. He doesn't want people to know where he lives. His mother declined to be interviewed. And some of his efforts at privacy veer toward the absurd. After noting that he loves beach vacations, Reed clams up. “The thing I enjoy, it is being able to look over the ocean and see nothing but water as far as you can see,” he says. “It’s always very intriguing to just think how that’s nothing but water out there. But if I look behind me, there’s a whole earth that’s moving with cars and infrastructure and people making decisions. But it’s just really peaceful right there.” Which beach locales are his favorites? “I’m not going to tell you that,” he says. “I’m a private person. I don’t want somebody to follow me.”

Although it’s publicly available through tax records, Reed won’t say what kind of car he drives. “It’s a little black car that gets me where I need to be,” he says. Reed doesn't want people to know what kind of car he drives because, he says, Black recently followed him. Leach, Reed's aide, says Black harrassed Reed while the councilman was in the barber's chair. (Black couldn't be reached for comment.) Joey Thomas, owner of JoeyCuts, tells The Pitch that, on that May day, Black came in and started taking photos of Reed. “I didn’t understand what was going on," Thomas says. "Nobody in the shop knew what was going on. It caught everybody by surprise.” Leach says Reed asked Black to make an office appointment. “Mr. Black declined and then followed Councilman Reed to the rear of the barbershop, grabbing him by his shirt and issuing a verbal threat," Leach says. Thomas says Reed talked with Black in the back of his shop; he didn't see or hear their exchange. After Black left, Thomas adds, Reed paid for his haircut and walked to his car.

R

eed is very particular about his word choice when discussing the recall effort. “I wouldn’t use the word frustrating,” he

Alexander (left) went from Reed supporter to recall petitioner; 18th and Vine (above) says, leafing through the recall affidavit and sipping water at the 9th Inning sports bar at 18th and Vine. “Again, it was a distraction. An unfortunate distraction.” The distraction was not his, but one shared by the community and the district, Reed says. He moves on to the East Patrol project. He says there’s a misperception in the Wendell Phillips neighborhood that the city gobbled up the site through eminent domain. He stresses that 15 of the 128 properties were taken by eminent domain, and homeowners underwater on their mortgages benefited from the move. “I have run into citizens who were relocated from the East Patrol site and have thanked me by saying things like, ‘Hey, we didn’t understand at the time. It was pretty emotional, but thank you for working with us,’ ” Reed says. “If it wasn’t fair, I’d be the fi rst out there with a picket sign saying it wasn’t fair.” He argues that his experience being evicted as a child makes him especially sensitive to displaced residents. “We certainly couldn’t compensate them for the time, the histories and the memories and the loss they were experiencing."

After two years of criticisms, Reed still manages to keep his head. He explains his zen nature with a story from when he was 15: A man confronted Alvin Brooks in the Ad Hoc office. “He’s telling him he’s going to kill him, he’s calling him an old man, and he’s saying all this stuff,” Reed recalls. “I remember standing there that day, scared, sort of shaking. And Mr. Brooks graciously stood there and told the guy, ‘God bless you. God bless you, sir.’ “It’s those examples of true servant leadership that compliment my own family values,” Reed adds. “It kind of gives me that patience and drive to forge ahead.” As late lunch customers trickle into the restaurant, Reed starts talking about election night in 2011. His campaign watch party was at the Juke House jazz bar. His voice disappears, and he looks out the window with wet eyes. “I didn’t think I’d tear up again,” he murmurs. He tries three times to start his story. Each time, he chokes back tears. “I ended up crying, kind of like I am now,” he says. “I remember thinking, Wow. I really won.” After his victory was announced on TV, he went into the restroom to compose himself. “My grandfather and my uncle, we were all in there,” Reed says between sobs. “And they just kept on saying you really won and how proud you should be. We worked really hard. I usually don’t tear up like this. I am so sorry.” Kenneth Reed Sr. died on March 30. “The thing that makes me emotional is when I think about how my grandfather really wanted to help during the campaign,” Reed says. “His health really continued to kind of get the best of him. He stuffed some envelopes. He had come down to the office; he couldn’t do much. But he’d sit around watching. He said he wished he could do more.” After a few minutes, Reed dries his eyes on his shirtsleeve and composes himself. His plans for re-election are already under way. A glass bowl brimmed with contribution envelopes at a May 9 fundraiser held at a Gates Bar-B-Q on East Emanuel Cleaver II Boulevard. And he seems poised for the next round of 3rd District politics. “Hey, man, this job isn’t for everybody,” he says. “You’ve got to have tough skin.”

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com

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WEEK OF JUNE 6–12 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

FA S H I O N The West 18th Street Fashion Show glitters.

21

PAG E

CAFÉ Another downtown Collection: Celina Tio’s

28 PAG E

MUSIC Guthrie and Irion: songs for the new Depression

T H U R S D AY | 6 . 6 | ALL TEED UP

What’s the best part about golfing? Being outside? Beer? Cart girls? You can have all that plus lunch and dinner, tons of swag, and E R MO the chance to win glory in our Longest Drive Contest if you sign up T A INE for The Pitch’s Summer ONL .COM PITCH Guide Golf Tournament. This year, it’s at Minor Park (11215 Holmes, 816-942-4033) and it starts at 10 a.m. Entry fees start at $50. Register at southcommevents.com/pitchgolf.

EVENTS

FIRST FRIDAY HIT LIST

Two new Crossroads exhibition spaces debut tonight, though it isn’t as though the buildings have been keeping low profiles. For one, there’s the 500,000-square-foot production space of Farm to Market; the bread company relocated its operations from Waldo a year ago to 100 East 20th Street, and it’s furthering its community ties by opening up the FTM Gallery. Its first exhibition is by David Francis Drymala, who specializes in painting with muted tones on tall panels. And there’s the Mid-America Arts Alliance building, at 2018 Baltimore, which — following an extensive renovation by Sabatini Architects and Centric Projects — kicks off its Live in the Crossroads music program this evening. Outside: music by Mockingbird Hillbilly Band and the Elders; inside the rehabbed 40-year-old structure, you’ll find three regional exhibitions: OK-KC, an exchange and collaboration between our Charlotte Street Foundation and the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition; a student show curated by Kent Bellows Studio & Center for the Visual Arts in Omaha; and a printmaking exhibition by ExhibitsUSA (which M-AAA manages) about Flatbed Press of Austin. If you didn’t get to Sherry Leedy Contemporary Art (2004 Baltimore) last month, you’re missing two very deep shows that require study. Tracy Krumm’s crocheted metal is a testament of patience and expertise, and Tanya Hartman’s We Write Ourselves Anew

F R I D AY | 6 .7 | FIRST FRIDAY PARTY ROUNDUP

The Crossroads Summer Block Party (19th Street and Wyandotte). This free street party, sponsored by Golden Sound Records, features some of KC and Lawrence’s best up-and-coming indie bands, including Cowboy Indian Bear, Shy Boys and Oils. Four food trucks and live art round out the night. The party goes from 6 p.m. to midnight, then moves to Snow & Co. (1815 Wyandotte). Go to crossroadsblockparty.com for the full lineup. The Truck Stop in the Crossroads (21st Street and Wyandotte). Hungry? Eleven food

FRIDAY

6.7

r oads fo Crossr Hit the y a rid First F

RUSSELL SHOEMAKER

18 PAG E

is also the result of long process, including interviews with a South Sudanese man who came here as a child displaced by war. At the Late Show Gallery (1600 Cherry), Russell Shoemaker’s latest work includes elements of his MFA thesis show in Brook-

lyn. Cosmic Joke is made up of wildly colorful paintings that, the gallery says, “operate like an imperfect digital cache, using a cut/ copy/paste nature to reference the way that memory is constructed.” — TRACY ABELN

trucks set up shop from 6 to 11 p.m., including Monk’s Roast Beef, Deco Street Eats and Lufti’s Fried Fish. See facebook.com/ KCTruckStop. Visions of Peace at the Crossroads Festival (parking lot south of 1811 Baltimore). More than 20 local community, civic and faith groups gather for live music, spoken–word and performance pieces from 6 to 9 p.m. For more information, see afsc.org/kansascity.

Square, the city’s central business district, could use some help getting back to those bustling days of yore. Support local merchants tonight with an Art & Wine Walk fundraiser for the square. Eight participating Missouri wineries pour samples for ticket holders at retail locations. The walk goes from 6 to 9 and requires check-in at Portrait Gallery (124 South Main Street, 816-461-5400). Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 the day of the event. Buy them at squareartandwinewalk-es2 .eventbrite.com. continued on page 14

WINE TRAIL

Business boomed in Independence in the late 1830s and early 1840s as pioneers moved westward on the Santa Fe, California and Oregon Trails. Independence

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CAMERON GEE

S AT U R D AY | 6 . 8 |

continued from page 13

AIR APPARENT

The U.S. Air Guitar Championships returns to Kansas City with a regional qualifier, and this year, Kansas City will crown a new local faux–guitar hero. Well, two of them. Under the competition’s new rules, last year’s regional champions receive byes and automatically go on to the semifinals. So Eric “Mean” Melin’s fiefdom is over, and two new invisible six-string kings or queens will be crowned at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207) and join Melin in the semifinals. Show starts at 10 p.m. Tickets cost $10.

S AT U R D AY | 6 . 8 | LEGAL MATRIMONY

In June 2012, Public Policy Polling reported that 64 percent of Missouri voters believed gay couples should be allowed to marry or form civil unions. 2013 probably won’t be the year the Show-Me State legalizes same-sex marriage, but local groups are keeping it in the forefront. Interweave — the LGBT/straight ally group at All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church — is presenting the KC premiere of 8, a staged reading of Dustin Lance Black’s documentary about the federal trial over California’s Proposition 8. “We have timed this to coincide with the Supreme Court decision on gay marriage,” says Interweave organizer Megan Monroe. The free performance at All Souls (4501 Walnut, 816-756-5651) begins at 7 p.m. For more information, go to 8theplay.com and click “Upcoming Readings.”

S U N D AY | 6 . 9 | MORE THAN A WOMAN

Ladies, the moon begins waxing tonight, and it’s time for a new beginning. Explore, sample, and learn new things at this weekend’s Just for Her Expo at the Overland Park Convention Center (6000 College Boulevard). Of course, the requisite Tupperware, Pampered Chef and Arbonne booths are there, too, but options for the New Millennium Woman — American Laser Skincare, Her Majesty’s Wine 14

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FESTIVAL ROUNDUP

F

estival of Fountains (in front of Union Station, 30 West Pershing Road). The City of Fountains Foundation celebrates its 40th anniversary Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a bike tour, guided trolley tours, kids activities, food vendors and live music and dancers. For more information, go to kcfountains.com. Festival on the Trails (Main and Elm streets, downtown Gardner). In the farthest reaches of Johnson County, this oneday festival promises an arts-and-crafts show; a car show; wagon rides; a beer garden; a Civil War expo; and chili, salsa and wings cook-offs. The headliner is country singer Tracy Lawrence. Everything happens Saturday between noon and 10 p.m. See festivalonthetrails.com. Greek Festival at St. Dionysios Greek Orthodox Church (8100 West 95th Street, Overland Park). Free admission and parking are available at the 52nd annual festival where the food takes center stage. Hours are Friday from 5 to 10 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 8 p.m. For more information, search for the festival on Facebook. Sugar Creek Slavic Fest (Mike Onka Memorial Building grounds, 11520 East Putnam). This year’s fest includes a special performance by Grammy-nominated accordion master Alex Meixner and a kielbasa-eating contest. Hours are Friday from 5 to 11:30 p.m. and Saturday from 3 to 11:30 p.m. Tickets are $3 for everyone over 12. See slavicfest.com. Weston’s First Annual Polish Pottery Festival (Main and Short streets in downtown Weston). Sponsored by Renditions Polish Pottery Shop (522 Main, 816-640-2300), this one-day event features Polish food, music and history (besides pottery). Hours are Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, go to renditionsweston.com.

WE D N

ESDAY

6 .1 2

ar t exican row M Highb on ls e N at the

Closet and Midwest Anti-Aging — are plentiful. Tons of giveaways, cheap spa treatments and cocktails can also to be found. Today’s activities close out the weekend; the expo started Friday. Hang out from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $6 online or $10 at the door. Buy them at justforherexpokc.com.

2012 doc, which uses scenes of public outrage from around the world and contrasts them with stories of a paradigm shift that’s gaining momentum. Get inspired at Liberty Hall (644 Massachusetts, Lawrence) at 7 p.m. Tickets are $4 (or $2 with a student ID). Watch the trailer at occupylove.org.

T U E S D AY | 6 . 11 | LIVE IN LIVING COLOR

SKATE OR DIE

Twenty of the world’s best skateboarders, including local Sean Malto, take to the Sprint Center (1407 Grand) for the third stop of the Street League Skateboarding World Tour 2013. Events surrounding the competition, which offers the biggest prize purse ever for a skateboarding contest, start today at 10 a.m. Tickets cost $25; see streetleague.com.

M O N D AY | 6 . 10 | #FAILEDOPERATION

The Arab Spring, the Egyptian Revolution and Occupy Wall Street told us something, right? Canadian documentary filmmaker Velcrow Ripper was definitely listening. “Today’s global awakening is what my earlier films have been anticipating and fostering — a current of potential that was pulsing and rumbling, just below the surface,” he writes in the director’s statement for his work, Occupy Love. “Suddenly the volcano has erupted.” Films for Action presents a screening tonight of the

Prolific impostor Frank Abagnale Jr. is now a lecturer for the FBI Academy and one of the world’s foremost experts on forgery, embezzlement and secure documents. His rise to these heights are loosely chronicled in Catch Me If You Can, the Broadway musical that opens tonight and runs through Sunday, June 16, at Starlight Theatre (4600 Starlight Road, 816-363-7827). Show starts at 8, and tickets run from $10 to $135. See kcstarlight.com.

W E D N E S D AY | 6 . 12 | ARTE DE MEXICO

Yes, the works of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera are the big draws at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (4525 Oak, 816-751-1278), but their art helps make up an exhibition of more than 100 pieces of Mexican art that include abstract, conceptual, figurative and surreal from the collection of Jacques and Natasha Gelman. Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Masterpieces of Modern Mexico is on display through August 18. Tickets are $8 for adults (free for members). Find out more at nelsonatkins.org. E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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JUNE 6-12, 2013

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S TA G E

BACK TO BEFORE

The MET’s Ragtime: minimal

BY

sets, maximum feeling.

L I Z C O OK

usical theater geeks, start your engines. The Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre’s production of Ragtime has everything you want from a big show: lavish lighting and costumes, powerhouse performances, and emotional songs that swell to the top of the MET’s intimate space. Ragtime follows three sets of characters whose storylines intersect in early 20thcentury America, what the show calls “a n era of E MOR something beginning.” An affluent white couple in New Rochelle, T A E IN ONL .COM New York, fi nds a black PITCH i n fa nt a b a ndone d i n their garden. A passionate Harlem pianist, Coalhouse Walker Jr., searches for his love, Sarah, and for justice in a time of racial turmoil. A Latvian Jew, Tateh, and his daughter pursue the fabled American dream. The musical features a strong book by Tony Award–winner Terrence McNally. The playwright’s 1997 Corpus Christi sparked a slew of controversy and backlash, but Ragtime, for all its emotional power, is anything but edgy. It hums with unwavering optimism and unabashed Broadway classicism, from its sweeping, sentimental music to a “Where are they now?” epilogue that leaves no storyline untied. The MET’s new production taps into that upbeat spirit with plenty of nostalgia. Costume designer Shannon Smith-Regnier, especially, has captured the look and feel of the age, clothing the production’s large ensemble through several detailed, period-specific changes. Snow-white gowns and crisp suits for the New Rochelle family contrast the more casual styles and varied patterns of the Harlem nightclub set, and the frayed shawls and drab garb of the Latvian immigrants.

STAGE

MANON HALLIBURTON

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rich, powerful voice that fills the space (and The lighting is also arresting. Shane Rowse’s moody, suggestive colors and occasionally dwarfs those of his castmates complex cues provide much-needed tex- in group numbers). Robert Gibby Brand is warm and spirited ture and nuance to a minimalist set. As the as Tateh, who carves out a place in the film inplay moves through multiple settings, two dustry. Liz Clark Golson provides comic relief wooden staircases and platforms flank an as bubbly chorus girl Evelyn Nesbit, and Miopen floor where actors cart props on and chael Dragen is rock-solid as off between numbers to Mother’s Younger Brother, a suggest different interibudding revolutionary. (His Ragtime ors. (The alley-style seating Through June 16 at the Met“The Night That Goldman means that almost every ropolitan Ensemble Theatre, Spoke at Union Square” is chair affords a sure view of 3604 Main, 816-569-3226, a high point in a show full the action.) metkc.org of strong voices.) The enThat design helps direcsemble is every bit as good tor Karen Paisley keep the as the principal cast, givfocus on the show’s exceling full-company numbers like “Wheels of lent cast. Teal Holliday and Justin G. McCoy a Dream” a nearly operatic power. turn in stirring performances as Sarah and The MET tempers some of the show’s Coalhouse. Holliday’s Sarah is captivating nostalgia with a zeal for modern staging and vulnerable, and pensive songs such techniques that sometimes proves a hinderas “Your Daddy’s Son” show off her clear, ance. Projections are in vogue right now, but haunting voice and emotional range. Mchere they feel like an afterthought. Cheesy Coy has an aggressive stage presence and a

Left: Jordan Haas (in cap). Above: Megan Walstrom and (right) Robert Gibby Brand animations of falling snow undermine what actors and lighting more skillfully suggest. Black-and-white photos of the show’s real historical figures (Emma Goldman is one) pop up on screens as their corresponding characters are introduced, a move that points out the artifice in an otherwise straightforward production. And some minor sound issues (crackling speakers, microphones cutting in and out) were distractions during last Friday’s show, though with a run through June 16, Paisley and her production team have time to make fi xes. None of those quibbles should deter musical fans. The MET’s Ragtime is pure theatrical escape for anyone who wants to mainline earworm tunes during an infusion of buoyancy and heart.

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FA S H I O N

BY

Show mints a Gilded Summer.

N A NC Y HULL RIGDON

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

GOLD RUSH

The West 18th Street Fashion

Left: Helling and her work; above: Patricia

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est 18th Street Fashion Show organizers were a few hours and drinks deep into a conversation when their focus turned to wealth distribution. “We began speaking about how most of the money in America is in the hands of just a few families,” says Peregrine Honig, the event’s artistic director. That night last fall, the team landed on 2013’s show theme: Gilded Summer. It’s a play on the Gilded Age — the label that writers Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner gave to the late 1800s and early 1900s in their The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today. The authors’ satire paints the post–Civil War era — a time marked by booming wealth and the subsequent growing disparity between rich and poor — as a time of grave social problems veiled in gold. “In a way,” Honig says, “we are now living in a Gilded Age.” Beyond economic issues, though, Honig points out that it was an era when World’s Fairs captivated the nation, seeing a movie at a nickelodeon was novel, and artisanal industry thrived. And whereas last year’s Triple Crown Summer theme resulted in a show that was largely feminine, Honig says, the upcoming show lends itself to masculinity. And the timing is good, with buzz still surrounding Baz Luhrmann’s movie adaptation of The Great 18

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JUNE 6-12, 2013

Gatsby, which is a Gilded Age unto itself. “We had no idea this movie was coming out when we came up with the theme,” Honig says. “It’s nice when something comes out in pop culture that makes our idea relevant.” The annual show, set for Saturday, June 8, once again transforms 18th Street in Kansas City’s Crossroads into an outdoor couture showcase at dusk. Organizers have narrowed down dozens of designer applicants to 18 collection designers and eight accessories designers, with the goal of showcasing emerging talent. Here’s a preview of five designers new to the show who help make the lineup, as Honig says, one of the most sophisticated yet.

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ilvia Patricia isn’t out to make models look pretty. The Johnson County Community College fashion-design student brings what she calls “the raw, the ugly, and the brutal truth of severe workmanship.” This means she’ll use upholstery fabric, restricted and crisp looks, and raw metal (she’s working closely with a welder) to tell a story she views as a harsh reality. Her collection seeks to link today’s social issues with those from the turn of the 19th century. You’ll see: an elegantly dressed woman with a cage piece around her neck,

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an expression of upper-class decadence; a middle-class woman donning a well-tailored look; and a haggard man who represents what Patricia calls “the new American slave.” You’ll also see a woman with a wired-shut mouth, a reflection of how Patricia sees the typical American. “We like to think that with each generation, the world is a better place,” she says. “But we’re still not free to speak our minds. If you say the wrong thing in the workplace, you’ll be terminated.” Patricia, who moved here from Chihuahua, Mexico, when she was 5 years old, has always had a flair for the avant-garde. After JCCC, she hopes to attend fashion school out of state. She has her eye on Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle. She aspires to dress movie casts. Working with Tim Burton, especially if it meant Johnny Depp and outlandish characters like Edward Scissorhands and the Mad Hatter, would be a dream come true. “I’m all about taking a character and going to great lengths to express that individual,” she says.

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hen Lyndsey Helling made the designer cut, she headed to TCBY and asked for the trash. She prefers recycled materials and was craving the ice cream cups’

cheerful colors and shapes. The store handed over two heaping bags, and Helling began researching the late 1800s. “It was this period of reinvention, so I’m taking fashion elements from that time, combining them with these used items and am inventing something new,” she says. The cup pieces drive a bright, vintagemeets-modern summer dress with a Gilded Age–inspired detail: a high neck. She’s also using vertical buttons and structured looks to honor the period. Pairing used materials with new concepts, she’s seeking to play on the show’s theme by linking rich and poor. Her designs incorporate recycled materials (aside from the ice cream cups), including a bustle made of a burlap coffee sack. (Each piece in her collection has a lightweight, muslin underlay.) She moved from Bloomington, Indiana, to the Kansas City area in spring 2012 and attended the West 18th Street show soon after. “I want to be a part of this,” she told her husband during the show. Her fashion-design path hasn’t been traditional. She graduated from Indiana University Bloomington with a degree in studio art but didn’t consider entering fashion shows until one that encouraged the use of recycled materials happened to catch her eye. That was the In-

Left: Lawson and Auvray and their work; above: Xeno and her pieces. dianapolis Museum of Art’s 2010 Project IMA: Fashion Unbound, where she presented a party dress made from grocery-store ads and other mailers. The next year, her work was featured in Bloomington’s Trashion Refashion Show. “In high school, I would make these tube tops out of pillow cases and run shoelaces up the backs,” she says. Her interest in finding a second life for materials hasn’t waned since then. “I take these materials I love and make the finished product up as I go. It’s so surprising and exciting.”

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. Clemence Lawson pictures the colorful drapes in her West African childhood home, the fabric dancing in the breeze. Elodie Auvray longs to see an electric-blue front door on a house with red windows — a common sight in her homeland of French Caribbean, Guadeloupe. The two JCCC fashion-design students have teamed up to present a collection inspired by their roots. “We want to make this feel like home,” Lawson says. Expect bold primary colors, cotton with sheer layering, and plenty of movement in their pieces. Gold — a nod to their heritage as well as to the show’s theme — accents their work. “Our cultures are pretty loud, so our presen-

tation will be really energetic,” Lawson says. At the last minute, though, she decided she The women have bonded through their didn’t want to follow the crowd and canceled similarities: Both speak French and love her trip. Instead, she headed to Kansas City, spicy dishes. And their style differences — where her brother lived. “I love discovering Lawson steers classic; Auvray leans playful — new things,” she says. strengthen their joint work. In work that finds its inLawson moved overspiration in culture, Auvray seas to the Kansas City area has in the past created con“I'm drawn to with her family when she stricted, European styles designs that stay the made with African fabric was 12 and has been drawn to fashion design as long and f lirty, Asia-inspired same through time.” looks. as she can remember. Her grandmother, a talented After graduation, she seamstress, helped pique hopes to travel, and ather interest, as have many classic designers. tending a design school in Europe is back on “I’m drawn to designs that stay the same the list of possibilities. Her work locally has through time,” she says. “I fell in love with ethalready led her closer to one goal, though. nic designers that incorporate timeless prints.” “I want to represent my culture by being a Moods and weather heavily influence her Caribbean designer,” she says. “I’ve realized work. She fights the gloom of winter with lace that there isn’t a designer in the Caribbean and pastels, and embraces summer with vithat represents other Caribbeans, and I want brant prints. Through the various looks, she to fill that need.” stays focused on motion. She dreams of opening a boutique in New York City. “My biggest goal is that I would want oxers were Gilded Age celebrities, evokpeople to walk in and say, ‘Wow, this is one of ing inspiration in hard times. Accessories a kind,’ ” she says. designer Sarah Xeno channels this spirit with A year and a half ago, Auvray had booked a collection she says defies gender stereotypes. a flight to France. All her friends were going, “This is about guys beating the crap out of each and she planned to study interior design there. other, and at the same time, I’m presenting

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metal that looks like lace,” Xeno explains. “It’s a feminine take on a masculine arena.” Her jewelry accentuates a collection from Honig and Danielle Meister, of Birdies Panties and Swim Boutique, that promotes a fresh perspective on boxing history. Xeno’s pieces include a championship belt, boxing gloves and headgear. Expect metallic items with intricate craftsmanship. The accessories collection represents a side of Xeno that gravitates toward lavish designs, created with organic, meditative pattern making. On the flip side, she digs geometric, structured looks. Ultimately, her influences — including art nouveau architecture, anatomy, zoology and florals — determine the style. Xeno has spent six years designing and fabricating custom jewelry, and she began metalsmithing 10 years back with the assistance of courses through JCCC. She dabbles in other art forms and has taken painting and drawing classes at the Kansas City Art Institute, though designing accessories brings the greatest intrinsic rewards. “I think of it as wearable, sculptural art — on display for all to see,” she says. For a rundown of the event and its designers, see this issue’s special insert.

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19

KANSAS CITY’S OLDEST AND LOCAL FAVORITE

“EXTRAORDINARY” - Charles Ferruzza, The Pitch

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(off 39th St, just east of KU Med)

816.753.3600 • www.gkbbq.com

20

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CAFÉ

COLLECTION NOTICE

Hello, downtown? Celina Tio calling.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

ANGELA C. BOND

Collection • 1532 Grand, 816-471-7111 • Hours: Lunch: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Friday; dinner: 5-10 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday • Price: $$-$$$

C

ollection — which chef-owner Celina Tio says she named for a gathering place in the boarding school she attended in her youth — is going to be a wonderful restaurant when it grows up. It’s been a challenging infancy so far. Tio may have taken this unforgiving stretch of Grand in E MOR the spirit of “build it and they will come,” but the young and restless T A E IN downtown diners who ONL .COM PITCH flock to Extra Virgin and the Jacobson have so far failed to stumble into Collection. This despite Tio’s celebrity status — the James Beard Award–winner is by now familiar from her appearances on reality-TV cooking shows — and in contrast to the almost immediate success she enjoyed with her earlier restaurant, Julian, in Brookside. Then again, there’s a lot more than 5.8 miles separating Julian from Collection. The former opened in a location previously occu-

CAFÉ

pied by Joe D’s Wine Bar, which had been a very popular neighborhood spot for two decades. Collection’s building, on the other hand, is on a stretch of Grand that draws none of the family-on-a-stroll set, not much of the dating crowd at night, and scant foot traffic during the day (something Czar, the bar across the street, could have told Tio). Diners had eagerly awaited the arrival of Julian in Brookside, but few people seem to know that Collection exists or where it is. Tio understands this. Part of the problem, she says, is that, unlike her opening at Julian, she took her time changing the space on Grand from the small, lunch-only café that used to exist here — a personality-free room with notoriously bad service — into Collection. The old restaurant was the sort of place where you’d see one of those big, neon “Open” flashers in the window. I’m starting to think that Tio should plug in one of those signs — I’ve eaten at Collection three times now, two dinners and a lunch, and the dining room has been nearly empty on each occasion.

And this isn’t a dining room that forgives Chef Celina Tio's Collection exhibits, absence. It’s big and gray, with charcoal clockwise, almond cake with coffee carpeting and walls painted dove-gray anglaise, cumin-roasted carrots, and slate, and there’s not enough art on and baked rigatoni. the walls to warm up the cool interior. For now, though, Tio is juggling two restauIt’s also quiet enough to notice the backrants, and she has delegated many hands-on ground music — and to be annoyed every responsibilities to Michael Mosely (the longfive minutes or so when the music is intertime bar manager at Julian) and 26-year-old rupted by a commercial, because for some sous chef Dan Sowders, who reason Collection tunes in a local radio station. You started his career with Tio Few people seem to can get that ambience at as a dishwasher, moving know that Collection Town Topic, which serves his way up under her critia much cheaper cheesecal eye. “I would never hire exists or where it is. burger t ha n T io’s (a nd a sous chef from outside,” includes fries rather than Tio says. “I like to promote the chips Tio sets next to her sandwiches). from my own staff.” Still, Tio says she has big plans for ColSowders is very talented. A recent soup lection, including the Belfry (yet another that he created — a tart, briskly chilled punod to her schoolgirl past), a depot for coffee ree of cucumber and pink grapefruit — was and pastry in the mornings and sandwiches refreshing in every sense of the word. But and snacks until late at night. She says that’s I would have enjoyed it more on a scorchcoming later this year. (Great, but I say she ing-hot day instead of a dreary, muggy one, should order satellite radio fi rst.) when it went dow n continued on page 22

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21

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JUNE 6-12, 2013

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continued from page 21 Scallops get the "Oscar" treatment. like a very upscale smoothie. Sowards also I never crave shepherd’s pie, even in cold makes the best calamari I’ve ever tasted: weather, but Tio says she loved the dish at tempura-battered pieces of fresh squid — “I have it flown in from a new vendor in Bos- boarding school, so she’s keeping Collection’s version of it on the menu even as the season ton," Tio says — that melt on the tongue and are complex even without the accompany- changes. I admit that I fell for it; this pie is luscious, with sautéed ground lamb piled on ing jalapeño-and-harissa aioli. Harrisa — that Tunisian hot sauce made silky mashers dotted with roasted carrots, all smothered in a short-rib au jus reduction. with garlic, cumin, coriander and caraway — is Not all of the dishes are as generously why the spicy crème fraiche accompanying the sweet roasted carrots at Collection makes this portioned. A friend of mine complained one of the most arresting vegetable starters in about her “ladylike” serving of Campo Lindo chicken breast, glazed with town. I also give high marks a lemon caper sauce and to the fluffy cloud of goat Collection served with a dainty pile cheese, whipped with olive Olive oil whipped of roasted potatoes. He oroil and smartly arranged goat cheese ........................ $7 dered two desserts. with roasted beets and a Cumin-roasted carrots.......$6 The sweet s here a re scattering of pistachios. It’s House-ground rather on the delicate side served with crostini made cheeseburger .....................$11 as well, but memorable. I from Farm to Market baSpanish mac and cheese ....$11 Lamb shepherd’s pie ..........$19 guette, but my table finished like the unexpected spice Pineapple cheesecake ........ $5 it off with the butter-griddled lurking in the pineapple Farm to Market bread that’s cheesecake (Sowder slips an appetizer in its own right, a hint of cayenne in the sided with a dollop of red-wine apple butter glaze). A square of soft almond cake, thickly (heavier on the wine than on the apple). A blanketed with a satiny, coffee-flavored anvegetarian could make a meal of the Collecglaise, would be just as delicious with coffee tion starters — and might have to, because the at 8 a.m. as it was at 8 p.m., after dinner. five main courses and the seven choices in the I do think that diners will come to Col“Sandwiches n’ Stuff” category aren’t particulection, once it grows from that awkward, larly friendly to the meat-free. (Sowders says gawky new-restaurant stage and develops he’s ready to riff on the menu for vegetarians.) into the sexy urban boîte it wants to be. I have an almost visceral negative reacThe components are here: an accessible, tion to any menu that calls its food “stuff,” appealing menu; attentive service; a curvy and I cringed when the server asked me, and cozy little bar in the center of the room; straight-faced, what “stuff ” I wanted added a small but well-chosen wine list; even its to my cheeseburger. (The choices include an own parking lot, just north of the buildegg, bacon and mushrooms.) I went without ing. For now, Tio must lure serious diners, any stuff, and that helped me taste a burger not Sprint Center passers-by and business that was outstanding with cheese alone. lunchers. But her restaurant concept is so It’s not all hand-held choices in this cat- rich in potential that it should fi nd its place egory: There’s a really fi ne macaroni and at the head of downtown’s class. cheese, made with deliciously nutty Spanish manchego and bits of Serrano ham (which Have a suggestion for a restaurant can be left out), topped with a coquettish The Pitch should review? sprinkle of smoked-paprika breadcrumbs. E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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s regulars of many, many watering holes around town, we’ve found a funny trend: Bars without their own breweries offering their own brands of beer. It’s not a bad gimmick for tavern owners, who buy some not-so-great beer from breweries, slap the establishments’ names on the kegs and hang up signs in restrooms touting the impostor suds. In anticipation of a summer spent regulating our body temperature with cold drinks in dark bars, we sampled five bar-branded brews.

DUKE’S IPA

Duke’s On Grand | 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122 Source: Cathedral Square Brewery (St. Louis) “Enjoy our locally brewed house beer,” a sign in the men’s room at Duke’s nudges pee-ers. Except the house beer isn’t locally brewed. On a recent visit, a waitress at the bar formerly known as Willie’s told us that the rich red IPA with minimal head comes from Cathedral Square Brewery in St. Louis, where one of the bar’s owners lives. Duke’s IPA is intensely hoppy and bitter, with a slight metallic aftertaste. IPA fans should be pleased, but if you’re unsure, try it on a Thursday when all drafts are $2 all day. Otherwise, it’s $5 a glass.

TROOST LIGHT

Mike’s Tavern | 5424 Troost, 816-437-9400 Source: Flying Monkey Brewery Mike’s experiment in self-labeling is a cheap light ale called Troost Light. The reformed dive bar keeps it on tap and under the gaze of Roscoe, the bar’s mounted-moose-head mascot. “People come in all the time and say, ‘No, it’s a pilsner,’ ” says Val, a Monday-night waitress and bartender. “But it’s a light ale.” Call it whatever you want. (The erstwhile News Room bar named it News Room Ale.) Just don’t call it refreshing. It’s a little bitter and sweet, with a thin consistency. A musty aftertaste hangs in your nose after sipping the brassy gold beer. Pitchers cost $4 on Mondays.

BLUE LINE BEER

The Blue Line | 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825 Source: Flying Monkey Brewery A pilsner brewed for this River Market establishment by Flying Monkey, Blue Line Beer pairs well with the solid tavern fare served here. (The menu is full of hockey-themed jokes: Burgers are pucks; chicken strips are “goal tenders.”) It’s a good fit for anybody fond of yard beer but looking for a new 24

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JUNE 6-12, 2013

BE N PA L O S A A R I

Crafty local bars push self-branded brewskis they didn’t make.

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flavor. It won’t replace lowbrow beer drinkers’ Miller Lites or PBR tallboys. But at $3.50, it’s a nice diversion.

BEACH BEER

Volleyball Beach | 13105 Holmes, 816-942-2820 Source: Unknown The bartender at this faux beach getaway in Martin City won’t reveal the origins of its so– called Beach Beer. “I can’t tell you,” she says on jam-packed Tuesday night. “It’s a mystery beer. It’s a good light beer.” It’s certainly light on color and your wallet — a 22-ounce, strawyellow draw goes for $3.50. It’s easy to see, even with an unknown source, why this is the Gatorade of the Volleyball Beach’s bump-setspike crew. It goes down smooth, but the taste is bland and almost nonexistent. We’d bet it’s Natty Light or Milwaukee’s Best.

BLARNEY BREW

Fitz’s Blarney Stone | 3801 Broadway, 816-753-4949 Source: Flying Monkey Beer Even dive-bar lovers get worried looks on their faces when you mention Fitz’s. When we were there, an electric wheelchair sat inexplicably unattended in the middle of the bar. Blarney Brew goes for $1.75 a pint. The pilsner by Flying Monkey is fairly smooth and a bit sweet and fruity. After one pint, we wondered if a few Starbursts were dissolved in each keg. It’s drinkable and cheap, fitting for a hard-drinking place like Fitz’s. Barkeep, another round.

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JUNE 6-12, 2013

STREETSIDE

FESTIVAL FAIL

Kanrocksas hits the self-destruct button.

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

O

n May 17, the organizers of the Kanrocksas Music Festival announced that a “limited” number of single-day tickets were being made available, for $99. (Two-day tickets had been on sale since March, for $175.) A week and a half later — exactly one month before the event was to be held at the Kansas Speedway — we all learned that there was nothing remotely limited about tickets to Kanrocksas. “Due to insufficient ticket sales, Midwest Music Festivals and the Kansas Speedway have decided to cancel the 2013 Kanrocksas Music Festival scheduled for June 28th and 29th,” read the press release and a note on the festival’s website. That Kanrocksas shit the bed is no great shock. But it is embarrassing, and a little unprecedented. Canceling a festival of that size (one that had just wrangled a mention among Entertainment Weekly’s must-sees on the summer music calendar) is the nuclear option. Millions of dollars and a year’s worth of planning had already gone into Kanrocksas, but the organizers were so certain they were going to lose their asses that they pulled the plug to avoid an even bigger meltdown. What happened? The simple answer is that nobody was buying tickets. Why nobody was buying tickets requires a bit of unpacking. Let’s have a crack at it. In case you’re new here, here’s a rough historical outline of Kanrocksas. In 2011, out of nowhere, word arrives that a huge, twoday music festival is coming to the Kansas Speedway. The organizers: Chris Fritz, the longtime concert promoter and self-styled Bill Graham of Kansas City; Bill Brandmeyer, heir to a medical-products-company fortune and owner of two bars (now closed) at the Legends; and Mammoth Inc., the Lawrence booking and promotions company. Eminem headlines. People show up. Still, attendance lands well shy of the organizers’ goals. Much money is lost. In 2012, there is no Kanrocksas. The word Kanrocksas re-enters the local lexicon in 2013, this time without Fritz. There are whispers that Fritz is to blame for the 2011 debacle, that he’s an old-school concert promoter who hasn’t adjusted to the realities of the 21st-century music business. In January, Kanrocksas unveils three headliners: folk-rock heartthrobs the Avett Brothers, on-the-rise rapper Kendrick Lamar, and EDM superstar DJ Tiesto. (Later, the bill adds MGMT, Fun, Passion Pit, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Pretty Lights and others.) In an interview with The Kansas City Star, Brandmeyer compares his updated booking strategy with the movie Moneyball: “We felt like we could buy four or five great bands for the price of one.” In other words,

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no Eminem, whom Kanrocksas is rumored to have paid more than $1 million in 2011. The 2013 version of Kanrocksas, then, was always meant to be a bit scaled back. The lack of a big-dollar headliner — a Mumford and Sons, a Paul McCartney, a Nine Inch Nails — is visible evidence that Brandmeyer isn’t trying to compete with established festivals such as Lollapalooza, Coachella, Bonnaroo or Outside Lands. A straight-up second-tier festival is not the worst idea in the world. But if you don’t have big names, you can’t charge big prices. Which is what Kanrocksas was doing. Compare Kanrocksas 2013 with this year’s sold-out Lollapalooza. Over its stacked three days, Lollapalooza offers the Cure, the Killers, Nine Inch Nails, Mumford and Sons, Lumineers, Phoenix, Postal Service, New Order, the National, Vampire Weekend and hundreds more. Three-day passes went for $235 — just $60 more than Kanrocksas was asking for two days (not counting $25 if you wanted to camp). At $95, Lollapalooza’s one-day passes were actually $4 cheaper than Kanrocksas’ one-day passes. That’s preposterous. St. Louis’ LouFest has the Killers, Wilco, the National, Alabama Shakes, Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, Jim James, Local Natives, Icona Pop, Fitz and the Tantrums, and Toro y Moi. It also has an identity — mostly folk and indie rock, not much in the way of EDM or hip-hop. As a 31-year-old guy who listens to lots of music, I am much more interested in the LouFest lineup than I was in the Kanrocksas lineup. Lucky for me, two-day tickets to LouFest cost just $95. Again, that’s $4 less than one day at Kanrocksas. Not every potential festivalgoer is like me, of course, and the Kanrocksas lineup was nothing if not diverse. It included, for instance, lots of EDM

Fun: all dressed up and nowhere to play acts. But fans of that genre tend to be college-age or in their early 20s. The economy isn’t great for those people right now, and a $200 ticket (not counting food and drink and gas and lodging) might as well be the whole summer’s cash. In its varied bill, Kanrocksas’ schedule looked less like Lollapalooza than it did this year’s 80-35 Music Festival, in Des Moines, which features Wu Tang Clan, David Byrne and St. Vincent, Deerhunter, Umphrey’s McGee, Yeasayer, Wavves, and Menomena. At $39 a day (or $65 for two), though, it’s yet more evidence just how ill-proportioned Kanrocksas’ ticketing was. (The Des Moines event is even more affordable now; if you send over your Kanrocksas ticket purchase confirmation, you get a $10 discount.) Impract ica l t ic ket pr ici ng doomed Kanrocksas 2013, but other, smaller issues had already weakened the fest. The Kansas Speedway is too big, too far away from the city and probably too expensive to rent, given the more modest ambitions of the fest this year. And in addition to having always been stupid, the name “Kanrocksas” was one we’d all learned to associate with failure after 2011. Why not rebrand and rename? I’ve met Brandmeyer. He’s a friendly guy who’s really enthusiastic about music. He just wants to throw some big parties, and he has the cash to do it. I don’t think he or the other organizers of Kanrocksas were trying to rip anybody off with ticket prices. They just found themselves stuck in a spot where the math wasn’t going to work. Maybe one of these days, Brandmeyer or some other local will crack the code. Until then, meet me in St. Louis.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

pitch.com

JUNE 6-12, 2013

the pitch

27

MUSIC

SCION SONG

Sarah Lee Guthrie and Johnny Irion

BY

spearhead a new family tradition.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

M

iley Cyrus, Willow Smith — nepotism in the music industry has reached comical heights in recent years. Even the talented ones, like Solange Knowles, are a little hard to root for. But in the case of Sarah Lee Guthrie — daughter of Arlo, granddaughter of Woody — and Johnny Irion, nepotism isn’t quite the word. “Cosmic inevitability” seems more appropriate. The 34-year-old Guthrie didn’t pick up a guitar until she was an adult, around which time she met Irion, a songwriter who also comes from an artistically influential family of the Dust Bowl era. (His uncle is author Thomas Steinbeck, and his great-uncle is John Steinbeck.) The two married in 1999 and have been making music together since. Listen to their gorgeous Americana songs, and the idea that there are high-powered agents pulling music-biz strings for these cultural scions is immediately rendered ridiculous. Bright Examples, from 2011, is a dreamy folkpop gem, all ’70s AM-radio and Laurel Canyon tones. That one was produced by Andy Cabic and Thom Monahan of Vetiver, and featured guest spots from Gary Louris and Mark Olson of the Jayhawks. The pair’s latest, Wassaic Way, was produced by Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy and Pat Sansone. (Not to complicate matters too much, but on Wilco’s Mermaid Avenue collaborations with Billy Bragg, the group recorded new music to unreleased Woody Guthrie song lyrics.) If you’re a fan of any of the performers mentioned above, there’s a pretty good chance you’ll cotton to Guthrie and Irion’s music. In advance of their show Saturday at Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, The Pitch dialed up the couple last week at the home they share with their two children in western Massachusetts.

The Pitch: I just recently discovered Bright Examples. It’s so great! Johnny Irion: Thanks! Yeah, I thought the Vetiver guys just did such a wonderful job with it. I met them through Gary [Louris] on his solo tour, and Andy [Cabic] and I hit it off. Vetiver was touring at the time, and they came over and hung at our house. I loved that [Vetiver] Thing of the Past album so much. It really got me excited about recording again. So it just kind of went from there. You guys just released “Chairman Meow,” a song from the upcoming album. It seems a little more upbeat and sunnier than some of the stuff on Bright Examples. Is that generally true for the rest of the album? JI: I’d say the sunny songs are sunnier, but when it’s stormier, it’s a little stormier. Jeff was able to really accentuate the ebbs and flows of what we do. 28

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JUNE 6-12, 2013

Can you talk a little about the Wilco connection? JI: Jeff had known of Sarah Lee and I prior but hadn’t seen us play. Then we did a show in Three Oaks, Michigan, opening for [Sansone’s band] the Autumn Defense. And Jeff was there. Luckily I didn’t know he was there. I’ve thought of that several times, actually, how glad I am that I didn’t know he was there. After our set, he came by and said he loved it. Then he asked us to play [the Wilco-curated festival] Solid Sound two years ago. How much influence did Tweedy and Sansone have on the way Wassaic Way turned out? JI: I mean, a lot. We had definite ideas about what we wanted to do, but there were also about two and a half or three records there to make, and it was kind of a matter of which record to make from them. So we brought in all these songs, and he [Jeff ] and Patrick picked the tunes. So yeah, they were really instrumental in the process. Some songs we were surprised they picked. Others we were relieved because we were hoping they’d make the cut. With the sound — you know, with [2001 Wilco album] Yankee [Hotel Foxtrot] — Jeff kind of dissembled the Americana senses he’s always had, and we were hoping he could bring a little of that to this record. So there’s more drum machines, big swells, these kinds of soundscapes. We wanted an Americana record, but we didn’t want every song to sound like Harvest or something. I think we can do that on our own.

pitch.com

Bound for glory: Guthrie and Irion You’ve both made albums on your own. Now it seems like you’re committed to working together. What do you think working with the other brings to it? Sarah Lee Guthrie: Johnny had made several records before I met him. He had a lot of experience, whereas I didn’t. He knew a lot about making records. I just made one solo record, stopped there. I decided it probably came too soon for me, and I never really enjoyed it. Johnny just has these songs I love; it’s what I fell in love with back in 1997. So he’s always been the main contributor and songwriter of our group. He’s always said he wants to be able to sit in the same song circle as guys like Willie Nelson, Jackson Browne, Jeff Tweedy, and he works really hard at that. What I think I bring is a sense of simplicity. I tend to try to stay big-picture with Johnny’s songs. I think I have more to lend there. I think because of the way I’ve grown up, knowing the insides and outsides of music in general, it’s given me a really good sense of what’s good and what could be better. I tend to trust that. Do you ever feel like your relationship with music is almost, I don’t know, mystical or something, because of the musical tradition in your family? SLG: I don’t think it’s a mistake that I’m here doing what I’m doing. I think there’s

a reason why I play music and why I fell in love with a songwriter. I mean, gosh, I hope it’s for something! I’ll give you an example that makes me think that this record was — that fate had a hand in it. The third day we were at the Wilco studio, there was a package delivered to Jeff, and it was Mermaid Avenue 3, which had just come out and which I didn’t even know existed. And Jeff hands it to me, and I’m looking through it, looking at pictures of my family that I’ve never even seen. My aunt Kathy, who died when she was 4 in a horrible fire. I’d never even seen a picture of her, and I’m reading the liner notes, and it says it’s her. And there’s Woody articles on the wall of their loft. And, you know, Jeff has written all these songs where he put music to my grandfather’s lyrics. So days like that make you think it’s about more than just you. I’m not just me, I’m a part of the Guthrie family. And I think we kind of think of Jeff in some way as part of our family, as part of the Guthrie family. And I try to carry on and honor it and embrace it and treat it as part of my responsibility. It’s this awesome connection that brings me to music and people who make great music. Saturday, June 8, at Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

J A Z Z B E AT WINARD HARPER SEXTET

Often, jazz drummers operate in the background — jumping at the occasional solo but mostly laying a base, part of the foundation on which saxophones and horns build. Not so when the group bears the drummer’s name. Since the 1980s, Winard Harper — who backed sax legend Dexter Gordon and spent four years with singer Betty Carter — has led groups known for their hard-driving bop. In these, Harper is far more than the foundation. He’s out front, his drums leading the charge upon which the music builds. On his latest album, Coexist, the drums and bop are always present — swinging the title tune, underlying an Ellington standard or driving a gospel-tinged “Amazing Grace.” Winard Harper Sextet at the Blue Room, 1600 East 18th Street, 8 p.m. Friday, June 7, and Saturday, June 8; $15 for one night or $20 for both nights. — LARRY KOPITNIK

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JUNE 6-12, 2013

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29

MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, J U N E 6

They Might Be Giants

They Might Be Giants has been perfecting its bite-size nerd rock over the past 30 years, carving out along the way as distinct an identity as any band working today. An album titled Nanobots (released in March), including 25 songs in 45 minutes, with titles such as “Circular Karate Chop” and “Insect Hospital”? That could only be the handiwork of the two Johns — Flansburgh and Linnell — who were geeks in Brooklyn wayyy before it was fashionable. Thursday, June 6, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 785-749-3434)

Black Flag, Jealous Again: 7 p.m., The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Peter Case: 8 p.m.Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Pat Green: 7 p.m. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District, 13th St. and Grand. Ray Wylie Hubbard with Guy Forsyth: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

F R I D AY, J U N E 7 Gladstone Blues Fest: John Paul’s Flying Circus. J.P. Soars, Cedric Burnside Project: 5 p.m. Oak Grove Park, N.E. 76th and N.E. Troost, 816-436-5423. Ray Price, Dallas Wayne, Tater and the Gravy Train: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816483-1456. Waiting for Signal EP-release show with Heroes + Villains, Roman Ships, Sons of Great Dane: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179.

S AT U R D AY, J U N E 8

Psychedelic Furs

English punks in the 1970s, new wave icons in the 1980s, splitsville in the 1990s, spotty reunions in the 2000s. What has this new decade brought the Psychedelic Furs so far? A tour paying tribute to the group’s classic 1981 album, Talk Talk Talk, in 2011, and, this summer, another victory lap. Expect all the classics; there’s been no new Furs material on record in 20 years. Sunday, June 9, at the Midland Theater (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

Chvrches

Glaswegian trio Chvrches drives in the same lane as acts like Purity Ring and the Knife — woman-fronted electro-pop groups — but isn’t quite so icy. Its 1980s-tinged synth hooks are approachable, if still a little menacing, and all signs point to this being a breakout year for the band: a buzzy SXSW, a tour with Depeche Mode and a debut due in the fall. Friday, June 7, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Waiting for Signal

Mayday, the new album from locals Waiting for Signal, is the most recent addition to the catalog of albums practicing a genre that’s sometimes referred to around here as the

Back and still big: They Might Be Giants Kansas City Sound. It’s dark, sometimes epic rock, with varying degrees of angsty emo and grunge tones. On Mayday, you can hear echoes of 1990s local legend Shiner, plus some of the muscle of acts like Muse and Audioslave. Sample it at this release show, at which Sons of Great Dane, Heroes and Villains, and Roman Ships are set to assist in the celebration. Friday, June 7, at Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Crossroads Summer Block Party

Despite miserable heat, the first Crossroads Summer Block Party, last July, was a success. It returns this year to 19th Street (between Wyandotte and Baltimore) in the traditionally cooler month of June. Local label Golden Sound Records has again organized the party, and the lineup includes members of its roster, including Fullbloods, Hidden Pictures, and Millions of Boys. Also performing: Cowboy Indian Bear, Akkilles, Shy Boys, Oils and Opossum Trot.

F O R E C A S T

30

It’s always nice when a show offers exposure to a lot of local talent in one fell swoop, and this is one of those shows. Bonus: It’s free. The festivities get under way at 6 p.m., and the afterparty (at Snow & Co.) starts at midnight. See crossroadsblockparty.com for the schedule. Friday, June 7, at 19th and Wyandotte

Lord Huron

As Lord Huron, Michiganer-turned-Angeleno Ben Schneider writes pretty, pastoral folk-rock. Its commonalities with the music of Fleet Foxes are well-noted, but on his most recent, Lonesome Dreams, I hear just as much of the, um, dreamy qualities I associate with Pacific Northwest group, the Helio Sequence. As a sound, it’s nothing terribly novel given today’s folkdrenched indie climate, but this guy’s executing it better than a lot of the others. Monday, June 10, at Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

K E Y .....................................................I Love the '80s

............................................................Nerd Alert

.........................................Record-Release Show

......................................................British People

.................................................. Locally Sourced

...................... Songs About History and Science

........................................................ Lots of Hype

................................................... Folk Revivalism

..................................................................... Free

.........................Getting the Band Back Together

pitch.com

Humming House: 8 p.m., $10. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

MONDAY 10

TUESDAY 11 The Blank Tapes, Beach Day, Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas: 8 p.m., $10. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Defibulators: 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

WEDNESDAY 12 Logic, C Dot Castro, Skizzy Mars: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

FUTURECAST J U LY

....................................................Not a Real Lord

JUNE 6-12, 2013

SUNDAY 9

Eyeshine, No One’s Heroes: 7:30 p.m., $10. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

..................................................Pick of the Week

the pitch

Gladstone Blues Fest: Brandon and Shinetop, Jason & the Billy Bats, Selwyn Birchwood, Eugene “Hideaway” Bridges, the Nighthawks: 1 p.m. Oak Grove Park, N.E. 76th and N.E. Troost, 816-436-5423. Latenight Callers, In Back of a Black Car, Thick & the Foolish: 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Billy Joe Shaver with Lilly Haitt: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Patrick Sweany, the Problems, Elli Smith and the Commotion: 9:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300.

THURSDAY 4 Fourth of July: The Bottleneck, Lawrence THURSDAY 11 The Dirty Heads, the Expendables, Big B: The Midland SATURDAY 13 Ian Anderson: Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts FRIDAY 19 One Direction: Sprint Center TUESDAY 30 The Postal Service: The Midland WEDNESDAY 31 The Postal Service: The Midland

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31

NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6775). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 6 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Tex Railer’s Doomtown, 9 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Field Day Dreams, Future Wade, the Burdock King, Paper Buffalo, 8 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926 1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Ryan McCall and Band Practice

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Samantha Crain, La Guerre, 10 p.m.

FOLK/ROOTS/JAM BAND Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Justin Andrew Murray.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Drew Six KC Live! Stage at the Power & Light District: 13th St. and Grand. Pat Green, 7 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Diverse. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Joe Cartwright Jazz Duo, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Coco Trio, 8 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Rod Fleeman and Dan Bliss, 7 p.m.

a

time, feature, name or location ON YOUR IPHONE BLACKBERRY ANDROID

32

the pitch

JUNE 6-12, 2013

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Chris Ruest Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. House Jumpers Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Jason Vivone and the Billybats Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Cold Sweat Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Dwayne Mitchell Trio The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Dan Doran, 7:30 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Filthy 13, 9 p.m.; Old Crows, 5:30 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Doghouse Daddies, 9 p.m.

DJ

MORE

CLUB

INGS LIST E AT IN ONL OM

PITCH.C

The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Gruv with Mike Dileo & Trevor Shaw MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-3268281. DJ Cruz & Cyan, 10 p.m.

COVERS

The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Groove Therapy Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Pink Royal with The Phantastics KC Live! Stage at the Power & Light District: 13th St. and Grand. KC Live! Tribute Band Night, 8 p.m.

Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. Karaoke with Jim Bob, 9 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Starz Born Entertainment with Nesto the Owner and Snug Brim, 9:30 p.m., Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. John Morgan, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Country dance lessons, 8-9 p.m. Maker’s Mark Bourbon House & Lounge: 1333 Walnut, 816-442-8115. La Femme First Fridays VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Ultimate Blue Corner Battles, 8 p.m.

F R I D AY 7

BY

Crossroads KC at Grinders: 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454. Hearts of Darkness, Monophonics, 7 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Ras Neville and the Kingstonians VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Sexy Saturdays

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Samantha Fish Band, 7:30 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Billy Ebeling Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Brody Buster Duo, 7 p.m.

R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

HAPPY HOURS

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Indigo Hour with BMW, 5:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Everette DeVan Trio with Dionne Jeroue, 5:30 p.m. Mark Lowrey, 9 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. The Gatsby Party featuring the Dave Stephens Band, 9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 4 p.m.; Joe DeFio, 5 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m.; JLove Band, 9 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 9139248-5550. The KC Sound, 8 p.m.

VA R I E T Y

The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Reggae with AZ-One Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. John Morgan, 7:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. Karaoke with Baby Brie, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. BluntRap, Huey P. Nuisance, Ir Neko, the Abnorm, DJ PMS, 9 p.m.

FIND

WORLD/REGGAE

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

VA R I E T Y

check out

JAZZ/LOUNGE

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. The Many Colored Death, 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Too Late for Satellites, the Monarchs, After Nations, Leering Heathers, Madora, 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Home & Away, I Am Nations and Mime Game, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Music Band, Pale Hearts, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Drew Black and Dirty Electric, Molehill, the Summit, the Electric Lungs, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Man in the Ring, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Kasey Rausch, 10 p.m.

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S AT U R D AY 8 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Arya, Dirt, Eleven After, Solus, Breaking Even, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Bloodbirds, Dry Bonnet, 10 p.m. Town Center Plaza: 5000 West 119th Street, Overland Park. The Smithereens, the Doo Dads, 7 p.m

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Jeff Porter, 7 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Man in the Ring, 9 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Jaisson Taylor Duo, 7 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Paul Peress Trio, 5:30 p.m.; Will Matthews Trio, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Midtown Quartet The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Levee Town, 7:30 p.m.; Mama Ray’s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Patrick Sweany, the Problems, Elli Smith and the Commotion, 9:30 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Lonnie Ray Blues Band The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Doghouse Daddies, 5:30 p.m.; Cadillac Flambe, 9 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Billy Ebeling and the Late for Dinner Band, 8 p.m.

DJ Ambassador Hotel: 1111 Grand, 816-298-7700. Gossip Saturdays at Reserve Bar, 8 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. DJ Candlepants Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. DJ Eric Coomes Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Mike Scott The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Uriah West, Jason Kidd, Joey C. & Chris D., 10 p.m.

COVERS The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Victor Jacob Band The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Phantastics, Storm. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Bow Tie Affair

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Super Nerd Night, 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. John Morgan, 7 & 9:45 p.m.; The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. David Hasselhoff On Acid album-release show with At the Left Hand of God, Narcotic Self, Maps for Travelers, Clairaudients, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. 1001 Arabian Nights Bellydance with A’ishah and friends Woodsweather Cafe: 1414 W. Ninth St., 816-472-6333. Amanda Wish Open Mic, Saturdays, 1-4 p.m.

S U N D AY 9 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Opossum Trot, Real Kind, Danielle Grubb, Thommy Hoskins, 7 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Bram Wijnands stride piano, 7 p.m.; Paul Shinn Trio, 10 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill’s jazz brunch, 11 a.m.; Mark Lowrey jazz jam, 6 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2-7 p.m. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night with Dennis Nickell, Rick Eidson and Jan Lamb

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke, 8 p.m. Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. Prestige Poker League, 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. John Morgan, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Scott Shaffer, Wes Van Horn, Zach Smith, Maggie Parker, 8 p.m.

Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Beer Garden Variety Show with Foxy by Proxy, EMUprov, the Holographs, Skreee! and more, 4 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Secret 77, I Am Nation, Forget Roseline, 7 p.m.

Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Open jam with El Barrio Band, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays’ Open Blues Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Ensemble Tuesdays -R&B jam and open mic, 7 p.m.

JAZZ

VA R I E T Y

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Charlie Gatschet The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and friends, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Jackie Myers Band, Cody Ross, 10 p.m.

Duke’s on Grand: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Xtreme League Trivia, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Karaoke. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Gayme Night, 7:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Los Lobos Locos, Sri Yantra, Bohica, 10 p.m.

M O N D AY 10 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

OPEN-MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States, 9 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Open Mic Night, 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Open Mic with Jon Theobald, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Trivia Bingo, 10 p.m. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Trivia with Matt Larson, 8 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Stand Up Comedy Series with Wes Van Horn and Scott Shaffer, 7 p.m., free. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Costume Night with Tanya McNaughty and Jadey McJuicy, 9:30 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Wells the Traveler, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam’s Club Karaoke, 10 p.m. Rhythm and Booze: 423 Southwest Blvd., 816-221-2669. Geeks Who Drink, 7:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Uptown Comedy Night with Norm Dexter, 10 p.m. Blue Monday poetry and open-mic, 8-10 p.m.

T U E S D AY 11 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. The Rackatees, Four Arm Shiver, and Dead Dog, 9 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Transients, 9 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Jonny Green, 8:30 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Jay Nash, David Ramirez, Elsa Rae, Month of May, 7 p.m. The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Songwriter Showcase with Scott Ford, 7 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Mark Montgomery Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Andy Dewitt Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 6-10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Eboni Fondren with Charles Williams, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Dirty Bourbon River Show, 8 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Miss Major and her Minor Mood Swings, 7 p.m.

W E D N E S D AY 12 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Defibulators, 8:30 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Somewhere in Hiding, Noveria, Contagious Wednesday, Drawn Onward, Far From Seattle, 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Crayons, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Pretty, Ryan Lee Toms, Sinple, 2nd Hand King, 10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. A La Mode, 7 p.m.

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B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop, Jr., 7-9 p.m. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Big Medicine Gang, Lost Optical, 8 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge, 7:30 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Billy Ebeling, 7 p.m.

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Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Robert Moore, 9 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Vinyl Awareness with Bill Pile, Mike Scott, DJ Clockwerk and DJ Rico Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Stan Kessler Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Flannigan’s Right Hook, 9:30 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Singer-songwriter jam session with Tyler Gregory Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground open mic series, 9-11 p.m. Woodsweather Cafe: 1414 W. Ninth St., 816-472-6333. Blues Jam with the Dave Hays Band, 7-10 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Ultimate Karaoke. The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Karaoke. Charlie Hooper’s: 12 W. 63rd St., 816-361-8841. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 7:30 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Country dance lessons, 8-9 p.m. Snow & Co.: 1815 Wyandotte, 816-214-8921. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 7:30 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Angel Salazar, 8 p.m.

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our sexual differences are putting a strain on our marriage. Ten years ago, he asked me to talk dirty to him about having sex with other men. It has progressed to him wanting to be a cuckold. I only want to be with him, but he presses the issue by verbalizing cuckold situations during sex. This makes me close my eyes and shut down. By the time he is done, I have no desire to orgasm because I no longer feel attractive. Worse, I feel like I am not enough for him. The only way he can get off is to talk about, think about, or hear me talk about having sex with other men. It makes me feel worthless as a sex partner — which is crazy, because I am attractive and open to a great deal of things (toys, games, dressing up, striptease, etc.). He is a good father and a good provider, and I love him. But I won’t stay much longer if this continues.

Extremely Frustrated Female Experiencing Despair Dear EFFED: Your husband was probably reading cuckolding blogs for years before he worked up the nerve to raise the subject, and here’s what he’s gleaned: Husband brings it up, wife shoots it down, husband whines, wife agrees to explore it as fantasy only, and then one day — after months or years of dirty talk — wife announces she wants to give it a try. She winds up loving it, she says she regrets waiting so long, and husband lives happily ever after in cuckolded bliss. Reading so many cuckolding success stories — many likely fictitious — has left your husband convinced that if he just keeps at it, one day his wife will want to try it. (Some wives do try it and like it. I got a letter from a woman who’s angry that her husband — after years of dirty talk and a half-dozen cuckolding experiences — has decided that it isn’t for him after all. He doesn’t want her sleeping with other men; she doesn’t want to go back to sleeping with just him.) Tell your husband in no uncertain terms that you don’t want to hear about cuckolding anymore. Period. He is free to think about whatever he wants to during sex — we all are — but he has to keep his cuckolding fantasies to himself. Wrap up the convo by informing him that from now on, your sex sessions end the moment the subject of you sleeping with other men is raised. If he brings up other men, EFFED, get off the bed, get out of the bedroom, and go to the kitchen and have some ice cream. Your husband needs to find a new erotic script that works for you both. The incentive for him: Since you are open to many things — toys, games, dressing up, striptease — a fantasy scenario that turns you on is likely to become a reality scenario pretty quickly. 34

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JUNE 6-12, 2013

pitch.com

Finally, EFFED, cuckolds see their wives as so desirable — and so insatiable — that they’re incapable of giving their wives all of the sexual attention they deserve. But I can see why you’re upset. You want sex to be about the two of you, about the intimacy you share (or used to share), and your inconsiderate husband is always running his mouth about people who aren’t in the room. It’s understandable that you would feel like you’re not enough for him after 10 years of this bullshit. But your husband’s cuckolding fantasies don’t mean he finds you unattractive — they mean the exact opposite.

Dear Dan: I always told myself that I would for-

give my husband if he cheated on me. Well, he had an affair for eight months. He also blew through our savings and racked up debt. The college fund we started for our two children is gone. He spent the money on fancy dinners, expensive gifts and incredible vacations for his girlfriend. I am so angry, I can’t imagine staying. My husband ended the affair and wants desperately to save our marriage. As much as it pains me to subject my kids to divorce, I don’t know if I can commit to him again. Is the best option to DTMFA?

Heartbroken Dear H: Sexual infidelity is one thing — and it’s relatively common (so people should go into marriage prepared to work through it) — but we’re talking about a whole series of betrayals. Your husband betrayed you sexually and financially. He stole from you. He stole from his own children. Now, I can understand thinking with your dick (because I have a dick), and we can all imagine a circumstance in which we might succumb to temptation (because we all experience temptation). But I cannot even begin to wrap my head around how someone could spend his own children’s college fund on gifts, trips and meals for his piece-of-shit on the side. (Not all “other women” are pieces of shit, but anyone who would allow her married lover to spend that kind of money on her in eight months is a flaming piece of shit.) DTMFA. It’s advice, H, not binding arbitration. While I couldn’t see staying if I were in your shoes, I could see myself meeting with a marriage counselor a few times before pulling the plug — for the sake of the kids. Dan’s new book — American Savage: Insights, Slights, and Fights on Faith, Sex, Love, and Politics — is available now.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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The Pitch: June 06, 2013