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JANUARY 24–30, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 30 | PITCH.COM

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JANUARY 24–30, 2013 | VOL. 32 NO. 30 E D I T O R I A L

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TEXT EXCHANGE The Klink Mobile CEO bets that the future of banking is on the cellphone.

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SARA SULLIVAN AND CHRISTINA LUNDEEN Occupation Sullivan: Pilates instructor. I’ve been on a

From left: Lundeen and Sullivan

contract assignment with Google Fiber since early June as well. Lundeen: Owner of Christina Lundeen Photography

Q&As INE

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friends.

Lundeen: Annie Leibovitz so I could ask to be

her 36-year-old photography intern.

Who or what is your sidekick? Sullivan: My iPhone, and

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? Sullivan: New York magazine. Keeps me in

Christina for the last year!

the loop.

Lundeen: My 6-month-

old, Zoe

Lundeen: The New York Times digital sub-

scription 

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Sullivan: Book editor, airplane pilot Lundeen: Stuntwoman

What was the last book you read? Sullivan: It sounds silly, but the last book I read

that I thoroughly enjoyed is Angry Housewives Eating Bon Bons by Lorna Landvik. It’s a light read but still keeps you wanting more with the characters. Lundeen: Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Sullivan: Rye Lundeen: Westside Local Where do you drink? Sullivan: Bluestem, the Gaf, anywhere in

between

Lundeen: Gram and Dun, Bristol downtown What’s your favorite charity? Sullivan: Besides the Young Friends of Art?

I’ll support any local group or function. My friends are pretty involved in the city and its charitable causes, so we share the love. Lundeen: I donate photography portrait sessions to many local charity events every year, so I can’t pick a favorite: March of Dimes, Hillcrest Transitional Housing, Spay & Neuter Kansas City, Good Samaritan Project.

Where’s your favorite place to spend your paycheck? Sullivan: Lululemon Lundeen: Anthropologie Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? Sullivan: I love showing off our local food scene! And the Nelson, of course. Lundeen: An afternoon at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Rieger for dinner and then cocktails at Manifesto. 

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” Sullivan: It embraced the local culture, food and technology scene the last few years. I was a little wary to move home from NYC four years ago but couldn’t be happier here. Kansas City is making a name for itself with all of the

off with all the fabulous food, drinks and entertainment planned for 2013. Come to the party and get involved with the Nelson and the Young Friends of Art.

Which celebrity would you like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun? Sullivan: Drew Barrymore. I think we’d be

Current Neighborhood Sullivan: Waldo Lundeen: Brookside

ONL

Chairwomen

What movie do you watch at least once a year? Sullivan: Love Actually or Christmas Vacation Lundeen: The English Patient 

Hometown Sullivan: Blue Springs/Lee’s Summit Lundeen: Fort Dodge, Iowa 

MORE

Party Arty

above, and I’m proud to call this town home. We have the Nelson, we have the Kauffman Center, we have Google Fiber, we have James Beard award–winning chefs. What else do you need? Besides a good baseball or football team? Soccer is covered. Lundeen: It embraced local food, entertainment and the art scene. As a former New Yorker, I was so impressed with all the great eateries, live music and world-class museums, like the Nelson, when I moved here four years ago. I continue to be more and more impressed the longer I live here. I have a serious crush on you, Kansas City. 

“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Sullivan: Renovated Kauffman Stadium instead of building a new one downtown.

Lundeen: Couldn’t revive the public school

system in KCMO.

“Kansas City needs …” Sullivan: Better public transportation. After

living in Chicago and NYC, I have a great appreciation for it. Lundeen: Better public transportation. I miss the subway from my NYC days.

“People might be surprised to know that I …” Sullivan: Am in a mother-daughter book club. I’m friends with my mom’s friends and their daughters, and it’s super fun. Lundeen: Have a degree in civil engineering from Iowa State.

“On my day off, I like to …” Sullivan: Read. Sleep. Eat. Drink wine. Work

out. Not necessarily in that order. Lundeen: Have a date night with my handsome Australian husband, Bruce. He’s my very own Hugh Jackman. 

“In five years, I’ll be …” Sullivan: Who knows? Wherever the world takes me!

Lundeen: Taking Zoe to kindergarten, expanding my successful photography business, and doing lots of traveling with Bruce (our favorite hobby). Hopefully, I’ll win the Powerball jackpot by that time. 

What’s your favorite day trip? Sullivan: Weston Lundeen: Ames, Iowa, for a Cyclone football or basketball game

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? Sullivan: In high school, my prom date asked

if he could kiss me, which I thought was really sweet. Then he said, “Open mouth or closed?” I started cracking up. Boys, take note. Lundeen: There was a horrible brush with food poisoning that both Bruce and I have blocked from our memories.

Describe a recent triumph. Sullivan: After 12 years in the liquor and mar-

keting industry, I gave it all up to become a Pilates instructor. Totally new line of work for me, and I had to memorize every muscle in the secret, but I love those shows: Suits, White body, plus hundreds of exercises, to become certified. And on Sunday morning, hopefully Collar, Covert Affairs. Lundeen: The Office. Even without Steve Carell.    I can say Party Arty was a huge success! Lundeen: Balancing the transition to working mom with everything else in my life: runWhat takes up a lot of space in your iTunes? Sullivan: I think it’s music (Top 40 girlie ning my photography business, caring for stuff ), but my boyfriend disagrees. And I’m baby Zoe, planning Party Arty, catching up not afraid to admit that I’m excited to go to with my girls over a glass of wine, and making sure my husband and I can still do some the Lady Gaga concert next month! of our favorite things together. I couldn't do it Lundeen: Bob Dylan and the National without Bruce, my mom and all of our friends What local tradition do you take part in — it takes a village.

What TV show do you make sure you watch? Sullivan: Anything on USA. It’s my dirty little

every year? Sullivan: Royals Opening Day! And Party Arty. Lundeen: Party Arty. Our theme this year is

“Eternal Spring,” and we’ll knock your socks

Party Arty is 8 p.m.–midnight Saturday, January 26, at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art’s Bloch Building (4525 Oak). Tickets are sold out.

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TEXT Exchange

KLIN K MOBILE C EO J ES SIE BISHOP BE TS THAT THE FUTURE OF MOVING M O N E Y I S O N YO U R C E L L P H O N E . BY B E N PA LO S A A R I P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

K

link Mobile’s world headquarters is in the clubhouse of a sprawling, gated Overland Park apartment complex. The space is perfect for Jessie Bishop, the startup’s 30-year-old CEO and founder, who says she can conduct international business and “not leave for a week.” “I can literally roll out of bed and get my day started,” she says. “The last thing I want to do is go somewhere.” The only things that Bishop and her handful of employees scattered around the globe need are an Internet connection and Skype. (Klink’s chief technology officer lives in Mexico City, another employee is based in Florida, and another is in Afghanistan.) The clubhouse (a common area for residents) has Wi-Fi, a gym, and a glass wall overlooking an infinity pool and a patio. When Bishop isn’t jetting to Afghanistan or speaking in the United Arab Emirates, she makes the short walk from her building to the clubhouse, where pop songs quietly play over speakers. Bishop pulls out her battered BlackBerry (she’s fiercely loyal to the struggling mobile brand) to demonstrate how Klink works. She types “$10” and texts Klink. Within seconds, the recipient’s phone vibrates with the arrival of a text message. “[Jessie Bishop] just sent you $10 using Klink Mobile!” the message reads. Bishop says easily moving money between

phone users could revolutionize how cash is dispersed in the developing world. “In Afghanistan, for example, 3 percent of the population has access to a bank,” Bishop says. (Half of the world’s population doesn’t have bank accounts; 8 percent of Americans are “unbanked,” according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.) “Nobody has that, so their phones are becoming the actual bank itself.” When a customer sends money using Klink, the funds don’t go into the recipient’s bank account. The currency lives on the phone itself, which is different from other moneytransferring technology companies, such as PayPal or Des Moines startup Dwolla. Recipients could buy goods and services from other Klink users or use the money to pay their cellphone bills. “It’s becoming a virtual currency in and of itself,” Bishop says. “It creates a kind of currency ecosystem worldwide.” The money cannot be converted into tangible cash and withdrawn, but Bishop says that’s in Klink’s future. “I could walk up to an ATM and, just like I’m voting for Dancing With the Stars, I could text the ATM from my mobile device, and the ATM shoots out cash,” she says. “But that has to happen in phase two, when Klink has the relationships with the banks.” Phase one is signing cellphone carriers around the world to work with Klink. So far, they have been receptive; Klink is operational in Afghanistan with Etisalat, a carrier with 3.5 million users.

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Bishop says Afghanistan’s antiquated infrastructure makes it the perfect proving ground. She spent a couple of weeks in the country last year. “People travel into the city, into Kabul, to pick up their paychecks every single month,” she says. “There are lines so long at some of these banks, they will stand in line all day after traveling however many kilometers. They’ll stand in line all day at the bank to collect their paychecks.” That money could be more easily distributed with Klink, she says, improving the quality of life of millions of Afghans. Klink’s next launch site: Mexico. “There are three mobile operators in Mexico, and we have two of them contracted,” Bishop says. “And they’re finishing integration this week or next.” The deal gives Klink access to more than 50 million subscribers. Before Klink can save Afghans from waiting for days in long bank lines or give people in America an easy way to send money to family members in Mexico, the startup needs money. In early January, Klink was preparing to launch a text-message campaign, inviting users to try the service in Afghanistan. The risk was high for the young company — when a Klink transfer is made, the company fronts the cash, later recouping it from the sender’s bank or credit card. That means Klink’s scant resources (angel investors have pumped $80,000 into the company) could be strained and possibly drained.

“That’s a really scary thing for me,” Bishop says. “I’m like, shit, we better go raise some money.”

B

ishop is building Klink on a shoestring budget, or “bootstrapping,” the startup code for hiring a few employees and working long hours for no pay. The entrepreneurial lifestyle has left Bishop with little time for a social life or friends. “I haven’t had a boyfriend in I don’t know how long,” she says. “That’s a lot to ask from someone.” Despite a lack of funding, Bishop never gives off an air of desperation. She has been here before; this is the second time in three years that she has built an international company. Bishop sounds like a career counselor when she talks about her pre-entrepreneurial life: “Don’t ever be too good for anything. You never know when you’re going to be rock-bottom or king of the hill.” She has been both. Bishop grew up just outside De Soto. Her parents, Riley (a clinical social worker) and Linda Joslyn-Bishop (a psychologist), commuted daily to their Country Club Plaza offices. Her mother is the breadwinner and a breastcancer survivor. She is an inspiration to her three daughters. “We have a role model of a woman who had a career and never gave up her career,” Bishop says. “She still works seven days a week, and she’s 71.”

2.5

Billion unbanked people worldwide Source: World Bank

8

Percent of unbanked Americans Source: FDIC

3

Percent of Afghans with access to banks Source: U.S. Agency for International Development

Joslyn-Bishop says her daughter showed flashes of entrepreneurial hustle as a kid. “She started the violin at 3 years old, and I remember the violin teacher telling me that she was the most fearless violin player he’d ever met,” she says. “She just didn’t know fear.” After graduating from Pembroke Hill School in 2001, Bishop attended Purchase College, State University of New York. But she left New York after the September 11 attacks, and she studied abroad in Spain. After her freshman year, she briefly moved to Morocco, where she lived in William S. Burroughs’ former home. She later enrolled at the University of Puget Sound, earning a degree in fine art in 2005. Finding a job in the art world proved difficult, so Bishop moved back to Kansas City and took a job as a barista at Beanology, a now shuttered boozy coffeehouse. She was looking for a more sustainable career when a regular customer hired her to troubleshoot VeriFone credit-card-payment machines. “I know how to dissect those and put them back together,” she says. “I know more than you could want to know.” But Bishop tired of corporate jobs. “I can’t stay inside the lines,” she says. “I need excitement. I need new things.” So she traded her office job for a waitress gig at Sullivan’s Steakhouse in Leawood. “I had to wear fishnets and black miniskirts, and I served cocktails for a while,” she says, rolling her eyes. “You know, whatever. If you need money, you need money. If you need money, go out and make it.” Then Bishop decided to make money in a way that didn’t involve fishnets or miniskirts. In 2009, she created her first startup, Prepay Nation, an international prepaid mobile-minutes company. “Unlike here in the U.S., the rest of the world is prepay,” Bishop explains. “So they all have to add money to their account before they can use it.” Bishop co-founded the company with Deepika Jain and Shipra Agrawal, and Pre-

pay Nation got off to a fast start, winning the mobile-industry prize in 2010 at the Women 2.0 business conference in San Francisco. Money quickly rolled in. “We were about to take on venture-capital funding,” she says, “and we were doing about a run rate [projected revenue rate] of $60 million.” Bishop’s voice grows quiet, hovering above a whisper. Her gaze fixes on her hands on the tabletop. Her partnership with Prepay Nation fell apart. Bishop explains that the company was established as a limited liability company in the founders’ names — but the ownership pie wasn’t clearly divided. “My background is in art. I’m an artist. And [I had no] actual business training,” she says with a slight chuckle. “And we didn’t have an operating agreement.” Without a clear division of Prepay Nation’s ownership, there was a fissure. Bishop won’t say on the record how her Prepay Nation partnership dissolved, other than acknowledging that she wasn’t happy.

“You have to be really careful about what money you take.” So Bishop moved in with her parents and began planning her next move. Prepay Nation CEO Anurag Jain also won’t discuss Bishop’s relationship with Prepay Nation, which is based in Philadelphia with eight employees. “She was a pleasure to work with,” says Jain, whose wife is a co-founder. Jain speaks guardedly about Bishop’s departure from a company that she helped build and guide. “A year into the business, she wanted to change the terms of the business,” he says. “She was compensated fairly on what was originally decided.”

From left: Buteau, Alvarado and Bishop work together for the first time. Prepay Nation bought out Bishop’s ownership share, Jain says. He won’t discuss the details of the agreement. (Bishop and Prepay Nation have agreed not to disparage each other publicly.) The company has grown without Bishop, acquiring a French company. (Terms of that deal haven’t been disclosed.) Bishop is hoping that she has learned from her Prepay Nation experience. “I said to myself, if I have the skill set to do this, if I have the relationships to do this, if I have the brains, if I have the willpower, if I really want this, go do it again,” she says. “Don’t be a lazy ass and don’t give up.”

A

side from her hardworking mother, Bishop draws inspiration from another successful, albeit less wholesome, professional: Gus Fring, the sadistic, unflappable meth kingpin of AMC’s Breaking Bad. In the show, Fring brings veggie trays to cartel meetings, volunteers his time and money to the Albuquerque Police Department, and calmly kills his enemies. He’s also the successful owner of more than a dozen fast-food franchises, which are fronts for his multistate drug ring. “Gus, no matter what, he’s so stoic,” Bishop says. “You never see him express a ton of anxiety and emotion. That’s something that I wish, as a CEO, I can learn — to be constantly calm.” Bishop knows that staying calm will become more difficult as Klink grows. Funding won’t be the only concern for the young company. Bishop and her Mexico City–based CTO, Alan Alvarado, say safeguarding transactions is paramount. Alvarado recently tested the system’s security in what he calls a Klinkathon; he brought together several continued on page 8

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continued from page 7 hackers, bought them beer and told them to try to bring down Klink. The idea was based on hackathons in which companies test their Web security against determined hackers. Alvarado, who at the time hadn't met Bishop in person, says no one could breach Klink. “Yeah, we’re pretty happy with that,” he tells The Pitch in a phone interview. Alvarado admits that hackers are always going to attack the site. “People will want to get this money,” he says, adding that the Klinkathons are going to be regular occurrences to keep him on his toes. He has already seen attempts in China and Russia to crack the site. The attempted attacks may not be all bad, Alvarado says. “In Russia, we don’t have carriers,” he says, “so that makes me think Klink Mobile is starting to be somewhat popular in the European continent.” Before anyone can try to steal Klink’s money, Bishop needs to raise it. (She named her company Klink because “that’s the sound money makes.”) Bishop says there are several reasons that venture-capital firms might pass on her company. For starters, the concept — creating a virtual currency that is transmitted over the phone — is difficult to explain. “What we’re doing is so high-risk and so far out there,” she says. Plus, focusing on Afghanistan, a country battered by war and viewed as a Taliban stronghold, could throw off some investors. “Transferring money from the U.S. to a person in Afghanistan, that’s a hard thing convince people that that’s something they should participate in,” Bishop admits. Also hurting her cause: That country’s uncertain future once American forces are withdrawn from the country. If investors are worried about terrorists using Klink, Bishop says, that’s a bogus concern. “Terrorism, drug cartels are never going to go away,” she says. But, she adds, because Klink transactions live on the phone, the company can track where money goes after it’s sent. “Should it occur, we’re going to be in a better position to address it than the current banking institutions are today.” Maybe there’s another reason for the lack of investors. “People have a hard time with these baby cheeks, I think,” she says, pointing to her face. Or maybe Bishop is more cautious now. She says she’s looking for the “right money.”

Klink is Bishop’s second startup since 2009. But to someone who hasn't drawn a salary for more than a year, logic might dictate that any money is the right money. Bishop says that isn’t true. “There are so many people that I’ve started to do due diligence with,” she says. “Halfway through, when they’re about to put a deal on the table, they’re like, ‘Oh, by the way, how would you feel about us putting our boy in as the CEO?’ You have to be really careful about what money you take.” She adds that she isn’t looking for potential investors who want to hear only good news. “A lot of investors want to be told lies, I think,” she says. “They want to hear that everything is really good all the time. … I’m going to tell you when it’s really bad, and I’m going to tell you when it’s really good. If you can’t handle that, you’re not the right person for this company.”

A

s Bishop and her team prepare for their text campaign in Afghanistan, they’re in an odd position. With limited resources to cover all transactions, the company can’t afford for its initial push to be too successful. “I’m worried we won’t have enough money to fund the transactions,” she says. But this is the moment that Bishop needs. She’s closing in on a professional rebound. If the text campaign succeeds, Klink will be far more attractive to venture capitalists, she says. Only then can she finally stop bootstrapping. “If everything goes as planned, we’ll be extremely successful,” she says. “And I don’t think we can bootstrap anymore at that point.” But what if Klink fails? Bishop barely considers the notion. “That won’t happen,” she says. “But let’s say it does. I’m not afraid of that. I’ve already done that before. It’s not that bad. I mean, it sucks, but it could be a lot worse. I could be homeless and without family.” This past Monday, Klink world headquarters has shifted briefly from Bishop’s apartment complex to a conference room at the offices of the Ogletree Deakins law firm. In a room overlooking the Plaza, Alvarado, Bishop and Jean Olivier Buteau, Klink’s vice president of business development, share one side of a beige marble table. As they talk about the future of the company, a huge Panasonic TV on one wall shows President Barack Obama’s inauguration.

A friend of Bishop’s works for the fi rm and has set up this borrowed time in a space that’s much swankier than Klink can afford to replicate. On this Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the office is almost deserted. This is the Klink team’s first time working together in the same room. The three look almost relieved to be physically close to one another. Alvarado uses a tablet with a stylus to draw diagrams of how their servers work and what he has planned for the company. He says collaborating over Skype is fi ne, but he prefers to be in the same room. “Now I can explain everything how I want,” he says. He arrived with his wife the previous night. “I like to draw to explain my ideas. Because if I just speak, I think, ‘Oh, maybe they don’t understand.’ ” “I’m pleasantly surprised with Alan because the guy knows exactly what he’s talking about,” says Buteau, who is staying in Bishop’s apartment while he’s in town. (Bishop is staying with her parents.) The VP sounds like he’s on a blind date: “He’s young and intelligent, so I’m pretty happy.” Alvarado explains to the other two that the next crucial step for getting users to trust Klink is earning recognition from online privacy companies Verisign and TRUSTe. “Hopefully we can get a certificate with Verisign first, then TRUSTe,” Alvarado says. “We need to have these certifications.” “How much does that cost?” Bishop asks. It’s one more bill to pay. “They didn’t tell me yet,” Alvarado replies. Their first same-city business day over, the three Klink colleagues walk a block south from Ogletree Deakins to Café Trio. They’re stopping by a happy hour put on by the Centurions Leadership Program, a group of local entrepreneurs organized by the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce. At two long, high-top tables in the cozy bar, Bishop answers questions from seven local businesspeople. It’s a good-natured inquisition, but Bishop is in full hustle mode. As the Centurions order their second and third drinks, Bishop hasn’t yet drained her fi rst glass of red wine as she runs through various versions of an elevator pitch. “This has huge potential. If we do this right — massive,” she says. To Sir With Love plays on a muted TV hanging over the tables. She collects more business cards. An hour into the cocktail session, a woman asks Bishop what will happen if Klink runs out of capital. The CEO doesn’t pause. “We will find some way to make money,” she says. “We are that creative.” She jokes about part of her own limited holdings: her antique German violin. “When my money runs out, I’ll sell my violin,” she says with a wry smile. It hasn’t come to that yet, and it might not. For now, Klink is updating its system again — a move that slightly delays its planned text campaign in Afghanistan. “We didn’t want to actually blast out to 3.5 million subscribers yet,” Bishop says. “We want to do that exactly when we are ready.” The launch is tentatively set for later this week.

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FILM Barbara heads west.

28 PAG E

MUSIC FORECAST The Darkness suits up for a new decade.

T H U R S D AY | 1 . 2 4 | FRESH BEATS

Friends don’t let friends buy mix CDs from aspiring rappers at gas stations on Troost or Prospect. Friends do go with each other to the Goomba Rave at the Bottleneck (737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483). Team Bear Club throws Lawrence’s freshest dance party, which resumes for the semester with a new resident DJ, Nick Riviera (aka DJ Nick Arcade). Tonight’s installment of the weekly throwdown promises to be tasty, with Bear Club regulars DJ G-Train and Feast spinning. “There are several other major DJs on deck for the coming semester,” says organizer Phil “Morri$” Canty, “so we promise that we will have more bombs to drop on the people.” Come for $1.25 PBR draws and $4 double

BALLIN’ OUT OF CONTROL Cue the whistling of Brother Bones’ “Sweet Georgia Brown.” The Harlem Globetrotters bring their hoop tricks to KC for one day at the Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000). Shows are at 2 and 7. For tickets ($19–$132), call 888-929-7849 or see sprintcenter.com. wells, and stay for Canty’s cuts from the recently released Night Slugs Allstars compilation. Doors open at 8 p.m., and the show starts at 9. The cover is $3 or $5.

F R I D AY | 1 . 2 5 | ROCK ’EM, SOCK ’EM LADIES

Details are scant about the men fighting in tonight’s Ultimate Blue Corner Battles at VooDoo Lounge (Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Drive, 816-472-7777). Maybe that’s because the women fighting, including exChiefs cheerleader Rachel Wray, are getting all the press. Last December, she told kcmma.com that she traded in her pompoms for a better workout. “I want the knockout and [I’m] hoping that I won’t let the crowd get to me,” Wray says. Her opponent is Katelyn Radtka, a Missourian with a 7–12 record. Other women’s matchups include Ashley continued on page 12

F R I D AY | 1 . 2 5 |

NO TUNES LIKE SHOW TUNES

W

ill a remake of Annie ever be as good as Jay-Z’s “Hard Knock Life”? Was Judy Collins’ performance of “Send in the Clowns” on The Muppet Show in 1977 not an epic example of creepiness? Rediscover show tunes at the Kauffman Center (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7200) when Steven Reineke, music director of the New York Pops, conducts the Heartland Men’s Chorus for Broadway Rocks. The Lion King, Wicked, Mamma Mia and Rent are well-represented during this three-night run (which began Thursday). Hear the high-energy program tonight at 8. Tickets cost $38–$84. See hmckc.org. pitch.com

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11

Jan 23-Feb 10

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continued from page 11 Daniels vs. Melissa Bennett and Crystal Jordan vs. Molly Welsh. The fights begin at 8, and tickets start at $22.50. For more information, see voodookc.com.

S AT U R D AY | 1 . 2 6 |

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S AT U R D AY | 1 . 2 6 | PARTY ARTY, PEOPLE

Tickets for Party Arty, the annual see-andbe-seen celebration of the Nelson-Atkins’ Young Friends of Art, are totally sold out. At last look, tickets were selling for up to $200 on Craigslist. That’s a steep price for “Eternal Spring,” this year’s theme. But it might just be worth it, with catering from North, Cooper’s Hawk, Tito’s Vodka, Patrón, and others. The party starts at 8 p.m. (Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, 816-751-1278) and builds anticipation for the Nelson-Atkins’ next big exhibit: Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Masterpieces of Modern Mexico From the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection. For more info, see nelson-atkins.org.

S U N D AY | 1 . 2 7 | UNLUCKY BILLY

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J A N UA R Y 24 -3 0 , 2 0 1 3

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arlier this month, National Geographic News posted a photo of a bald eagle with leucism, a mutation that produces white spots on an animal’s body from lack of pigmentation. Photographer Traci Walter called the sighting unforgettable. Watch for leucistic eagles during the 12th Annual Eagle Day at Mr. & Mrs. F.L. Schlagle Library (4051 West Drive, Kansas City, Kansas, 913-299-2384) and J.P. Davis Hall (North 91st Street and Leavenworth Road, 913-596-7077), located at opposite sides of Wyandotte County Lake, which organizer Jessica Lawrenz calls a prime feeding ground. “If the water is frozen and the eagles can’t catch fish, they’ll prey on the old, weak and injured waterfowl,” she says, warning of bird-on-bird violence. The free event includes live bird presentations, binocular and field-guide checkouts, and eagle crafts for the kids. Activities go from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. See kckpl.org for more information.

Ballet-dancing Billy Elliot can’t catch a break. His mum is dead, his dad and brother are caught up in the mid-1980s coal miners’ strikes, and his best friend is gay. His fictional struggles, set to the music of Elton John, make up the plot of the Tony Award– winning Billy Elliot: The Musical. It finishes its KC tour today at the Music Hall (301 West 13th Street). Performances are at 1 and 6:30, and tickets cost $35–$75. See kansascity. broadway.com or call 816-513-5000.

SAD AND SEXY

In Portugal, fado music is mournful, haunting, dramatic, melancholic and deeply heartfelt. Tonight, local trio Fado Novato — singer Shay Estes and guitarists Beau Bledsoe and Jordan Shipley — promises a performance straight out of the historic district of Alfama in Lisbon. Where does one find such a sexy time? Renée Kelly’s Harvest, at Caenen Castle (12401 Johnson Drive, Shawnee, 913-631-4100). “It’s pretty intimate for a castle,” Estes says. Admission ($25, $20 in advance) includes a glass of wine and Lisbon-inspired snacks during the 7 p.m. performance. At press time, the event was sold out. See fadonovato.com for updates. — CHARLES FERRUZZA

M O N D AY | 1 . 2 8 | HAPPY-HOUR HIT LIST: SUSHI JOINTS

Are you one of those I-don’t-eat-meat-butI-love-sushi types? Maybe you like cheap drinks but refuse to contribute to the overfishing of the ocean? Either way, the specials at these independently owned sushi joints are for everyone. Kato Sushi (6340 Northwest Barry Road, 816-584-8883). From 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., get $1.50 selections of nigiri and $3.95 selected appetizers. The drink deals are just as good: $2 domestic bottles, $2.50 Japanese bottles, $3.50 glasses of house wine, $3.95 selected martinis, and $5 22-ounce cans. Sushi Gin (9559 Nall, Overland Park, 913-649-8488). This spot is known for its all-day $1 nigiri specials, and its happy-hour specials (from 5 to 7:30 p.m.) change daily. On Monday, get 22-ounce Kirins, glasses of house cabernet, gin and tonics, and large servings of sake, all priced at $4.50. Dragon, Alaska and New York rolls cost $4.95 each. Sushi House (5041 West 117th Street, Leawood, 913-663-3333). Around since 2002, this tidy location has a new happy-hour menu (with deals from 3 to 6 p.m.) that includes $3 house sakes, $4 draws, and $5 house martinis and sangrias. All appetizers are $2 off.

A KANSAS CITY LOOPER

Asked about tonight’s film showing at the Kansas City Central Library (14 West 10th Street, 816-701-3400), Robert Butler gave us this picturesque endorsement: “We can’t time travel,” the former Kansas City Star film critic said, “but if you’ve ever wondered what it was like to sit in a smoky jazz club in the

1930s and experience great musicians squaring off in a classic ‘cutting contest’ for musical supremacy, Robert Altman’s Kansas City provides the next best thing.” Fall in love with our town again at 6:30 p.m., in the Stanley H. Durwood Film Vault, on the library’s top floor. Admission is free. See kclibrary.org.

T U E S D AY | 1 . 2 9 |

LIED CENTER PRESENTS Saturday

FEB. 2nd 7:30 p.m.

A LITTLE MORE COUNTRY THAN THAT

Honky-tonk times are had at Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300) at 7 p.m. every Tuesday with the invitational jam Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco. “We’re more Johnny Cash than Alice in Chains, for sure,” says Dutch Humphrey of the three-hour event, which features a DJ, an occasional local act, and a $5 shot-and-a-beer special. Even if you aren’t down to jam, Elkheart — rounded out by Tim Gutschenritter, Evan John McIntosh and Brent Windler — lays down a sweet Americana set about an hour in. There’s no cover, and it’s for those 21 and older only. See czarkc.com.

W E D N E S D AY | 1 . 3 0 |

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There’s really something for everyone at the Science of Rock ’n’ Roll: silenced drum kits, old jukeboxes and record cutters, recording opportunities in soundproof booths, and enough local memorabilia to remind you that KC rocks just as hard as Austin. Tickets for the exhibit, at Union Station (30 West Pershing Road, 816-460-2020) through May, cost $15 for adults and $12.50 for kids 14 and younger. See scienceofrock.com for more information.

SURVIVORS

Karen Thompson Walker’s The Age of Miracles smartly combines a contemporary coming-of-age novel with an is-this-the-endof-the-world fable. It’s among last year’s most memorable books, and the author stops here tonight to talk about it. For this Rainy Day Books event, she’s joined by Patricia O’Brien, who writes novels as Kate Alcott and who last year put out her own but-we-were-just-getting-started story, The Dressmaker, set on the Titanic and during the aftermath of its sinking. Both books are new in paperback; choose one as part of your $15 admission to this 7 p.m. discussion with Rainy Day’s Vivien Jennings. It’s at Unity Temple on the Plaza (707 West 47th Street). For tickets and more information, see rainydaybooks.com. — SCOTT WILSON

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S TA G E

OUT OF THE PAST

BY

DEB OR A H HIR SC H

BRIAN STUBLER

The Living Room conducts a powerful reprise of Blackbird.

R

elationships are complicated. EspeCordes and Severo face off. cially when the connection is between floor and debris overflowing the wastebasket, a 40-year-old man and a 12-year-old girl. That’s among the lessons of Scottish play- symbolic of their messed-up lives and the wright David Harrower’s Blackbird, said to be damage left in the wake of their tryst. These two characters can’t be easy to inspired by a 2003 case involving a 31-yearold former U.S. Marine, Toby Studebaker, portray, yet Cordes and Severo immerse and a 12-year-old British girl. Together they themselves again in the roles. These people haven’t seen each other since the trial, flew to France and checked into a hotel, havwhen they shared its awful publicity. Una, ing met online the year before. Winner of the 2007 Laurence Olivier still consumed, is trying to come to terms Prize for best new play, Blackbird is a mas- with her feelings of rage, shame, confusion, terful exploration of the dynamic between despair, even abandonment. She’s a victim 55-year-old Ray (Scott Cordes) and 27-year- of not only an adult who knew better but old Una (Vanessa Severo) as they recall a also medical and legal systems — including a judge who admonishes her “suspiciously three-month “courtship” that culminated in a trip to a motel 15 years earlier. Directed adult yearnings” — that failed her. Did I say it was complicated? by Bryan Moses, this one-act at the Living Ray has learned his lesson. Or has he? Room is not easy theater, but it is a riveting He, too, deals with his crime, his guilt, his navigation of a forbidden relationship’s legal yearnings, as they revisit those days. And and emotional aftermath. what is Una ultimately seeking? Cordes The same play, with the same two actors and Severo expertly traverse the memories and director, was produced at the Living of their shared past, the Room two years ago (reneeds and feelings that viewed here February 3, Blackbird motivated their actions, 2011). It was affecting then, Through February 3, and the ever-present conseand this reprise remains at the Living Room, quences. Their reunion and powerful despite its now 1818 McGee, 816-533-5857, its tensions come off stark, shorter 75-minute length. thelivingroomkc.com sometimes raw. In the intiThe story begins quickly, mate confines of the show, as Una confronts Ray at his enacted in a smaller performance space of place of employment. We’re never sure just the Living Room, it’s just Cordes and Severo what Ray’s job is, but Una has located him — Ray and Una — maneuvering moment by thanks to a picture in a trade magazine. moment through the alternating directions “How did you find me?” he asks. We, too, want to know. He’s wary, nervous. He of a difficult encounter. We’re eavesdropping, as unsure as the characters just where doesn’t really want to talk to her. Ray has successfully hidden behind a it’s all headed. In the stillness following the play’s end, different name, Peter, and a new life. Does we’re left wondering if Ray has changed, if anyone in that new life know his history, including his ex-con status? The ceiling fix- Una can move on. Those lingering questions tures’ fluorescent bulbs bathe the stage in a only heighten the impact of this heartbreaking work, and add to an uneasiness that perharsh, exposing light as the details of Ray and sists long after it’s over. Una’s bond emerge. (Later, a moment of darkness sheds further light on Una’s story.) The lunchroom is a mess, trash strewn around the E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

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ART BY

Studios Inc. under the microscope

THE RE S A BE MBNI S T E R

B R I T TA N Y F I C K E N

LAB RESULTS

Group shows at Paragraph and

G

roup exhibitions, particularly those with no overarching theme, can be tricky organizational feats. With no structure to guide the selection or placement of artwork, and no curatorial premise to coax new meanings and interpretations, individual pieces must stand on their own. Two local residency programs, Studios Inc. and the Charlotte Street Foundation’s Urba n C u lt u re P rojec t, have taken very differE R MO ent approaches to their latest g roup ex h ibiAT tions. At the former, E N I ONL .COM 13 artists-in-residence PITCH h ave sele c ted one or two works each to represent their output, with the results spread throughout the cavernous gallery space. The Charlotte Street Foundation, meanwhile, assembled Observation/Hypothesis/ Experiment: Studio As Laboratory with the help of Plug Projects, a curatorial collaboration of five artists, who together operate their own exhibition space. The Plug show’s title suggests a complex curatorial thesis, and the press release accompanying the exhibition doesn’t dispel that impression. O/H/E, it says, “Explores the idea of the studio as a place to discover and explore” and uses the scientific method as a loose basis for its organization. As I said: tricky. The curators have broken up the work — including painting, sculpture, video, collage and sound — into three categories. In Plug’s words, “Work that focuses on looking and

ART

listening, and is reliant on taking in exter- consulting the checklist, it’s impossible to determine exactly what the thin, dried nal information is classified as ‘Observation.’ ” Those artists who collect information membranes are in Skye Livingston’s “23 Files.” Pinned to the wall like a specimen through “testing and revising” have been placed under the “Experiment” heading. collection, they are, in fact, grapefruit skins, Finally, the “Hypothesis” artists are those peeled and splayed open for arresting, grothe curators understood to be “making work tesque display. Hanging nearby are Elizabeth Allen-Cannon’s four untitled collages, based on a proposition as basis for the reawhich combine coloring-book cutouts of soning in making decisions.” familiar cartoon characters in unexpected, If that all sounds pretty convoluted, it does at least count as a theme — something nonsensical ways. There’s Spider-Man, crushed beneath a falling, that, in theory, helps any upside-down letter P. And UCP undertaking. Unlike 2012 Resident there’s a balding tough guy the Studios Inc. residency Group Exhibition who wears the top of Bert’s program, which proThrough February 8 head like a stocking cap as vides space exclusively at Studios Inc., 1708 he force-feeds a heart into fo r m idc a r e e r a r t i s t s , Campbell, 816-994-1226, Ernie’s wide-open mouth. the UCP works primarthestudiosinc.org No concept unites the ily with emerging artists pieces on display in this whose work would benefit Observation/Hypothesis/ year’s Studios Inc. resident from an astute curatorial Experiment: Studio show, but that turns out to vision. But approaching this As Laboratory work just fi ne. art through the lens of the Through February 1 Diana Heise’s “Mo Zistscientific process, at least at Paragraph Gallery, 23 East 12th Street, 816-221-5115, war Morisyen (Excerpts as executed here, doesn’t charlottestreet.org From Captain’s Log),” a lead the viewer to greater series of 10 digital prints, insight or understanding. doc uments t he a r t ist’s There’s little to explain why some works fit into some categories, which experiences of a trip abroad through phoare defined in a way bound to leave plenty tographs and text. Heise’s warmhearted memories recall directions to a friend’s of gallerygoers scratching their heads. The home, visits with students, and a ritual intwo-dimensional works based on study from life, for example, fit more or less into the tended to banish a migraine. The prints are strikingly tactile and tender, particularly “observation” category, but we’re left to now that most travel updates reach us via guess the propositions motivating the artthe Internet. ists filed under “Experiment.” Also notable is Barry Anderson’s “CasA few works still stand out. Without

Left: Allen-Cannon's “Plantpant”; above: Studios Inc. cade,” four fl at-screen monitors mounted to a wall in a vertical line, each angled a different direction. The monitors display a mash-up of water imagery in horizontal bands moving downward, an effect that provokes a sinking feeling, a visual undertow. Curiously, Beniah Leuschke’s “Pay Dirt” is the only piece on the checklist that doesn’t include a price. On the bottom half of the work, Leuschke uses iridescent sequins to decorate the surface of a panel. On the top half, he cuts out and reglues letters spelling out the work’s title. Is this a joke concerning the object’s value, or is it the price? Matthew Dehaemers’ sculpture “Descendents” appears to be an axle ending in two tires of vastly different sizes: one appropriate for a monster truck, the other scaled to a regular automobile. A cool light glows through the thin, delicate Kinwashi paper that forms its surface. The sculpture is at once delicate and rough — a utilitarian plastic bucket and a soiled, moving blanket support its light and airy form. The only thing these pieces seem to have in common is the fact that they were created in the same building. (Heise’s prints were mailed here.) Together, though, they demonstrate that Studios Inc. residents are producing good work. That’s true of the art coming out of the UCP’s studios as well, even if science can’t prove it.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

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Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

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S C O T T W IL S ON

T

he first thing you’ll want to know, as you watch Quartet, is where first-time director Dustin Hoffman shot his movie. The setting is Beecham House, a fictional home for retired English musicians, and the scent of the idyllic estate’s cool, green lawns and smartly tended gardens wafts down from the screen on the Buckinghamshire breeze. (The answer: Hedsor House, a Georgian marvel in that county.) That you wonder about geography and architecture before pondering the drama at hand is one of Quartet’s numerous postcard-sized pleasures. It’s a curiosity stirred not by boredom but by a principal notion at work in Ronald Harwood’s script (adapted from his 1999 play): Why rage against the dying of the light when there’s still croquet to be played and Verdi to be sung (in whatever register remains available)? So, yes, Quartet — in which several septuagenarian British actors give sly, noble performances as septuagenarian artists of another stage — is a close cousin to last year’s keep-moisturized-and-carry-on British hit, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. And, yes, it’s as light as a grey-wagtail feather carried on that sylvan wind. But Hoffman’s picture also shares a bloodline with an old-school genre, the backstage musical, and his cast brings infectious relish to the form’s de rigueur roles (diva, understudy, jilted divo, etc.). To say much about Harwood’s wispy plot

Courtenay and Smith stroll through Quartet. invites prediction, but of course the poster alone offers a reliable forecast. The pastured opera singers played by Tom Courtenay (quietly powerful), Billy Connolly (very good in a role planned for Albert Finney) and Pauline Collins (touching, if overly daft) are unexpectedly joined by Maggie Smith (as Maggie as she wants to be). Smith’s faded soprano was once briefly married to Courtenay’s heart-bruised tenor. Can the four of them (under the wilting gaze of Michael Gambon’s foppish impresario) make a little Rigoletto together again? Very probably! Hoffman, 75 and a part-time Kensington

resident himself, embraces his inner Anglophile with a crew led by cinematographer John de Borman and editor Barney Pilling, U.K. aces whose shared credits include Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day and An Education. And he uses his end credits to pay tribute to the stage careers of the character actors and real-life musicians who populate Beecham House, a gentlemanly tip of the top hat that feels sincere rather than mawkish. (One of Harwood’s inspirations is worth revisiting: Tosca’s Kiss, Daniel Schmid’s 1984 documentary about Casa Verdi, the Milan retirement home founded by the composer.) It’s a respectable effort, neither overreach nor tour de force. And if you suspect that’s the point, you’re also glad he made it. ■

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key film from the 2012 festival circuit is starting to see commercial release in the United States, despite not having received an Oscar nomination in the foreign-language category. (It was a strong year for foreignlanguage movies.) Even without an Academy Awards nod, though, Barbara seems likely to connect with American audiences. It’s a tense historical inquiry from one of Germany’s most important contemporary filmmakers, anchored by a great performance by Nina Hoss. Barbara is the latest effort by director Christian Petzold, a poet of anomie and an artist of penetrating sociological insight who has often trained his focus on the crisis of reunification. His recent Yella and, especially, Jerichow examine the lingering impact of the German Democratic Republic on post-communism’s displaced nomads, but Barbara is a period piece. Here he places his benighted characters within the terror and malaise of the East German 1980s. Barbara Wolff (Hoss), a doctor, has been sent from Berlin to the countryside for unspecified transgressions against the state. At her new post, she reports to Reiner (Ronald Zehrfeld), a young, talented physician who informs the Stasi in order to keep his own mistakes from catching up with him. Barbara and her West Berlin lover (Mark Waschke) plan to sneak her

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Can Nina Hoss outpedal the Stasi? to the West, but things get complicated. She arrives at the rural hospital intending merely to mark time, but between having her apartment tossed and submitting to periodic body-cavity searches, she becomes personally invested in her young patients. Like her, they’re victims of the GDR’s Stalinist tyranny. The normally austere Petzold shifts here toward a more conventional, humanistically inclined cinema, imbuing Barbara with a warmer, more classicist look than his past works. He has deliberately sanded down

the jagged edges of his directorial style but retained his clear-eyed materialism — not a surprise, given that the film is another of Petzold’s frequent collaborations with leftist documentarian Harun Farocki. Life under communism isn’t a glamorously horrific experience but a dull, throbbing banality — a slow, grinding death. Compare this with the sensationalism of 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, or the bromides of The Lives of Others, and Petzold’s contribution shines all the more brightly. — MICHAEL SICINSKI

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TRUE GRITS

Two new midtown diners vie for the wee-hours crowd.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Sosa’s 39th Street Diner • 3906 Waddell, 816-531-7672 • Hours: 6 a.m.–1:30 a.m. Monday–Wednesday, 24 hours Thursday–Saturday; closes at midnight Sunday • Price: $–$$

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to Chubby’s on Broadway, which has had Burgers are big but not equal at Huddle relatively little competition the past 20 years House (left) and Sosa's 39th Street Diner. for full-service late-night dining, despite its migraine-inducing acoustics and brutal light- that’s what the round, crunchy fried nuggets are supposed to be) rolls off the line ing. Even the dewy-faced 20-somethings who favor the place look like cadavers there. with a sealed plastic container of Marzetti’s cocktail sauce. By contrast, the two new restaurants are The burgers are unexceptional. The patty clean and polished, qualities that are bound melt is a mushy imitation of the real thing. to fade but, for now, make Chubby’s seem And the scrambled eggs have the color and grungier and more foreboding than it really consistency of something forgotten from a is. But there are other differences, and some morning buffet. of them aren’t so positive. Still, it’s hard not to root for Huddle Let’s start with Huddle House, which House. The service is cheery (if not very opened quietly last month in an odd locaattentive), and the $14 breakfast platter is tion (the former Midwest Cyclery space) for so generous that it doesn’t leave room on a restaurant — or for anything else. There’s no parking lot yet (“We’re getting that to- the table for your elbows. It’s not one plate, baby, but six — at one meal, my friend had gether,” one server explained to me), and finding a curb space on this stretch of Broad- to set the waffle (not very fluffy but very sweet) on a w indowsill way after midnight can be while he tackled the eggs, a little daunting. Inside, the Huddle House the sausage and the crisp space is cozy (translation: Patty-melt platter .........$5.29 bacon. Then he went too small), but the ambiShrimp dinner ................. $7.99 to work on the cheeseence is that of a hospital High Rise Platter ..........$13.99 covered hash browns, a coffee shop. Not that any Steakhouse burger ........ $7.49 biscuit smothered in cream hospital in America would gravy (bland) and a chewy offer its patrons the fatpatty of chicken-fried steak (with another tening, artery-clogging dishes on Huddle thick helping of that gravy). The meal also House’s menu. But like I said before, that’s what you included grits and gravy, but they mercifully never showed up. want at a place like this, and what Huddle At Anthony Sosa’s new diner, the former House serves is traditional American diner Nichols Lunch space is miraculously clean, food: breakfast platters, burgers built for and the servers really know what they’re two hands, chicken-fried steak. There’s a fast-food feel to the presentation, though. doing. Among them is the quick-witted Bill Johnson, who has worked in almost every Salad dressings are in plastic squeeze packrestaurant in town; all are quick to refill ets, and the dinner of fried shrimp (at least

the oldest 24-hour diner left in the city, and how me a town where people like to maybe the last still embracing a concept that drink, and I’ll show you at least one 24has fallen out of favor. hour restaurant. How far out of vogue has the all-night Following a night of drunken debauchery, diner fallen? Consider the ill-fated Fran’s you need a place to unwind and sober up, a way station on the road back to sanity — or Restaurant. It should have been a no-brainer, at least on the road home. Such a place must positioned as it was in the Power & Light offer certain things: greasy sausage, runny District. Instead, it deepened the case against diners. From the moment it opened its doors, fried eggs, big and absorbent pancakes. A in 2009, to its unmourned closing three years messy plate containing any of these — better later, Fran’s was awful — poor food, high yet, all of them — helps soak up the insult you’ve paid your system all evening. Like a prices, indifferent service. Diner food doesn’t need to be outstanding. (It almost never is, powerful microbe eating away an oil spill. but if your order arrives at the table fast and Believe me, I know. Kansas City has a long and proud history hot, that’s grace enough.) And no one expects first-rate service at a counter that’s still open as a hard-drinking, saloon-loving town, the only place that legally banned Bible- at 3 a.m. But a diner does have to be friendly and cheap, and Fran’s was toting, hatchet-wielding, neither. bar-smashing Carry Nation Sosa’s 39th I come now to the city’s from re-entering its perimStreet Diner two new diners, which have eters after one of her ramPancakes opened in midtown with far pages. We’ve had all-night (short stack) ................$3.99 more potential than Fran’s restaurants of some sort Huevos rancheros .........$5.99 ever had. Huddle House, for at least a century. I, for Meatloaf muffin .............$8.99 Fried-chicken dinner.....$8.99 the first local outpost of an one, would like to have freAtlanta-based chain, serves quented the R.S. McClintock all the items on its shiny New Cafeteria, at 11th Street and Walnut, which gave your great-grandpa plastic menu 24 hours a day. A few blocks a chance to sober up in the hours before he away, at 39th Street and Southwest Trafficway, the restaurant formerly known as had to button his collar for Sunday services. Today, though, there aren’t many places Nichols Lunch (a 24-hour refuge of warmth ready to comfort you in your hour of bleari- and tater tots that lasted eight decades) has been reborn as the family-owned Sosa’s 39th ness. Sure, the Town Topic at 2021 BroadStreet Diner. It serves until very late Sunday way is a beloved icon. No matter what time through Wednesday and stays open 24 hours you stumble in — dead drunk or sober as a on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. monk — there’s a friendly face and an order Both restaurants sit in close proximity of buttered toast waiting for you. It’s also

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Huddle House puts its stamp on midtown. coffee cups, water glasses, soda tumblers — and, soon, cocktail glasses. For the first time in this old venue’s history, it’s getting a bar. A stiff drink might come in handy if you’re trying to take on the “meatloaf muffin.” I had never heard of such a thing until I dined at Sosa’s, and I hope never to see one again. Yes, it’s a traditional ground-beef meatloaf, baked in a muffin tin and served in a soup cup. The one I sampled had an exterior so tough that I could have fired it from a cannon. There’s some exceptional food here, though: a creamy mac and cheese and a damn good chili. And I would order the fried chicken again. At Sosa’s, you get a deepfried bird that’s moist and meaty under a crust with just the right amount of crunch. Sosa’s serves juicy, perfectly grilled burgers, a surprisingly authentic Reuben and a few well-executed Mexican dishes. The huevos rancheros can be ordered day and night (and should be — they’re terrific), as can all of the breakfast dishes. The pancakes are airy and fluff y, and the biscuits can be had with gravy that features ample sausage bits. The cinnamon rolls are fresh and thickly iced. Desserts here could use some work. The carrot cake looks house-made (and the waitress insisted it was, though most of the desserts here are outsourced), but my slice was as dry as the Sahara. (I’d be happy to see Sosa’s offer Golden Boy pies, a staple of classic diners.) The glory days of the all-night diner are long gone, and perfection isn’t coming back to the form. Over the years, my memories of Nichols Lunch have taken on an unrealistic burnish that sometimes keeps me from admitting that the place was an absolute dump. But if the best diners are made for the imagination, then Sosa’s has a good chance. It exudes the same lovable qualities that I found at Nichols, and the food is a hell of a lot better. And what of Huddle House? It’s not lovable — not yet — but it’s likable enough at 3 a.m. The crowd is a lot more interesting at that hour than it is during the Today show’s time slot, and someone even remembered to bring out my grits.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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FAT C I T Y

BARREL JUMP

Micah Weichert wraps up at

BY

75th Street to found ManKind.

JON AT H A N BENDER

F

or nearly as long as people have walked on Earth, they’ve done so with a beer in one hand. Micah Weichert, the 35-year-old head brewer at 75th Street Brewery, is keeping our long, shared beer history in mind as he launches his new venture: ManKind Brewing Co., which he hopes to open in the late summer or early fall. His own love of beer has taken him around the country. Weichert served as the head brewer for the Waimea Brewing Co. in Kauai, Hawaii, and helped launch a production facility for the Brugge Brasserie in Indianapolis. Locally, he has been a brewer at the Pony Express Brewing Co. in Olathe and the 23rd Street Brewery in Lawrence, and he has spent the past three years at 75th Street in Waldo. Weichert’s last day at 75th Street is Saturday, February 9 (the day of the Big Chill, the Waldo brewpub’s third annual strongbeer-and-chili tasting), and he briefed Fat City about his plans for ManKind. The Pitch: What kind of brewery do you envision opening? Weichert: The fi rst question everybody asks is, “Is it is going to be a packaging brewery or a brewpub?” And the answer is somewhere in between. We’re going to do food and have a large distribution network right away, from Wichita to St. Louis. The model that comes to mind is Urban Chestnut in St. Louis. It was started by a former brewer at Anheuser-Busch. Homebrewers may be more focused on nanobrewing: a small, two- or three-barrel system. Then there are guys who just want to see the bottles on the shelf. We’ll do growlers. Growlers are starting to get really popular. Gas stations in the Northwest are doing growler fills, and [approval for] growlers come with your federal license. What are you brewing first? We’ll probably have five flagship beers, but that may change, too. When we’re fi rst opening, I don’t want to say, “This is our flagship beer.” Instead, I’ll let people decide what they like over our first few months and make that our flagship. I have hundreds of recipes on file. When I write a recipe for a type of beer that I haven’t done before, I’ll go to the liquor store and find as many different examples of that style as I can. Then I research the traditional ways of producing that beer. Then I take those two worlds and combine them with my own. I’ll brew American ales, English ales, German lagers and Belgian ales. I fell in love with Belgian beers in Indianapolis, contrary to the belief of my liver. There’s lot of ingredients that I’m waiting to use. I just don’t talk about it much. I was brewing Robert Isler’s Flying Monkey out at Pony Express [in Olathe], and he taught me that a good beer is a beer that sells. Where will ManKind be located? We looked on the Kansas and Missouri 22

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sides, but the Crossroads has really been developing, and there’s the availability of industrial-style buildings with bay doors and high ceilings — the perfect type of building for a brewery. There are three buildings we’re looking at right now. We actually want to be near Boulevard and pull in convention traffic from downtown. We’re not trying to overtake Boulevard or go head-to-head. There’s an amazing community of brewers. We borrow ingredients from each other. There is probably no other industry where your so-called competitors are supportive of your success. Your Kickstarter campaign [Weichert is seeking $30,000 by February 11] mentions the importance of green construction and practices to your mission. What are your plans? We’re calling it an ethno-industrialbotanical approach. We’re going to make some T-shirts. The ethno part is ManKind — we’ll be using different flavors from different cultures. For the botanical, we’ll be using a lot of bamboo — decorating influence from my time spent in Hawaii. It will go well with the industrial edge of the brewery. I designed the tap tower in the Alley at 75th Street, and my wife’s family owns a custom stainless fabrication business in Topeka. Once I found out [my wife] Naomi spoke German and liked dark beer, I was done. The brewpub is going to be as green as possible. We’ll use sustainable building materials and install solar panels in phases. The food and beer will be made with local, organic and sustainable ingredients. I won’t be able to get local or organic ingredients all the time, but sustainable products are readily available. What’s the approach to the food side at ManKind?

pitch.com

T

Weichert drinks to a new horizon.

his may well be the year when Kansas City embraces regional

craft beer. In that case, one of the key

The food and beer will fall into the whole concept of ManKind. There will be different cultures throughout history represented. It will be an eclectic American bistro but still simple. I don’t want you to have to order something you can’t pronounce. I do think beer pairings are a really underutilized tool. You can have it on the menu, but that might get overlooked. You need an educated staff that is comfortable recommending pairings. We’ll go more with suggestions than pairings. If you want a raspberry wheat and a 20-ounce T-bone, I’m going to get you one. I’ll get you five. With the Doodle Brewing Co. in Liberty, the Martin City Brewing Co. looking to make its own beer, and the Wilderness Brewing Co. looking for a location in the city, there are a lot of potential new brews on the horizon. Is this a good time to be in the brewery business? There’s a new wave similar to what took place in the early ’90s. That’s when homebrewers were coming out of their basements and garages and bathtubs and opening breweries and making old-world-style beers. Ours is just coming out of a recession. It was supposed to hurt the craft-beer industry, but then nobody traded down. It just created a whole new wave in our industry. Got an idea for what Micah Weichert should be brewing in the Crossroads this summer? Sit down with him over a brew at 7 p.m. Monday, February 4, at Waldo Pizza (7433 Broadway). Weichert and several area brewers are on hand that evening in the restaurant’s Tap Room to talk about craft beer and ManKind Brewing Co.

additions could be Perennial Artisan Ales (perennialbeer.com), a St. Louis brewery founded in September 2011. Owner Phil Wymore spent time at Goose Island and Half Acre, in Chicago, before bringing his own Belgian brews to life, and his brewery is known for exotic flavors — a coconutmilk stout and a brown ale brewed with maple-roasted squash — that transcend mere novelty. Perennial arrives in town this week with tastings and brewers’ events across the metro. Head brewer Cory King is at the Flying Saucer Draught Emporium (101 East 13th Street) at 7 p.m. Wednesday, January 23. On draft: the coconut-milk stout and Saison de Lis. Grinders (417 East 18th Street) holds a “Meet the Brewer” event at 6 p.m. Thursday, January 24. Expect Red IPA (which has until now been available only in the Perennial tasting room), Hommel Bier and Aria. Founders Emily and Phil Wymore stop by to chat over beer at the Foundry (424 Westport Road) at 4 p.m. Saturday, January 26. Abraxas, Perennial’s Mexican chocolate stout, is on tap at the bar recently named one of Draft Magazine ’s 100 best in the country.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com pitch.com

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The R.E.M. generation gathers for an evening of tribute.

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

F

or certain rock fans born between, let’s say, 1960 and 1980, R.E.M. represents something approaching a religion. I consider myself a respectable R.E.M. fan — I have most of the band’s records, I like a lot of its songs, and they always seemed to me like a pretty cool group of dudes, especially Peter Buck — but I was born in 1982. I wouldn’t become a rock fan for another decade or so, and by then it was less obvious why R.E.M. was such a meaningful band. They were huge, sure. And they were still writing great songs. But all the truly special stuff they did, whatever that was, had happened back in the 1980s. Sometimes you have to live through these kinds of cultural revolutions to fully understand them. “What is it about R.E.M. and people like you?” I recently asked the 41-year-old editor of this newspaper. I remembered him stopping by my office the day after R.E.M. officially broke up, in September 2011. He had spent the previous evening drinking whiskey alone and listening to his 180-gram vinyl copies of Murmur, Fables of the Reconstruction and Automatic for the People. (“Just the second sides of the albums because it felt like more of a goodbye,” he told me.) “I went to this R.E.M. tribute last night,” I continued, “and it was all dudes about your age, and I’m trying to write something about that. Can you contextualize passionate R.E.M. fandom for me?” “Have a seat, son,” he said. “It’s just this great American story,” he began. “Peter Buck and Michael Stipe are these two record-store types in Athens, Georgia, listening to Television and CBGB bands. And they hook up with this rhythm section of Bill Berry and Mike Mills, who grew up on Southern boogie and didn’t care about the art underground or post-punk. But these two factions come together, and they share this will to be weird. And then they just proceed to do everything right. They play frat parties. They drive a van to play a show in New York. They split their publishing four ways. They put out Murmur, which is basically perfect. You can hear in it the Velvet Underground, the Byrds, post-punk, straight pop. It has a polish to it but also this lack of polish. Then they do four more records for I.R.S., and they keep getting better even as they’re getting more and more popular. Then they sign to Warner Bros. at the right moment and release Green, and it’s great, and the videos are still super-weird …” “But can you pinpoint why you feel so strongly about the band? Where does the extreme devotion come from?” “I don’t think it’s much more than the musicianship and the authenticity,” he said, then he paused. “It felt like you were bearing witness to something great and important. Listening to R.E.M. back then, you were in on something great. And anybody who was not in on it was really way out of it.”

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Then he instructed me to listen to Reckoning and Murmur as I wrote my column. (I am.) When I emerged from his office, I had a long, gray beard, and the moon was in a new phase. About Sunday’s tribute: Apart from the bitter cold, it was an ideal evening for a show. Teachers, government workers, mail carriers, and persons of various other professions were not required to work Monday on account of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. I walked in as Thom Hoskins was wrapping up his solo set of R.E.M. tunes. In the restroom, two goofily dressed middle-aged guys were talking loudly to each other in passable-butfake British accents. One of them was wearing sunglasses, and they both seemed very drunk. About 20 minutes later, these two men were onstage. It turns out, they were Rob Morrow, drummer for the Pedaljets, and Mike Niewald, founder and singer for the kids’ rock band the Doo-Dads. Lori Wray joined the Pedaljets for the beginning of their set, singing lead vocals on two Automatic for the People cuts: “Sweetness Follows” and “The Sidewinder Sleeps Tonite.” Then Niewald took over vocals. He wore pink pants, a headband and the aforementioned sunglasses, and his mic grip was positively Stipe-like. They played “Driver 8” and “Radio Free Europe,” among others. It wasn’t the tightest set I’ve ever heard, but it had a certain charm to it. “It’s harder than you think,” Morrow said after one particularly sloppy song. The crowd sat for most of the show, but the room was full. There were lots of men between the ages of 35 and 55. “What do you think the chances are that we’ll hear a song from an album after Automatic for the People?” my friend said, scanning the room. “There’s no way.” “Maybe something from Monster?”

Wyoming (left) and Niewald: a tale of two Stipes “No way.” He was right. The closing act, the Cody Wyoming Deal, played songs only from R.E.M.’s I.R.S. era: “Finest Worksong,” “So. Central Rain,” “Pretty Persuasion.” They looked the least like R.E.M. — in addition to Wyoming, the band included Hipshot Killer’s Mike Alexander on guitar, songwriter and Vinyl Renaissance dude Erik Voeks on bass, and Matt Richey on drums — but they sounded the most like them by far. Wyoming had Stipe’s jittery mumble down pat. “Is Robert Moore here?” Voeks asked at one point, peering into the crowd for the organizer of the evening. “I don’t think he’s even here. I was going to tell him about how I saw R.E.M. on the Green tour with the GoBetweens. He really loves the Go-Betweens. But I guess I won’t tell it.” “Erik Voeks has amazing hair,” my friend said. “It’s like the hair of a famous person.” “I’d kill for that hair,” I said. Then Wyoming invited everybody from the other bands onstage for the last song, “Superman,” but only Hoskins went up. Well, it was after 10 p.m. R.E.M. fans aren’t as young as they used to be. With some extra time to spare, the band bravely attempted “It’s the End of the World As We Know It (and I Feel Fine).” It was like that scene in Tommy Boy in which David Spade and Chris Farley try to sing it in the car and give up after Six o’clock, TV hour. Some guy from the crowd went onstage and bailed them out on the second verse, but after that, it was just a bunch of mumbling and “Leonard Bernstein!” and then the chorus. Everybody knows that chorus.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com pitch.com

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SIGN O’ THE TIMES

Free Energy’s Paul Sprangers on starting a label,

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pop songcraft and his band’s latest, Love Sign.

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rowse the track list of Love Sign, the new LP from Free Energy, and it’s clear that no momentous shifts in the band’s aesthetic have occurred since its 2010 DFA Records debut, Stuck on Nothing. “Electric Fever,” “Girls Want Rock,” “Dance All Night”: the Philadelphia group is still enthralled with the kind of power-pop party anthems of such forebears as Cheap Trick, AC/DC and Weezer. Love Sign is an improvement over Stuck on Nothing, though. The songwriting is tighter, and it’s more cohesive sonically. Also, the band has left DFA and is self-releasing Love Sign through its own label, Free People. We recently chatted with frontman Paul Sprangers about this new phase of the band. Free Energy’s tour stops at Czar Monday. The Pitch: So you guys started your own label. I sometimes wonder what exactly record labels even do anymore. Can you enlighten me? Sprangers: [Laughs.] Dude, that is such a good question. Thank you for asking that. I’ve learned so much more about what a record label does now than I did when I was actually on one. I’m starting to realize everything E R O M I took for granted: the ways that labels are good, but also the ways T A INE ONL .COM that they’re inefficient. I H PITC think labels now, for the most part — it’s maybe about cred? Maybe a label has some connections, maybe it has a certain distributor, maybe it has certain relationships? But at the end of the day, it’s kind of like — actually, I don’t know how much you want to get into this stuff. I could really go on for a while. No, go on. I like this stuff. OK, yeah, I love this stuff, too. I geek out on this stuff. Because, I mean, I used to totally worship labels: Matador, Sub Pop, Merge. I was such a fan of records as entities and rosters, and I’d listen to everything that certain labels put out. And DFA, of course, was like a dream come true. That said, we’re so particular about our music and our design and aesthetic that we want to control everything. Even down to, like, how posters are put up at the venue before we get there. Like, with the street team — we would always complain when we’d get to shows and the EMI street team would have just thrown up a hundred posters the day of the show. And it would look crazy! I mean, this is a small example of how anal we are. But it was, like, fuck it, why don’t we get our own street team and have them put up fl iers all over town two weeks before the show? And so, that’s what we’re doing now. Our management helps a lot with dayto-day stuff, arranging logistics, things like that. Scott [Wells, lead guitar] designed the cassettes. Scott’s older brother did the art for the new record. My friend fi nished the design. We put together the posters. So it’s really liberating doing the whole 26

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label thing yourself. And, also, you can’t blame anybody when you’re doing it yourself. Which is good. I think when you’re on a label, you can become babies. And we defi nitely did that sometimes. You kind of bitch and moan about things that you don’t like, and you feel like you don’t have much power to change the way things are going at the label. The label is this big bureaucracy, and you have to wait for answers. Do you feel like being on a bigger label can slow you down as a band in some ways? Sometimes kids would ask us to use our songs in, like, their movies, and EMI would have to confer with their lawyers and shit. And it’s like, come on. They’re out of touch — all the old barriers, the old guard trying to protect everything, that’s all done.

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Free Energy renews itself. Also, fi nancially, we didn’t want a label taking half of our publishing. The way we funded this whole new record is by saving the money we got from licensing our songs to commercials and stupid movies. That money just went into a pot and then right back into our business. I feel like you don’t have that freedom when you’re on a label. We’ll see, I guess. Talk to me in a year. And, you know, I hate to come down on labels because I’m still a huge fan of certain labels, like I said. And I think they’re really good for some bands. But for us, where we are, we wanted to try some of this stuff by ourselves. It used to be, if you were a new band, that the goal was to get signed to a record label. pitch.com

Now it seems like it might be more important to get a good booking agent or a good publishing lawyer, or something. Do you have any thoughts on this? I feel like lawyers and professionals are kind of like fertilizer that you can apply to a plant. But if the plant isn’t ready or fully grown, sometimes the fertilizer can hurt the plant. Apologies if this is a bad analogy. There are a lot of things that can bring attention to a band, but if you don’t have it all together, the attention will go away just as fast, if the attention even comes at all. And that can be really damaging. So I think the best thing is to really focus on yourself and what you make and on yourself as a person. Lawyers just hop on whatever’s hot. But to answer your question, my advice for young bands starting out is just to keep writing songs and meet whoever books the coolest shows locally, wherever you go see shows you like. And I’m talking smaller cities, not New York or whatever. Whoever writes for your weekly, try to get them to come to a show, send them artwork, show them why you’re psyched about what you make. That’s the most fun way, to make connections with people who care about what you’re doing, because those are strong and those last. Those connections last longer than whatever fuckin’ lawyer gives a shit about you for 10 seconds. Are you guys cool with DFA, or is it weird? Totally cool, it was a very amicable deal. It ended kind of like how it started. It started very slow and very, like, “Eh, OK, let’s do this” — not a lot of fanfare. And it ended the same way, like, “Eh, we like the record” — but we didn’t push them, they didn’t push us and, in the end, we decided to make our own label. I feel like there are some bands that are pop purists and really only into other bands that write super-tight, hooky pop songs. And then there are pop acts that listen to a lot of, I don’t know, Jim O’Rourke — acts that are maybe more esoteric and whose influence on their pop songs isn’t quite as obvious. What camp do you fall in? Absolutely both. I totally loved Jim O’Rourke back in the day — I mean, Tortoise, Gastr Del Sol, the Sea and Cake, Joan of Arc. I was into a bunch of stuff that Jade Tree put out. We defi nitely listen to a lot of pretty confrontational, aggressively avant-garde music. Scott and Evan [Wells, bass] are into a lot of world music and reggae. We listen to a lot of new-age music. And we grew up listening to Pavement and GBV. It’s weird because I think some people think we’re, like, meatheads or something. Which is so strange because we’re total nerds. We’re just these huge, huge nerds. But we moved on and dug deeper and grown, and now we’re really concerned with craft. So we listen to bands where we see that present, and for us right now, that’s Fleetwood Mac and the M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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Boss, these masters that made these incredible statements. Do you feel that there are any other misperceptions about Free Energy? I think maybe — and it’s partly our fault — that we let the press take the Camaro-driving, beer-swilling, mullet-dude image of us too far. Because it’s certainly not our life. I mean, I’ve read things where people think what we do is this nihilistic party music. And that, to me, is the furthest thing from the truth. I think it’s idealist music that encourages people to look at themselves and the world and try to wake up. I see it as very spiritual. I know that sounds pretentious, but I really do. That’s why we make it. Everything we make is trying to celebrate the world. But we also really like smart people who make dumb things, like Will Ferrell or AC/DC. I think people who are unafraid to be dumb — I’m so inspired by them. I think they’re geniuses. Whereas I’m always turned off by overly talky, dense art because it tends to indicate a self-consciousness or some kind of fear. There’s an overly intellectual part of the culture that doesn’t appeal to me at all. I find that the simplest things are often truest, and things that are really contrived and wordy are often hiding something. That’s a generality, but I find that it applies a lot. Are you happy with the way the new record is being received? I’m happy that it’s getting a reaction. We were just laughing — we read the worst review today. It said something like, “This is the worst piece of shit recorded in pop history.” [Laughs.] But I think that’s good. I think that when there’s some kernel of truth in something, hopefully people respond to it and they really connect with it, or it turns them off and rubs them the wrong way and makes them really angry. But either way, it means there’s something in there that’s meaningful. I don’t know if I had high hopes for it to be very critically acclaimed, but I’m glad the fans like it. On Twitter, you’re in contact with fans, and everyone really likes it and agrees that it’s better than the last one. Yeah, I think it’s better than the last one, too. Thanks — yeah, I think it’s way better, like light-years better. But I’m not surprised that it wouldn’t get an amazing critical response, because it’s not a huge departure from Stuck on Nothing. It’s the same general mood: fun, party-time pop. That’s a good point. I think the core of the feeling is very similar to the last one. But I think the production values and the way we perform has grown. I think the singing is stronger. The guitar playing is stronger. But, yeah, that’s a good point. I agree with you. I think our story is kind of the same: What we’re trying to do with our bands is this big, idealist, ambiguous, optimistic thing that we keep trying to tell in different ways, with different imagery and sounds and melodies. I think you just keep trying to tell the story you’re interested in, but in slightly different ways. That’s all we’re really interested in doing. Free Energy appears at Czar Monday, January 28.

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M U S I C F O R E CAST

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Other shows worth seeing this week.

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T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 2 4 Inspectah Deck: The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. No Justice, John D. Hale Band: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Shawn and Marlon Wayans: Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233.

F R I D AY, J A N U A R Y 2 5 Hi-Boi, Morri$, Shwasted, DJ Feast, Damon Skywalker, Dreadheadslut and DJ Lee: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Lil’ Ed & the Blues Imperials: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Winter Jam Tour Spectacular: Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, 816-283-7300. Shawn and Marlon Wayans: Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233.

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Sweet Honey in the Rock (left) and the Darkness

Sum 41

Are you under the impression that Sum 41 is washed up, forgotten, yesterday’s news? You are as wrong as singer Deryck Whibley was when he thought his marriage to Avril Lavigne would last forever! You are as wrong as Whibley was when he thought, There’s no way my exwife will take up with that blond singer with the permed mullet from Nickelback! The Canadian pop-punk bros are still killing it — they have 3.5 million Facebook fans, if that counts for anything — and this Lawrence date is part of the second leg of their 10th anniversary Does This Look Infected Tour. Take that, Kroeger! Monday, January 28, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Olassa

We’ve been tracking Olassa over the last six months while awaiting the release of the upbeat folk group’s debut EP, I Love You, Come Back to Me. It sees the light of day this Saturday in Lawrence. The group balances a little melancholy with rowdy, whiskey-soaked grins, which makes the Replay Lounge an excellent venue for sending Olassa’s new musical baby out into the world. Bluegrass acts the Kansas City Bear Fighters, the Calamity Cubes and Alex Law (of Deadman Flats) round out the bill. Saturday, January 26, at the Replay Lounge (946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676)

Sweet Honey in the Rock

An all-female a cappella gospel group founded in 1973, Sweet Honey in the Rock has in recent years earned Grammys and an invitation to perform in front of President and Mrs. Obama at the White House. The six members’ big, booming voices will be a fun test of the pristine acoustics inside the Muriel Kauffman Theatre. Wednesday, January 30, at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7222)

Vagabond Swing, with Jorge Arana Trio

Nobody can accuse Vagabond Swing of false advertising. As its name suggests, the Lafayette, Louisiana, group cooks up a funky mix of Depression-era sounds: ragtime, bluegrass and spunky jazz. The group is joined here by Jorge Arana Trio, a local outfit that plays a kind of extremely loud jazz built from polyrhythmic drumming, screeching guitars and fat, jam-band-style bass lines. Friday, January 25, at the Brick (1727 McGee, 816-421-1634)

MidCoast Takeover Fundraiser

We are less than two months away from the annual music-industry orgy South by Southwest. I plan on attending, and so do a number of bands from around these parts. Many of them play the MidCoast Takover party, an unofficial event sponsored by the local nonprofit Midwest Music Foundation. To raise money

The Darkness’ theatrical cock rock — a throwback to bands like Aerosmith, Queen and Kiss — was a breath of fresh air back in 2003, when brooding, lifeless new-wave bands like Interpol were the toast of the rock world. The band’s shtick is not quite as novel today, but its core argument remains a compelling one: that rock music has been taken over by nerds, and what audiences really want from rock bands is a guy crawling around onstage in a catsuit, with hair down to his ass, singing over monster powerchord hooks. The Darkness broke up for six years (apparently) but returned in 2012 with a new record, Hot Cakes. Based on what I’ve read on the Internet, the group is still putting on crazy shows and wearing unitards. God bless them. (This performance was originally booked at the now-closed Beaumont Club; it’s been moved to the Uptown Theater.) Wednesday, January 30, at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

.........................................Record-Release Party

................................................... Possible Hobos

........................................................... Canadians

.................................................Epic Guitar Solos

........................................... Possible Hallelujahs

.....................................................Hot Topic Gear

..................................................Probable Bulges

................................................. Vocal Acrobatics

................................................... Folk Revivalism

.................................................. Locally Sourced

........................................ Austin Is Cool, I Guess

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S U N D AY, J A N U A R Y 2 7 I Wish We Were Robots, Dead Ties: Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Shawn and Marlon Wayans: Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233.

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The Darkness

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for some of these bands, MMF is holding fundraisers in the coming weeks. This first one offers geeky dance-pop from Antennas Up; bouncy new wave from Molly Picture Club; dark, crunchy hard rock from Drew Black and Dirty Electric; and spirited folk-rock in the Mumford mold from She’s a Keeper. Saturday, January 26, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Frost, with Zeds Dead, Krewella, Figure, Fury + MC Dino, Seven Lions, Popeska: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Pilot For a Day, Mime Game, David George and a Crooked Mile, Sovereign States, Little Rosco: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Red Bull Thre3style: Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Shawn and Marlon Wayans: Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233.

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Free Energy, Not a Planet, Rev Gusto: Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300.

W E D N E S D AY, J A N U A R Y 3 0 One More Round, Outlaw Jake: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Stone Sour, Otherwise, Isaac James: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Title Fight, Sovereign States: Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085.

FUTURECAST FEBRUARY SATURDAY 2 Morrissey: Liberty Hall, Lawrence SUNDAY 3 Ed Sheeran, Rizzle Kicks, Foy Vance: The Midland MONDAY 4 Lady Gaga: Sprint Center FRIDAY 8 Afentra’s VD Party with Shiny Toy Guns, Willy Moon, Beautiful Bodies, iamdynamite: The Midland SUNDAY 10 Emilie Autumn: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 15 Galactic: Liberty Hall, Lawrence SUNDAY 17 Electric Six, the Dead Girls: The Riot Room Nick Offerman: The Midland THURSDAY 21 Toro Y Moi, Sinkane: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 22 Talib Kweli: The Granada, Lawrence WEDNESDAY 27 Maroon 5: Sprint Center THURSDAY 28 Yonder Mountain String Band: Liberty Hall, Lawrence

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NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

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The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. The Floozies, Montu. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Big 3. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The MGDs, 9 p.m.

ROCK/POP/INDIE

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Mike Borgia and the Problems, Pullman Standard, Atlas, 6 p.m. The Dubliner: 170 E. 14th St., 816-268-4700. Patrick Lentz. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. The Electric Lungs, Dolls on Fire, Appropriate Grammar, 10 p.m.

The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Whiskey for the Lady, Jacob Cross. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. The Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Rich Berry. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Fast Johnny Rocker, 7:30 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rick Bacus.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Eddie’s Lounge: 3512 S.W. Market, Lee’s Summit, 816-537-4148. Tracy Allison. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. John Joiner.

DJ The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Team Bear Club’s Goomba Rave, 9 p.m., $3/$5.

ACOUSTIC Lenexa Longbranch Steakhouse: 8600 Marshall Dr., Overland Park, 913-894-5334. Stovepipe and Jazzy Jazz.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Matt Otto Quartet. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Paul Roberts Duo. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Solo with Dan Doran.

COMEDY Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Jay Oakerson.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. The Phantastics, Pink Royal.

ACOUSTIC Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Dan Brockert.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Bill Crain Quartet, 8:30 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Valentine E and the Ticklers. MOR The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Dave Stephens Band. Lucky Brewgrille: 5401 Johnson INGS T T Dr., Mission, 913-403-8571. Stan IS L A INE L Kessler, with the Ron Carlson Trio. N O M O The Majestic Restaurant: 931 PITCH.C Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 5 p.m.; Bram Wijnands. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Monique Danielle, 5:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Mike Metheny.

CLUB

COMEDY Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Jay Oakerson.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

ELECTRO

SINGER-SONGWRITER Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Chad Elliott and Bonita Crowe, 8 p.m.

The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Frost PreParty with Chadillac, FSTZ, HoodNasty, NVS.

FOLK Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Foes of Folly, Deep Fried Squirrel, Enemies of Bill W, 9 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Rock and Roll Riot Benefit.

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ROCK/POP/INDIE

ROCK/POP/INDIE

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Diverse Plays Michael Jackson, Josh Powers, and Thunderkat. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Blessed Broke, the Ants, the Sawyers. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Pussycat Friction Sauce, the Lucky Graves, Electric Third Rail, 9 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Of Vikings Blood, Plissken, Mega Joos, Jerkface, 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. We Are Voices, Grenadina, Forrester.

Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Jimmy Dykes & the Blisstonians. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Clairaudients, Bears and Company, Mime Game, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Up the Academy, Til Willis and Beach Team. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Drew6. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sundiver, the Travel Guide, Parts of Speech, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Liquor Buddies, the Heavy Figs, 6 p.m.; The Rackatees, the Shidiots, Black on Black, 10 p.m. Uptown Theater: 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Ultimate 80s Party with the Zeros.

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HIP-HOP

EASY LISTENING

Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Blues Jam, 7 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jam with Rick Eidson and friends.

J A N UA R Y 24 -3 0 , 2 0 1 3

Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816-679-0076. DJ Allen Michael, DJ Eric Coomes. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E.

The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Team Trivia, 7 p.m. Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m., $5 per person. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Halfway to the Jones Party.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

THE PITCH

DJ

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Back to School Dance Party. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Karaoke, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m.

Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Interactive Acoustic with Jason Kayne.

30

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray Jazz Meets Blues Jam, 2 p.m.; Four Fried Chickens and a Coke, 9 p.m.

#48 – The Pitch – 1/24/13

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J A N UA R Y 24 -3 0 , 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

31

1/17/13 10:10 AM

The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Mary Bridget Davies 5:30 p.m.; the Allied Saints, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Brendan MacNaughton. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Cole Porter Band, with Big Damn Heroes, 8:30 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Route 291, with Jason Craig and the Wingmen, 9 p.m. Lenexa Longbranch Steakhouse: 8600 Marshall Dr., Overland Park, 913-894-5334. Riverrock. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Deadman Flats, 9 p.m.

DJ MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Rico. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. DJ Ashton Martin.

HIP-HOP The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Dolewite.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Wild Men of Kansas City. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Angela Hagenbach Trio. Hotel Phillips: 106 W. 12th St., 816-221-7000. The Stan Kessler Duo, with Harry Miller. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. The Grand Marquis, 5:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Snuff Jazz, Brian Hass. Tavern at Mission Farms: 10681 Mission, Leawood, 913-2136588. Earl Baker.

AMERICANA Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Lonesome Hank and the Heartaches.

COMEDY Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Jay Oakerson, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

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32 T H E P I T C H 2 THE PITCH

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. PreParty Arty Party, 6 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Live karaoke with Separated at Birth.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Jam with Earl Baker, 4 p.m.

Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sunday Funday with DJ G Train on the patio.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill, 11 a.m.; Mark Lowrey Jazz Trio open jam session, 5 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Brian Haas, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Show Stopper Karaoke, midnight. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

M O N D AY 2 8 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States, 9 p.m., free. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. WyCo Lowrider’s Association, 9 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Bret Mosley, Will Nitcher.

DJ Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Dark Mondays with DJ Desmodus, 10:30 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Thirsty.

JAZZ Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m.; Karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam Club Karaoke with Scary Manilow, 10 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

M E TA L / P U N K

T U E S D AY 2 9

Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. White Trash Bash. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Population Not, Torn the Fuck Apart, Absence of God, In the Shadow, Night Creation, Klehma, Lantern Hill Nightmare.

ROCK/POP/INDIE

SINGER-SONGWRITER Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Katy Guillen Trio, 7 p.m.

SKA Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Checkered Beat.

VA R I E T Y Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Revolution Circus with Mercury Mad’s Multi-Nax, MissConception, the Bad Ideas, 10 p.m.

S U N D AY 2 7 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Sundiver, Cody Ross, Rooms Without Windows.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors.

DJ Aura: 3832 Main. Frost Recovery Party with Fareoh.

J A N U A R Y 2 4 - 3 0 , 2 0 1 3 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X pitch.com

RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Monarchs, Taste Bud G-Spot, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Sinple, Secondhand King, Akai Najir, I-r Neko, Les Paul.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Brendan MacNaughton. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Brian Ruskin and Jerry Hahn. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Clash of the Comics.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Horror Remix.

The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Bingo and Blvd. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m., $5 buy-in. Double Nickel Bar: 189 S. Rogers, Ste. 1614, Olathe, 913-3900363. Poker night. Dukes: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Beer pong tournaments, 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. It’s Karaoke Time! MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Robert Moore’s Name That Tune, 7 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Gayme Night upstairs, 7:30-10 p.m.; PHAT Show, 8 p.m.; karaoke on the main floor, 10 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Tango night.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

VA R I E T Y Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Kilroy Presents.

W E D N E S D AY 3 0 ROCK/POP/INDIE RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Andy Frasco, Kris Lager Band.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Hillbenders & Hatrick, 8 p.m.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Sonic Spectrum with DJ Robert Moore, 9 p.m. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Random Play Wednesday.

ACOUSTIC Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Colby & Mole. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Chad Elliott, Clint Michaelson.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. A La Mode.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Cowboy Bill Martin. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Dov Davidoff.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Karaoke. Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. Brodioke. The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Karaoke. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Drink specials. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Bike night; karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. Karaoke, 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic Open Mic with host Tyler Gregory. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816833-5021. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends.

MON: RURA L GRIT 6-9 , KARAOKE WED 1/23 10PM OPEN MIC W / H O S T MARK FRI 1/25 VAGABOND VICK 9PM JORGE ARA SWING, NA TRIO S SAT 1/26 HADES OF JADE 10P, M BLESSED B ROKE, T TUE 1/29 HE SAWYERS 10PMTHE ANTS, THU 2/7 BINGO AND BLVD W/ F TUE 2/12 MIKE DILLON BAND, ORESTER 8PM THE PHANT FAT TUES D AS ROP OUT B OOGIE TICS

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THE PITCH

33

S AVA G E L O V E

STICKS AND STONES Dear Dan: A friend of mine is a cross-dresser

considering transitioning. He came out to a female friend he had known for a long time but hadn’t seen in a while, and she told her that she wanted her to come to her house fully dressed for some hot sex to “explore her bi-curiosity” or some shit. I told her to go for it, saying gender-transgression play is potentially hot. I neglected to mention that she should go for it only if she trusted this girl (hereafter known as “Evil Bitch”). Evil Bitch backed out as soon as she arrived but took her out to dinner (still fully dressed) as consolation. Now my friend is telling me that Evil Bitch messaged a bunch of mutual friends, outing my friend to them. After my friend told Evil Bitch that what went down between them was private, Evil Bitch posted pictures from their dinner date — fully dressed — on her Facebook. I feel bad because I encouraged her to go for it. Is there anything my friend can do? She’s freaking out and thinks that Evil Bitch ruined her life.

Friend of Cross-dresser Betrayed By Evil Bitch

We Support Your Right to Bare . . . Bare Arms, Legs, Back, You Name It.

1717 Main St. Kansas City, MO 816/421.1915 facebook.com/bazookasshowgirls bazookasshowgirls.com 34

THE PITCH

J A N UA R Y 24 -3 0 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

Dear FOCBBEB: Your friend is a she, then a he, then a she, then a he. I’m gonna stick with “Your Friend,” despite how clunky it is, because I can���t tell how Your Friend identifies. Twenty years ago, Your Friend could’ve said they got dressed up for a laugh, and Evil Bitch is misrepresenting what they did that night. But I can only assume that Your Friend and Evil Bitch exchanged e-mails, swapped texts, sent DMs via Twitter, etc., so Your Friend shouldn’t accuse Evil Bitch of lying. That will prompt Evil Bitch to retaliate by posting emails, texts, and DMs to Facebook, which will make things worse. Your Friend is out about the cross-dressing now, at least, and Your Friend should embrace being out with as much grace and courage as Your Friend can muster. And the more at peace with being out Your Friend appears to be, the fewer people Your Friend will be outed to. If Your Friend tries to keep this quiet, other malicious assholes will realize they can hurt Your Friend by spreading the news. If Your Friend acts like Your Friend couldn’t care less who knows, malicious assholes will be less likely to spread it around. I’ve known a few people who were outed by malicious shits like Evil Bitch, and it sucks and it hurts and it can turn a person’s life upside down. But most of the people I’ve known who were outed looked back a year or two later and were happy to be free of the stress of keeping their big secret. In the meantime, offer Your Friend your support and get in the face of anyone who gives Your Friend any grief. Dear Dan: I just read your column about evangelical girls “saddlebacking” (having anal sex in order to preserve their virginities). I am a 21-year-old and have been sexually active since age 14. I engage in oral and anal sex. I’ve never had vaginal intercourse, so technically I am still

BY

D A N S AVA G E

a virgin. My reason for doing this has NOTHING to do with religion and everything to do with AVOIDING PREGNANCY. And with my experiences over the past seven years, I believe I’ll be able to keep my future husband fulfilled and happy in the bedroom.

No Name Dear NN: Anal is a highly effective birth-control method, and there’s only one known case of someone getting pregnant through oral sex. But anal intercourse is also the most effective means of HIV transmission, so I hope you’re using condoms. And one quibble: If technically you’re still a virgin, then technically my husband is still a virgin. Yeah … no. Your vagina might be a virgin, but you’re not. PAULINE “DEAR ABBY” PHILLIPS: I grew up reading both Eppie “Ann Landers” Lederer in the Chicago Sun-Times and Pauline “Dear Abby” Phillips in the Chicago Tribune. I always preferred Ann’s column to Abby’s — did you know they were twins? — and, as I write this, I’m sitting at Ann’s desk, which I bought at auction after her death. But I have a newfound appreciation for Abby after reading Margalit Fox’s obit in The New York Times (tinyurl.com/abbyobit). The obit ends with a famous three-word response: “Dear Abby: Two men who claim to be father and adopted son just bought an old mansion across the street and fixed it up. We notice a very suspicious mixture of company coming and going at all hours — blacks, whites, Orientals, women who look like men, and men who look like women. This has always been considered one of the finest sections of San Francisco, and these weirdos are giving it a bad name. How can we improve the neighborhood?

— Nob Hill Residents “Dear Residents: You could move.” Phillips wrote that decades ago, when adult gay men often resorted to adopting their adult partners to secure legal protection for their relationships. My sympathies to Jeanne Phillips, Pauline’s daughter and the current author of the Dear Abby column. QUEER READERS: Help advance psychosocial research and do your part to include the LGB community in research while examining critical questions about the effect of rejection in the lives of LGB people. Adults (18–49) of all sexual orientations are needed for an important study. See surveymonkey.com/s/ attachmentandalienation to learn more and to participate. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

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ATTENTION: EX-OFFENDERS & AT RISK JOB SEEKERS Do you need job placement assistance? Do you need your criminal record expunged? Wills, Divorces, Child Support, Civil & Criminal Motions Filed Contact: Beyond The Conviction for these and other career and life barrier removal services. (SOME SERVICE FEES APPLY)

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A CANDY-COATED COMPETITION TO NAME

KANSAS CITY’S SWEETHEART

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FEB 21

2013

6-8PM

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Info on tickets & sampling your sweets call

816-561-6061

pitch.com

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THE PITCH

37

AD PROOF:

(JS)

Proof Due Back By: 1/18 at 5pm Ad #: P26630-f-13966-5x5 Deadline To Pub: 1/21 at 2pm First Run: 1/23/13 Publication: Pitch Weekly Section: iPad Drop Specs: 4.776x5.291 LJ approved

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Move Over Textbooks. Classroom Technology Has Taken Over. Since 1892, Brown Mackie College has believed education should evolve to meet the needs of students and employers. Back then, that meant delivering a quality, career-focused education via pencils and paper. Today, it means we’re embracing tablet technology in our classrooms and beyond.

If you have an interest in marketing/advertising and are able to receive college credit, then you are in luck! P is looking for an intern who is able to handle multiple projects at once and experienced in MS Excel/ Word.

MAC PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

MACAPARTMENTS.COM

Featured property:

BROWNHARDT APARTMENTS Studios to two-bedrooms

If you qualify, send your resume to: jason.dockery@pitch.com

BrownMackie.edu Brown Mackie College is a system of over 25 schools located throughout North America. Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. See BMCprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info. Apple, the Apple logo and iPad are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

Pet friendly, Stainless Steel Appliances, Dishwasher, Central Air, Granite Countertops

877-453-1039 350 E. Armour, KCMO

38

THE PITCH

J A N UA R Y 24 -3 0 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

Stonewall Court Apts 1-Bdrms starting at $395 central air, secure entry, on site laundry, on bus line, close to shopping, nice apts, Sections 8 welcome $100 Deposit (816) 231-2874 M-F 8-5 office hours

WILLOWIND APARTMENTS 2 Bedroom/1 Bath Apartments

Are you out of housing options? Have Credit Problems? Previous Evictions?

We rent to the rent challenged

Holiday Apartments Studios FREE Downtown Area

Wood burning fireplace, 1,000 sq. ft., Large Master BR & lots of closet space: $525 3927 Willow Ave • KCMO 64113 816.358.6764

$112/WEEK $150/DEPOSIT*

* Restrictions apply

APPLICATION WHEN YOU BRING IN On Site Loundry Facility Paid Cable TV THIS AD Holiday Apartments (816) 221-1721

Month to All Month Lease! Utilities

NORTHLAND VILLAGE $100 DEPOSIT ON 1&2 BEDROOMS

Classifieds

pitch.com

$525 / up Large 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts and Townhomes Fireplace, Washer/Dryer Hook-ups, Storage Space, Pool.

I-35 & Antioch • (816) 454-5830

J A N UA R Y 24 -3 0 , 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

39

APTS/JOBS/STUFF

®

816.218.6702 816.218.6759

FREE BANKRUPTCY CONSULTATION • PA Y M E N T P L A N AVA I L A B L E •

CASH FOR CARS

Wrecked, Damaged or Broken. Running or Not !

LAW OFFICE OF JENNIFER DODSON 435 NICHOLS ROAD SUITE 200 K A N S A S C I T Y, M O 6 4 1 1 2 8 1 6 . 9 7 7 . 2 7 6 3 W W W. J D O D S O N L AW. C O M

We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code. The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertisement.

Cash Paid ! www.abcautorecycling.com 913-271-9406

DUI/DWI, KS, MO

P.I.--Work Comp.--Bankruptcy Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher www.bratcherlaw.biz

816-453-2240

LOST WEDDING RING Lost at Massage Envy KC Plaza

Offering $800 REWARD! Rebecca 614-354-8385

Brady & Associates Law Office. 913-696-0925 Licensed In Missouri, Kansas and Colorado. WWW.MBRADYLAW.COM

816-221-5900

www.The-Law.com

ACT NOW INVESTIGATIONS ****Confidential****Professional**** Infidelity-Domestic Dramatic Family & Child Issues

Scared? Anxious? Confused?

Help Is Here!

DWI, Solicitation, Traffic, Internet Crimes, Hit & Run, Power & Light Violations. 816-221-5900 - www.The-Law.com David Lurie Attorney

BE IN A MOVIE!

Auditions on Saturdays in KC. Casting For Feature Film. Lead Roles, Crew, Extras. Male & Female 18+ For Details, Serious Inquiry's: 913-526-5150

Solving Cases For Over 24 Years Fully Licensed & Insured. KS-MO

913-469-0006 actnowinvestigations.com

913-742-0022

AFFORDABLE ATTORNEY

DOWNTOWN AREA STUDIO APT $112/WEEK Min.

SPEEDING, DWI, POSSESSION, ASSAULT

$150 Deposit, All Utilities Paid, Laundry Facilities. Holiday Apts, 115 W. Harlem Rd, KCMO 816-221-1721

FREE CONSULTATION Call: The Law Office of J.P. Tongson (816) 265-1513

$10

816-965-7125

Readings

* DWI * * CRIMINAL * * TRAFFIC * Practice emphasizing DWI defense. Experienced, knowledgeable attorney will take the time to listen and inform. Free initial phone consultation.

THE LAW OFFICE OF DENISE KIRBY 816-221-3691

SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606

House Parties Every Friday & Saturday Night. Hot Tub, Dance Pole, Live DJ, Pool Table

$$ Paying Top Dollar $$ For Junk Cars & Trucks Missouri: 816-241-7548 Kansas: 913-321-1000

Reunites Love- Depression-Finances Success 100% Guaranteed Results !

99.7% Toxin Free w/n an hour We can help you pass Coopers 3617 Broadway, KCMO 816.931.7222

lifestylesofkc.com

U-PICK IT SELF SERVICE AUTO PARTS

ERICA'S PSYCHIC STUDIO

Tarot Readings Crystal Readings

DWI, SOLICITATION, INTERNET BASED CRIMES Law office of David M. Lurie

Personal Injury & Employment Law

Psychic Readings Palm Readings

SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606

DUI/DWI, KS, MO

P.I.--Work Comp.--Bankruptcy Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher www.bratcherlaw.biz

LOST WEDDING RING Lost at Massage Envy KC Plaza

Offering $800 REWARD! Rebecca 614-354-8385

DWI, SOLICITATION, INTERNET BASED CRIMES

816-221-5900

www.The-Law.com

****Confidential****Professional**** Infidelity-Domestic Dramatic Family & Child Issues

Solving Cases For Over 24 Years Fully Licensed & Insured. KS-MO

913-469-0006 actnowinvestigations.com

Attorney since 1976: 913-345-4100, KS/MO. Injuries, workers comp, criminal, divorce, DUI, traffic, and more. Low fees, Call Greg Bangs. Personal Injury & Employment Law

Brady & Associates Law Office. 913-696-0925 Licensed In Missouri, Kansas and Colorado. WWW.MBRADYLAW.COM

Law office of David M. Lurie

HOTEL ROOMS

816-453-2240

ACT NOW INVESTIGATIONS

ADOPT: Adoring Family, Successful Fashion Magazine Editor, LOVE & Laughter awaits 1st baby. Expenses paid. Samira 1.800.352.5741

Scared? Anxious? Confused?

Help Is Here!

DWI, Solicitation, Traffic, Internet Crimes, Hit & Run, Power & Light Violations. 816-221-5900 - www.The-Law.com David Lurie Attorney

A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331 6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd. HBO,Phone,Banq. Hall

$37.06 Day/ $149 Week/ $499 Month + Tax


The Pitch: January 24, 2013