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APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 43 | PITCH.COM

UP LAWSUIT CREEK WITH THE SHUTDOWN-PRONE NUKE PLANT IN OUR BACKYARD. PAGE 7

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BLOWING THE ROOF OFF THE TRUMAN SPORTS COMPLEX THAT NEVER WAS. APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 43 | PITCH.COM

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Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, Jonathan Bender, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Chris Milbourn, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel Editorial Intern Katie Miller

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Lynn Collins

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Collin Click, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

WINNERS AND WASHOUTS With the first pick in the 2013 NFL Draft, the Chiefs select … B Y J U S T I N K E N DA L L

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C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

HOME PAIGE Ricardo Khan and UMKC Theatre score big with Kansas City Swing. BY DEBOR AH HIRSCH

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A D V E R T I S I N G

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

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QUESTIONNAIRE NEWS FEATURE F I LT E R STAGE THE KANSAS CITY THAT NEVER WAS … CAFÉ FAT CITY MUSIC NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

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SCREENLAND CROSSROADS to close in May; will reopen somewhere else downtown, probably. KC Sports Commission says it will learn from the Boston Marathon attacks for the upcoming KC MARATHON.

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Who or what is your sidekick? My kiddos, Shep (6) and Gunner (3), and my husband, Shane

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? I always felt there was something quite badass about being an FBI agent.

What was the last Kansas City restaurant you patronized? When I’m in town, I make the rounds

to Taco Viá, Carmen’s, Winstead’s and Gates.

Where do you drink? Wherever they’ll keep

serving me.

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: In L.A., Planet Blue. In KC, Annabelles.

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Anything KU/Jayhawk-related. I’m a Mizzou Tiger through and through!

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Troll 2

What local tradition do you take part in every year? I love the ol’ Plaza Lighting Ceremony. Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Richard Tyson during the Two

Moon Junction years. Mmm mmm mmmm …

Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter: My pal Greg Grunberg @greggrunberg.

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: After answering this questionnaire,

I’m pretty over myself.

What subscription do you value most? People.

com (hello, guilty pleasure).

Last book you read: Wallbanger by Alice Clayton What is your most embarrassing dating moment?

I once made out with a guy who had poison oak … that didn’t end well.

Interesting brush with the law? I was pulled over once for speeding, and when the officer asked if there was anything in the car that shouldn’t be (i.e., guns, drugs, machetes), I raised my hand and said, “Just me, officer.” Describe a recent triumph: Nearly finished edit-

ing a comedy/travel show that my production company is developing, Have Boobs Will Travel. Lefkovitz plays Krisztina Furton in Pain & Gain, which opens April 26.

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NEWS

UP A CREEK

BY

S T E V E VOCKROD T

The nuclear power plant nearest KC might melt down — in court.

A

$25 million lawsuit by the owners of the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant against a vendor is the latest headache for Kansas City’s closest nuclear reactor. Attorneys for Kansas City Power & Light and Westar Energy claim in a lawsuit filed on April 12, 2013, in Jackson County Circuit Court that ABB Inc., in North Carolina, did lousy repair work on a transformer at the nuclear reactor in Burlington, Kansas, about 80 miles from Kansas City. Wolf Creek’s owners charge that the vendor’s slapdash labor led to a January 13, 2012, shutdown of the nuclear plant, which lasted 73 days. Victor Dricks, a spokesman for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which provides federal oversight of the country’s nuclear-energy plants, tells The Pitch that there was no immediate public danger associated with the plant shutting down after a loss of power. Even so, that closure caused regulators to place Wolf Creek at the third level of a five-level rating system used to ascribe how closely reactors should be inspected. Most of the country’s 103 nuclear reactors are in a better category than Wolf Creek. The Burlington facility shares its third-level distinction with 17 other nuclear reactors. Only one, in Alabama, has a lower rating. The NRC’s rating for Wolf Creek means heightened regulation and inspection at the reactor. Wolf Creek’s shutdown was another in a string of incidents attracting attention from the Union of Concerned Scientists, a nonprofit environmental advocacy group that lobbies for clean energy. The UCS has been a frequent critic of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, insisting that the agency should be a better watchdog for the country’s nuclear industry. Wolf Creek was deemed a “repeat offender” in the UCS’s March 2013 report, which covers the previous year’s safety performance at every U.S. nuclear reactor. “No one has been harmed at Wolf Creek, but I wouldn’t boast of its performance,” says David Lochbaum, director of the UCS’s Nuclear Safety Project. The UCS had previously cited “near miss” episodes at Wolf Creek in 2011 and 2012. The facility was under increased scrutiny by regulators in 2011, after it experienced too many unplanned shutdowns the year before. Those incidents were not deemed immediate public-safety threats. “The good thing about nuclear plants is, they are not a house of cards,” Lochbaum says. So what’s the big deal? “The whole concept is to maximize the number of steps between where you are and

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Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant: any takers? disaster,” explains Lochbaum, who has seen disaster close up. He has been a busy man since the March 2011 meltdown of Japan’s reactor at Fukushima. “Unfortunately,” he tells The Pitch, “Wolf Creek is further down that path.” Great Plains Energy, holding company for KCP&L, seems to recognize this. Its most recent annual report lists Wolf Creek among the risk factors that could affect its business and financial performance. While Wolf Creek is KCP&L’s most efficient electricity generator, in terms of fuel cost, the utility acknowledges that extended shutdowns can have a negative result on company finances. Nuclear fuel accounts for about 14 percent of Great Plains’ generation; the company reported a $17 million impact from that 73-day outage last year. And the plant’s age isn’t helping matters. “Wolf Creek was constructed prior to 1986, and the age of Wolf Creek increases the risk of unplanned outages and results in higher maintenance costs,” the Great Plains’ report says. The same report describes Wolf Creek’s performance as one of the company’s greatest challenges in 2012. That’s perhaps why, on November 9, Great Plains CEO Terry Bassham said he was dissatisfied with Wolf Creek’s performance and may look for a new partner to help run the facility. “We are in the process of soliciting proposals,” Bassham told investors during a thirdquarter conference call. “At the end of the process, the owners may hire one of these companies to help with operations.” Anyone wanna run a pre-Chernobyl nuclear plant?

MidAmerica  Neuroscience  Research LeAnn  Cannon 913-­894-­1500  ext  151

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com pitch.com

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he Kansas City Chiefs have been on the clock since last season mercifully ended with a 2–14 record. That’s bad enough for the first overall pick in Thursday’s NFL Draft but a year too late for sure-thing prospects Andrew Luck and Robert Griffin III. That is, unless Andy Reid and John Dorsey’s new regime trades away the pick, which has been among the rumors. If the Chiefs keep the pick — and even if they trade down — they’ll likely aim to protect newly acquired quarterback Alex Smith’s blind side by selecting an offensive tackle, either Texas A&M’s Luke Joeckel or Central Michigan’s Eric Fisher.

The magnitude of the pick grew during the Super Bowl with an NFL Network commercial hyping the league’s combine and draft. In the parody spot, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announces the Chiefs taking Leon Sandcastle — Deion Sanders in an Afro wig and Fu Manchu mustache — with the first pick. Prime Time at 45 would have been better than some of the franchise’s recent choices. In fact, he would have been preferred over a lot of number ones since the 1970 NFL and AFL merger. (CBS Sports counted 20 busts since the union.) Every franchise has a history of picking studs and duds. In honor of the Chiefs holding No. 1, here are our choices for the best and worst draft picks in KC history.

——— THE BEST ——— Buck Buchanan 1963, Round 1, Pick No. 1

KC can claim more than one sports star named Buck. In the 1963 AFL Draft, the Chiefs made Buchanan the first black player in pro-football history to be chosen with the first overall pick. It was a wise decision. With Buchanan at defensive tackle, the Chiefs won two AFL championships (1966 and ’69) and Super Bowl IV. Buchanan was the team’s “iron man,” playing in 166 straight games (182 total), racking up six AFL All-Star nods, two Pro Bowl selections, six All-AFL picks and a second-team All-Pro selection.

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Oh, and an induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Bobby Bell 1963, Round 7, Pick No. 56

Buchanan wasn’t the only gem in the 1963 AFL Draft. In the seventh round, the Chiefs picked Bell, a defensive end from the University of Minnesota. (The Chiefs waited until round seven, convinced that the NFL’s Minnesota Vikings were going to take him.) Bell played linebacker in Hank Stram’s “stack defense,” and he played it so well, he became the fi rst Chief ever elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. continued on page 11 A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

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Winners and Washouts continued from page 9

Willie Lanier 1967, Round 2, Pick No. 50

The Chiefs added Lanier to its vaunted defense in 1967, and the hard-hitting linebacker played a part in the stout, shut-down D that won Super Bowl IV over the Minnesota Vikings. Getting there, however, was due largely to Lanier’s emotional leadership, centered on five crucial words: “They’re not going to score.” Lanier yelled this at his teammates in the 1969 divisional playoff game as the New York Jets had a first-and-goal on the 1-yard line. The Chiefs’ D held the Jets to a field goal, then went on to win the game.

Tony Gonzalez 1997, Round 1, Pick No. 13

It hurts to write it, but Tony G. deserved to go out a winner. Unfortunately, that means exgeneral manager Scott Pioli made the right move, trading one of the best tight ends in the game for a draft pick (Javier Arenas). But when Gonzalez goes into the Hall of Fame in Canton (and he will — the man holds NFL records for most receiving yards, receptions and touchdowns as a tight end), fans know it’ll be in red and gold.

Derrick Thomas 1989, Round 1, Pick No. 4

Easily one of the greatest pass rushers of all time, Thomas menaced quarterbacks. D.T. had a Hall of Fame career — holding franchise records for sacks, safeties, fumble recoveries

Bay Buccaneers for a seventh-round pick. Sims seems to be the beginning of several defensive-line busts. See also: Junior Siavii (’04), Turk McBride (’07), Tank Tyler (’07), Alex Magee (’09).

and forced fumbles — and fans at Arrowhead still wear his No. 58 jersey. The sack master’s life is still colored a bit by his irresponsible death.

Neil Smith 1988, Round 1, Pick No. 2

Victor Riley 1998, Round 1, Pick No. 27

Offensive lines facing the Chiefs had to pick their poison in the late 1980s and ’90s, when a quarterback was sure to get swallowed by either D.T. or Smith. It stings a bit, though, that Smith’s career concluded with AFC rivals the Broncos (where he won two Super Bowls) and the Chargers.

Riley’s mediocre life may make Chiefs fans a little squeamish about taking an offensive tackle in the first round. The only thing memorable about his time in KC is that he was charged with multiple felonies for ramming his vehicle into another vehicle, which contained his wife and infant daughter. Let the record books show: aggravated assault, criminal damage to property, misdemeanor child endangerment, leaving the scene of an accident.

Will Shields 1993, Round 3, Pick No. 74

Not one game was missed in 14 seasons — that means 231 consecutive games, including the playoffs. Shields was a pure diamond in the rough, playing in 12 Pro Bowls every year from 1995 to 2006.

Jared Allen 2004, Round 4, Pick No. 126

The mullet king of Minnesota makes the list for being a sneaky good value from the fourth round. Allen terrorized opposing quarterbacks in ways this city hadn’t seen since D.T. and Smith. Sadly, No. 69 had to leave KC, but the Chiefs turned Allen into a first-round pick (offensive tackle Branden Albert) and two third-round picks (one of which was running back Jamaal Charles). Not a bad haul.

Jamaal Charles 2008, Round 3, Pick No. 73

Thanks to Larry Johnson being a royal fuckup, the Chiefs turned to Charles (and, to a lesser extent, Kolby Smith). Charles put together back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons in 2009 and 2010 before tearing his ACL in the second game of the 2011 season. Charles bounced back by rushing for 1,509 yards in 2012, and he broke Jim Brown’s 47-yearold yards-per-carry record by averaging 5.82 yards.

Christian Okoye 1987, Round 2, Pick No. 35

“The Nigerian Nightmare” retired as the Chiefs’ all-time leading rusher, with 4,897 yards in six seasons. (Priest Holmes later broke the record.) Okoye called it quits due to injuries. His legend lives on among Chiefs fans and retro gamers, thanks to Tecmo Super Bowl, in which he’s virtually impossible to tackle.

——— THE WORST ——— Pat Barnes 1997, Round 4, Pick No. 110

The Cal quarterback never threw a pass in the NFL. Not once.

Larry Johnson 2003, Round 1, Pick No. 27 Todd Blackledge 1983, Round 1, Pick No. 7

The Quarterback Class of 1983 saw six gunslingers drafted in the first round. John Elway went No. 1. A quarterback wasn’t selected until six picks later … by the Chiefs. KC drafted Blackledge, who had led Penn State to a national championship. Four of the QBs in this draft played in Super Bowls. Blackledge wasn’t one of them. The Chiefs picked him instead of Jim Kelly or Dan Marino. Kelly. Marino. Let that sink in.

Trezelle Jenkins 1995, Round 1, Pick No. 31

Three seasons. Nine games. One start. That’s it. That’s all KC got out of the offensive tackle from the University of Michigan. But don’t feel bad, Chiefs fans. The XFL’s San Francisco Demons drafted him five years later — and he couldn’t make the team.

Sylvester Morris 2000, Round 1, Pick No. 21

Longevity wasn’t Morris’ strong suit. The wide receiver from Jackson State saw his career ended by knee injuries after just one season playing for the Chiefs, catching 48 passes for 678 yards and three touchdowns (all three caught in one game, a 42–14 thrashing of the San Diego Chargers).

LJ is yet another player noted for his off-thefield failures. Dude was a dick. His rap sheet includes allegations and/or arrests for waving a gun at his then girlfriend in 2003, pushing a woman in 2005, assaulting women at nightclubs in 2008, and attempting to strangle an ex-girlfriend at a Las Vegas casino in 2012. At least the Chiefs cut the self-proclaimed “King Pink” before he could become the franchise’s all-time leading rusher.

Percy Snow 1990, Round 1, Pick No. 13

It’s hard to pin Snow’s failing on the Chiefs. When the linebacker from Michigan State finished his rookie season, there was hope that he’d be a part of Marty Schottenheimer’s defense for years to come. Then he hopped on a moped during the 1991 training camp. And he crashed. His season was over, and so, pretty much, was his career. This is why teams put clauses in their contracts against riding motorcycles (and mopeds).

Paul Palmer 1987, Round 1, Pick No. 19

The 1987 draft was a strange one for the Chiefs. The team selected running backs in the first and second rounds. continued on page 13

Ryan Sims 2002, Round 1, Pick No. 6

Chiefs general manager Carl Peterson made Sims the first defensive tackle taken in the 2002 draft, taking a pass on future Pro Bowl DTs John Henderson and Albert Haynesworth. Both proved to be better in the trenches than the Tar Heel: Sporting News would call Haynesworth “the most dominant defensive tackle in the league” in 2009. In his five KC seasons, Sims started only 36 games and managed to record just five sacks. The Chiefs had seen enough of him by 2007, when the team dumped him on the Tampa

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The course for the event will begin in Theis Park at 10:00AM on Saturday, April 27, 2013. Walkers will head west on Cleaver II, through Main Street, where they will enter Mill Creek Park. Cleaver II will be closed for about 15 minutes from Rockhill Road to JC Nichols Parkway as well as Oak Street from Volker Boulevard to Cleaver II. From Mill Creek Park, the route continues east on 43rd Street to Oak Street, which veers slightly to the right and becomes Rockhill Road, and on to 45th Street. Participants will go west on 45th to Oak Street. At Oak, the route heads south and enters the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art Sculpture Park. They will follow the brick path on the west side of the South Lawn and travel back to Cleaver II. Walkers will proceed east on Cleaver, back to Rockhill Road, and follow Rockhill south to Volker Boulevard. *NOTE: Walkers not able to use stairs on the Nelson’s South Lawn to Volker will continue south on Oak to Cleaver II. Route monitors will assist persons on which path they should take. At Volker, walkers will be immediately directed down to the Brush Creek walkway on the south bank of the creek where they will cross Oak Street and continue on to Brookside Avenue. The route turns north on Brookside, across the bridge, where walkers will be directed back down to the Brush Creek walkway on the north side of the bank and travel back to Theis where the course ends. Based upon the judgment, and with the assistance, of the Kansas City Police Department, any LQWHUVHFWLRQRUSRUWLRQRIVWUHHWDORQJWKHURXWHFRXOGEHVXEMHFWWRLQWHUPLWWHQWWUDIoFFRQWUROLILWLVGHHPHG DGYDQWDJHRXVIRUWKHVDIHFRQGXFWRIHLWKHUIRRWRUYHKLFXODUWUDIoF AIDS Service Foundation of Greater Kansas City, and the many recipients of the donations it collects during this event, thank everyone very much for all the cooperation they have given over the years. Please come out and walk with us!

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Steve Metzler Brian Williams

Winners and Washouts continued from page 11 Palmer, a Heisman Trophy runner-up out of Temple, went first. The second guy, well, he was a Nightmare on Palmer’s playing time.

Harvey Williams 1991, Round 1, Pick No. 21

If you thought Palmer was living a bad dream, think of Williams out there in a Chiefs backfield loaded with Christian Okoye and Barry Word (and, later, Marcus Allen).

Gale Sayers 1965, Round 1, Pick No. 5

The Chiefs drafted the Hall of Fame running back from the University of Kansas in the AFL Draft and made an aggressive play to sign the Kansas Comet. But Sayers was also drafted by the NFL’s Chicago Bears (Round 1, pick No. 4), and he chose Chicago’s offer, which he referred to as “$4.95 and a carton of Cokes.” If he had signed with the Chiefs, the Wichita native would easily be on the team’s all-time-best list.

— THE JURY’S OUT — Dwayne Bowe 2007, Round 1, Pick No. 23

The 2013 season looks to be a big one for the Chiefs’ No. 1 receiver. Bowe had an awful 2012, beset by injuries and poof quarterbacking. But ’13 may be Bowe’s lucky number,

now that he has inked a five-year, $56 million contract. Can he live up to being one of the highest-paid receivers in the league? There’s plenty of opportunity with a new quarterback, a new coach and a new system.

Tyson Jackson 2009, Round 1, Pick No. 3

B.J. Raji. Brian Orakpo. Brian Cushing. Clay Matthews. The Chiefs passed on these four Pro Bowl defensive players (and wide receiver Percy Harvin) to take Jackson with the third overall pick. The team guaranteed the LSU defensive end $31 million. How well did this work out? In March, Jackson accepted a pay cut of more than $10 million to stay with the Chiefs.

Eric Berry 2010, Round 1, Pick No. 5

Berry is a two-time Pro Bowler, earning honors his rookie year and last season. No bagging on a guy who missed the entire 2011 season with a torn ACL. He’s certainly a long way from being a bust.

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Jonathan Baldwin 2011, Round 1, Pick No. 26

Baldwin was supposed to be the No. 2 receiver behind Dwayne Bowe. In two seasons, however, the former Pittsburgh Panther has done little to secure that spot, despite possessing big-play ability. (He caught a 57-yard pass, the team’s longest reception for ’12.). Baldwin’s offseason story is the same: He looks good when the team plays without pads, but when they suit up, well, that’s a different story. His time may be up with the signing of Donnie Avery.

Justin Houston 2011, Round 3, Pick No. 70

In his second season with the Chiefs, Houston doubled his sack total (10). The linebacker earned a ticket to Hawaii for the Pro Bowl when an injury forced Denver’s Von Miller to cancel. He has been a bright spot in a defense that was one of the worst in the league in 2012.

Dontari Poe 2012, Round 1, No. 11

It’s really, really early to gauge what kind of player Poe may become. But after one season, this is what we know: He’s a freak athlete. (At the NFL Combine, he ran a 4.98-second 40yard dash, despite weighing 346 pounds, and captured the attention of President Obama.) As a rookie, he started every game at nose tackle, recorded 38 total tackles (28 unassisted) and proved to be a three-down player, even if he failed to get a sack. If he continues to progress, he’ll be a hit.

E-mail justin.kendall@pitch.com pitch.com

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WEEK OF APRIL 25–MAY 1 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

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PAG E

THUMBS UP

From left: Jennifer Owen, Robert Pherigo, Audrey Hartwell and Sylvia Stoner

The photo at left isn’t a Dr. Seuss hostage negotiation — it’s evolution. More specifically, it’s a scene from Darwin, Michael Henry and Dwight Frizzell’s new opera, which the Owen/Cox Dance Group stages this weekend with NewEar Contemporary Chamber Ensemble in a world premiere that caps the latter’s 20th season. In this biographical look at Origin of Species author Charles Darwin, expect singing, dancing and equator crossing, set to a score centered on violin, bass, flute, clarinet, bassoon, horn and piano. It’s at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Union Station’s City Stage Theatre (30 West Pershing Road, 816-460-2020). For tickets, see tickets.cto.umkc.edu. — SCOTT WILSON

STAGE Bill Burr breaks out.

26 PAG E

FAT C I T Y Blue Door Farm gets ripe.

30 The Black Keys go arena rock.

T H U R S D AY | 4 . 2 5 | PERFECTLY PASTIE

Maintaining the gold standard for KC burlesque, the Burlesque Downtown Underground kicks off its third annual Kansas City Burlesque Festival with an Opening Gala at Retro Downtown (1518 McGee). Running through Saturday night, the festival promises boner-worthy performances from international stars, regional beauties and local up-and-comers at Crown Center’s Off Center Theatre (2450 Grand) and the Folly Theater (300 West 12th Street). Cover for tonight’s party, priced lower than the performer competition and showcase and the Royal

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Burlesque Ball, is only $5. Get more information about the festival at kcburlesque.com. All events are 18-and-older.

F R I D AY | 4 . 2 6 | JUST A SMALL-TOWN FEST

We can come up with absolutely nothing witty to say about Edwardsville, Kansas, the quiet community in southwestern Wyandotte County. Instead, we’re just offering an unironic nod of general approval toward Edwardsville Days, a two-day celebration featuring food and craft vendors, homemade pie and chili, and an “Edwardsville Idol” competition, all at continued on page 16

T H U R S D AY | 4 . 2 5 |

THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO HO

T

he 25th Annual AIDS Walk Kansas City happens Saturday, so in a push to get your fundraising dollars in her kitty, Daisy Bucket has booked an evening with Los Angeles comedian and gay-community goddess Wendy Ho, at Social (1118 McGee, 816-472-4900), from 7 to 10 p.m. Advance tickets cost $10 at wendyho.eventbrite.com or $15 at the door. pitch.com

A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

15

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S AT U R D AY | 4 . 2 7 |

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When the 3,400-square-foot Alexander Majors House (8201 State Line Road) was restored in 1984, the antebellum home’s abundant herb and vegetable gardens were retained. This evening’s Herb Cocktail Party makes use of this green centerpiece to further the historic home’s mission. “It’s a creative way to get a younger group of Kansas Citians involved in the museums and in philanthropy,� says Anna Marie Tutera, executive director of the Wornall/Majors

ILLUMINATI

The rock ballet Common People puts William Shatner’s wild voice to Ben Folds’ music and Margo Sappington’s dance.

THE PITCH

Artist and creative manager Ashley Anders celebrates her Gorilla Events’ third anniversary with a group exhibition of nine artists, a portable screen printer, live music, Boulevard beer and the Lucky Baby Tea Cart. This show — her biggest yet — is free and runs from 6 p.m. to midnight at City Ice Arts (2015 Campbell, 816-820-4105). Learn more about the artists at facebook.com/AMAgorillaevents.

S AT U R D AY | 4 . 2 7 |

BORN THIS WAY

Aaron Hartzler’s Salon and Huffington Post writings about growing up gay in a conservative, evangelical household are witty, relatable and full of painful revelations. “It’s not that I’ve stopped loving Mom and Dad — I haven’t. It’s just that I’ve accepted the fact that they may be as powerless as I am to change,� he writes in a piece called “Honey, We’re Praying for You.� The KC native lives in Los Angeles but makes his way to the Barnes & Noble in Zona Rosa (8625 Northwest Prairie View Road, 816-505-3355) to plug his new young-adult work, Rapture Practice, and maybe do a little hanging out at the shopping center. “I didn’t see a movie in a theater until I was 15 years old,� Hartzler tells The Pitch. “My mom and dad felt that most movies were not pleasing to God, so I wasn’t allowed to go.� Take a teen to the free 2 p.m. event. For more information about the book, see aaronhartzler.com.

MEDICATION IN MOTION

KC’s favorite saxman BOBBY WATSON wails live for the World Premiere multimedia ballet Energy Made Visible by Karole Armitage.

16

POP-UP ART

House Museums. “It also gives us a chance to show off the history of these wonderful houses that need to be preserved by the next generation of members and donors.� Drink up the legacy and the herb-infused libations from 5 to 8 p.m., and eat food from barbecuesauce king Shannon “FireBug� Kimball. For tickets ($30), see wornallhouse.org or call 816-444-1858. Reservations are required.

HISTORICAL HERBS

Dancer: Logan Pachciarz. Photography: Kenny Johnson.

HEY-HAY, GOING TO KANSAS CITY

continued from page 15 Edwardsville City Park (690 South Fourth Street). Today’s events begin at noon and wrap up around 11:30 p.m., with a performance by Revelations, the Journey tribute band. Admission is free, so you can save your money for the $2 carnival rides. Find out more at bsedwchamber.org.

pitch.com

uixotic’s artistic director, Anthony Magliano, calls the troupe’s Surfaces: An Illuminated Retrospective a “brand-new visual and audio experience for 2013.â€? It’s also a tribute to the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, for which the group, Magliano explains, “will be painting with light on the entire front façade of the Nelson with intricate, projection-mapped compositions.â€? See it for free at 7:30 p.m. from the Kansas City Sculpture Park, on the south lawn of the museum (4525 Oak). Bring lawn chairs or blankets. For details, see nelson-atkins.org; reservations are requested.

Overland Park’s Bill Douglas, the author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to T’ai Chi and QiGong, says the internal Chinese martial art that he began practicing early in his life offers profound health benefits. “In a way, I was seeing the future, because with population growth and technological rapid change, the whole planet is in the stress ball I was in 30 years ago,� he tells us. His solution? The creation of World T’ai Chi & Qigong Day, in 1999. “We did a pilot event, and it was spectacular: 200 people spread out across the lawn of the Nelson doing t’ai chi. CNN picked it up, and then this idea just went global. It’s now celebrated in 70 nations.� At 9:30 a.m., join experts, novices and casual followers around the globe to achieve mental clarity. The free event takes place on the south lawn of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (4525 Oak). For more information, see worldtaichiday.org.

works by 10 of his students. “This is not a student production,” he tells us. “It’s a separate, stand-alone production of plays that I think are ready for the next level of being done before a paying audience.” Directed by such local heavy hitters as Scott Cordes and John Rensenhouse, the plays making up this two-hour showcase, titled InTENsity 2.0, begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Fishtank Performance Studio (1715 Wyandotte). This is the last night for the showcase, which began Friday, April 26. For tickets ($10), see brownpapertickets.com.

T U E S D AY | 4 . 3 0 | Chalk one up for art.

S U N D AY | 4 . 2 8 | PAVEMENT ART

The sidewalks of the Historic Northeast’s Concourse at Kessler Park (200 South Benton Boulevard) transform into brightly colored temporary works of art for a second day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the sixth annual Chalk Walk Festival. The free event features activities for kids, food trucks and community-information booths. Find out more at chalkwalk.org.

RUNNING NORTH

The average time of the 5,930 athletes who finished last year’s Trolley Run was 44 minutes and 14 seconds. Organizers say the course — beginning in Waldo at 75th Street and E R MO Wornall and ending on the Plaza — is home to the most populous fourT A INE ONL .COM mile run in the country, PITCH which basically means that all of your friends are in on the cardio good time. So if you don’t participate, you’ll feel like a lazy piece of shit. But you can also feel good about cheering on the runners and walkers on their way to the huge, family-friendly after-party at 10:45 a.m. in Mill Creek Park (J.C. Nichols Parkway and 47th Street). Registration for the run, which starts at 7:45 a.m., is $30; see trolleyrun.org for details.

EVENTS

M O N D AY | 4 . 2 9 | JAZZ BROTHERS, SOUL SISTERS

National Volunteer Week officially ended April 27, but opportunities still abound with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City. In an effort to attract new mentors and appreciate those already doing the work, BBBS-KC is putting on the Happy Hour & Jazz Celebration at the Phoenix (302 West Eighth Street, 816-221-5299).

FRESH STAGES

Frank Higgins, a playwriting instructor at the University of Missouri–Kansas City, says he’s paying it forward by producing 10 new

THE JOB GAME

The U.S. Department of Labor says the unemployment rate fell from 8.2 percent to 7.6 percent last month, not because people found jobs but because approximately 290,000 people quit actively looking for work. That means your chances of finding gainful employment are better at today’s KC Royals Career Fair, where you come in contact with more high-profile corporations — such as the University of Kansas Medical Center, Pepsi, Farmers Insurance and Sporting KC — than just trying on your own. Shine your shoes and print your résumé on the good stock, then get to the job search, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Kauffman Stadium (1 Royal Way, 816-921-8000). Admission costs $15 and includes a ticket to the 7:10 p.m. Royals game against the Rays. To register for the job fair, see kansascity.royals.mlb.com, click on “job opportunities,” then “view postings” to find the Career Fair link.

TASTE 2013 A mouthwatering food & beverage guide. Find it on stands & in area hotels

May 16th, 2013.

W E D N E S D AY | 5 . 1 | WHISKEY WEDNESDAY

Do you believe that atmosphere affects the way your cocktail tastes? Run this experiment with the most adult of beverages — bourbon — at one of these local establishments. Burg & Barrel (7042 West 76th Street, Overland Park, 913-649-2525). From 2 to 6 p.m., sip more than 15 varieties priced at $4. Flights with three selections go for $12. If you’re still being a responsible drinker at 10 p.m., when reverse happy hour starts, Fireball shots cost just $3. Duke’s on Grand (1501 Grand, 816-527-0122). From open until close, get any well or call whiskey for $3 — just 12 quarters. Big spenders can drop another $2 for Bud or Bud Light chasers, domestic bottles or wells, from 4 to 7 p.m. The Well (7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700). Want to feel like a real Waldo player? Drink scotch, whiskey or whiskey cocktails for $4 all day and night. E-mail submissions two weeks in advance to calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

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S TA G E

HOME PAIG E

Ricardo Khan and UMKC Theatre

BY

score big with Kansas City Swing.

D E BO R A H HIRS CH

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P R O V I D E D B Y U M KC T H E AT R E

ork like you don’t need the money. Love like you’ve never been hurt. Dance like nobody’s watching.” Satchel Paige’s succinct instructions have been quoted often, but the UMKC Theatre production of Kansas City Swing, a new play by Ricardo Khan and Trey Ellis, shows us a vivid version of the man behind those words. Paige and other baseball players of his time, including Buck O’Neil and Bob Feller, emerge from history, animated before us. It’s September 1947, the year that Jackie Robinson stepped into the all-white major leagues, a time of impending change in baseball and in the black community. Paige is 41 and a Negro Leagues all-star, getting ready for a barnstorming tour against Feller’s team. The play, which Khan also directs, pulls together diverse elements (including music composed and performed by Bobby Watson) to make an affecting work that’s poetically written, choreographed and acted. In an e-mail conversation with The Pitch, some impact on that with my work, as Kansas Khan talked about his work in theater and his City, not unlike many, appears to continue to relationship with audiences. The Pitch: You’ve directed at theaters around struggle with that. Your play Kansas City Swing, which you the country, including the Kennedy Center and co-wrote with Trey Ellis, combines the topics of the Apollo Theatre, in Harlem. But you’ve also baseball, jazz and racial integration in 1940s directed at the Unicorn Theatre here, and you’re KC. What drew you to KC’s past, including your a visiting professor at UMKC. How did you become involved with the university and with the previous work here on Quindaro? With Kansas City Swing, it was the discovKC theater community? Khan: After conducting a design work- ery for myself of the impressive black midshop in 2004 for the graduate school at dle class that existed prior to integration. I wished I was there. I wished for the sense UMKC Theatre, I was asked to direct the play upon which that workshop was based, The of self that must have existed, the music, the clothes, the style of the times. 1947 and Darker Face of the Earth. It was former U.S. Jackie Robinson entering the majors was a Poet Laureate Rita Dove’s first play, and she and I did the premiere of that play together pivot point for many elements of how we live, all of us, black and white. And this provided in Ashland at Oregon Shakespeare Festival a great backdrop for the telling of a story of years before that. The experience of revisitthe great American game. ing that play with students As for Quindaro, that was fascinating to me. Also Kansas City Swing came from Googling “Unfascinating was the Kansas Through April 28 at UMKC derground Railroad Kansas City I learned to appreciate Theatre, 4949 Cherry, City” and seeing that the and become quite fond of. 816-235-6222, first article to pop up spoke I was also at the time foumkctheatre.org of Quindaro. Every moment cused on the development after that was a revelation of new works, both here in this country and abroad in Johannesburg and about that town, a place created by the union of freed blacks, abolitionist whites, and Native London. What followed in KC was my ability Americans. I thought, people need to know of to involve UMKC students in these multiyear these amazing chapters in our history, times processes of creating new work, and what that remind us that “Yes we can, we can do resulted was Quindaro in 2008 and Train to this, too, here and now.” 2010 in 2010. You’re a co-founder of Crossroads Theatre Co. What about KC’s theater scene attracts you? The legacy of baseball, its love of jazz, its in New Jersey, which you’ve said is the “coming rich and storied history. I also continue to together of people from many backgrounds to try be committed to the elimination of barri- to create a whole new world.” What type of world have you wanted to create with Crossroads? ers between people, and I hope I can have

Well, first, because through my parents I represent a number of world cultures, I grew up knowing myself as a citizen of the world, not just a child of my small block in Philly or Camden, New Jersey. This matters and always has because as I’ve watched our American society develop, relationships between cultures tend to be more defined by the past than the hopes and promises of the future. Since the African-American experience is so rooted historically in a history of enslavement, mental and physical, my hope for the new world is to remove those definitions that are so based on being victim or victimizer, and instead discover new, more healthy foundations upon which we can relate to one another across culture lines. It’s an easier thing to do when a person has a global perspective of himself or herself. When all you know of yourself is your block, your neighborhood, your people, you’re missing out on the realization of your true power and the power of our society. So Crossroads, like the name implies, is about many roads merging in order to learn a new way, form a new way, and then move on, changed. You’ve collaborated before with Ellis, on Fly (about the Tuskegee Airmen), which Crossroads Theatre staged in 2009 and was favorably reviewed by The New York Times (October 9, 2009). Is that the type of work originating at the Lincoln Center Institute, at Lincoln Center, where you’re artist in residence? And could you talk about your work’s educational goals? I try to make my work always educational on some level, because I believe so passionately in the need to learn more about ourselves and each other, not just from social media,

pitch.com

Khan (above) directs Michael R. Pauley Alisha Espinosa and Thomas E. Tucker (from left) in Kansas City Swing. films or TV but from the sharing of live experiences of community that only theater can do. But educating is not the driving force. The driving force is to tell a story and try to create great theater. Trey and I have been fortunate with Fly because LCI told us to do what we do and let them be the ones to be concerned with how to educate using the piece. So that’s what we did. Fly just did phenomenally well at the Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C., and will be in Cincinnati in September and at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis in October [October 16–November 10; see repstl.org/season]. How does your work as a writer inform your work as a director, and vice versa? I’m still trying to figure that one out. I’m a conceptualizer. And not too far from the mind of a director, I am influenced by metaphor, seeking the magic in symbolism and the power of words. Trey is great with language. And together, we somehow merge into a flow that has worked and been extremely enjoyable. Ultimately, it’s about telling a story, creating magic onstage, and impacting an audience so that they are somehow a little different going out than they were coming in. To me, it takes both the writer and director in me to do that. And dividing those two heads, for me, would be like separating music from the lyric when the song you’re singing has more to say than either one can give.

E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

19

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S TA G E

SO ICY

Is 2013 the year that Bill Burr finally breaks out?

A

fter 20 years of grinding it out on the comedy circuit, Bill Burr is finally having his cultural moment. He has a recurring role on Breaking Bad; he acted alongside Al Pacino and Christopher Walken in Stand Up Guys; he has a successful weekly podcast, the appropriately named Monday Morning Podcast; and his act — long a favorite among comedy nerds and fellow comics — now plays to theater-sized audiences. The topics of Burr’s medium-angry rants range from why Steve Jobs was overrated to the gender wars to a legendary 2006 tirade in which he verbally abused a drunken Philadelphia crowd for 12 minutes. (Look it up on YouTube; it’s pretty amazing.) The Pitch caught up with Burr last week as he was making his way through the South toward the Midwest. The Pitch: You’re probably as big now as you’ve ever been, right? Burr: Yeah, probably. I honestly don’t think about it too much. I’m just focused on looking out in crowds and hopefully not seeing empty chairs. Can you enjoy it at all or are you one of those guys who’s afraid it’s all going to disappear in a second? No, I can enjoy it. But I’m still kind of focused on the game within the game, which is topping the last hour that I wrote. So I feel like I have a job to do when I go up there. Like, right now, I’m going through the South and I’m really amped up to do the new material and kind of kick the shit out of it. I mean, I’m a lifer when it comes to this stuff. I’m not using stand-up as a steppingstone to something. But I would think you’re getting a bunch of TV offers lately, because your act has gotten pretty big and you’re in movies and Breaking Bad and stuff. Yeah, I mean, I’ve got some stuff going on, but everybody kind of does. There’s always

development meetings and things. So, yeah, Breaking Burr I’m working on something, but even if I got baseball stadiums — you kind of get to share a pilot picked up and got a TV show, I’d still in the history of a city when you play them. be doing stand-up. What kind of material are you doing this time Like, Kansas City has the Midland, which is old, but they’ve redone it or whatever. It’s around? kind of that same story in every city. The I’ve got a whole new hour. It’s kind of crazy, maybe. I was kind of like, OK, I probably venue used to be the crown jewel of the city in the early 1900s, and then after 40 years it’s trashed women enough on my last special. So I all run-down, and then it’s a porno house in stayed away from that subject. I just tell crazy the ’70s. Then some Jackie stories, find the beat night Onassis type says, “Hey, after night, and it slowly Bill Burr I’m going to take some of gets better. Also, what I’m Saturday, April 27, my husband’s money and trying to do is live my life. at the Midland redo this thing.” And then Go out, do ordinary things, 1228 Main, 816-283-9921 it becomes great again. But, and eventually make an ass midlandkc.com yeah, I really like theaters. I of yourself and feel stupid, just played the Tabernacle, and turn that into material. in Atlanta, which used to be a Baptist church. Is this tour all theaters? No more clubs? This tour is a lot of theaters. But when There’s organ pipes up on the wall behind you. It was incredible. I’m working out the new hour, I’ll only do Are you doing well in the South? I feel like, for comedy clubs. most comedians, it’s probably the South and the Do you prefer the intimacy of clubs? No, I like theaters in the same way I like old Midwest that are the last frontier.

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L Yeah, the South was sort of the last frontier because I’m so hardcore from the North. I got the East Coast first, then San Francisco and the West Coast, then I kept hammering at the South, and this is the first time I’ve been able to do theaters down here. It’s been great. And I actually like doing the kind of cities that aren’t the type of cities where you can get an easy direct fl ight to — these kind of B- and C-level cities. Like, I just did Hoover, Alabama. I did Charleston, South Carolina; Athens, Georgia. I’m in Tallahassee tonight. People are just so excited that, for once, you came to them, and they didn’t have to drive four hours to get to you. After the shows, they’ll be like, “Can you tell Jim Norton to come down here? Could you tell Louis C.K. or Dave Attell to come down here?” It’s like you’re visiting an island, and they’re giving you messages to tell the rest of the world. Have you been back to Philadelphia since that comedy festival where you berated hecklers and insulted their city for 12 minutes? Oh, yeah, I went back like six months after that. Philly is so crazy. It’s like, everybody remembers that incident but them. What they did to me, they do to somebody every two weeks. You wait six months, and they’re like, “Oh yeah, did we do that to you? I don’t even remember.” Who are some comics we should be paying more attention to? Chelsea Peretti, Sean Patton, Joe DeRosa. My openers on this tour, Paul Virzi and Jason Lawhead — I like to have someone working the crowd in front of me that I feel is going to really be a monster. There’s a lot of really good comics coming up. This next wave is one of the strongest classes I’ve seen. I mean, I’m just a huge fan of stand-up in general, so it’s really inspiring for me to watch them.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

 ď-* pitch.com

A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

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A look back at the original Truman

J

uly 11, 1968: Ground breaks for the construction of the Truman Sports Complex — Arrowhead Stadium and the former Royals Stadium. But one of the design’s most distinctive features has already been nixed. Architect Charles Deaton’s blueprints originally called for a rolling roof, capable of shielding either stadium from the elements. (A 2008 attempt to add a rolling roof failed at the polls.) Workers would have moved the half-moon-shaped structure from one stadium to the other on railroad tracks; when not in use, it would have stayed between Arrowhead and what we know today as Kauffman Stadium. In the end, though, the innovation was deemed too costly, not least because its designers hadn’t settled on a durable but lightweight material (something that could be dome-shaped but withstand high winds without sailing away in a gust). Here’s what it would have looked like. The 1968 preliminary renderings shown here were prepared for members of the Jackson County Sports Authority; the images are today held by the Jackson County Historical Society, which has just relaunched its website, jchs.org. “This was one of the biggest, most expensive projects taken on by Kansas City at the time,” says Steve Noll, the society’s executive director. To cover construction costs, a 1967 bond issue raised $102 million, an amount equivalent to about $712 million today. But there was infighting over how to spend the money — amusing evidence of which remains in a handwritten, green-ink note that someone in on the planning neatly added to one of the diagrams: “This shape is pretty. Pretty expensive.” Arrowhead Stadium opened in August 1972, and Kauffman opened the following spring. Very pretty indeed. And roofless.

See more of these images at pitch.com.

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com pitch.com

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23

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CAFÉ

THE DUKES OF HUMMUS

At the Basha, two budding restaurateurs turn out some accomplished Middle Eastern food.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

The Basha • 7016 West 105th Street, Overland Park, 913-341-7778 • Hours: 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.–8 p.m. Sunday • Price: $–$$

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like restaurants that pretend to have some connection to royalty: Burger King, Princess Gardens, Dairy Queen. One aspires to make even a soft-serve cone a luxurious experience. This city’s Middle Eastern restaurants tend to prefer biblical and geographical references to regal words. But newly minted restaurateurs Mohammed Mosley and Nader Shehata like to think big, so they named their six-week-old Overland Park restaurant the Basha. “Basha is a title given to someone with high power and authority, like a duke or a lord,” says Mosley, a native of Jordan. Basha is also MORE the traditional Arabic pronunciation of the T Turkish word pasha, A E IN ONL .COM a high-ranking title for H C IT P diplomats and dignitaries during the Ottoman Empire (sometimes spelled bashaw). All of which is to say Mosley and Nader want their patrons to feel, if not like royalty, at least like VIPs. The tiled dining room, painted a glossy shade of café au lait, is more comfortable than it is exclusive, with high-backed booths and picture windows that look out on the parking lot it shares with Buffalo Wild Wings instead of, say, the pyramids. And it’s not a place where you can drink like a king; Mosley and Nader don’t have a liquor license and probably won’t get one. (Alcohol is prohibited by their religious customs.) The Basha instead emphasizes a selection of hot teas, served in delicate glass cups. The Turkish coffee here is thick and sweet, and Mosley is also proud of his restaurant’s signature cold drink, a ruby-red concoction of lemon juice and hibiscus flowers with an unsubtle, Kool-Aid-like sweetness. “It’s a potent aphrodisiac,” whispered one of my dining companions. She went on to point out that the kefta kebabs I ordered for dinner reminded her of certain pornographic mosaics in Pompeii. I had the waiter take her juice away. That night, we started with the modestly priced sampler plate. Here, that means a generous helping of exceptionally creamy hummus, a smoky roasted-eggplant baba ghanoush, grape leaves stuffed with rice and herbs and lamb, falafel, and triangles of fresh pita bread (which could use a short toss on the grill). After that, it’s almost indulgent to order an entrée. And you may need help wiping away the memory of the sampler’s falafel, which lacks visual appeal. Instead of crispy chickpea-batter patties in the shape of a ball or a croquette, the Basha’s falafel (which, when I tried it, was a bit over-fried) consists of pucks resembling

ANGELA C. BOND

CAFÉ

shawarma. I preferred the beef kebabs to those with ground lamb. Mosley calls his baked pasta creation — a cross between Greek moussaka and Italian those little compressed peat wafers that exlasagna — Basha-mel. It’s a slab of layered pand when you add water. penne with ground beef tucked under a But I say it’s unfair to judge the cuisine at a creamy blanket of fluffy béchamel sauce. The Middle Eastern restaurant only by the quality result is sort of a pallid moussaka — likable of its falafel. That dish, after all, has more in common with the lowly french fry than with but forgettable. Pasta is also an ingredient in one of the two meatless entrées here, kushari: the rest of the menu. Dinners here, which are ridiculously inexpensive, include a very sim- a construction of macaroni, rice, lentils and chickpeas in tomato sauce. ple salad of chopped lettuce, The other alternative is the cucumbers and tomato in The Basha “veggie plate,” which is the an equally uncomplicated Sampler plate .................$6.99 same thing as the sampler dressing of olive oil, lemon Kefta kebab plate .........$12.99 appetizer plate but more exjuice, sumac and mint. It’s Basha-mel ..................... $10.99 pensive and without lamb in a pleasant prelude to an Grilled salmon ...............$12.99 Lamb chops....................$13.99 the grape leaves. array of dishes that preLebanese nights ............$3.99 The surprise here, though, dominantly spotlight meat turns out to be the lamb or chicken and are, for the chops, priced so inexpenmost part, beautifully presively that I cringed at first, imagining puny pared. The grilled salmon at Basha is one of the prettiest, tastiest incarnations of this ribs. The chops here aren’t brawny but they are meaty, delightfully tender and fragrant with pink-fleshed fish in the metro. Before grillcardamom, cumin and pepper. It’s a standout ing, Mosley brushes it with lemon juice, olive on an already affordable menu, maybe the best oil and his own mix of seasonings (I tasted deal in the place. cumin, cinnamon, ginger, onion and sumac) Mosley and Nader insist that they have and a delicate peppery marinade. the largest dessert selection — five choices — The kitchen also does an impressive job with standards of the Americanized Middle Eastern of any Middle Eastern boîte in the city. “Our baklava comes from Michigan,” Mosley says, menu: a very nice, gristle-free rotisserie gyro plate and a spiced, marinated chicken (or beef) “but we make everything else in our kitchen.”

Good chicken and creamy hummus stick out at the Basha.

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The “everything else” includes a milky rice pudding; a square of sweet cheese wrapped in shredded phyllo pastry called kunafa; and Mosley’s favorite, Lebanese nights, which is a sumptuous choice if you like old-fashioned boiled puddings. The Basha version is cooled into a dense rectangle swathed in heavy cream and sprinkled with crushed pistachios. It isn’t a particularly sweet delicacy, so it’s very good with a cup of the Turkish coffee, which here rages with sugar. Neither Mosley nor Nader has much restaurant experience, but opening the Basha was their dream. And America is the land of dreams, right? They seem to be on the right track. The kitchen is well-paced and efficient, the servers are very young but not clueless, and — with the exception of that prefab falafel — everything I tried here was well-prepared and delicious. I don’t know if I felt like a basha — or even a pasha — while eating at this new restaurant, but that wasn’t for want of congeniality on the Basha’s part. And my dining companion on that first visit did, in fact, come away with a certain imperial air. “I really did feel like a queen,” she told me as we left. No more hibiscus juice for her.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

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FAT C I T Y

WAITING FOR THE SUN

Laura Christensen’s Blue Door

BY

Farm fights off a cold spring.

JON AT H A N BENDER

FARMERS MARKETS

Tuesday Lawrence Farmers Market, 824 New Hampshire, 4–6 p.m. Begins May 7.

Wednesday Gladstone Farmers Market, 525 Northeast 70th Street, 2–6 p.m. Begins May 1. Lee’s Summit Farmers Market, corner of Second Street and Douglas, 7 a.m.–sellout. MEGAN DEJMAL

Liberty Farmers Market, 1332 West Kansas, 7 a.m.–noon. Waldo Farmers Market, 303 West 79th Street, 3–7 p.m. Begins May 1.

A

cold, wet start to growing season means that humans and bunnies alike are waiting a little longer for carrots. Fat City caught up with Laura Christensen, who operates Blue Door Farm in Kansas City, Kansas, as she worked her fields in preparation for the opening of the Brookside Farmers Market and the start of transplant season. Now in her seventh year of farming, Christensen has a sense that the spring and summer harvests are likely to be delayed. “Last spring was drier and warmer,” she says. “Everything is going to be a few weeks later, but the markets will still have produce, particularly leafy greens coming out of high tunnels.” In the high tunnels on her certified-organic farm, Christensen has planted greens, chard, fennel and arugula, all of which can thrive in cold temperatures and high humidity. In her fields, she’s waiting to plant tomatoes until the soil temperature rises and the danger of overnight frost abates. Christensen is also keeping an eye on the root vegetables in the ground; her beets and carrots have yet to germinate. The forecast isn’t all tepid: The cooler temperatures have kept pests away and should lead to a bounty of head lettuce. “Everyone is in a wait-and-see mode,” Christensen says. “But once the weather heats up, I expect to hear from lots of gardeners asking about heat-resistant and drought-tolerant plants.”

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Christensen has dozens of heirloomtomato plants, from cherry to slicers, and she recommends the Eva Purple Ball and Purple Calabash. The former has a sweet taste and a thin pink skin, and it’s productive even in extreme heat. The Purple Calabash looks like a Cinderella pumpkin and deserves to be the T in your BLT. “I know this year will be great,” she says. “I just don’t know how yet. That’s farming. It’s a little different each year. If you want to eat locally, you have to roll with it.” Christensen is selling transplants and produce at the BadSeed Farmers Market (1909 McGee) Friday nights and at the Brookside Farmers Market (63rd Street and Wornall) Saturday mornings through June.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

TURNING THE CORNER After three dead years, Westport’s most storied diner returns to life.

T

he red-brick building at 4059 Broadway has sat empty for more than three years — long enough for many people to have forgotten that it was one of the most popular

pitch.com

Friday Christensen’s Blue Door is open. breakfast-and-lunch spots in midtown: the Corner Restaurant. But even before the Westport institution shuttered, back in 2010, it had gotten almost unbearably grimy. The food had slid into mediocrity, and the service left everything to be desired. Michael Pfeifer, who is reopening the Corner later this month with business partner Dawn Slaughter, was in grade school when the diner enjoyed its heyday, in the mid-1980s. Back then, customers happily stood in line an hour or longer on weekends to get a table. I remember those days well. You could count on recognizing at least a couple of people you knew. Sometimes you’d get to witness a friend wincing through an awkward breakfast with the previous night’s romantic conquest. Pfeifer’s turn as a Corner customer eventually arrived. “I used to come here in my 20s and hang out with my friends,” he says. By then, it was still popular but had begun its decline. (And Pfeifer had begun a restaurant career, working as a server at the Hotel Phillips, the Plaza III and Sullivan’s Steakhouse.) But even if the Corner you remember is the shabby, postmillennal version, you’ll be amazed at what Pfeifer and Slaughter have done. New tables and chairs sit atop a

BadSeed Farmers Market, 1909 McGee, 4–9 p.m. Begins May 3.

Saturday Brookside Farmers Market, Border Star Montessori School parking lot, 63rd Street and Wornall, 8 a.m.–1 p.m. City Market, Fifth Street and Walnut, 6 a.m.–3 p.m. Independence Farmers Market, corner of Truman and Main, 5 a.m. to 1 p.m. Begins May 4. Kansas City Organics, at Minor Park (Red Bridge Road, just east of Holmes), 8 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Begins May 4. Lawrence Farmers Market, 824 New Hampshire, 7–11 a.m. Merriam Farmers Market, Merriam Marketplace, 5740 Merriam Drive, 7 a.m.–1 p.m. Begins May 4. Olathe Farmers Market, downtown, 200 West Santa Fe, 8 a.m.–sellout. Overland Park Farmers Market, 7950 Marty, 6:30 a.m.– 1 p.m. Parkville Farmers Market, English Landing Park, in the parking lot off Highway 9 downtown, 7 a.m.–noon.

Sunday City Market, Fifth Street and Walnut, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.

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floor freshly covered with earth-tone tiles. The kitchen has been modernized to a high shine, and the plate-glass windows have been cleaned and draped with sheaths of rustic burlap. Hanging lights, created from antique chicken feeders, illuminate the dining room. And there’s another major change: This new Corner Restaurant has a bar — the kind that prepares mimosas and bloody marys to go with breakfast. Slaughter, a former bar manager, is working up her own syrups — including ginger, habanero pepper and peach — to use in an array of specialty cocktails. The Roasterie has readied a dedicated coffee blend for the new Corner; expect French-press on your table but no espresso-based drinks. (“If one of our customers wants to bring in one of those coffee drinks from one of our neighbors, like the Broadway Café,” Pfeifer says, “that’s all right.”) When the new Corner opens, at the end of the month, Pfeifer and Slaughter and chef Natasha Sears will revive many of the original restaurant’s popular morning dishes. Expect new items, too: German-chocolate pancakes, fried chicken with waffles. Pfeifer expects the Corner’s hours to be 6 a.m.–3 p.m. every day, with late-night dining (till 4 a.m.) Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. — CHARLES FERRUZZA

ROLLED OUT

I

f you want a final Chacko’s cinnamon roll (or several), or maybe a few of the Mission eatery’s tasty cinnamon-and-sugar “downtowner rolls” (or several), you’d better plan ahead a little. The Mission restaurant is down to the last days before its April 27 closing. For a while now, the place has offered its cinnamon rolls (that The Pitch once named

PARKING LOT PARTY FRIDAY, MAY 3RD

Pfeifer (top, at left) and Slaughter are the new kids on the Corner (above). the city’s best, and which still live up to the hype) only on Saturdays. You can still call in a last order (913-671-8199) if you get on the horn by noon Friday. Co-owners David and Rachel Finn were the parents of toddlers when they opened their first retail shop, in 1999. Those kids are now young adults. Son Chacko is 17 years old, and Liz is a 19-year-old student in the hospitality program at Kansas State University. The Finns moved their shop from 6001 Johnson Drive to a slightly smaller venue at 6009 Johnson Drive in 2010. David Finn has been in the culinary business for most of his adult life. Before opening Chacko’s as a catering venture 15 years ago, he worked for the PB&J restaurants. “We don’t know what we’re doing yet,” he said last week as Rachel Finn took some call-in orders. “But we need to come up with something fairly quickly. We have bills to pay.” — CHARLES FERRUZZA

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E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com pitch.com

A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

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P p PIT C H 27

MUSIC

BA SE HITS A

s a title, Country Singles has the generic ring of some bargain-priced George Jones best-of album. But it’s also the name of a publication you can fi nd at truck-stop newsstands in rural parts of the Midwest. The Grisly Hand’s occasional weekend tours tend to bring the group to such locales, and the members have become devoted readers. “It’s mostly personal ads. Truckers and rural people and criminals use it to meet people and find pen pals and things like that,” singer Lauren Krum says. “A lot of the ads are from incarcerated women,” says singer and guitarist Jimmy Fitzner. “It’s funny to read but also kind of sad — like, there’ll be some woman who’s looking for somebody to pick her up at jail with flowers or E R MO something,” Krum says. Over time, it seemed like a fitting title for the T A INE new Grisly Hand album. ONL .COM PITCH “It beca me this ha lfjoking, half-serious way for us to embrace the country moniker,” Krum says. “Describing our band can get tiresome: ‘folk,’ ‘Americana,’ whatever. So it’s a little bit being like, ‘We’re a country band.’ ” “It’s also kind of playing on the idea of us being a cocky band with a bunch of hit songs,” Fitzner says. “Like, ‘These are a bunch of our hit singles.’ ” Nobody will mistake Country Singles for the new Carrie Underwood joint — it tilts toward barrelhouse grit rather than Nashville sheen — but it’s pretty damn accessible. The Grisly Hand has occasionally reached outside familiar country tropes and chord progressions (“Western Avenue,” from last year’s Western Avenue EP, was a home run), and they continue to do so on Country Singles. The hooks are sturdier, the melodies sweeter. This is possibly related to the recent additions of some local-scene vets to the group. Matt Richey (Dead Voices, Tiny Horse, Blessed Broke) joined the band on drums in the fall of 2011. Mike Stover (Mr. Marco’s V7, the People’s Liberation Big Band, Dead Voices) has been supplying steel guitar since April 2012. “I had worked with Lauren and Matt on other projects: Dead Voices, the Exile on Main Street tribute from a couple years ago,” Stover says of joining. “I’ve also worked with Lauren on a couple of jazz gigs. I was already a fan of the band’s energy and, probably most importantly, the songwriting. I think those two things set the band apart from the current batch of kinda-country-but-notreally bands.”

M US I C

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On past albums, Krum and Fitzner handled most of the songwriting, but those duties are more spread out on Country Singles. Guitarist-mandolinist Ben Summers contributes two songs; the title track was written as a group in the studio. “I think widening the spectrum was defi nitely one of the goals for the album,” Fitzner says. “More electric guitars, more keys, more full-band type of stuff,” Summers says. “At the same time, there’s also a song where it’s just Lauren on the piano.” That one, “Blind Horse,” is a highlight, though it’s not a country song at all. It’s a medium-mournful ballad that showcases Krum’s confident, soulful voice — one of the finest in the city. Timing isn’t everything, but it’s sure something/You can’t be my everything, but you’re sure something, she sings, fragile and exposed. The song was recorded

pitch.com

The Grisly Hand returns to the plate with Country Singles.

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

heard a hip-hop record when you’re writing your songs,” Fitzner says. “So I think we try to incorporate sounds we were listening to in the ’80s and ’90s into our music, too.” “There’s a sing-along quality to some of those [Mumford-like] bands that isn’t really what we’re after,” Richey says. “Right, it’s very purposely sing-alongy,” Krum says. “Like, here comes the part where you know all the words.” “I think there’s a big difference between a good pop hook that sticks in your head versus something where you’re begging listeners to sing along with you,” Stover says. “Like, I think we have pop hooks in spades. There are a lot of songs on this record that I think you’d want to sing along to in the car. But it’s a different kind of thing.” So, no, the Grisly Hand is not riding the bombastic folk wave. But it probably doesn’t hurt to have a bit of folk and country in your sound these days when trying to book shows out of town, which the Grisly Hand has been doing, slowly but surely. It has been making some headway in the Midwest, playing cities like Little Rock and Fayetteville, Arkansas; Omaha, Nebraska; Manhattan, Kansas. “Those shows are interesting because it takes playing two or three times in a town before anybody knows you,” Krum says. “And it’s a good exercise in humility, going to places where nobody gives one shit about you.” The Grisly Hand recently played a Friday night at Chicago’s Hideout, a venerable dive and popular venue for artists on famed altcountry label Bloodshot Records. Al Scorch, a country songwriter in Chicago with whom Richey used to play, hooked that show up. (Trevor McSpadden, another staple of the Singles and ready to mingle: the Grisly Hand Chicago country scene — he plays with the Hoyle Brothers — is on the bill at the Grisly on a slightly out-of-tune piano in a garage. Hand’s release show at Knuckleheads April 26.) “It was cool to go up there and play kind “It just kind of happened. It wasn’t even on the agenda for the day, so that removed of a bigger place where we didn’t know the audience, as opposed to a little of the pressure of playing a house show or it being just me and the The Grisly Hand, with something,” Krum says. piano,” Krum says. the Hoyle Brothers, And trucking it up north T he c l at te r i n g ho e Trevor McSpadden to Illinois was also, predowns and slow-burning and She’s a Keeper sumably, an opportunity to folk songs that comprise Friday, April 26, check out the latest issue of the rest of Country Singles at Knuckleheads Saloon Country Singles. “Like this — in addition to the vinone,” Fitzner says, reading tage country attire that the members favor — suggest a certain nostal- aloud an entry in which a clearly deranged woman seeks a mate who shares her interest gia for the past. Mumford and Sons and its in werewolves, fortunetellers and campspawn are cashing in by reviving the 1870s; fires. “I mean, it’s pretty good reading if to the extent that the Grisly Hand is chanyou’re stuck in a van for a couple hours.” neling the past, it’s the 1970s: Gram Parsons, the Band, Emmylou Harris. “I think it’s silly to act like you’ve never E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

pitch.com

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29

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

APRIL:

24: Outlaw Jim 25: Jason Vivone & the Billy Bats, The Mojo Roots and Bottoms up Blues gang 25: Lyal Strickland 25: Anthony Gomes -Solo 26: Jeff Bergen’s Elvis show 26: The Grisly Hand Cd Release 27: Tommy Castro & The Painkillers 28: The Railers 30: The Healers Jimmy Hall, Samantha Fish, Danielle & Kris of TUF, Kate Moss, Resse Wyman

MAY:

2: Ramblin Jack Elliott 3: Merle Jam featuring Kelly Willis & Bruce Robinson with Outlaw Jim and the Whiskey Benders, Tater & the Gravy Train & Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge Greats 4: Merle Jam featuring Delbert McClinton, Samantha Fish, Kris Lager band, Amanda Wish, & Stacy Mitchhart

FRIDAY, MAY 10TH

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For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 30

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MUSIC

NO RESERVATIONS

Talking with the Black Keys’ Patrick Carney

BY

L E S L IE K I N S M A N

T

he Black Keys continue to kill it. The dirty-blues duo cleaned up at the 2013 Grammys with Best Rock Performance, Best Rock Song and Best Rock Album. April 28, they play their fi rst arena show in Kansas City at the Sprint Center, with special guest opener the Flaming Lips. Drummer Patrick Carney recently took some time out to chat with The Pitch. The Pitch: How did the Flaming Lips end up on tour with you this year? Carney: We’ve been a fan of the Flaming Lips for a long time, and our schedules just synced up pretty well for those tour dates. Right now we’re in the studio making another album. I think we’ll be hopefully done with the album later on, by the time this tour starts. We’ll be recording at least through the middle of April. Will you be working with Danger Mouse on this album? He’s coming to Nashville in a couple of weeks. We’ve been working on writing songs this past year, with the exception of going to L.A. for E MOR a middle ground. I think that’s what making the Grammys. It’s startmusic is all about. ing to come together, I Do you want to continue pursuing production think. We’ve written T A E IN side projects in the future? about 15 songs, and there ONL .COM PITCH I recorded the first four Black Keys albums. are probably nine that I kind of got into it that way. Recording is fun we’re going to keep. And for me to do, and I enjoy it, but at the same we’ll probably have to write another 10 more time, it’s a very taxing process. It’s always to make an album. fun helping a band record, picking their songs You helped produce Tennis’ sophomore aland mixing them. But the problem is dealing bum. How did that project come about? with the label and the budget and making They basically just e-mailed and asked me sure everything happens on time. You end if I was interested in helping them make an alup too involved and seeing bum, and I was. I like workthings through the eyes of ing with bands that have The Black Keys, the label. It becomes comthat kind of pop aesthetic with the Flaming Lips pletely disheartening. So but are still coming from a Sunday, April 28, that’s why I try to do it on a different direction. I try not at Sprint Center casual level with people I’m to do that much production friends with. work. But for them, it kind A nd Da n [Auerbac h, of worked out perfectly beBlack Keys guitarist and singer] and I have cause they came to Nashville, and we made never had to deal with a label. Every label the album in, like, 10 days in my garage. we’ve been on has been super-cool, or we had They’re going to make another album so few records with them, we were still able soon, and I think I’m going to hop on. You to leave pretty quickly. A lot of it just comes don’t really know how it is working with from experience. Dan and I have been doing a band until you’ve made more than one this for a long time, and our manager has been record with them and have a good underworking with us for most of our career. standing and trust. It takes a lot of time. I On Record Store Day, you released a 7-inch think that’s why Danger Mouse is such a split with Iggy and the Stooges’ “No Fun” on one good producer for us. We’ve been working side and your cover of that track, from 2002, on with him off and on for six years, so when the other side. Can you tell me more about this? he says something, we know it’s a valid and Our version of “No Fun” was never on a honest assessment. We might disagree with 7-inch, and we thought it sounded amazing it, but we’ll make a compromise. It’s never his to have a split with the Stooges. And this is way — or our way — or the highway. We’ll find

M US I C

pitch.com

Key party at Sprint Center the third time we’ve done a split for Record Store Day. We did a split with the Flaming Lips in 2009 and also with Devo in 2010. You guys had a guest appearance on Anthony Bourdain’s Kansas City episode of No Reservations. It was interesting to see a band from Akron, Ohio, meet Bourdain in Kansas City. Are you really into barbecue or something? Dan and I are huge fans of Anthony’s, and he asked us to be on the show. And there was only one opportunity for us to be on it before we went on tour, and that was in Kansas City. The night before, we played a show in L.A. and we flew last minute to KC — mainly because we wanted to hang out with Anthony Bourdain. But I’ve tried a lot of barbecue there because our bass player, Gus Seyffert, is from Kansas City. He’s taken us to Gates and Arthur Bryant’s. The weird thing about Kansas City is that we never played there until 2010. Of all the cities in the U.S. that you normally hit on tour, that’s the only place we’d always miss. So now we’ve been there three or four times, but we’ve only played twice. We’ve actually been to KC more in the past two years than we have in most cities in the U.S., which is kind of strange. But I get it. I know if I was watching a show about Akron, and they had a band that wasn’t from Akron on the show, it would feel very strange to me.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

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A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

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31

MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST Afentra’s Prom

Lazlo and the crew over at 96.5 the Buzz have spent the past few weeks blitzing listeners with ominous warnings about the station’s health: Ratings are down, and Entercom is threatening to end the whole operation. Throwing a big, free concert at the Midland is probably not going to solve these problems, but a show of moral support never hurts. The lineup is nothing if not Buzz-friendly. On tap: neo-Motown hipsters Fitz and the Tantrums, ’90s alt-rock slackers the Lemonheads, blues-tinged classic rock from Beware of Darkness, and folk stomps from locals Quiet Corral. Friday, April 26, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

Sonic Spectrum Tribute to Glam Rock

What to expect from a glam-rock tribute? Bowie, for sure. T. Rex, probably. Roxy Music, maybe. New York Dolls, maybe. Gary Glitter? Perhaps we’re getting ahead of ourselves. Supplying the theatricality and spandex this evening are local acts Soft Reeds, Vi Tran Band, and Glitterdick, a group featuring members of Drew Black and Dirty Electric and the Quivers. Sunday, April 28, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Diana Krall

Canadian chanteuse Diana Krall tends to attach her sultry voice to classy jazz standards. But on her latest, Glad Rag Doll, she’s straying from the script a bit. Produced by T Bone Burnett, the album finds Krall flipping through songbooks from the 1920s and ’30s, and going for a looser parlor feel. To add to the music’s speakeasiness during shows on this tour, Krall projects silent black-and-white films from the era behind the stage. If you want to pretend like you live in Boardwalk Empire, this could be your jam. Wednesday, May 1, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, A P R I L 2 5

Fitz and the Tantrums

Country Mice, the Hips: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Anthony Gomes: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Melodians, the Yellow Wall Dub Squad, Dynamq – the Sudanese Child: 10 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878.

F R I D AY, A P R I L 2 6 Captured by Robots, Drop a Grand: The Brick, 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. D.L. Hughley: 8 & 10:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Mansions on the Moon, Carousel: 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

S AT U R D AY, A P R I L 2 7

Fleetwood Mac

Christine McVie formally retired from Fleetwood Mac after 1997’s reunion album, The Dance. The rest of the old gang is on hand, though: Mick Fleetwood, Lindsey Buckingham, John McVie and Stevie Nicks. I can’t vouch for the rest of these 60-somethings, but I saw Lindsey Buckingham perform solo last year, and he’s still in full command of his abilities. Plus, I’m seeing some nice Tusk representation on this tour’s set lists, so I’m gonna go ahead and call this one a can’t-miss. Tuesday, April 30, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

Acid Mothers Temple

Japanese psych schizos Acid Mothers Temple have drawn on folk, free-jazz and world music during the roughly two decades that they’ve been a band. If there’s anything cohesive to be said about the group’s prolific output, it’s that it’s noisy, sometimes terrifying and definitely an acquired taste. Tuesday, April 30, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

F O R E C A S T

32

BY

Cowboy Indian Bear

It’s been something like three years since Cowboy Indian Bear put out a new album. The Lawrence quartet rectifies that void this week when it releases Live Old, Die Young, a collection of triumphant, atmospheric rock songs that occupy a middle space between Broken Social Scene and Arcade Fire. Helping the group celebrate are Heartfelt Anarchy, the local hip-hop duo, and Palace, an indie-pop group from St. Louis that shares a label (the Record Machine) with Cowboy Indian Bear. Thursday, April 25, at Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club (3402 Main, 816-753-1909)

Soft Reeds

It’s a big week for the Record Machine: In addition to a new record from Cowboy Indian Bear, the local label is dropping Blank City, the latest from nervy glam-rockers Soft Reeds. Joining them on this bill to celebrate are the young garage-pop enthusiasts Rev Gusto and veteran space-rockers Be/Non. Friday, April 26, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

...........................................................Androgyny

.........................................Record-Release Show

.................................................................... Free!

........................................................... Babe Alert

...................................... Possible Hallucinations

......................................................... Radioheads

..................................................... Ragtime Vibes

.......................................................Kind of Scary

.................................................. Locally Sourced

..........................................................Mom Jeans

.................................... Sounds Like David Byrne

....................................................... Bowie-esque

..........................................................Old Hippies

............................................Elvis Costello's Wife

A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

S U N D AY, A P R I L 2 8 D.L. Hughley: 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Kvelertak, Cancer Bats, Black Tusk, Hot Knives: 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

M O N D AY, A P R I L 2 9 Arrington de Dionyso’s Malaikat dan Singa: 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Scott H. Biram: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. James Blake: 7 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972.

T U E S D AY, A P R I L 3 0 Corey Smith, Connor Christian & Southern Gothic: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. The Devil Makes Three, Jonny Fritz: 8 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Gov’t Mule, the Revivalist: 6:30 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665.

W E D N E S D AY, M AY 1 Cosby Sweater: 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Papadosio, the Malah: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

FUTURECAST

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

THE PITCH

Bill Burr: 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Tommy Castro and the Painkillers: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. G-Eazy, Christoph Andersson, Jay Fay & Matt Easton: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Michale Graves, American Dischord: 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. D.L. Hughley: 7 & 9:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233.

THURSDAY 2 Tracy Morgan: Uptown Theater FRIDAY 3 Crystal Castles: Liberty Hall, Lawrence MONDAY 13 Fabolous and Pusha-T: The Midland THURSDAY 16 Rodney Carrington: The Midland

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T H U R S D AY 2 5 B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Flying Circus. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Billy Ebeling. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jason Vivone, the Mojo Roots, Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Landon Leist, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 7 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Young William and the River Siren, Paul Klein, the Burdock King, 7:30 p.m.

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I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Hi As Hello, Island Apart, 9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Bullet Proof Tigers.

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Pop Shots with Clockwerk & DJ Archi. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Mike Scott. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Tequila Bear. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Feast, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Playe, 10:30 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC

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34

THE PITCH

A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

Jerryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Lyal Strickland, 7:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. One Night Stand: An Acoustic Evening with KCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rock-N-Roll Bad Boys, 10 p.m. Sunset Grill: 14577 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-681-1722. Tony Antonucci, 7:30 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Makusa. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Joe Cartwright Jazz Duo, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Michael Pagan Duo. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Brandon Draper. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Paul Shinn and Joe Lisinicchia, 6 p.m.

SINGER-SONGWRITER The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Matt Costa, the Blank Tapes, 8 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Albert Bickly and Laura Lisbeth. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Songwriterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Showcase with M-Bird, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

F R I D AY 2 6 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. School of Rock benefit concert for the Sandy Hook School, 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Sky Seems Red, 9 p.m. The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Club Wars, 9 p.m. Daveyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Demon Lips, Kill Noise Boys, Rex Hobart and the Misery Boys, 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Winnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Circle, Ryan Forest, Santonio Tanderas, Rabbit Eater, Dread Headed Slut, 9 p.m.

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Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. The Magnetics. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Doo Dads, 6 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Black on Black, Muscle Worship, Many Moods of Dad, 10 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Jeff Porter, 8 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Katy Guillen Trio, 7 p.m., $3. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Lonesome Hank. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Brendan MacNaughton Band. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Coyote Bill open jam, 5:30 p.m.; Danny McGaw Band, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Ben Miller Band.

FOLK/ROOTS/JAM BAND

B.B.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Brad Vickers and Vestapolitans. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Valentine and the Ticklers. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 RochE R ester, 816-483-1456. Jeff Bergenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s O M Elvis show, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Stone Cutters Union, GS IN T 9 p.m. LIS AT E N I Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., ONL M Overland Park, 913-239-9666. John PITCH.CO Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Flying Circus, 9 p.m.

The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Steady States, Schwervon, Pale Hearts. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Arentwealldead, Simple Lines, Sundiver, Box the Compass, 8 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L

HIP-HOP/RAP

Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. The Travel Guides, Me like Bees, 9:30 p.m. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Mindless Self Indulgence, the Red Paintings, Razorwire Halo. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Fort Frances, Hidden Pictures, Y(our) Fri(end), 10 p.m.

The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Dolewite.

CLUB

HIP-HOP/RAP The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Dolewite, 9 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Dan Brockert. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Patrick Woolam. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Danny McGraw, 10 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rick Bacus, 5:30 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Indigo Hour with Just a Taste of Jazz, 5:30 p.m.; Everette DeVan with Eboni Fondren, 8:30 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 4 p.m.; Bram Wijnands, John Blegen and Tommy Ruskin, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m.

SOUL Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Slow Ya Roll, 9 p.m. Icons Restaurant & Lounge: 1108 Grand, 816-472-4266. The Boss Kingz, 8 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 2 7 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Metal Wars, 8 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. The Chris Tady Trio, Pussycat Friction Sauce, Blaze Malise, 9:30 p.m. Dannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Landrush. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Das Furbender, Mad Kings, 6 p.m.; Blue Bird, Tides for Aviation, Heartscape Landbreak, 9 p.m. Martin City Brewing Company: 500 E. 135th St., 816-2682222. Amendment 21, 8:30 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. The Funs, Lazy, Dated, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Drew Black and Dirty Electric, Knife Crime, the Sluts, the Caves, 8 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Brody Buster; Mama Rayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2-5:30 p.m.

Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Tyrannosaurus Chicken. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. David George & the Crooked Mile, Fight the Quiet, John Maxfield, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. The Ramblinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Minds, 8 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Good Time Charley, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Dan Doran Band, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Riptide, 7 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Gerald Clayton Trio. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Shay Estes Duo, 7 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Max Groove Trio, 9 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Dave Stephensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Mustachio Bashio, 9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Joe DeFio, 5 p.m.; Bram Wijnands, Rod Fleeman and Tommy Ruskin, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Steve Lambert Quartet, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Air Crew, 10:30 p.m.

COVERS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Waymanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Revelation, 9 p.m. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. KC/DC, 9 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Stolen Winnebagos.

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Farmers Ball Finals, 8 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Arm the Poor, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Adrian Truth, Nicolette Paige, the Phantastics, 7:30 p.m.

S U N D AY 2 8 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Hymn For Her, the Monarchs, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Country Mice.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Cryinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Out Loud Honky Tonk, Aaron Traffas Band, 6 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Chill with Phil.

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Epicurean: 7500 Troost, 816-333-4541. The Band OaSis, 6-9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Bram Wijnands, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill’s jazz brunch, 11 a.m.

COMEDY/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke, 8 p.m. The Fox and Hound: 10428 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-6491700. Poker, 7 & 10 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Janet Williams, 7 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Ultimate DJ & Karaoke Showdown.

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Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Healers with Jimmy Hall, Kate Moss, Samantha Fish, Danielle & Kris Schnebelen and Reese Wynan, 8 p.m.

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Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Rooms Without Windows, Oils, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. The National Rifle, Werewolf Nebula, 10 p.m.

HIP-HOP/RAP Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Homegrown Hip-Hop DJ JB Chill, Cuff Da Bossmann, the Abnorm, Mel Balu & Hyphy Team, Miss Conception, 9 p.m.

COMEDY/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Trivia with Matt Larson, 8 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. MANic Monday, 10 p.m. Moxie Bar & Grill: 4011 N. Oak Tfwy., North Kansas City, 816455-9600. Beer Pong Mondays with DJ E-Rock. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam’s Club Karaoke, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Uptown Comedy Night with Norm Dexter, 10 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

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26

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Hudspeth and Shinetop, 7 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 6-10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Blues Hour with Briar, 5:30 p.m.

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Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Brendan MacNaughton. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Funner Brothers, Cowgirl’s Trainset, 6 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Candice Evans Duo.

Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Rich Hill. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Max Groove. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m.

COMEDY/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Geeks Who Drink Trivia, 8 p.m. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Horror Remix, 8 p.m., free. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Bingo. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m., $5 buy-in. Duke’s on Grand: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Xtreme League Trivia, 8 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Ladies’ Night. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Trivia Slugfest, 7 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Robert Moore’s Name That Tune, 7 p.m. Tower Tavern: 401 E. 31st St., 816-931-9300. Trivia, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Bad Decisions Comedy Tour with Bob Keen, Tony Valle $ Diaz Mackie, 8 p.m. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Beer pong tournament, 9:30 p.m.

W E D N E S D AY 1 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Quiet Hollers, Sona, Benjamin Hyatt Band, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.; Shedding Watts, Band 13, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Hue Blanc’s Joyless Ones, Silent Drape Runners, 10 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Flannigan’s Right Hook, 9:30 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Salty Dawg.

FOLK/ROOTS/JAM BAND Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jayke Orvis & The Broken Band, 8 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Gooding, Saint Lux, Timothy Isreal, 8 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. II Cattivo, Sundiver, Muscle Worship, 8 p.m.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Robert Moore, 9 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Smack in the Middle with Brent Tactic & DJ Avant Garde.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Colby & Mole. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night with Matt Shoaf. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dan Bliss, 7 p.m.

COMEDY/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Ultimate Karaoke. The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Karaoke. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Comedy Night, 8 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. The Girlie Show, 8 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Country dance lessons, 8-9 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. The Dirty Game Show, 10 p.m. Nica’s 320: 320 Southwest Blvd., 816-471-2900. Trivia with Matt Larson, 7 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Brian Dunkleman, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m.

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S AVA G E L O V E

NO PROBLEM

DEAR READERS: Last week was made of problems. The bombing of the Boston Marathon, the explosion that leveled a small town in Texas, the rising tide of anti-gay violence in France, the North Koreans being North Korean. And when I sat down to write this week’s column — while the manhunt was still under way for the second bomber in Boston — it occurred to me that the last thing the world needs right now is more problems. So this week, I’m running letters only from people who don’t really have problems. Because we could all use a break.

Her Sub Pimp Dear HSP: Thanks for sharing! Dear Dan: I just started dating a guy who seems perfect in almost every way. (I’m a guy, too.) He’s cute, fun, charming, smart and successful. There’s only one thing that’s bugging me: He has a super-furry ass crack. The funny thing is, I can tell he trims the hair on his legs with the longest guard on the trimmer. All he’d have to do is keep going up onto his ass and into his crack. Yes, I know some guys find a furry crack to be a big turn-on. I’m not one of them. We’ve been on four dates and gotten fully naked only once, so it’s not like I feel so totally comfortable with him that I can just come out and say it …

Really Into Men Smooth Dear RIMS: Your letter reminds me of a funny

conversation I overheard at the gym. Guy #1: “You should grow a goatee — it would feel great when you rim me.” Guy #2: “I have a goatee when I rim you.” Sounds like you have a beard when you rim your new boyfriend, and I would advise you to get used to bearded rimming for the time being. You’re only four dates and one fully naked Big Gay Sex Romp into this new relationship, which is too soon to start asking for body mods. But once you hit, oh, 20 dates and a dozen Big

38

THE PITCH

A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

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D A N S AVA G E

Dear TIA: There’s no working around an allergy

so severe it can land you in the hospital — and with everything else you two have going for you, forgoing latex is the price of admission your new girlfriend should be willing to pay.

Dear Dan: No question, just a thank-you. Last

week, my 16-year-old son told me that he has a crush on his best friend … who happens to be a 16-year-old boy. I’ve known he was gay since he was about 4, but without your column, I don’t think I would’ve been prepared for his “revelation.” You and your readers taught me the importance of letting him know that I will always accept him, love him and support him in any decision he makes. The best part: He wasn’t really worried about telling me; he was worried that I wouldn’t let his crush spend the night anymore. (And he was right to worry!)

Dear Dan: No problem here. I’m a straight

36-year-old guy. My wife has always been great about indulging my kinks, so when she announced at age 34 that she had a kink of her own, I regarded it as my mission to make it happen. We just got back from a trip to see a safe, trustworthy friend in Los Angeles who “paid” me to have sex with my wife. (He put 20 $100 bills on the bar at the hotel, but it was money I had given him.) My wife was turned on but also grateful. She kept saying how much she loved me for making her paid-for-sex fantasy come true. People who stand in the way of their partner’s fantasies don’t realize what they’re depriving themselves of — so much love and gratitude!

BY

Proud Mom Gay Sex Romps, I think you could offer to give him a hand with those clippers.

Dear Dan: Whenever this college student studies, she gets incredibly horny! At peak times in the semester, when I’m constantly reading or studying, I find it impossible to go more than a couple of hours without having to masturbate. The more aroused I get, the less focused I am, so denying the feeling is not a solution. But there are definitely times when my productivity is negatively affected by my need to relieve myself. I have an active sex life! I’m not bored sexually or mentally! Is there a physiological explanation for this? Lady Hits the Books Dear LHTB: Some people are turned on by com-

Dear PM: After reading that you intend to

“support [your son] in any decision he makes,” I started to compose a mildly scolding response in my head. (“Why would you do that? Gay kids, like straight kids, need their parents to be their parents. Your son needs you to meddle lovingly, criticize constructively, and help him pull his gay head out of his gay ass when it needs pulling. Because gay kids make bad decisions, too.”) But you made it clear at the end of your letter — he was right to worry about those sleepovers being over — that you aren’t confusing “support my gay son” with “sign off on any damn thing my gay son wants.” Well done!

Dear Dan: I’m an 18-year-old British queer girl

who was recently involved with an older woman while visiting the United States. She told me about your “campsite rule,” and she followed it to the letter and was generally wonderful. I’ve since moved back to London and told everyone I know about your column. As a result, there’s a small group of teens running around North London who adore you. I hope we can spread your excellent advice and make as many people as possible into GGG partners.

pletely random shit, and no one quite knows why. Probably something to do with our big brains — just think of the billions of nerve endings, all those synapses making connections, all those formative childhood experiences that get all synapsed up and become adult erotic obsessions. Think of all that and then count your lucky stars that studying turns you on. If there were a way to bottle and sell your kink, no one would ever need to take Adderall again.

CC

Dear Dan: I’m a 19-year-old newbie lesbian Dom

Dear CC: Thanks for the lovely note and tell

starting a relationship with a smart, sexy, wildly kinky 22-year-old. We share a lot of fetishes, and our relationship so far could not be better. One issue: She’s very, very into latex clothes. I have a severe allergy and would probably need to be hospitalized if she wore latex clothing. She’s been GGG about anal, which was something I wanted to explore. She did that for me, and I want to do this for her. Is there a good alternative to latex?

Thanks in Advance

the older woman I said thanks — for honoring the campsite rule and for helping build my readership in the U.K. by turning you on to my column. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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> Classifieds

WE ARE CURRENTLY HIRING FOR

BAR MANAGER FRONT DESK CLERKS (all shifts) RESTAURANT SUPERVISOR SERVER

APPLY IN PERSON ANYTIME: 200 W. 12TH ST, KCMO | EOE | GREAT BENEFITS/GREAT LOCATION

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1.888.665.4104

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4/2/2013 8:19:49 AM

BUY NORTHLAND VILLAGE $100 DEPOSIT ON 1&2 BEDROOMS

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A P R I L 2 5 - M AY 1 , 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

43

APTS/JOBS/STUFF

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The Pitch: April 25, 2013