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Brywood makes April fools of its bondholders. | PAGE 7 Free State ’ s new bottling plant roars into action. | PAGE 22

———PU B LIC———

Matt Besler isn’t just Sporting KC’s local hero — he may be the future of U.S. soccer. By Jonathan Bender

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Closing Date: 4/9/13 QC: CS

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QUESTIONNAIRE

MARYJO THOMPSON Occupation: Box Tops coordinator for St. Charles Borromeo Catholic School

O

Q&As

E NLIN

during Christmas.

M PITCH.CO

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Oded Fehr

Current neighborhood:

AT

KCMO, north of the river, near Liberty

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: Liars

Who or what is your sidekick? My amazing husband!

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? The Bible

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Archaeologist

Last book you read: The Panther and The Shack

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Pizza Ranch. Love the gluten-free pizzas.

Favorite day trip: Zoos (Omaha, St. Louis,

Springfield, etc.)

What’s your favorite charity? Anyone who

supports a cure for cancer.

Interesting brush with the law? I am a thirdgeneration police officer, so I have more stories than I could share about being the “law” people had a brush with.

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Any

place where I can get box tops for my purchase!

Describe a recent triumph: I am finishing

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? KC barbecue

Finish this sentence: “Other than the Kauffman Center, Kansas City got it right when …” It created the Sprint Center.

“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Lost the

accreditation of Kansas City schools.

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? The controversy over the Power &

Light District

police officer

What local tradition do you take part in every year? Helping with the food drive at church

Hometown: St. Louis

MORE

Retired

“People might be surprised to know that I …”

Was once a police officer in St. Louis, then KC.

What TV show do you make sure you watch?

Covert Affairs

take up a lot of space in my iTunes:

High-energy workout songs

What movie do you watch at least once a year?

G.I. Jane and The Thomas Crown Affair

my second year as Box Tops coordinator for St. Charles Borromeo Catholic School. The year before I took over (2010–11), our school made $989 from the Box Tops for Education program. In my first year as coordinator (2011–12), our school made $2,110.50. This year (2012–13), our total check from the Box Tops for Education program will be just over $3,200. I am so very proud of our Box Tops Detectives! For a school of 300 students, preschool through eighth grade, they are doing amazing!

Johnson County Library is YOUR library. Why shouldn’t you tell us how to make it better? www.jocolibraryconversation.org

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The course for the event will begin in Theis Park at 10:00AM on Saturday, April 27, 2013. Walkers will head west on Cleaver II, through Main Street, where they will enter Mill Creek Park. Cleaver II will be closed for about 15 minutes from Rockhill Road to JC Nichols Parkway as well as Oak Street from Volker Boulevard to Cleaver II. From Mill Creek Park, the route continues east on 43rd Street to Oak Street, which veers slightly to the right and becomes Rockhill Road, and on to 45th Street. Participants will go west on 45th to Oak Street. At Oak, the route heads south and enters the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art Sculpture Park. They will follow the brick path on the west side of the South Lawn and travel back to Cleaver II. Walkers will proceed east on Cleaver, back to Rockhill Road, and follow Rockhill south to Volker Boulevard. *NOTE: Walkers not able to use stairs on the Nelson’s South Lawn to Volker will continue south on Oak to Cleaver II. Route monitors will assist persons on which path they should take. At Volker, walkers will be immediately directed down to the Brush Creek walkway on the south bank of the creek where they will cross Oak Street and continue on to Brookside Avenue. The route turns north on Brookside, across the bridge, where walkers will be directed back down to the Brush Creek walkway on the north side of the bank and travel back to Theis where the course ends. Based upon the judgment, and with the assistance, of the Kansas City Police Department, any LQWHUVHFWLRQRUSRUWLRQRIVWUHHWDORQJWKHURXWHFRXOGEHVXEMHFWWRLQWHUPLWWHQWWUDIoFFRQWUROLILWLVGHHPHG DGYDQWDJHRXVIRUWKHVDIHFRQGXFWRIHLWKHUIRRWRUYHKLFXODUWUDIoF AIDS Service Foundation of Greater Kansas City, and the many recipients of the donations it collects during this event, thank everyone very much for all the cooperation they have given over the years. Please come out and walk with us!

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NEWS

BRYWOOD GOES BROKE

Be BY

Inspired!

S T E V E VOCKRO D T

A strip mall defaults on its bonds, sticking investors with the tab.

Volunteer! Join us at the KC Area Track and Field Meet on April 20th!

From the city’s standpoint, it’s not on the hook to make payments as it has been for some TIF projects, such as the Power & Light District. Heather Brown, executive director of the Tax Increment Financing Commission of Kansas City, tells The Pitch that neither Kansas City nor the TIF Commission guaranteed the bonds in any way. So at least there’s that, Kansas City taxpayer. Adding the fact that the developer, an affiliate of Illinois-based Tri-Land Properties Inc., slipped into bankruptcy last year, there appears to be little recourse for those bondholders, whose identities are not publicly known. But the TIF was structured in a way that made these investments attractive — not so much for the well-heeled, who might be better positioned to absorb a loss, but rather to mom-and-pop investors. The project also benefits from being within a community-improvement district, a status that tacks on an additional sales tax used to make TIF payments, according to a budget submitted to the city for its plans on how to spend that additional sales-tax revenue. The bond offering for Brywood, sort of a prospectus for potential investors, relayed overly optimistic projections for how improvements would affect sales and property taxes. The document predicted that total retail sales would reach nearly $33 million in 2012, up from a projected $21.3 million in 2010. Actual financial results paint a dim picture of Brywood compared with those sunny prophecies. While the project in 2007 made $24.6 million in total retail sales, the 2011 figure was just $18.9 million. Last year’s financial information was not available, it’s difficult to imagine

The dream of Brywood (left) and the reality that $18.9 million grew to the supposed $33 million in 2012. The struggling nature of retail markets during the recession certainly has had a role in pinching Brywood’s sales, the TIF doesn’t appear to help the project much. Making matters worse is that the developer successfully challenged the center’s property valuations to Jackson County and lowered the amount of property tax it generates. Renderings of the project when it was announced in 2009 show a relatively swank new shopping district after remodeling. “We look forward to delivering a renewed, high-quality project to this great community,” boasted Hugh Robinson, Tri-Land vice president, in a 2009 press release. Part of the promise of TIF is that it will lead to new and exciting projects like Robinson suggested — projects that wouldn’t otherwise happen on their own. Brywood Centre looks like any ordinary strip mall with mostly ordinary stores. Aside from the Price Chopper, its tenants include payday lender Advance America, nail salon Modern Nails, a Dollar Tree and discount clothing retailer Citi Trends. Those with critical roles in the Brywood TIF are keeping quiet about the latest developments. David Frantze, a well-known real-estate lawyer who represented Tri-Land Properties when Kansas City approved TIF for Brywood, could not be reached for comment. Neither could Robinson, the Tri-Land executive.

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com pitch.com

mo t

n Kansas City, Missouri, the use of tax incentives to develop private projects is often described as an investment, a means to grow the tax base. And sometimes that happens. But Kansas City is also haunted by economicdevelopment opportunities that didn’t pan out as originally described. The latest entry to that list: Brywood Centre shopping district. On April Fools’ Day, bondholders who supported tax-increment financing for Brywood Centre at 63rd Street and Blue Ridge Cutoff learned EWST that their bonds were in N E R O M INE A default. Almost in RayONL M / P L O G town, Brywood Centre is P IT C H .C O a small strip center in Kansas City’s 5th District. Its main tenant is Price Chopper, which benefited, in part, from taxpayer assistance for a $3 million makeover. TIF is a way for new taxes — such as sales and property taxes — to go back into a project to offset some of a developer’s costs. Typically, a district is created, and its revenues go into an account that a developer can access over time for reimbursements. In some cases, like Brywood, bonds get sold to investors as a means to drum up quick money in advance, and those investors eventually get paid back. But those who invested about $4 million in Brywood Centre shouldn’t count on getting their money soon, if ever. The project isn’t generating enough money to make payments to bondholders. By April 1, about three years after the bonds were issued, bondholders got a message that was the equivalent of an ATM user getting the “insufficient funds” notice on the screen before them.

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———PU BLIC———

Sporting KC’s Matt Besler didn’t leave his hometown to play soccer — and now soccer is coming to him

T

he final whistle blew, and frustration spilled out of 100,000 fans. Cups f lew. H a nd s c r ad le d he ad s. Spanish and English curses hung in the warm, fetid air in Mexico City’s Estadio Azteca. The crowd on this March Tuesday night refused to accept that the United States and Mexico had wrestled to a 0-0 draw. Several of Mexico’s players berated Guatemalan referee Walter Lopez. As the world boiled over around him, Matt Besler cracked a smile for the first time in 94 minutes. The Sporting Kansas City center back, alongside teammate Graham Zusi, had just anchored a spirited defensive effort for the U.S. Men’s National Soccer Team, helping his squad earn a critical point (its first on Mexican soil in 16 years) toward qualifying for the 2014 World Cup. Now, more than 7,000 feet above sea level, it was suddenly a lot easier to breathe. This was the result that the U.S. team wanted but wasn’t supposed to be able to achieve. The back line was untested, in transition. Besler, 26, had discovered that he would be starting only 11 hours before kickoff. The last time he was in Mexico City for an international friendly, he had watched the entire game from the bench. But it was the vaunted Mexican front line that broke, an anxious Mexican crowd that soured. After drawing a yellow card in the 19th minute for a hard foul, Besler — the reigning MLS Defender of the Year — proved adept at marking Mexico’s strikers (among them, Manchester United’s Chicharito) and luring them offside. And his play dominated the headlines following the match. The Castrol Index, the official performance tracker of the U.S. Soccer Federation, named Besler the top-performing player in Mexico.

BY J O N AT H A N B E N D E R | PHOTOGRAPHY BY C H R I S M U L L I N S “It was the perfect situation for me,” Besler says. “We were under fi re, and if we could just go out and do well, it could be the biggest sports story in the country.” The next morning, when Besler’s return fl ight touched down in Houston, his phone chirped with 200 texts from friends, family and media. The messages were clear. Still 796 miles from his home in Kansas City, the man who is arguably America’s best stopper had arrived.

W

ith David Beckham leaving the Los Angeles Galaxy, there’s an opening in the American soccer world for an ambitious city. And Sporting KC has been lobbying for Kansas City, Kansas, to fi ll that void since opening Sporting Park in 2011 (a space that Forbes magazine praised last week in a story headlined “One of America’s Best Sporting Experiences”). The city is part of the national soccer conversation. Major League Soccer’s All-Star Game comes to town July 31, and earlier this month news broke that Sporting and U.S. Soccer had signed a memorandum of understanding to jointly explore a $50 million National Training and Coaching Development Center in KCK. The team itself has been an MLS success, winning the past two Eastern Conference regular-season championships (before falling both seasons to the Houston Dynamo in the playoffs). In 2012, Sporting captured its fi rst U.S. Open Cup in eight years, on the strength of a stifl ing defense (Sporting allowed a league-low 0.79 goals per game) led by Besler. The Overland Park native’s drive and ability have allowed Sporting’s long-term goals to pay dividends ahead of schedule.

“He epitomizes the vision of Sporting KC,” team CEO Robb Heineman says. “What we thought we could be over time is an organization that focuses on developing its own. It’s just here now — we didn’t have to wait 10 years for that to happen.”

I

“He does the things as a leader that keeps everybody in check every day,” Vermes says. “He’s a very intelligent, conscientious kid, and he’s always thinking about the rest of the team.” He pauses, then adds: “It’s a quiet resilience. He never loses the ball.”

t’s 40 degrees on this April day, and Besler’s teammates are bundled in sweatshirts unefore the pitch, there was the parking der their pinneys and winter hats as they lot. Nearly two decades ago, Matt Besler drill at the Sporting Club Training Center in was a red-faced little kid in a youth soccer Swope Park. His only concession to the chill jersey, hoping to squeeze a shot between is a long-sleeved warm-up jersey. orange cones set up on the pavement outside He takes a pass inside the penalty box. His Kemper Arena. left foot comes down like a vicious pendulum, “I think I enjoyed the parking lot more but the clock is overwound: The ball soars than the actual game,” he says. “I remember for the right corner and then continues well we’d go out there with our youth team, hours on, over the crossbar and the fence behind it. before the game, go in sweaty and then want Besler expresses no frustration as he sprints to come out and play more.” back to his original position, about 35 yards Besler’s favorite player was a left-footed from the goal, his arms chopping the air. His midfielder named Jon Parry (now director next shot bows the back of the net before the of coaching for the Sporting Kansas City keeper can even launch a dive. Academy) — he chose for himself Parry’s “He is a quiet leader number, 7 — and he who works extremely and his family cheered hard,” defender Chance Parry and the Comets “We were under fire, Myers says. “He has a and the Attack and the lot of confidence, and Wiz. In 2000, Besler and if we could just that rubs off.” recalls, he watched on go out and do well, O ver t he nex t 75 TV as the Kansas City it could be the minutes, Besler raises Wizards captured the his voice only to praise MLS Cup. biggest sports story a teammate. His gesVer mes was t hen in the country.” tures are subtle, his a center back, on his hands moving only to way to being named show where he wants the MLS Defender of the ball or where he the Year, as tough as wants a fellow player to make a run. In the flattop he sports today. But in that 1–0 passing drills, his line moves with clear victory over the Chicago Fire, it was Tony efficiency, following manager Peter Vermes’ Meola’s 10 saves that inspired Besler and his barked-out instructions. two younger brothers. continued on page 11

B

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Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

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continued from page 9 “Tony Meola had a ridiculous game,” Besler says. “And I remember we all went into the backyard after that game and wanted to be him. We only had one set of goalie gloves for the house, but I was oldest so I got fi rst crack at them.” Besler arrived as a star center midfielder at the University of Notre Dame. He had led Blue Valley West High School to the 5A Kansas State Championship, notching 23 goals and 19 assists. He was that team’s playmaker, a rover who made sure that the ball found his foot and then the net. But Notre Dame didn’t need a center midfielder. It needed a center back. And Besler wanted to start. “I had to think about things differently,” he says of switching to defense. “You don’t get joy in beating someone. You get joy in outthinking them and frustrating them. It was also an adjustment in my style of play. As an attacker, you can be very aggressive, and if that doesn’t work out, it doesn’t work out. But as a defender, you have to be more conservative. You can’t get caught out of place.” Besler adjusted, and Notre Dame benefited, advancing to the Elite 8 of the NCAA Tournament in his sophomore and junior years. In January 2009, Besler headed to St. Louis with his father for the MLS SuperDraft, expecting the New York Red Bulls to select him ninth overall. He didn’t know that Sporting — then still playing as the Wizards — planned to call his name with the eighth pick. “He was a local kid with a left foot that Peter [Vermes] saw as this piece of clay he could mold,” Heineman says. “We weren’t going to let anyone else take him.” The team drafted Zusi the same year. The two rookies bonded. Zusi lived in the basement of Besler’s parents’ house. The duo adopted a pair of dogs and spent hours talking about what it would take to make the team and then stick. Besler cracked the starting lineup his rookie year (as did Zusi), but his playing time diminished in 2010. “I had to simplif y things,” he says. “In college, I would dribble and pass and go forward to make a play here or there. As a professional, you can’t do everything. You’ll get penalized for it. I had to realize that all I needed to do was my job. I pick the three or four things I need to be responsible for. I don’t need to cross the bar and score. That’s Graham’s job. He can do that better. He’s a professional at that.” Besler sat down with Vermes, who had taken the reins from Curt Onalfo, to fi nd out how he could play more. “Every year, at the end of the season, he asks: ‘What can I do better?’ ” Vermes says.

Besler trains at Swope Park. “A lot of guys do that, only Matt writes down every single thing in a notebook like he is taking notes at a lecture class.” In 2011, Sporting paired Besler on the back line with Aurelien Collin, a French center back playing his fi rst U.S. season. The two make good foils — Collin’s garrulous free-spiritedness contrasting Besler’s wry

Besler recruited his teammates for those offseason workouts. Zusi and Myers live in Kansas City during the offseason, joining defender Seth Sinovic and midfielder Michael Thomas, who are both from the area. They meet every weekday morning to play racquetball or basketball before working out. “You know he’s there,” Myers says. “When you’re laying in bed and tired, you know he’s in the gym working — and that motivates you to get up and get there.” “You develop chemistry by working really hard in the gym, by working really hard for something,” Besler says. “You know what builds chemistry? Carrying each other out of the gym.” That chemistry means that Sporting’s back line moves instinctively, and Myers and Sinovic attack from the wings with telepathic precision. “He’s that quiet leader on the field,” Sinovic says. “I feel comfortable going forward because I know that he’s got me covered in the back.” Sporting started 2012 with seven straight wins and ended with a 12-game unbeaten streak. The team won the last game of its season, 1–0, against Houston — a bittersweet victory because the Dynamo advanced to the East Conference Finals on continued on page 13

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“ When you ’r e l ay ing in bed a n d t ir ed, you k now he ’s in t he gy m wor k ing — a n d t h at moti vat es you to get u p a n d get t her e .” calm. And Besler went from being a nice local story to a breakout star. He started 32 matches, led the team in minutes played, and was named to the MLS All-Star team. “What people don’t realize is that all those awards come after the season and after you’ve played,” Besler says. “You’ve already put in the work. I do take pride in playing the most minutes. That’s why I work in the offseason, because it gives me a chance to play all those minutes.”

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Public Defender continued from page 11 aggregate goals. (Houston’s two-goal victory in the fi rst of the two-game series served as a tie-breaker.) Sinovic, after notching his fi rst professional goal, grabbed the ball out of the net, ran to the middle of the field and slammed it down. That was as far as his celebration went; he knew there was still work to be done. “That was awesome,” Besler says. “That’s the kind of team we are.”

I

n the offseason, Besler made two commitments to Kansas City. He got engaged to Amanda Miller, and he signed a three-year contract with an additional one-year club option. In negotiations with Sporting, the man who wears No. 5, in honor of George Brett, made it clear that he was listening to other offers but preferred to play in Kansas City. “I think a lot of who Matt is with Kansas City and his career comes across in interviews and when people talk to him,” says Miller, who works for an apparel company in Overland Park. “He’s just a hometown kid that loves playing here and wouldn’t have it any other way.” “Matt got a substantial raise,” Heineman says. (According to the Major League Soccer Players Union, Besler’s previous contract paid him $92,000 in 2012.) “But in the context of getting a big raise, he was the first one that said we need to keep our core group of players together and was willing to take less than his fair market value to make sure that happens.” At the same time, the team’s identity shifted. Two offensive playmakers, midfielder Roger Espinoza and striker Kei Kamara, are now in England. While C.J. Sapong and new forward Claudio Bieler work on their timing, Sporting’s defense has kept the team near the top of the conference standings. It would be easy for Besler to take some credit. Instead, he echoes one of Vermes’ mantras. “You’re going to do the best individually if the team does the best,” Besler says. “I put everything into helping the team do well. I don’t worry about myself. I don’t worry about my career. Because if the team does

well, it comes back around and then personally you do well.” His first goal is to get Sporting KC back to the playoffs. But Besler admits another ambition. “When you put on that U.S. jersey, you don’t know what it’s like until you do it,” he says, grinning. “But it’s almost addicting. The feeling you have is so good. And once you have that feeling, you just want more.” With an aging U.S. squad — longtime star Landon Donovan has an unclear timetable for return to the team, and defender Carlos Bocanegra is in the twilight of a strong career — Besler may factor in this country’s performance in upcoming World Cup qualifying matches and the Gold Cup this summer. The American defense has been characterized as the team’s weak spot, so a series of strong performances from Besler could help cement

his role with the squad. He’s also relishing the chance to play Kansas City ambassador on the national stage. Over the past two months, his teammates on the U.S. squad have been asking him about the culture and facilities here in the Midwest. “It’s the best place in the country to play,” Besler says. “I tell them to let me know if they want to come play. But I also tell them they’ve got to earn it.”

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ast month, while Zusi and Besler were warming up on the sidelines at Estadio Azteca, a group of their Kansas City teammates gathered to watch the game at Coal Vines, on the Plaza. “He’s elevated his game to the next level,” says Myers, who was at the restaurant. “It

Besler (left) and Benny Feilhaber take part in a passing drill. was a dream come true for us to see him on the field.” A little more than a week after the game, Besler is having lunch at Coal Vines. On his way out, he stops to greet one of the restaurant’s owners. “We haven’t seen you in a while,” the owner says as the men shake hands. “Oh, well, we’ve had training and the preseason.” “Hey, some of the guys were here Saturday night to watch the match. Were you here?” Besler gives him a small smile. “Actually, I was playing.”

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

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WEEK OF APRIL 18–24 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

19

GET WEIRD

PAG E

News flash: Weird Al Yankovic is never going away. His long career, beginning with a 1976 radio spot on the syndicated Dr. Demento Show, confirms that song parody, funny poems and wacky celebrity interviews are still viable ways to remain relevant. See what we mean when he performs at the Uptown Theater (3600 Broadway, 816-753-8665). Doors open at 7 p.m, and tickets cost $35–$110. See uptowntheater.com.

AY MOND

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Al: the Weird an orsem h th four

STAGE MET goes deep with Pride’s Crossing.

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FAT C I T Y The full Free State experience

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MUSIC FORECAST Allah-Las pop at the Granada

T H U R S D AY | 4 . 18 | CINDERELLA MEN

Tonight is the beginning of Golden Gloves’ 78th Tournament of Champions, the threeday regional competition that leads winners to the nationals in Salt Lake City next month. This preliminary round features boxers from two divisions, the Novice (17 and younger with fewer than 10 bouts fought) and Open (17–34 years old with more than 10 bouts fought), says tournament director Chris Walden. The action starts at 7 p.m. at the Turner Recreational Center (831 South 55th Street, Kansas City, Kansas). Tickets cost $10–$25. For information, see kcgoldengloves.com.

F R I D AY | 4 . 19 | BAD RELIGION

It’s hard out there for atheists living in Kansas, which is why KU’s Society of OpenMinded Atheists & Agnostics (aka “the best god-damned group on campus”) is bringing like-minded individuals together for Reasonfest 2013. The two-day conference kicks off tonight at 7, with “Eating Reasonably at Reasonable Prices,” in Woodruff Auditorium at the Kansas Union (1301 Jayhawk Boulevard, Lawrence). Over the weekend, look for speakers, workshops, and the “Godless Perverts Story Hour” with blogger Greta Christina and Evolutionpalooza continued on page 16

F R I D AY | 4 . 1 9 |

TRACK MEET

T

he only people who bitch about fixed potholes are race-car drivers. “The deal with repaving a racetrack — it always ruins the race,” Hall of Fame driver Richard Petty told ESPN last year in an interview about repaving the Kansas Speedway (400 Speedway Boulevard, Kansas City, Kansas). A little particular, don’t you think? For the second time since the upgrade, the KCK track hosts the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series. Tickets for today’s qualifying races, beginning at 3:30 p.m., cost $10 and include free admission for your cooler of Busch Light. See kansasspeedway.com. pitch.com

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mboy w’s To McGre 10. turns

continued from page 15 creator David Fitzgerald. Nate Phelps gives a talk, “Leaving WBC and the Atrocities of Extreme Religion,” on Sunday. See kusoma.org/ reasonfest. Admission is free. — KATIE MILLER

S AT U R D AY | 4 . 2 0 | SILVER FOXES

Register to Run. Win your Ride. Choose a GMC Terrain or a Buick Encore! Courtesy of the Buick and GMC Dealers of Greater Kansas City

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TROLLEYRUN.ORG

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4/11/13 4:36 PM

Over the 10 years that Laura McGrew has been at the helm of Tomboy Designs (1817 McGee, 816-472-6200), her mission has evolved as she has come to understand her clients’ needs. “The biggest fib in the industry is that there is a standard of fit, which most people fall into,” she says. “We all have our issues, and that’s why alterations are always free at Tomboy. We have the ability to make each style just right for each client.” McGrew celebrates the 10th anniversary of Tomboy at Mod Gallery (1809 McGee) from 7 to 9 p.m. The $35 ticket includes a fashion show with Tomboy’s spring 2013 designs, drinks by Boulevard and a coupon for $35 off a Tomboy purchase. See tomboydesign.net. The Pitch talked with McGrew about what works in fashion these days. The Pitch: Which fashion trend are you not onboard with these days? McGrew: Feeling like you have to follow a trend. I love everything going on for spring with bold color and graphics. But I also understand that not every person is comfortable with every trend. Do you believe in the old “everything old is new again” adage? Yes! It all comes around again. Who thought we would ever see shirtwaists and long skirts again? Thanks to Downton Abbey, even that style is being reinterpreted. The key is to update the silhouette in the right way so it looks fresh, and that is where the truly talented designers flourish. What’s your guilty clothing pleasure? After a long day making Kansas City look stunning, I love to put on my raggedy oversize sweatshirt and curl up with a good book.

KITE RUNNERS

Get high on kites when Metropolitan Community College–Longview (500 Southwest Longview Road, Lee’s Summit, 816-604-1000) hosts the seventh annual Flights of Fancy Kite Festival. The free, family event features food trucks, the world’s longest windsock, and professional displays from the KC Kite Club. Hang out from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and leave the pets, grills and booze at home. For more information, see mccflightsoffancy.org.

ONE-STOP DUMPING GROUND

Furniture, clothing, electronics, prescription drugs, bicycles, twin and full-size mattresses, and your worn-out Asics can all be legally and safely disposed of at the Northland Recycling Extravaganza. Organizations, including Sleepyhead Beds, revolvekc.org and the Riverside Police Department, collect all of the stuff you no longer have any idea what do with. There are no papers to sign or monies to be collected (unless you bring a glass-front or console TV), so you can park, dump and leave the items between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., at Pursell Construction (6305 Northwest Riverpark Drive, off Highway 9, between Riverside and Parkville). See facebook.com/ northlandrecyclingextravaganza for a complete list of items that can be recycled.

MIDDLE OF THE MAP

Troost Avenue has been ch-ch-ch-changin’ for more than 200 years —from a trail used by the Osage Indians in the late 1700s to wealthy estates in the 1800s to a jazz and entertainment mecca in the early 1900s to, ultimately, a racial dividing line today. But Troost belongs to everyone in KC, and that’s what the Troost Festival is about. “Really, anyone can participate, and in this kind of relaxed environment, it’s amazing what types of things happen,” says entertainment organizer Kristen Hentzen. Find performances and food at the intersection of 31st Street and Troost from noon to 10 p.m. For more information, see troostvillage.org.

C O R Y W E AV E R

W E D N E S D AY | 4 . 2 4 |

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anki-Poo, Pish-Tush, Pooh-Bah and Yum-Yum are all characters in Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Mikado, a comic opera lush with satire about British institutions. It continues its five-night run at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway) at 7:30. Tickets run $50–$125. See kcopera.org.

S U N D AY | 4 . 21 | CAT HOUSE

Earlier this month, the Kansas City Zoo debuted its newest addition: Natalia, a 10-year-old female Amur leopard. Only 38 of 230 accredited American Zoo Association facilities claim the rare breed of feline from Southeast Asia, known for a thick, long coat with widely spaced spots. See her today from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the zoo’s Africa section. The zoo is located in Swope Park (6800 Zoo Drive, 816-513-5800). For more information, see kansascityzoo.org.

M O N D AY | 4 . 2 2 | MOTHER’S DAY

Among the glut of green activities this week, today’s Student Conservation Association’s Kansas City Earth Day Event goes down on Earth Day proper. Participants meet up at Weston Bend State Park, about 30 miles northwest of downtown KC, for an afternoon of invasive-species removal, native-tree planting and trail maintenance. It’s dirty work, but consider all that the Earth does for you. Lunch, training, tools and gloves are provided. Afterward, spend the day watching more than 179 bird species (including hawks, eagles and herons) found in the park. Registration begins at 10 a.m., and the cleanup runs until 2 p.m. For more information, including directions to the park (16600 Highway 45 North), see thesca.org/events.

T U E S D AY | 4 . 2 3 | FROTH 101

The KU Natural History Museum’s latest topic for its Science on Tap discussion series

is heavy — “The Gut Talks, But Does the Liver Listen? The Role of the Gut Microbiome in Alcoholic Liver Disease” — so we leave it to the expert and the evening’s speaker, assistant professor Michele Pitchard. But ask her if Copperhead Pale Ale will cause your gut microbiome to behave differently than Ad Astra Ale, and she’ll tell you something like this: “It is likely that the gut microbiome is sensitive to the amount of ethanol to which it is exposed and for how long that exposure persists.” Educate yourself on your booze habits and their effects at Free State Brewery (636 Massachusetts, Lawrence) from 7:30 to 9 p.m. For more information about the free event, see naturalhistory.ku.edu.

W E D N E S D AY | 4 . 2 4 | THE ROARING TENS

RAW: Natural Born Artists, the showcase that began in Los Angeles in 2009 (and is slated to debut in China and Europe this year) continues with its second season at VooDoo Lounge (1 Riverboat Drive, Harrah’s Casino). More than 30 local artists display their works in film, fashion, music, performance art, accessory design, visual art, hair, makeup and photography. Tonight’s theme, The Great Gatsby, means that Charleston dancing, finger-wave hair and e-cigarettes in filters (no smoking in VooDoo, y’all). Drink, dance and network from 7 to 10 p.m. Tickets cost $10 in advance or $15 at the door; see RAWartists.org/kansascity/marvel. E-mail submissions two weeks in advance to calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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THE PITCH

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S TA G E

CHANNEL CHANGER

At the MET, Pride’s Crossing swims against memory’s currents.

BY

DEB OR A H HIRS CH

KC will once again be entertained by stunning and talented burlesque performers from all over the world at the historic Folly Theater and Off Center Theatre!

A

That energy and nerve still reside deep pretty young woman dons a robe and inside Mabel in a feisty old age, emerging in slippers and takes to a walker, aging moments of humor and reminiscence and within moments from a vibrant youth to an also in frustration and anger. She sometimes elderly and ill woman. lashes out at those long devoted to her: lifeCelia Gannon’s uncanny transformation, in the first minutes of Pride’s Crossing, gives long friend Chandler Coffi n (Alan Tilson), authenticity to her characterization of Mabel with whom she trained as a young swimmer; granddaughter Julia Renoir (Wyche, in Tidings — child, teenager, young woman, a second role), whom she raised; housekeeper nonagenarian — as she travels back and forth Vita Bright (Devon Barnes), who keeps watch. through the stages of her life. The inspiration for playwright Tina Howe’s Her words are sometimes cruel — “old lady 1997 play, onstage at Metropolitan Ensemble rage,” Howe calls it — a life’s unhappiness Theatre, is said to be twofold: Gertrude Ederle, brimming up like lava. Why her remaining family and friends the first woman to swim the English Channel, stay true to the self-absorbed Mabel isn’t in 1926, and Howe’s elderly aunt, who led a always clear, except that they know — and sheltered and confined life within an uppercrust New England family. Howe has said she love — the person she was, still is, an inner wanted “to give voice to the women of my self now mostly dormant. But as the story mother’s place and generation who grew up in changes channels from present to past and back again, we see moments turn-of-the-century, privithat expose Mabel’s verve, leged New England housePride’s Crossing drive and longing. holds, who really never had Through April 28 Gannon is excellent as the chance to flower and at Metropolitan Ensemble multifaceted Mabel, changassess themselves and find Theatre, 3614 Main, ing her voice and her posout who they were.” 816-569-3226, metkc.org ture, and physically growing Directed here by Karen feeble as the story’s shifting Paisley, this work also timeline demands. We feel elderly Mabel’s seems drawn from the life of the writer, who fought the rules that an elite upbring- effort just trying to make a phone call. Tilson ing imposed. Howe explores the constraints brings pride and pathos to his clubfooted that women, including herself, have faced Chandler, and he’s genuine as her family’s when their talents or ambitions drove them Irish cook, Mary O’Neill. Leonard is variously aloof, dashing, abusive and charming as to aspire beyond the boundaries defined for Mabel’s father; as Russian symphony conducthem by family and community. Proper women of the early 20th century tor Anton Gurevitch; as Mabel’s husband, apparently weren’t supposed to swim. Mabel’s Porter Bigelow; and as fellow nonagenarian mother (Shelley Wyche) tries to forbid it, but Wheels Wheelock. Adept as Phineas, Fox is vigorous, buoyant and passionate as suitor Mabel, surrounded by athletic and adventurand fellow swimmer David Bloom, the noous men — an Olympic-diving brother, Phineas no Jew in Mabel’s blueblood life who also (Jordan Fox); a yachtsman father, Gus (Matt assists in her record-breaking achievement. Leonard) — finds freedom in the water.

Foxy La Feelton St. Louis

Medianoche Spain Lady Jack Chicago

50 performers from as far away as Canada, Australia, Italy, and coast to coast from all across the United States will perform throughout three nights and five shows entertaining audiences with their own unique styles of burlesque in unique showcases.

MANON HALLIBURTON

MANON HALLIBURTON

Ginger Valentine Dallas

The croquet party is in full swing (left), and Gannon’s Mabel (above) finds her bliss. (His casting as Mary O’Neill’s daughter, Pru, is less fitting.) In Act 2’s culminating July Fourth croquet game — an annual get-together that Mabel is determined to re-enact — supporting cast members are believably aged. I grew tired just watching their effort at changing clothes (costume design by Shannon Smith Regnier), walking a few steps, staying awake. Coleman Crenshaw, perfect in an elderly matron’s mannerisms and speech, is a long way from the troubled young men he also portrays. It can be hard keeping track of every character, and some of them seem insignificant. That’s a script issue. Howe lets secondary characters — Mabel’s brother Frazier, Vita’s son, West — distract from the story more than serve it, and some components just don’t fit together. Mabel’s teenage greatgranddaughter, Minty (Erika Lynette Baker), however, pulls pieces of Mabel’s life from boxes and draws Mabel out as well, as we come to know a woman determined and disciplined enough to train and to jump into a cold English Channel, to swim for hours to the coast of France, yet is afraid, in her world of Boston Brahmins, to not conform in love.  This duality — triumph alongside poor personal choices — is Mabel’s primary contradiction. That we come to know the full arc of her life makes this depiction of her will and spirit ultimately bittersweet. E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

pitch.com

Tickets are on sale now through Ticketmaster and the Off Center Theater Box Office.

kcburlesque.com/TICKETS.html

Opening Weekend! Now Thru May 12 Faith. Art. Identity.

by Aaron Posner

Adapted from the novel by Chaim Potok

Directed by Cynthia Levin www.unicorntheatre.org 816.531.7529 3828 Main Street KCMO A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

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3 HOT DANCES PUT THE SIZZLE IN SPRING! KC’s favorite saxman BOBBY WATSON wails live for the World Premiere multimedia ballet Energy Made Visible by Karole Armitage. The rock ballet Common People puts William Shatner’s wild voice to Ben Folds’ music and Margo Sappington’s dance. Hey-Hay, Going to Kansas City is classic KC swing with music by Basie and McShann.

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ART

COLUMBUS DISPATCHES

Aspiring artists discover a new

BY

world at Dan Frueh’s Trap Gallery.

T R A C Y A BE L N

A

t its widest, the Columbus Park neighborhood is about 10 blocks by five blocks, ringed by interstate highways and sandwiched between the Heart of America and Christopher S. Bond bridges. Century-old townhomes sit alongside properties built during the last real-estate boom. The neighborhood has a credit union, a funeral home and its own community center. There’s a cul de sac of public-housing duplexes, and there are restaurants — Happy Gillis, LaSala’s deli, Vietnam Café, Garozzo’s — that draw crowds from all over the city. Its Catholic church, Holy Rosary, puts on what may be KC’s most traditional and bustling St. Joseph’s Day celebration every March. As in many neighborhoods, you don’t glimpse very many residents as you drive or walk through what was once called the North End. (The MORE name Columbus Park acknowledges the ItalianAmerican families whose T A INE heritage here goes back to ONL .COM PITCH the late 1800s.) But, unlike most parts of KC, this neighborhood has been an art enclave, home to at least a dozen spaces open for sharing art over the past few years. Many of the spots have simply been people’s homes or studios — the Blau Space (520 Gillis), the narrow azure structure where ceramist Angela Grisales’ terra-cotta birds still perch. And there’s Dan Frueh’s Trap Gallery, at 525 Gillis, which takes up the first floor of his family’s home. It’s presided over by the head of a formidable black bull. The plaque describing the beast’s provenance — killed by toreador Gregorio Lopez in 1972 — has a couple of old playing cards stuck in it. Frueh was studying graphic design and illustration at Drake University, and he happened to pick up the bullfighting trophy from a Des Moines Annie’s Santa Fe when the restaurant closed. It has accompanied him over several moves the past two decades, since Frueh graduated in 1994 from the Kansas City Art Institute’s photography and video department and then put down roots in KC. For the past 12 years, those roots have run through this three-story brick building, where Frueh has put on one-night exhibitions from spring through fall, and the gallery has become one of the area’s art anchors. It also has a tradition of extending its hospitality to art students. Every April since about 2003, and some Decembers, a senior-thesis exhibition takes over the space. “I always remember how hard it is to find a place do your senior show,” Frueh says.

ART

Friday, April 19, as the H&R Block Artspace opens the Kansas City Art Institute’s 2013 Annual B.F.A. Exhibition, photographer Laura Cobb presents (Re)compositions, her KCAI senior-thesis show, at the Trap. Cobb works with negatives in the darkroom to layer images into ethereal, luminously beautiful new pictures. She has written that her rural upbringing has influenced her work; (Re)compositions comments on the expansion of society as it takes over natural environments. Frueh has done his own environmental photography. He had completed a contract stint taking documentary pictures of flood-damaged homes for FEMA (followed by working

“Spine” by Laura Cobb freelance in commercial and architectural photography and with Paul Kivett of Colorworks) when he bought the Trap, in spring 2001. It had been vacant for a couple of years by then, and it bore the marks of earlier renovation efforts. Someone’s unfinished work let rain pour into the building. “We moved in at the end of June with nothing but a shower, a toilet, half of a kitchen sink and a fridge,” Frueh says. But it was the right spot for a photography studio, a place with artists in its history. Past owners include photographer E.G. Schempf and artist David Ford.

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And it was the right moment. That fall, Mark and Carol Sabec, who own the long building spanning the 1000 block of East Missouri Street, established the nonprofit Art in Columbus Park; 1020 East Missouri became a gallery, and other art spaces started popping up. For a couple of years, AICP, which included neighbors like Grisales and Sandra Amica Gomersall, among others, hosted their shows on First Fridays, until competition from the Crossroads District became too overwhelming. During one month, Frueh says, eight venues were putting up shows. “We had a cool little crawl,” he says. “But people moved away.” The nonprofit dissolved in 2007, by which time Frueh had gotten his gallery into shape. He changed the name to the Trap, and today the space has an appealing wood floor, bright shop windows, track lighting and a tin ceiling salvaged from 1512 Grand. A built-in window bench, now covered with planks from the third floor, is where Frueh found the two playing cards now up on the wall with the bull. He likes to think that the ace of diamonds and the joker were stashed in the bench years ago by someone looking to pull a fast one and win a card game. A different kind of betting goes on today at 525 Gillis, and the Trap seems to be winning. Frueh tends to choose artists who can selfcurate, but he has assembled a few group shows that have drawn large crowds. He dedicated two Octobers to a “celebration of oxidation” — the LOVE:RUST exhibitions, which included works by Mary Fasone, Stretch, Matt Crane, Erick Warren, Dan Wayne and George Rousis. Last May, the Trap put up a show called Proximity. “I was blown away by the number of artists who live here,” he says. “We had more than 30 people showing.” Cobb heard about the Trap from someone who had shown at the space and secured it for her thesis back in September. “I think it’s challenging to find a good place to show,” she writes The Pitch in an e-mail. “There are many places to have shows, which aren’t difficult to get, but galleries will generally charge a fee for using the location. Then they also take a commission. Dan is not doing either, which is really great. He just wants to help young artists.” Of course, Frueh also wants to help his neighborhood (he steps down as neighborhood council president this month, after years of serving), which benefits from an ongoing artist presence. And his family can claim at least a small profit. Frueh’s 9-year-old daughter, who calls Trap events “art parties,” takes advantage of warmer months to set up a lemonade stand.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

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FAT C I T Y BY

— and gives a daylong lesson in its craft.

JON AT H A N BENDER

CHRIS MULLINS

BREW CHASER

Free State readies its new bottling plant

S

pent grain is caked on my forearms, like I’ve just lost a fight with a cereal mascot. And more grain keeps belching my way, from a pipe above a bin resting on the arms of a forklift. A brown mound builds, and I attack it with a garden hoe in a futile attempt to free space for more grain. “Now I know how Lucy and Ethel felt,” I tell Patrick Raasch, a brewer at the Free State Brewing Co. He’s overseeing my apprenticeship on an April Friday at the East Lawrence production plant. It’s up to Raasch, 24, to make me feel as though what I’m doing is important, without his getting too far off his schedule. “Let me take over to finish that out,” Raasch says. He spreads the grain evenly before trucking it to a container destined for cattle at the Iwig Family Dairy. Steve Rold, a 29-year-old bearded giant, is the other pupil today, finishing his first week of training under Raasch. “Learning the plumbing is like The Matrix,” he jokes. Having worked at microbreweries in Iowa (Thirsty Mermaids) and North Carolina (Blind Squirrel), he has experience that I lack, but he’s riding his own learning curve. “The first week, I was just flipping switches and trying to figure out what’s going on.” At stake are approximately 38 barrels — 1,200 gallons — of Oatmeal Stout, one of the Lawrence brewery’s year-round staples and the focus of my day’s work in the 20,000-squarefoot home of the Sunflower State’s craft-beer movement. Twenty-four years ago, Free State became 22

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the first post-Prohibition brewery in notoriously dry Kansas. And this could be the year when the world beyond Lawrence learns why drinkers flock to Massachusetts Street for Copperhead Ale and Wheat State Golden. With a new bottling line expected to be up and running this month and a dedicated barrel-aging room, Free State is poised to shed the devastating effects of a 2008 fire at its East Lawrence plant. This year, founder Chuck Magerl’s vision comes to fruition: a pipeline of palate-pushing brews running down Interstate 70 to Kansas City. But fi rst there’s the matter of those 38 barrels.

T

he white clock with a Free State logo reads 9:04 a.m. as Raasch, Rold and I climb the elevated platform to the mash tun, a metal cylinder shaped like a pressure cooker. Head brewer Steve Bradt is already there, watching it fill with ground grain on its first step toward becoming beer. “This is the job I fell in love with,” Bradt says, “I was there the first night we opened, when I was just a bartender trying to describe something to folks not used to drinking craft beer. Since then, I’ve just become thoroughly entrenched with the art and science of beer.” Bradt was the brewery’s first assistant brewer, under Magerl, at the downtown Lawrence brewpub, and he oversaw construction of the production plant, rebuilding the brewery operation that Free State purchased from Portland, Oregon’s Widmer Brothers Brewing

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Co. His Helles, a light German lager, was the first brew off that line, in July 2009. He wants today’s mash (the ground grain mixed with water) to stay light and fluffy, like a biscuit, as the enzymes break down to form simple, fermentable sugar. A machinepowered rake stirs the muddy brown stock to ensure this result. Rold, who affectionately calls Raasch “boss,” takes the temperature with an outsize instrument resembling a comic’s prop meat thermometer, and he notes the volume. At 158 degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature is in the right range to produce the roasty, malty character that defines Free State’s Oatmeal Stout. Raasch moves nimbly to the next station while monitoring the temperature gauges and water levels. “You always have to be thinking where you’re headed next,” he says. “I was having dinner with my girlfriend the other night, and I kept telling her all the other things we could be doing with our time.” The redheaded former University of Kansas business-communications major maneuvers between the piping and vats like an experienced alpinist, his hands and feet finding the spaces. I manage to follow him, thanks less to dexterity than to lucky genetic happenstance. (I’m “great for confined spaces,” Boulevard brewer Jeremy Danner tweets that day.) And I’m learning that brewing is all clamps and hoses. Clamps need to be undone or secured. Hoses need to be filled or flushed. (Everything is rigorously cleaned to keep anything foreign from being introduced to the

Free State’s production plant in east Lawrence is ready to roll. brewing process; sanitizer is used in volumes not seen outside a doctor’s office or a day care.) As Raasch flicks switches (and I keep my hands by my sides), hot water sprays on the bed of mash in the tun. This process, known as sparging, produces a sweet, sugar-laden liquid called wort, which is then piped out the bottom of the tun (which has a false bottom, a screen that Bradt compares with a coffee percolator) and into an adjacent kettle. After bringing the liquid to a boil, Raasch and Rold add four varieties of hops, for aroma and taste. In the adjacent warehouse space, Bradt and production manager Brad Scott are testing the new line, working on a solution for a temperamental crowner (the station that presses caps onto bottles). Last used by Pepsi, the hulking metal line, with a conveyor-belt feed wide enough to accommodate 25 bottles, can push through 800 bottles a minute. Bradt requires only a quarter of that speed, but even at that rate it will run at four times the current line’s speed. “I’m a data junkie,” Bradt says. “I have sales figures going back years downtown. But as a production brewery, you have to be a lot more reactive, and there’s less flexibility. Still, my crystal ball is getting a lot shinier.” Bradt’s number crunching — let’s call it lager metrics — finds its complement in Geoff Deman, who has been in charge of the daily production and brewing continued on page 24

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A new mystery begins...

and Baldknobbers Backstabbers OPENS APRIL 19th!

Tickets now available at The Central Ticket Office:

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continued from page 22 at the pub since 2009 (and whom Bradt calls a “creative dynamo�). “I like to think like a chef,� Deman says. “I’ve been fortunate to do a lot of new styles, and the fun part is when products originate downtown and then go to bottle.� Stormchaser, one of Free State’s newest bottled beers, began as a lighter IPA on tap in the summer. Deman is working on Brightwater Saison (made with Nelson hops, to evoke a sauvignon blanc), which he expects to be on tap in May. He and Bradt have also been collaborating on Free State’s Eccentricity series — the barrel-aged small batches were first unveiled December 12, 2012, at 12:12 p.m. Inside a walkin cooler are Templeton Rye barrels and sealed kegs that have been aging as long as eight years. Iron Man Imperial Stout, Baltic Porter, Owd Mac and Barleywine are here, waiting to hit the new line for release in 750 ml bottles. “I’ve consistently had my preconceptions about how long our beer can last challenged,� Bradt says.

F

or the first time in six hours, Raasch is sitting. He posts himself at the corner of an elevated metal railing to maintain his view of the water levels and the kettle temperature. Rold sends the wort through pipes to the whirlpool, where the liquid is clarified by spinning. Raasch watches the steam at the whirlpool’s lid, waiting for the right moment to start pulling the wort toward the fermenter. Ideally, the solid

Top: Raasch (right) guides Rold on a brew day; above: Free State’s barrel-aging room. particulates drain through the bottom of the whirlpool tank, and the clarified wort is sent through a heat exchanger, where a cold-water bath rapidly brings down the temperature. Raasch takes samples at each stage to measure pH and the Plato-scale number (a measurement gauging the amount of malted sugar). The idea is to produce a brew that’s neither astringent nor too strong. Bradt pours small sample glasses of the cooled wort. The dark-brown wort is like watered-down simple syrup with an aftertaste of tree bark. The malt and hops have not yet found common ground in the fermenter, which is the day’s final destination. With the addition of yeast, the sugars will convert to alcohol, and Batch 605 of Oatmeal Stout should be ready in about two weeks. “Now,� Rold says with a smile, �we’re making beer.� When I walk out to the production floor, I notice a black-and-yellow sign that says “Danger Men Brewing,� and I feel some relief. Seven hours after I arrived here, Free State’s beer is free of danger from this man. Later that night, at a charity event downtown, I’m glad to be back on the other side of the bar, a cold bottle of beer in my hand.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com Charles Ferruzza returns to CafĂŠ next week.

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MUSIC

SWINGIN’ AGAIN

Dolewite sells it

BY

on the weekend.

BERR Y A NDER S ON

reezing rain, a thermometer stuck at 37 degrees Fahrenheit, grim partiers more likely to turn blue than go green — this is St. Patrick’s Day 2013 inside the Living Room, the Power & Light District’s main entertainment venue. Backstage, the six members of hip-hop cover act Dolewite (and a couple of wives) wait in the small, slightly cramped green room, drinking their comped Miller Lite bottles. The band was supposed to start at 3 p.m., but headliner Pauly D, the Jersey Shore star turned DJ, has been held up by an air-travel snafu. Dolewite’s members, some of them smoking outside now, don’t mind the delay as much as they do the cold. “You can see your breath onstage,” one of them says. The drummer from the Transients, an opening band, says his fingers went numb. “And birds shit, like, all the time on the stage,” says Dolewite’s drummer and unofficial leader, Mike “Sumo” Bransfield. When they fi nally take their places and start playing, five of the six bandmates are wearing green track pants (by Adidas, the brand of choice for performance apparel), and the musicians’ energy level shifts from neutral into high gear. They jump into a polished version of Pras’ “Ghetto Supastar,” with backup vocals from Dolewite’s lone woman member, Melissa Burnett. “There’s no room for fluff today,” Bransfield had warned before the show. By the third number — Young MC’s “Bust a Move” — the space in front of the stage is cramped with dancers. The next song, Digital Underground’s “The Humpty Dance,” sets folks in the mostly white crowd twerking.

I

n a metro that prides itself on its abundance of local, original music, Dolewite stands apart. For one thing, the band’s base is St. Joseph, a growing city an hour north, with its own slowly burgeoning music scene. Dolewite plays its home turf only three or four times a year, lead MC Mike Flanagan says. “One of our biggest shows of the year is the night before Thanksgiving,” he says. “We rent out the American Legion Hall and throw a huge party. Hundreds of people.” For another, it doesn’t write frank lyrics or court indie approval. It doesn’t experiment. Dolewite’s mission is simple: savvy nostalgia. It reworks mid-1990s rap so that Notorious B.I.G. and the Death Row Records catalog are joined by sing-along favorites by Salt-N-Pepa and Sir Mix-a-Lot and the party anthems of House of Pain and Cypress Hill. 28

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F

Busting moves: Dolewite

“We have a few songs we do mashups on,” says Warren Vandever, the band’s DJ. “Like, we’ll play half of the original, then switch up the instrumental with a radio hit. We try and keep the integrity of the song but change it enough to fit the different crowds we play for.” Vandever keeps the tempo elevated onstage, mixing tracks while Burnett and Flanagan handle vocals, Bransfield plays drums and Adrian Miller plays bass. On guitar and keyboards is Tommy Burnett, Melissa’s brother. Dolewite speeds up House of Pain’s “Jump Around” and quotes guitar riffs from “Smells Like Teen Spirit” in Rob Base’s “It Takes Two.” “It is other people’s music,” Vandever says with a shrug. “We’re robbin’ ’em enough.”

pitch.com

“We’ve all been playing long enough that we know what we can and can’t do justice to,” Flanagan adds. He’s 38, about the average age in the group, but he looks a decade younger. “We know what translates well to what we do. As long as it’s creating a party, we’re doing our jobs.” Clubs and promoters have come to rely on that sense of occupation. Over the past year, the band has headlined the Kansas City Zoo’s Jazzoo, the American Royal, and the YMCA of Greater KC’s Challenge Your Fashion fundraiser. Besides those high-profi le gigs, Dolewite throws down at least once a month at Fuel in Overland Park, the Landing in Liberty and the North Kansas City strip-mall bar BrewTop — big-capacity spaces that stay open until 2 or 3 a.m. and want drinkers to linger till last call. The band members, all of whom work day jobs, say Dolewite is a paid hobby. “Every time we play, it’s fun,” Flanagan says. “It’s our release. We take home a little grocery money.” Maybe more than a little, depending on the gig. The band members won’t talk figures, but Brian Williams, general manager at the Landing, says booking them is a moneymaker. “Dolewite is a huge shot in the arm every time they play,” he says. Before a recent show at BrewTop, Bransfield got word that the band was needed while the Michigan-Syracuse Final Four game was still in its first half. “Before the game is over?” Bransfield asked. “Yeah, fuck this game,” answered the staffer, a man in a black BrewTop polo shirt.

“I want to keep people in here.” He disappeared into a crowd thick with Victoria’s Secret Very Sexy perfume, tight T-shirts and ratted ponytails. This is Dolewite’s faithful, a suburbantilting mix eager to recount for one another stories of, say, the private “Gangsters Ball” the band played at an Overland Park country club a few years ago. “On the center of the tables, they had 40s with balloons tied to them,” Bransfield says. “A bunch of white people in track suits. It was crazy.” “It’s like, what if a chess club joined a rap band? It’s a satirical look,” says Zach Aaron, the group’s production engineer. “The formula for this kind of music is kick drum, bass and a lot of yo yo yos.” “We say it takes two to three songs to see a skeptic turn,” Vandever says. “First, newbies get that look on their face that says, ‘There’s no way these people are doing this.’ Then, after a little bit, their head starts to bob, and they’ll mouth the hooks.” Tapping into a desire to hear old songs again isn’t a new strategy for a bar band. But remembering that the 1990s belonged to rap is what’s giving Dolewite an edge over some other local acts right now. For people now in their prime bar-going years (or trying to get back to them), this is the music of their junior and senior years of high school — the sounds of new driver’s licenses and house parties and proms. “Everyone wants to be familiar with the music,” Flanagan says. “And that’s something a lot of bands don’t address.”

E-mail berry.anderson@pitch.com

pitch.com

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MUSIC

MOON PHASES

Talking with Lawrence lifers

BY

Fourth of July about record No. 3.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

C

HIGH DIVE RECORDS

ollege-town vibes are alive in the dark basement of the Ohio Street house in Lawrence where Fourth of July practices: Pacifico bottles, Predator on TV, a long discussion about litter boxes. The band of brothers — Brendan and Patrick Hangauer, Brian and Brendan Costello — is prepping for the release shows it’s playing this month for Empty Moon, another unsparing album of dizzy folk-rock tunes. The group makes two appearances in Kansas City this week: Friday night at the Brick (with Ghosty and the Devil) and an in-store Saturday afternoon at Vinyl Renaissance for Record Store Day. The Pitch: What has changed in the three years since Before Our Hearts Explode? Brendan Hangauer: I think the main difference on this record is that Kelly [Hangauer] Brian Costello: Yeah, I think at first, when isn’t in the band anymore, and we don’t have he would talk label stuff to us, none of us took as much keyboards and organs and trumpets him really seriously. But now, watching him and girl vocals, and things like that. We’ve been man the merch booth and everything, he’s playing shows with just the four of us, and we super-organized. He totally knows what he’s wanted this record to be stripped-down in a doing, which is really nice. way where we could play it Brendan Hangauer: And live pretty much the same now I pretty much talk to Fourth of July way it sounds on the record. him five times a day. When With Ghosty and the Devil More of a rock feel. And we I got the vinyl test pressing Friday, April 19, at the Brick recorded it with Chris Crisci, of the album in the mail a 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634 who I think knows our sound couple months ago, I played really well. I’m a really big it on my record player, and it Saturday, April 20 at Vinyl Renaissance fan of [Crisci’s bands] Old was off a little bit — it was too 1415 West 39th Street Canes and Appleseed Cast. fast. And I was freaking out. 816-756-0014 He had kind of a punk apI called Jeff, and he was just proach to recording where all over it. He got ahold of it’s like, if you mess up your the guy who cut the lacquer. part a little bit, he’ll be like, “Yeah, that’s the He was on the phone with me being like, “I’m take we should use.” When I first heard the not putting out anything you don’t feel 100 record, I was like, “Wow that is pretty raw.” percent about.” Totally supportive. Then I But as I listened to it, that part of it really grew went and listened to it on my roommate’s on me, and now I think it’s our best-sounding record player the next day, and it sounded album for sure. perfect. It wasn’t the vinyl. It was my shitty You guys have put your stuff out on Range Life record player. But, yeah, that’s kind of how he Records since the beginning. You moved to High is, just a dude who’s on your side no matter Dive Records for this one. How come? what, even if you’re totally wrong. I like how the record starts with the jolt of your Brendan Hangauer: My brother [Zach Hangauer, Range Life founder] is out in San voice on “Empty Moon.” Francisco now, and Range Life has kind of Brendan Hangauer: That was actually Zach’s turned into more of an electronic thing. And idea. I still talk to Zach every day. He’s the guy if we were doing this new album on Range I talk to first and foremost about every creative Life, he could really only afford to do a digital thing. He’s the person I trust the most to tell me release. So I was shopping it around to labels the truth about stuff I do. Originally, that was and stuff, and then Jeff [McCoy] got in touch the last song, and “Berlin” was the first song. and said that he had started a label and that the Then Zach was like, “Uh, that’s kind of a dark only band on it so far was the ACBs, which is a song for an opener.” So we swapped them. band we’ve played some shows with and think It seems like there’s been a bit of an exodus is awesome. And we’d known Jeff for a while, in the Lawrence music scene in recent years. just from him coming to our shows and saying Brendan Hangauer: Definitely. But there’s he was thinking about starting a record label. still some great bands and musicians in But I mean, lots of people say lots of things town. Danny Pound, Cowboy Indian Bear, after a show and a hundred beers, or whatever. Hospital Ships. Y(our) Fri(end) is a new one 30

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College bros: Fourth of July that’s pretty good. And a lot of garage-rock bands: Up the Academy, Mouthbreathers. When you were starting out in the mid-’00s, your sound was pretty well lined up with collegekid tastes. Now it’s all about Skrillex and EDM. Is it harder to get college kids out to your shows these days? Brendan Hangauer: Well, KJHK is sponsoring our release show here in Lawrence. But, yeah, I definitely feel like there’s a disconnect with college kids. At the same time, it used to be all our friends who came to our shows — it was kind of a party, an excuse to get drunk and dance and socialize. Now at our shows, I’ll look at the crowd and won’t recognize any of the faces. Brian Costello: I’ve noticed lately, we’re getting more dudes in the front row singing along to every song. You’ll see guys hanging out before the show, and you’re like, Are they here to watch the game or something? Then we start playing, and they’re right up front. Whereas it used to be girls up front. I would have never guessed that dudes would be really into what we’re doing. Patrick Hangauer: I think college kids still listen to everything, even though it sometimes seems like they only listen to Skrillex or whatever. There’s still college kids coming out to rock shows around here. Brendan Hangauer: We’ve played some shows at dorms and stuff. It goes OK. Once we played an event at one of the “cool” dorms, and there was an announcer off to the side of the stage raffling off Xbox 360s. Some kid won, and half the audience followed him up to his dorm room. I mean, these kids are 18 years old. You have to remind yourself how idiotic you were when you were 18 years old.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

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MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, A P R I L 18 Kelley Hunt: 7 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Katey Sagal: An Evening of Music and the Cast of Sons of Anarchy: 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Spoonfed Tribe: 10 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Pegi Young & the Survivors, the Blackbird Revue, Eric Murphy: 7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300.

F R I D AY, A P R I L 19 Wade Bowen, KC Limits: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Fourth of July, Ghosty, the Devil: The Brick, 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Jimmy Thackery & the Drivers: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S AT U R D AY, A P R I L 2 0

Lucero, with Langhorne Slim

Allah-Las, with the Black Angels

Once a country-punk bar band, Lucero has embraced its Memphis roots on recent albums — its songs now include richer elements: horns, pedal steel and gospel vocals. It’s a great look. Any band that’s as likely to cover Jawbreaker as Bill Withers is the kind of band I can get behind. I want to take you out to a show/I want to kiss you while the band’s playin’ rock and roll, frontman Ben Nichols sings on 2009’s “Sounds of the City.” That seems kind of basic written here on the page, but with the ballpark keyboards and horn section swirling around Nichols’ raspy voice, it’s something like a revelation. Opener Langhorne Slim is a foot-stomping showman with a songbook full of lovesick, old-timey folk tunes. Tuesday, April 23, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Allah-Las’ self-titled debut is the result of four crate-digging record-store clerks (at Amoeba, in Los Angeles, to be specific) attempting to make as authentic a ’60s garage-pop album as could be made in the year 2012. The group favors vintage analog gear, crisp surf-rock tones and Stones-y jangles. It’s revivalism, but it’s about as close to the real thing as I’ve heard. Austin’s the Black Angels share some garage fundamentals with Allah-Las but also stretch out into acid-drenched psych jams. Monday, April 22, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Lucero (left) and T.I. from somewhere in the Midwest. It favors busy arrangements; bouncing pianos; and dense, theatrical, front-and-center vocals — somewhere between Ben Folds and the Long Winters. The group has toured relentlessly over the past half-decade, and it has the enthusiastic young fans to show for it. Thursday, April 18, at the Jackpot (943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085)

T.I.

I still think T.I. is one of the greatest rappers alive, although he hasn’t done a ton lately to support that belief. Still, he’s got hits for days, so a T.I. show should be worth the coin. He’s touring in support of his most recent album, Trouble Man: Heavy Is the Head, and he’s bringing along some younger rap names to back him up. Among them: on-the-rise Future, from Atlanta; Tyga, of “Rack City” fame; and Top 40–friendly rapper B.O.B. Saturday, April 20, at the Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

Black Mountain

Black Mountain’s stoner rock is huge enough to encompass a variety of 1970s influences: Rush-like prog, Black Sabbath metal and Deep Purple’s psych rock. The group recently did the soundtrack to Year Zero, a surf film set in post-apocalyptic times, which sounds exactly like the kind of movie you’d associate with a band like Black Mountain. Tuesday, April 23, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Jukebox the Ghost

32

Tate Stevens

The last time country singer Tate Stevens performed in Kansas City, he was auditioning for the second season of The X Factor at the Sprint Center. The Belton native went on to win, earning him the kind of popularity that gets you two headlining nights at the Midland. (Sunday night sold out in about 30 minutes, so a Monday date was added.) Tickets to the show include a copy of Stevens’ debut album, which is out Tuesday via RCA Records Nashville. Sunday, April 21, and Monday, April 22, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

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A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

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(hed)p.e., In the Shadow, Killing the Calm, Embrace This Day, Kansas Prairie Killers: 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Josh Ritter and the Royal City Band, Martin Sexton: 7 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972.

Suffocation, Exhumed, Jungle Rot, Rings of Saturn, Adimiron, Troglodyte: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Weird Al Yankovic: 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665.

T U E S D AY, A P R I L 2 3 People’s Temple: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676.

W E D N E S D AY, A P R I L 2 4 Bonobo, Shigeto: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Phutureprimitive, Ill-Esha: 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

FUTURECAST

..................................................Pick of the Week

THE PITCH

S U N D AY, A P R I L 21

M O N D AY, A P R I L 2 2

Jukebox the Ghost is based in Brooklyn but sounds more like an earnest indie-pop group

F O R E C A S T

Eric Harland and Voyager: 8:30 & 10:30 p.m. Gem Theater, 1615 E. 18th St., 816-842-1414. KJHK’s Farmers Ball with Pink Royal, Haunt Ananta, Forrester, Brain Food, Bellafonte, Real Sugar, Y[our] Fri[end], Spirit Is the Spirit: 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. That 1 Guy, Captain Ahab’s Motorcycle Club, Deadman Flats: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Webb Wilder with Moreland & Arbuckle: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

MONDAY 29 James Blake: Liberty Hall, Lawrence TUESDAY 30 Fleetwood Mac: Sprint Center Gov’t Mule, the Revivalist: Uptown Theater

MAY THURSDAY 2 Tracy Morgan: Uptown Theater FRIDAY 3 Crystal Castles: Liberty Hall, Lawrence

THE 7TH HEAVEN 4.20 SALE ALL SMOKING ACCESSORIES ON SALE 40% TO 20% OFF ALL HOOKAHS, VAPORIZERS, GLASS, METAL, WOOD, ACRYLIC, AND CERAMIC SMOKING ACCESSORIES,PAPERS, SHISHA, CHARCOAL, ASH CATCHERS, CASES AND MUCH MUCH, MORE. CHAMELEON, CRUSH, VAPOR BROTHERS, TRIPPY STIX, HELIX, GRAV LABS, ZONG, GRAFFIX, PROTO PIPES.

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33

NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6775). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 18 ROCK/POP/INDIE Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Radkey 7-inch release show with Stiff Middle Fingers, Ponyboy, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Pretty, Kitten Tits, Going to Hell in a Leather Jacket, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Levee Town. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Philistines, Amy Farrand and the Gospel Sensation. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Rich Berry. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Atlantic Express featuring Hal Wakes, 6:30 p.m.; Jimmie Bratcher, 7 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. The Bluz Benderz.

HIP-HOP RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Ultimate Hip Hop Artist with Tytus, Supa Dave & Keed, Da Animal, Star B, Koud Sity, Milli Mocha, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Brett Gretzky, Dom Chronicles, Two4One, John Price, S.A. the Abolitionist, DJ Johnny Quest, Steddy P, 10 p.m.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Shay Estes Duo. Gem Theater: 1615 E. 18th St., 816-842-1414. MCC- Penn Valley Jazz Festival, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, E R O 816-215-2954. Stan Kessler Trio with M Kathleen Holeman, 8 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Brandon Draper, GS IN T 9 p.m. LIS E AT N I L The Majestic Restaurant: 931 ON M Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram PITCH.CO Wijnands and Joe Lisinicchi, 6 p.m.

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Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Harland Williams, 7:30 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Collin Kane, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Maria the Mexican, 10 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. Lenexa Longbranch Steakhouse: 8600 Marshall Dr., Overland Park, 913-894-5334. Andy DeWitt. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Derek Jones, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Shut Up and Rock Jam, 7:30 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Free Form Free For All Open Mic with Teague Hayes, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jam night with Rick Eidson.

F R I D AY 19

BEST Selection of Glass in KC! GGCN c…„ C iwŠ © d……„ C L i‹„ ILGM Xˆ…wzw aYce LJGGG

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34

THE PITCH

A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

ROCK/POP/INDIE Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Damned by the Pope, A Plague on Faith, Autumn of Apologies, Leo Astray, 8 p.m.

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Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Forsaken Few, Ghosts of Normandy, Beating Wooly Bully, For the Broken, 8 p.m. FOKL Center: 556 Central Ave., 913-207-9549. Dream Girl, Mason Mercer, Do It to It, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Father Figures, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Filthy 13. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. 3 Son Green, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Drunkard’s Dream, 7 p.m.; Quiet Corral, Brain Food, Admirals, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Cherokee Rock Rifle, MegaJoos, St. Dallas & the Sinners, 9 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Stairway to Zeppelin, KC/DC.

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Meatpop,Jon Eric, Arm the Poor, 9 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Clairaudients, Mime Game, Indian Giver, Colin Elmore, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Mojo Dogs, Ben Moats, Clementines, 5 p.m.; Dead Voices, Austerity Measures, the Ants, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. The Gardrails, Johnny Dildo & the Superchargers, the Sun Eaters, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Found A Job, Brother Bagman, 3 Son Green, 8 p.m. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. The Patrick Lentz Band.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

Barley’s Brewhaus: 11924 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-6634099. Karla Bauer, 9:30 p.m., free. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Linda Shell & the Blues Thang; Mama Ray’s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Garrett Nordstrom Experience. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. The Late for Dinner Band. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Bobby Simkins, 5 & 8 p.m Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Rumblejetts, Levee Town.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Bobby Smith. Icons Restaurant & Lounge: 1108 Grand, 816-472-4266. The Boss Kingz, 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Samantha Fish with the Trip Daddy’s, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Old Crows, 5:30 p.m.; Monsters Inc., 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Fast Johnny Ricker.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. The Outlaw Junkies. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Buttermilk Boys, Partners in Glory, 9 p.m. Community Christian Church: 4601 Main, 816-561-6531. Darryl Purpose with Soundz of Africa, 7 p.m. The Kickstand: 10817 E. Truman Rd., Independence, 816-2522560. BrokenHorn, 8 p.m.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Indigo Hour with Lady D., 5:30 p.m.; Roger Wilder Trio, 8:30 p.m. Gem Theater: 1615 E. 18th St., 816-842-1414. MCC- Penn Valley Jazz Festival, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Phil Thompson Duo, 8 p.m.; Mark Lowrey Trio, 11 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 4 p.m.; Bram Wijnands Trio, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m.

WORLD The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Miguel Mambo DeLeon, 9 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Sons of Brasil, 8 p.m.

COMEDY

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Darcus Gates, 8:30 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Angela Hagenbach Trio, 7 p.m. Gem Theater: 1615 E. 18th St., 816-842-1414. MCC- Penn Valley Jazz Festival, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Greg Richter and Joe Straws, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rick Bacus Trio. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Grand Marquis, 9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948-5550. Project H, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Wires, Adriana Nikole. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Promise Makers dinner show, 7-9 p.m; Thee Devotion, the Ned Ludd Band, 9 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Heather Thornton, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y

Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Harland Williams, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Collin Kane, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

EASY LISTENING The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Garry Lincoln, 10 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Dan Doran Band, 7 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Tequila Mockingbird, 7 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 2 0 ROCK/POP/INDIE Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Striving for Cairo CD-release show with 10001, Sure Fire Method and Masse, 7 p.m. The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Nigel Dupree, 9 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The Problems, the Raven & the Writing Desk, Sinple, 10 p.m.

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Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Adam Lee, Drew Black and Dirty Electric, the Quivers, 9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Checkered Beat, 10 p.m. One Block South: 7300 W.119th St., Overland Park, 913-4510444. Grand opening party with the Zeros, Noe Palma, DJ OB-One, JT Quick, 8 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Nug Life 420 Patio Bash with DJs Ruby Weapon, TreyStyles and Clockwerk, 10 p.m.

S U N D AY 21 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. The Raven & the Writing Desk, Root & Stem, Cadillac Flambe, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Hudson Falcons, Faultfinder, Donner Diaries, the Uncouth, 8 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Lance Fahy, Joe Avery, Greg Pelligreen, 6-9 p.m.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1

A BENEFIT CONCERT FOR

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A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

35

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

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THE PITCH

SUNDAY

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36

FRANK JAMES

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JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Bram Wijnands. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill’s jazz brunch, 11 a.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Jeff Harshbarger’s Alternative Jazz Series, 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Roger Wilder, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Groove Station: 9916 Holmes, 816-942-1000. KC Blues Jam with Crosseyed Cat, 2-6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Back Room Jam, 1-5 p.m.; Open Jam with Levee Town, 2-7 p.m. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-3585777. Jam Night with Dennis Nickell, Rick Eidson and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

M O N D AY 2 2

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Geeks Who Drink Trivia, 8 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. Duke’s on Grand: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Xtreme League Trivia, 8 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Trivia Slugfest, 7 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Karaoke.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays’ Open Blues Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

SINGER-SONGWRITER The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m.

ROCK/POP/INDIE

W E D N E S D AY 2 4

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. After Nations, Perfect Pursuit, Paper Buffalo, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Lion House, Ask an Adult, Too LatefFor Satellites, 10 p.m.

ROCK/POP/INDIE

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Carl McComasReichl, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and friends, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Trivia with Matt Larson, 8 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. Moxie Bar & Grill: 4011 N. Oak Tfwy., North Kansas City, 816455-9600. Beer Pong Mondays with DJ E-Rock. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam’s Club Karaoke, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Uptown Comedy Night with Norm Dexter, 10 p.m.

T U E S D AY 2 3 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Average Black Bears, Faux Reality, 8 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Clairaudients, Artifex Pero, Sundiver, the Lesser Bear, 7:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. 99 Bottles, the Uncouth, 8 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Transients, 9 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Trampled Under Foot, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Garrett Nordstrom Experience. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Dan Bliss. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 6-10 p.m.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Cynthia Van Roden, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Kathleen Holeman, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m.

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Early Graves, Enabler, Keef Mountain, 7 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785832-1085. HRVRD, Daylight, Artifex Pereo, Forrester, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.; Take Me Captive, Species, Ghost of Normandy, A Plague in Faith, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Woodsman, 10 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Flannigan’s Right Hook, 9:30 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Folkicide, Rabbitt Killer, Major Matt, 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Outlaw Jim & the Whiskey Benders with Phantoms of the Opry, 8 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-2399666. Brandon Miller Band, Lonesome Hank & the Heartaches, 5:30 p.m.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Organ Jazz Trio, 8 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill, 6 p.m.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. James Johann, 7:30 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Janet Williams, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Brendan MacNaughton. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge, 7:30 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Piano time with T.J. Erhardt, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Brandon Miller, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic Open Mic with Tyler Gregory. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 S. 291 Hwy., Liberty, 816-429-5262. Open mic. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground.

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A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

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37

S AVA G E L O V E

DICK HOLES

Dear Dan: I’m uncircumcised, and the opening

at the end of my foreskin is not large enough for the head of my penis to pass through. This means my foreskin doesn’t pull back when I get an erection. The Internet says this is a condition called “phimosis,” and a lot of medical websites recommend circumcision. I’m not super-excited by that idea. I don’t have any pain or difficulty with sex or urination, and I’ve never had any health problems related to being uncircumcised. The foreskin isn’t stuck or fused to the glans — the hole is just small. Is there a safe, nonsurgical way to enlarge the opening in the foreskin?

Dick Hole Panic Dear DHP: “Tell Dick Hole Panic not to panic,”

says Stephen H. King, M.D., a urologist in Washington state and my new go-to guy for all questions dick. “Phimosis occurs in an uncircumcised penis when a circular ring of the foreskin becomes scarred, often from prior infection, inflammation or trauma. This scar prevents the normally elastic tissue of the foreskin from fully retracting to expose the head of the penis.” Roughly one in 100 men have phimosis, King says, “and depending on the degree of narrowing, complications of phimosis can vary widely. These can include difficulty with cleaning/hygiene, infection, pain with erection, bleeding from skin cracking, and paraphimosis.” Paraphimosis sounds like something you want to avoid: “It occurs when a narrow foreskin is pulled back to expose the head of the penis but then can’t be pulled back over the head, which then constricts blood flow to the glans,” King says. Paraphimosis can cut off blood flow to the head of the penis, which can cause the head of your cock to become gangrenous and die, which is why anyone suffering from it should head to an emergency room immediately. Here’s something else to worry about: “Although extremely rare, penile cancer can arise, usually in older patients with recurrent infections/inflammation.” You’re probably panicking now — hearing about paraphimosis has me panicking, and I’m circumcised. But the doctor said your case doesn’t sound serious: You aren’t experiencing any pain, your dick seems to work fi ne, you haven’t suffered from a series of infections. You don’t need to do anything about your phimosis for now, King says, but if you’re worried about complications arising in the future, or if you want your sex partners to see the head of your dick someday, there are nonsurgical remedies. “ ‘Preputial gymnastics’ is one way to re-

38

THE PITCH

A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

solve phimosis,” King says. “It sounds like an Olympic event, but it involves gently pulling the foreskin back to expose the tip of the glans to the point where the ring of scar is exposed.” In other words, pull your foreskin back until you can’t pull it back anymore, and you’ll be looking at the scar tissue. “Hold this position for one minute and repeat three to four times a day,” King continues. “In combination with topical application of a steroid cream twice daily, typically betamethasone 0.05 percent (needs a prescription), more than 90 percent of cases will dramatically improve or resolve within four to six weeks.” And if you’re one of the 10 percent of phimosis sufferers whose case doesn’t improve through preputial gymnastics? “Then he should break out the Manischewitz for his impending bris,” King says.

Dear Dan: I’ve rarely ever been able to have an

orgasm during intercourse. The few times it happened, I was stimulating my clit. But I think my body is used to clitoral orgasms without a penis thrusting inside my vagina. Recently, I started mixing pot and sex. I’ve been a pot smoker for years but never thought to have sex on pot before. It has always been just a social thing with friends. It is incredible! Marijuana relaxes my body and heightens my senses so that when my BF and I have sex, I come! And come and come — and I squirt, which I have NEVER done before! When we have sex without smoking, the sex is still great, but I don’t orgasm like I do when I’m high. I feel like I need weed to orgasm the way I want to. Before I dated my BF, I smoked pot only once a month or so. Now I’m doing it once a week at least. My sex life is finally amazing and fulfilling. Three questions: (1) Does this sound like a huge problem? (2) Should I be worried? (3) What do you suggest?

Blazing Orgasms Newly Gained Dear BONG: (1) It does sound like a problem —

a problem that has been solved. (2) Not if you live in Colorado or Washington state, where voters legalized pot use in last November’s election. (3) A vaporizer.

Dear Dan: I’m in a great relationship with a

very sexy and open-minded woman. Recently we were talking about likes and dislikes, and she mentioned “role-play scenes.” This sent me into a little bit of a panic because this is something I’ve never engaged in. However, since I’m more on the dominant side in our relationship, I’d rather not ask her a lot of questions. I’m hoping to take the lead and find out something about it on my own. I want to

BY

D A N S AVA G E

seem imaginative to her and not just copy what other men have done. Unfortunately, my Web searches have been fruitless. Cosmo, Glamour, and even men’s sites have articles about “role play” from time to time, but they seem to be written for juveniles. Do you have any ideas about role-play scenarios — especially ones that could be initiated by a man?

Apprehensive About Role Play Dear AARP: I have plenty of ideas about roleplay scenarios that could be initiated by a man, but sexual pleasure is highly subjective — one gay man’s hot role-play scenario is likely someone else’s nightmare scenario. So you’re going to have to talk with your woman about what kinds of scenarios turn her on. Some people have a hard time talking about their kinks. Just saying the words I’m into role-play or I want to try bondage is such a struggle that a nervous kinkster is emotionally exhausted after the big reveal. The kinkster feels like she has done the hard part — she said “role-play” or “bondage” out loud! — and her partner should do the rest of the work, i.e., make their fantasies come true without asking them to talk about it anymore. But you can’t fly blind into someone else’s sexual fantasies. If she’s turned on by something mild like a sexy-cop-and-speeding-driver role-play scenario, surprising her with a serial-killer-and-his-terrified-victim role-play scenario is likely to backfire. Likewise, someone who’s turned on by gentle neckties-and-bedposts bondage isn’t going to be happy about an intense institutionalrestraints-and-soundproof-leather-hood bondage session. She’s going to have to give you more information, and you’re going to have to let go of the notion that being the Dom means not asking questions. A dominant’s first job — before a role-play scene begins, before anyone gets tied up — is to ask questions and find out what his submissive wants to experience. The trick is to give her what she wants while building in small surprises and gradually, over time, pushing into new territories together. But you’re going to have to ask her more questions, and she’s going to have to answer them. If she’s too shy to talk about her kinks, have the convo over e-mail. This week on the Savage Lovecast, I talk with author Emily Bazelon about sexting, slutshaming, bullying, and suicide: thestranger .com/savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

39

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THE PITCH

A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

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A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

41

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THE PITCH

A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

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A P R I L 1 8 - 24 , 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

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The Pitch: April 18, 2013