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SEPTEMBER 6–12, 2012 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 10 | PITCH.COM

KYLE JAMEs AND KEMET “tHEPHANToM*„ CoLEMAN CoME OF AGE iN KC’s MUsIC sCENE. BY JUSTIN KENDALL

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CENTER OF ATTENTION Kyle James wants to be a star, not a target. He might get there. B Y J U S T I N K E N DA L L

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Five strategies for dealing with the ALCOHOLIC CUPCAKE craze. GIGAMESH, THIEVERY CORPORATION, WANDA JACKSON and other incoming acts. FRANKS is getting ready to grill on Southwest Boulevard.

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2

QUESTIONNAIRE

NATE OL SON

Analyst in the Entrepreneurship Department, the Kauffman Foundation

Tell us about your work: My colleague Cameron Cushman and I share the Kansas City Entrepreneurship portfolio. Our job is to engage the community of entrepreneurs in Kansas City, create programs and events that can serve as education tools for the entrepreneurs and, it’s hoped, accelerate the growth of their companies by doing so.

What local tradition do you take part in every year? I’m working on starting some of my

own traditions. I really like KC Irish Fest and the American Royal.

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Andy Rooney Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter:

Tell us about 1 Million Cups: The Kauff man

Hometown: Omaha, Nebraska Current neighborhood: Brookside East,

whoop whoop!

Who or what is your sidekick? My iPhone and

my guitar. iPhone for practical reasons — it gets me through the day. But my archtop hollow-body electric is a trusted friend and brings me a lot of joy.

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? I don’t really think about this ques-

tion a lot because I have a pretty awesome job. I love it. But I would be a skyliner cue Flight of the Frenchies. The quest for total mental freedom fascinates me.

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Chai Shai on East 59th in Brookside Where do you drink? Faucets What’s your favorite charity? Vitamin Angels

— check it out.

Marginal Revolution, @MargRev

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: I don’t think it is irritating

me but more troubling me, about the clear digital divide in Kansas City. If you look at the Google Fiberhoods, everything east of Troost is yellow and everything west green. I’d like to see Kansas City work on bridging the clear gaps in our community.

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

Foundation’s Entrepreneurship Team developed 1 Million Cups as a way to engage Kansas City’s entrepreneurs on a weekly basis, educate the community about the great startups in Kansas City, and to accelerate the growth of these companies by doing so while building a dynamic and diverse entrepreneurial community. As a team, I think we sensed an opportunity to fill a gap in the Kansas City startup community through weekly educational programming. Two startups per week, six-minute presentations, 20 minutes of Q&A.

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: South-

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? Make: magazine because it

is full of creative and fun projects.

“People might be surprised to know that I …”

west Airlines — when you got to get away.

Speak Mandarin.

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? The Pitch (sarcasm) and the entire

“On my day off, I like to …” Explore new cities

Last book you read: The Book of Awesome by Neil Pasricha

Power & Light District with exception to the Cigar Box (if that counts).

through the art of power walking to music. If I’m in town, I’m probably working or dabbling on a few side projects.

Favorite day trip: Grove, Oklahoma, three

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests?

“In fi ve years, I’ll be …” Running my first suc-

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? I thought it was a date … she

The Power & Light District (whoa, sarcasm again). After barbecue, the Mutual Musicians Foundation, the Nelson, Westport, Brookside and the WWI Museum.

Finish this sentence: “Other than the Kauffman Center, Kansas City got it right when …” Working together to bring Google Fiber to Kansas City, Missouri, and Kansas.

“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Picked

yellow and red for the Chiefs’ colors. Objectively, these are terrible colors together.

“Kansas City needs …” More entrepreneurs and to support the ones that we have.

cessful company.

hours south of KC. My grandparents live on Grand Lake.

didn’t.

What TV show do you make sure you watch?

I don’t watch TV anymore. I prefer to listen to podcasts like Stuff You Missed in History Class, Stuff You Should Know and This American Life.

Interesting brush with the law? I was a

take up a lot of space in my iTunes:

Describe a recent triumph: 1 Million Cups has been really successful. I think people vote with their feet, and they keep coming back each week.

Daft Punk, Digable Planets, Blues Traveler, the Decemberists, James Taylor, the Killers, Bon Iver, Trevor Hall, and Bob Marley … a lot of Bob Marley

What movie do you watch at least once a year?

It’s a Wonderful Life — every Christmas with my mom.

masked vigilante for a while … but the character didn’t take off.

1 Million Cups meets at 9 a.m. Wednesdays at Kauff man Labs. See 1millioncups.com for more information.

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Center of Attention K Y L E J A M E S WA N T S T O B E A S TA R ,

N O T A TA R G E T. W I T H H E L P F R O M H I S F R I E N D T H E P H A N T O M*,

HE MIGHT GET THERE.

BY JUSTIN KEN DA LL

PHOTOG RA PHY BY BROOKE VA NDE V ER

4 THE PITCH 2 THE PITCH

S E P T E M B E R 6 - 1 2 , 2 0 1 2 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X pitch.com

K

yle James is center stage at Club 906 in Liberty. Microphone in hand, shirt off, cut abs on display, he’s delivering his hip-hop single to about 20 people. A few people dance to the rhymes as they watch Mayor Sly James’ 24-year-old son, backed by Kemet “thePhantom*” Coleman, perform “Bender.” Drinking for three days, some might say I’m on a bender, James rasps. Get a bad chick back to da crib, then I bender … over. Play my shit on replay because I’m colder than December. We don’t need no sleep we keep it rolling off this liquor. I’m on a bender, bender, bender … I’ll take this bottle to the head just might drink till I’m dead. Next door, at Retro Bowl (the two venues are connected), two Liberty cops have blocked the doorway to a bathroom where they’re questioning a man who looks like a much shorter version of Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah. He’s bleeding and has stuffed brown paper towels into his mouth to stanch the flow. He tells the uniforms that he got jumped. The police turn their attention to another man, dressed all in white. It’s a strange night, made a little stranger by James and Coleman’s enthusiasm booming through the walls. While a Retro Bowl employee mops up the blood, the two rappers are playing to their small audience in the adjoining club as if they’ve sold out an arena. “There’s people here who had other shit that they could be doing, but they’re here wanting to hear what I have to say,” Coleman says when they come offstage. “I don’t give a shit if no one shows up. I’ll perform like there’s 1,000 people there.” James is looking for a victory cigarette. He says he stopped smoking two days before the show to keep his voice fresh. Sweat drips off him. “It felt great,” James says.

“promo girls,” they say, and starting a line of merchandise. They call it a movement. “There’s a girl who got ‘COA’ tattooed on her,” James says. “I have to show you this. It’s crazy.” James pulls out his iPhone and reveals a photo of the letters inked onto a woman’s body. They say they’d joked with the woman about getting a COA tattoo. She didn’t hesitate. “There’s a lot of people who are the center of attention or think they’re the center of attention or want to be the center of attention,” Coleman says. “So they’ve definitely clasped onto that.” James has been the center of attention over the past year for confrontations at metro bars and nightclubs. The first on the record: an August 2011 fracas at Fran’s Restaurant. According to a police report, James threatened the job of an in-uniform, off-duty cop who had handcuffed him for acting unruly in the Power & Light District business and walking out on a $30 tab. James apologized a few days later and offered to pay his check. “As soon as that happened, I wasn’t Kyle,” James says. “I wasn’t K.J. I was the mayor’s son. People probably looked at it as ‘he wants some attention — it’s a gimmick,’ or something like that.” James is reluctant to rehash this and other scuffles, but he admits that he’s been wrong a few times. His mistakes, he adds, have just been a little more public than most people’s. “There’s also been times when things were blatant lies,” he says. “There’s also been times when my personality and how eccentric I am — people may not know how to react to it. I think it could be misunderstood.” By the end of August 2011, though, he was back in the news, accused of punching a woman in the face at a bar, the Point. TV news crews camped outside his apartment. Reporters knocked on his door, and James, scheduled to work that day, holed up to avoid the attention. “I actually lost my job,” James says. He’d been a server at Brio. “I couldn’t go to work because of this shit.” The assault case was scheduled for trial this past February but was thrown out after the woman failed to show up in court. By then, the TV crews and reporters were less interested. “I’m proven not guilty, and nothing’s even said,” James says. “Nobody even took the time to see if this is even fucking true. It’s just like, ‘He punched some girl in the face.’ Inaccurate. That’s part of the shit that comes with the territory.” Things got worse this past April 8. James was with Kendrick Williams that night when Williams was fatally shot in Westport. As the Middle of the Map Fest was wrapping up its weekend in the entertainment district, men in a car heckled Williams’ fiancée in the parking lot of the Sun Fresh market. Someone in the car opened fire on Williams when he moved to check on her. continued on page 6

“As soon as

that happened, I wasn’t Kyle. I wasn’t K.J. I was the

mayor’s son.”

K

yle James is late. He’s meeting with Coleman and a reporter at Fric & Frac, on 39th Street. When he gets to the restaurant’s patio, wearing a powder-blue Royals shirt, shorts and a flat-billed baseball cap, he wants to talk about his rap, not his rap sheet — the rumored fights, the mug shot in the daily paper. In three days, he’s putting out his first mixtape. It’s called Barz4Daze, and it features Coleman, who also mixed and mastered it. The two have spent a year on it. “Bender” is already out, and James is shooting a video for it. “It’s probably going to be one of the coolest videos to come out of here,” James says. Modesty often eludes him. He and Coleman call themselves “Team COA,” for center of attention. They shout out the letters at shows, punctuate social-media posts with them, deploy them in casual conversation. It’s not just a slogan but an attitude, and what it sums up goes beyond music — at least as far as hiring

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in his bank account, and it’s not very much. DJ Sheppa (left) shared his Pitch Music continued from page 5 We’re both fucking broke as shit. But he’s a Showcase with thePhantom* and James. grown-ass man, so his actions are his actions.” James (above) shows off his birthday gift. James saw a man point something from “The No. 1 thing that I hate is how this one of the car’s windows. He thought it was a camera phone. It was a gun. There was a pop. reflects on a man who did everything for my decisions or trouble. I don’t want no trouble.” Williams got “hyped up” and pushed him, brothers and sister that he possibly could,” “He’s really driven to do what he wants James says of his father. “He worked his ass James says. to do now,” Coleman says. off, tried to put us in the best schools. This is “These dudes are shooting?” James says literally the most inspiring person that I’ve Williams told him. “This is crazy.” ever been around in my whole life. And I hate Williams’ fiancée was the first to notice that nside Coleman’s A rmour Boulevard he’d been shot. Then Williams, 22, collapsed. how the things that I’ve done, even if they’re apartment on this August afternoon, his true or not true or whatever, how they reflect “He was smiling when he passed away,” caramel-colored cat, Achilles, roams the on him. Sometimes you have to learn in your James says. “He told me, ‘You got this.’ I’ve living room and flops down for attention. own way, and I’m still learning.” internalized that and remembered that. I The one-bedroom space is decorated with Mayor Sly James didn’t return messages knew what he was talking about. That’s why paintings, drawings and photos of famous left by The Pitch with his spokesman. But Kyle I want to be unwavering in the whole apblack Americans: Jesse Jackson, Malcolm X, proach to this because it’s bigger than just James says his father, who played in bands as Michael Jackson, President Obama. Family a young man, is supportive of his music career. photos share wall space. me. When you see something like that, it’s “My dad is supportive of whatever I want kind of hard to be scared of a crowd or be “I’m in my mother’s stomach,” he says to do that is legal, that is time-fulfilling, that when he points to a 1987 image of his parents onstage or be scared to walk down a street. is not going to outright harm other people,” in a church. There’s a shot of his dapper father What do you really fear at the end of the day? And are you going to let that limit you?” James says. “He’s completely supportive of in his law office. Coleman takes his fashion Williams’ killing remains unsolved. James me being passionate about something. That’s sense from his father and has the tie his dad and Coleman now wear matching black and hard to do. He’s letting me be me but at the wears in the picture. gold “Stop the Violence — In Memory of Kid” same time giving me guidance and input.” Coleman has just split a marathon push And James insists that the dust-ups with James to finish the mixtape. As Colebracelets to remember their friend. haven’t been about drawing attention to The violence around James didn’t stop, man shows off his place, the mixtape has his fledgling hip-hop career. though. In late April, Fox 4 reported that gone live for downloading and streaming on James was “beaten and bandcamp.com — for free. bloodied” after a fight with “I wanted to make it as a self-proclaimed martialaccessible to people as I “I’ll just chalk that up to not having arts expert outside the could,” James says. “Espedirection, not being focused, and allowing Brooksider. James refused cially being the first thing to press charges and acthat I put out. All I want is myself to be in a situation where I became cepted a ride home from as many people as possible vulnerable. And when I was vulnerable, I police. “I didn’t fight,” to hear it.” James says. “I just stood Four hours after its reprobably didn’t handle it or deal with it in the there thinking I was doing lease, the mixtape has been most mature way that I possibly could.” a righteous thing.” played about 500 times. I n M ay, Ja mes w a s James and Coleman charged with disorderly were supposed to perform “Music wasn’t even on my mind at Fran’s,” at the Riot Room as part of The Pitch Music conduct in Kansas City, Kansas. A judge ordered him to pay a $170.50 fine. He doesn’t James says. “I’ll just chalk that up to not havShowcase August 4. They say “technical difing direction, not being focused, and allowwant to talk about that one. It’s just another ficulties” kept them from playing their set that ing myself to be in a situation where I became Saturday night. Coleman says the Riot Room time when something happened to him, and people talked about it only because he’s the vulnerable. And when I was vulnerable, I had one sound person, working two stages, probably didn’t handle it or deal with it in who told him that the club didn’t have the son of the mayor. “People think he’s getting spoon-fed by his the most mature way that I possibly could.” wiring needed to hook up his laptop. And then He goes on: “I want to be known for music. parents,” Coleman says of his friend. “I could his computer crashed. (They found their way I want to be known for talent, not for rash onto the stage later. DJ Sheppa let them freeprobably name how much money this dude has

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J

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James practices his poses in midtown.

continued from page 7 — and the letters “COA,” which were drawn by Coleman. The birthday gift from his girlfriend took three hours to complete. The script for the words “center of attention” is hard to read on purpose, James says. He wants people to really look at it. On his right arm is a tattoo of an eagle and the word “freedom,” which he says he got when he moved out of his parents’ home at 17. James meets Coleman at his apartment. Coleman works on a Jimmy John’s “Italian Night Club” sandwich. James drinks an iced tea. They’re going to a meet-and-greet with Tech N9ne, who’s playing that night. “It’s the No. 1 way I’d want to spend my birthday,” James says. Ja mes a nd Colema n grew up idolizing Tech N9ne. Coleman modeled his style on the Kansas City rapper (along with Bone ThugsN-Harmony, the Notorious B.I.G. and Tupac). Now Coleman and James are working with Tech, who they say showed at their recent RecordBar show and proclaimed his approval. After their performance that night, Tech bought shots. The party moved to the Riot Room for Caribou Lous. They made a makeshift VIP section on the patio to celebrate Tech’s “Caribou Lou” single going gold. Another night, the trio started at Luna and ended up at the Foundation. “We were all kind of messed up, and this fool gets onstage and starts rapping at the Foundation,” Coleman says of James. “I was trying to express myself,” James explains. “He starts freestylin’, and then somebody was like, ‘You’ve got to get off the stage,’ ” Coleman says. “They kick him off the stage, and this fool says, ‘Who the fuck are you?’ That shit was the most hilarious thing ever. Tech talks about that all of the time. We’ve got a song coming out with Tech called ‘Who the Fuck Are You?’ ”

“It’s probably not one of those things that I would have done in the past five or six months,” James says. James is already working on the sequel to Barz4Daze, and he says he’s written a lot of it. “I’m going to try to knock that one out real quick after the first one comes out,” he says. “I’m already in my stride.” But they say their focus is on a COA album. “That album is going to be crazy,” James says. A couple of days ago, Coleman released the first song off an R&B project he’s almost done making, a come-on called “Believer.” He and James smirk as the track plays on a laptop. Your body is calling so you want to believe, Coleman sings in a smooth voice. I’ll make you scream Jesus. I’ll make you a believer … Call me the messiah because I’m back for the second coming. Coleman grew up in a religious home. His father became a pastor in 1997. Coleman says his parents made him read the Bible — an experience he says helps him write lyrics. “I’m spiritual enough to be comfortable saying those things,” Coleman says of “Believer.” “God is a lot cooler than people believe.” Kyle James is a different kind of believer. His faith is in his music. He believes he’s going to make it. He believes Coleman is going to make it. “Since the music has been picking up, I feel like a lot of people are like, ‘I understand that kid,’” James says. “My goal is to conquer this city,” Coleman says. “I want to be a household name with this guy.” “My buddy from L.A. just started a record label, and we’ve got some contractual things in the works,” James says. “We may not be here for long.”

“My goal is to conquer

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WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 6-12 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

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PAG E

FIRST-FRIDAY HIT LIST

FRIDAY

9.7

A painting by Burton Morri is unmistakable: bold black outlines, bright colors, woodcut-like slashes radiating from depictions of icons like the Statue of Liberty, Bomb Pops and, showing for the first time in public at the Hilliard Gallery (1820 McGee, 816-561-2956), Pop Art & Pop Tarts. With a long history of commercial commissions (including the Academy Awards, the Olympics and Friends), Morris presents a pop-art optimism that’s easy to digest. Silkscreened onto wood panels, the works in Patrick Sullivan’s Sleeping In series retain a woodcut sensibility. Using a limited palette and partial views of women dozing amid geometric representations that suggest dream catchers, Sullivan examines, his statement says, the “fragility of our physical limitations.” For the opening at Base Gallery (2011 Baltimore, 816-437-9975), the 16-bit Dream Emulator Orchestra by Dungeonmaster rounds out the experience. Plenum Space (504 East 18th Street, upstairs, 913-731-6402) presents iPhoneography by Chad Cogdill, who has set aside his usual digital SLR in favor of the tools aboard his iPhone. The results: sharp-angled views of our city. Fans of Tyson Schroeder’s melting and melancholy style won’t want to miss his solo exhibition of new work at Slap-n-Tickle (504 East 18th Street, 816-716-5940). Attack! Without Mercy includes performances by Amy Farrand and Jeff Harshbarger. — TRACY ABELN

n sleep o Don’t y rida . First F

ART Renée Cinderhouse hatches her Destiny.

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PAG E

CAFÉ The Reserve wants to bowl you over.

26 PAG E

MUSIC FORECAST

“3 Sleepers: Taylor” by Patrick Sullivan

Why go to the Granada?

T H U R S D AY | 9 . 6 | MAN UP

Some of you menfolk could use a kick in the pants. Get one today from Chiefs Hall of Famer Ed Budde, Conrad Dobler (named “Pro Football’s Dirtiest Player” by Sports Illustrated in 1977) and psychologist (and ultra-runner) Frank Lieberman. The three are in town for a meetand-greet at clothing store Casual Male XL M OR E (8721 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-383-1606). Dobler E AT N I L ON M and Lieberman are PITCH.CO selling and signing their respective books — Pride and Perseverance and It Has Nothing to Do With Age — and Budde talks about what it was like to be on a Super Bowl– winning Chiefs team. See them 1–4 p.m.

EVENTS

F R I D AY | 9 .7 | FIRST-FRIDAY PARTY ROUNDUP

Trey Bryan unveils his new book, Drawings of KC, at a 6 p.m. reception at Hotel Phillips (106 West 12th Street, 816-221-7000). Look for Hotel Phillips’ resident artist on the hotel’s mezzanine. The book costs $40; light appetizers and wine are on the menu. See hotelphillips.com. Reverend Glasseye plays at the opening of Charlotte Street’s Manifest Destiny at La Esquina (1000 West 25th Street, 816-221-5115). The Boston band’s music has been described as “country-goth glamour” by Paste magazine. Its free performance is 7–11 p.m. The West Bottoms screen-print shop Union Press (1219 Union, 816-842-5683) presents Chalk Empire, new works from Jeremy “Lo-fi” McConnell and Matt “Lou” Ruzich, at 7 p.m. Music by DJ Thundercutz and guests. The indoor mini-ramp will be open for skating. continued on page 12

T H U R S D AY | 9 .6 |

POOL POOCHES

S

urely your dog asked at least once this summer to hit the pool. Indulge your best friend at Dippin’ Dogs, 4–7 p.m., at Bay Water Park (7101 Longview Road, 816-965-9218). It’s a Sports Radio 810 event, so that means giveaways, door prizes and contests. There’s also a pet-supply drive, and vendors with a slew of dog-friendly essentials are slated to be on hand. Admission costs $10 a dog, with a two-dogs-per-person limit. Humans can wade in with the animals, but today isn’t for swimming. Dippin’ Dogs also happens noon–4 p.m. Saturday at the Springs Aquatic Center (9400 North Congress, 816-880-0279). For more information, see dippindogs.com. pitch.com

SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

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Walnut, 816-931-8614). The Irish, Mexican, Sudanese, Jamaican, Native American, Congolese and American cultures vie for your attention at this benefit for the Pilgrim Center for the Arts, the musical and performance division of the Hyde Park nondenominational church. Tickets ($20) at globalmusicfestkc.com. Kids under 12 get in free with a paying adult. The NewEar Contemporary Chamber Ensemble opens its 20th season tonight. The concert at All Souls Unitarian Church (4501 Walnut, 816-531-2131), M OR E titled “Divergent Dreams,” features the world premiere E AT N I L ON M of “The More Things PITCH.CO Change” by resident composer Ingrid Stolzel. A preconcert talk starts at 7:15, and the music begins at 8. Tickets cost $20 ($10 with a student ID). See newear.org.

FRIDAY

9.7

s ’ll mis nd you . s Wink a in k . Tom Paul F

EVENTS

CREATIVE BLOCK continued from page 11

BIG COMEDY HEADS

Headlining the first weekend of the Kansas City Improv Festival is Superego, the Los Angeles quartet behind one of the funniest, strangest and most imaginative productions in the overcrowded comedy-podcast market. Superego’s world is inhabited by aging country crooner Shunt McGuppin, whose xenophobic, sexually graphic songs are still somehow sentimental; Maggie, a jealous and chatty GPS unit; and a horny and confused FDR just trying to make it through another Fireside Chat. Comedian Paul F. Tomkins, a veteran of Mr. Show and guru of the Pod F. Tomcast podcast, joins Superego tonight. Colin Hanks, Tom Hanks’ non-rapping son, also appears with the group, which puts on shows at 7 and 9 p.m. at the Off Center Theatre in Crown Center (2405 Grand, Level 3, 816-842-9999). Troupes from around the nation perform

throughout the festival (which continues next weekend), alongside several KC outfits. See kcimprovfestival.com for full listings and ticket information. — BEN PALOSAARI

S AT U R D AY | 9 . 8 | YOU GOT THE MUSIC IN YOU

The rhythm is — eventually — going to get you. Prepare yourself with lots of fresh beats at one of these community events today. Dance in the Park at Roanoke Park (3699 East Roanoke Drive). Ballet, jazz, modern, hip-hop, belly, swing, West African, flamenco and circus arts are all slated for this free show in the park, beginning at 7 p.m. (The prelude: a free swing lesson at 6:30.) Meet your neighbors and bring your own food and drink. (Rain date is Sunday, September 9.) Global Music Fest KC at St. Paul’s Episcopal Day School playing field (40th Street and

Instead of putting crayons in your meaty paws and pressing them against newsprint, try hitting up the Big Draw (& Print) at H&R Block Artspace at the Kansas City Art Institute (16 East 43rd Street, 816-561-5563). This all-ages event is for anyone who wants to make art. Expect artist-led drawing sessions, collage instruction, and hands-on time with the Print Factory Workshop’s press. In the main gallery, an open draw goes from 1 to 5 p.m. Admission is free, and materials are provided. RSVP by sending an e-mail to bahern@kcai.edu or calling 816-802-3571.

S U N D AY | 9 . 9 | RISE AND SHINE

This weekend’s KC Black Expo includes an Isaiah Washington book signing, a meetand-greet with NASCAR driver Tia Norfleet, a fashion-and-hair “fantasy show,” and a Big Daddy Kane concert. Cleanse your soul today

B R E N N A PA X T O N

S AT U R D AY | 9 . 8 |

THE BITCH OF LIVING

T

he Coterie gets mature with its production of Spring Awakening, the Tony Award–winning Broadway musical that touches on homosexuality, rape and abuse. The Duncan Sheik– scored show is a Coterie At Night jam, meaning no children under 13. See it at 7:30 p.m.; tickets at coterietheatre.org.

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SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

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T U E S D AY | 9 . 1 1 |

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ew characters have ever matched the badassed Maj. Alan “Dutch” Schaefer, Arnold Schwarzenegger’s soldier in Predator. Experience it again on the big screen when the Alamo Drafthouse (1400 Main, 816-474-4545) presents the 1987 blockbuster, accompanied by in-theater pyrotechnics and cap guns as part of its Tough Guy Cinema series. (“We go all out for these things,” says Brad Johnson, Alamo’s PR man.) The action starts at 7:30 p.m., and tickets cost $12. at 5 p.m. when Bishop Mark Tolbert of Victorious Life Church (3400 Paseo) hosts a Gospel Fest with James Fortune, Jessica Reedy and Shirley Caesar. Tickets cost just $12 and include optional medical and dental screenings. Call 816-561-3730 or see kcblackexpo.com for more information. The expo gets going at noon (following Friday’s 11:45 a.m. ribbon-cutting ceremony and Saturday’s noon start). It’s at Bartle Hall (301 West 13th Street, 816-513-5000).

BETWEEN THE LINES

The Alcott Arts Center (180 South 18th Street, in Kansas City, Kansas, 913-233-2787) had a tough spring after thieves ripped off some copper from its building in April. “The Alcott is doing great, thanks to all of the supporters that came to our aid,” says Chris Green, the center’s executive director and co-founder. “We are having classes and art exhibits, producing plays, having musical performances and loving it. If we could get a new heat source and be able to stay open year-round, we would be set.” Keep the love and money coming this weekend (and next), when the Alcott puts on its

Park it for Shakespeare.

sixth annual Shakespeare in the Parking Lot at 4 p.m. This year’s selection: Hamlet. Admission costs $5 plus a nonperishable food item, which goes to the Central Avenue Center of Hope food pantry. For more information, see alcottartscenter.org.

M O N D AY | 9 . 10 | BEST-OF SPOTLIGHT — 2008 BEST REVERSE HAPPY HOUR AT NARA Four years after we recognized its after-hours special, Nara (1617 Main, 816-221-6272) is still killing it. Mondays mean Brodioke, $3 Kirin drafts, $5 cosmos and $7 sake selections. Hook yourself up on the cheap tonight from 10 p.m. to midnight; see narakc.com.

W E D N E S D AY | 9 . 12 | WHERE’S THE POTATO CLOCK?

Dude, your cherry-stem-knot trick is tired. Pick up a new, less awkward icebreaker at the Red Lyon Tavern (944 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-8228) when Teresa MacDonald, public-education director for the University of Kansas Natural History Museum, and fellow educator Bekkah Lampe lead “Science on the Spot: Bar Edition.” “The museum uses these events to reach audiences that might not often visit a museum,” says the museum’s Jennifer Humphrey. “Science isn’t reserved for the classroom — it’s a part of everyone’s lives.” So come for the beer and stay to experience Lime Laws of Motion, Napkin Chromatography, and Peroxide Snake, among other lessons. The learning goes from 7 to 9 p.m. and is free. Details at naturalhistory.ku.edu. E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

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SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

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ART

OFF THE MAP

Renée Cinderhouse’s alternate history of Manifest Destiny

LEGENDS 1867 VILLAGE WEST • next to Dave & Busters

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T R A C Y A BE L N

NIKKI GLASER SEPTEMBER 5-8 • Host of Mtv’s Nikki & Sarah Show • Last Comic Standing • Top 10 Emerging Comics by Askmen.com • Tonight Show • Went to KU

F

orever. That’s how long sculptor Renée Cinderhouse says she has been working on her new installation, Manifest Destiny. For months, she has built molds and cast objects. Over the past few weeks, she has been on studio lockdown, pulling 30-hour shifts while the kiln burns away. This show, scheduled to open September 7 at the Charlotte Street Foundation’s La Esquina gallery, marks the most ambitious endeavor yet in a two-decade career, during which the Kansas City Art Institute alumna has exhibited in New York, Florida, Texas, California and elsewhere. For Manfiest Destiny, she’s firing artifacts for a ghost history of the human race. Inside La Esquina, she’s building a forest of context for her sculptures, made of 14-foot “pages” culled from Victorian naturalist drawings. Viewers pass through a corridor papered with encyclopedia excerpts, among the first of which is an entry on John L. O’Sullivan, the newspaper editor who coined the phrase “manifest destiny” in the mid19th century. You’re not old enough to remember 1839 but, as Cinderhouse’s installation reminds you, you’ve been there. There had been an economic downturn, fueled in part by the fact that U.S. banks had overextended credit. Immigration and birth rates were up as the country’s population exploded (from 5 million to 23 million over the 50 years starting in 1800). As abolitionism grew, so did political divisiveness. And the story was being recorded by the likes of O’Sullivan, who wrote in 1839: “Yes, we are the nation of progress, of individual freedom, of universal enfranchisement … [moving] onward to the fulfillment of our mission — to the entire development of the principle of our organization — freedom of conscience, freedom of person, freedom of trade and business pursuits, universality of freedom and equality.” Back then, manifesting the country’s destiny meant killing off or converting American Indians. Mexicans were in the way. Women could not vote. A black person who was not a slave was counted by the Census as three-fi fths of a person. But narratives

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forged by O’Sullivan and his peers largely Cinderhouse (above) at work on Destiny. disregarded these facts as obstacles to a great 12-week-old fetuses. There are books, cards, Christian end. The dialogue today, Cinderhouse says, is a few chickens, dinnerware — all impossibly about cultural dominance rather than geo- delicate and fragile, frozen like fossils. Cinderhouse has invited artist acquaingraphic expansion. (The Mars rover notwithtances from around the country to participate standing, there’s nowhere else to go.) But again, the impetus and justification seem to be as the exhibition continues, their performances interspersed with the installation. She wants God’s plan, not necessarily the people’s will. So the living storybook of Manifest Destiny is Manifest Destiny to be a unified experience, for there to be no separation between audience her attempt to remake a frozen set of scenes and art. “It will be as if someone got out an amid a forest. The plants represent the time instrument after dinner,” she says, “and just in America’s story before the narrative of “We started playing on the porch or in the drawing the People” was usurped by a mass media whose perspective, as Cinderhouse writes in room, for example.” She says she chose the music based on what her artist’s statement, “is not necessarily the she listened to while working on Manifest opinion of the majority.” Destiny. The musicians play instruments faShe has wrapped the gallery in black, miliar from folklore: ukulele, autoharp, bowed velvety cloth, darkening the space into a banjo, cello. Reverend Glasseye is set to lead memoryscape decorated with those encyoff on First Friday, with the act Victor & Penny clopedia pages, pieces of our oral-history, prefilling the space September 15. For closing Internet collective knowledge. Oak leaves, weekend (September 28– made from the same, litter 30), there are three ticketed the forest floor; visitors are Manifest Destiny performances by the Denver meant to wander through Through September 30 Broncos UK. Different, welland look in on vignettes inat La Esquina, 1000 West 25th known local bands open for spired by natural-historyStreet, manifestdestiny2012 the Broncos each night. museum dioramas. (The . wordpress.com She wanted to explore ghost history has a living how music, art and theater narrator this weekend, could express the same things in a single space, when actor Ron Megee performs.) centered on a symbolic narrative. The effect is a Some of Cinderhouse’s hand-finished porcelain sculptures reference genetic en- bit surreal, built on dream logic — and not built alone. Héctor Cinderhouse, Renée’s husband, gineering — biodiversity’s destruction at handled the two-dimensional design work and the hand of blind profit. Corn, steered for the calligraphy for the show’s personalized centuries into human-usable versions, here thank-you pages. Other artists earned those becomes “One Corn,” a patented product invading heirloom fields. Apples, usually the thank-yous, too, including Rachel Eilts and symbol of humankind’s fall from grace, here Nate Bogart; they join a list of Kickstarter suptells another story: Westward expansion fol- porters whose pre-sale contributions helped cover material and performers’ costs. lowing Johnny Appleseed, and settlers plantFor Cinderhouse, though, there’s something ing trees and sticking around to see them grow, and a bitter fruit once used to make hard more at stake than scale and cost. She says it’s the artist’s role to show us how to change the cider rebranded as a healthy snack. cultural conversation. With Manifest Destiny, Her installation holds up axes (to reference the temperance movement’s zealous she has set out to rewrite what can’t be unwritten. And it’s taking shape. smashing of liquor barrels, the cutting of virgin forests to make way for settlement, other things) and also displays human femurs and E-mail feedback@pitch.com

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The Reserve is about to have its moment inside the remade Ambassador Hotel.

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The Reserve • Ambassador Hotel, 1111 Grand, 816-298-7700 • Hours: 6:30 a.m.–11 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 6:30 a.m.–1 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 7 a.m.–10 p.m. Sunday • Price: $$–$$$

owntown Kansas City isn’t exactly a mecca for first-class hotel dining. (Some people cite the Savoy Grill as the exception to this sad rule; even when I do it, though, it’s largely out of habit.) But there’s reason for new hope. The Reserve, tucked into the refitted Ambassador Hotel (at 11th Street and Grand), marks a step up in class from any dining venue in the Power & Light District, and it has a young chef with real talent, Geoffrey van Glabbeek. There’s no question that this neighborhood needed a boutique hotel. But is the boutique boîte inside a little too ahead of its time? Really, the first question might be: What time is it at the Ambassador? The mad clash of styles dominating the narrow lobby of the Ambassador evokes several different eras without paying homage to any of them, a temporal collage that you pass through before you actuE R O M ally reach the Reserve. It all works, though. Paul Coury, owner of the new T A INE ONL .COM hotel, knows good bone H PITC structure when he sees it. This dazzling, streetlevel space was once the lobby of the Gate City Bank, constructed a decade before the Depression, back when a little ostentation at your local money lender didn’t look vulgar. The floors are tea-colored marble, and the coffered ceiling, still boasting its original moldings, soars up past the mezzanine. Inside the swanky Reserve, there’s another busy motif to consider. Silvery rings hang from the shiny-metal drum light fixtures, and each chair, upholstered in clean white leather, is adorned with a single metal ring. Angelic halos or sexy hoops, they add up to some kind of statement, and I’d already seen more shapes and colors than my subconscious could cope with. (And I haven’t even told you about the original paintings on the walls, all with doubleentendre names that make you think you’ve wandered into the Kraff t-Ebing Café.) Your mind may need a few minutes (and a tiramisu martini) to process the overload. Of course, you’re not necessarily supposed to see everything in a hotel restaurant. The Reserve is well-lighted during the breakfast and lunch shifts, but it’s seductively dark after dusk. If you’re looking for the perfect spot for a secluded romantic assignation, this room should be high on your list. You’ll be lucky to see your dining companion, let alone the couple at the next table. I was here to eat, though, and chef van Glabbeek’s four menus (breakfast, lunch, dinner and a limited late-night selection) are — for now — less seductive than they are simply creative. The execution isn’t yet as refined as the décor. Still, there’s plenty of time for van Glabbeek to make improvements, and it won’t take much. He’s too young to remember when hotel dining rooms were the best places

CAFÉ

ANGELA C. BOND

D

Van Glabbeek’s six entrées can be ordered in either a small “tasting” portion or dinnerto dine in any city (an axiom now decades out sized. I made the mistake of first ordering the petite version of the braised short rib, which of date), but he’s savvy enough to see that he was just enough to make me wish I’d asked has the chance to fill a niche. What’s missing for two big plates. It’s an exquisite, tender beef from lodgings north of the Crossroads District is an intimate, sophisticated urban bistro that rib, seared and slow-cooked in red wine and veal stock, and served on a spoonful of creamy can offer both hotel standards (a good burger, herbed orzo. Van Glabbeek says he prefers short a club sandwich, decent breakfasts and coffee) ribs to steak, and he serves it like he means it: and a few unexpected choices. The Reserve’s ribs are a blue-chip affair. Some of his small plates are outstanding, More surprising: The blackened-chicken including a crustacean “corn dog” on a skewer: sandwich — a dull obligation on most menus — a succulent hunk of sweet lobster dipped in a kicks ass here. The kitchen rubs the bird breast light cornmeal tempura batter and fried until in a blend of allspice, pepper, cayenne, cinnathere’s a crispy, almost evanescent crust. His mon and chili powder, then sears it, slathers a version of a diner “slider” — two on a plate piece of puffy focaccia with for $12 — is so haute cuichipotle mayonnaise, and sine, you’ll feel guilty eating The Reserve drops the meat onto it with one with your fingers. The Lobster corndog ..................$11 a slice of pepper jack cheese. coaster-sized beef patty is KC sliders .............................$12 There’s not much meatless smothered in a sultry chiCrab cakes ...........................$12 here, though, outside of salpotle jam and a swath of Side order macaroni ads, a plate of hummus and queso fresco and tucked into and cheese..........................$6 flatbread, and most of the side a puffy egg bun. I think anyLentil and feta sandwich....$9 Fish and chips .....................$15 dishes (including a wonderthing called a slider need not Devil’s-food cupcake ..........$6 ful, rich, vegetarian-friendly be much bigger than a White macaroni and cheese that’s Castle burger (somewhere blanketed in a thick sauce between a postage stamp made with cheddar, Parmesan and nutty and a chewing-tobacco tin), but in this case, I Gruyere). The only meatless sandwich on the welcome van Glabbeek’s generosity. lunch menu is an awkward concoction of al The two crab “cakes,” on the other hand, aren’t much bigger than traditional marshmal- dente lentils, crumbles of feta, chopped tomato and arugula daintily spooned between two thin lows, and the ones I sampled had been fried until the exterior was the color of a very old cop- slices of bland flatbread. I found the one I tried impossible to cut, clumsy to eat and visually per penny — and nearly as tough on the teeth. “They’re 90 percent crabmeat,” my server ex- boring. (I failed to sample the dinner menu’s pappardelle pasta, which comes in a seasonalplained. What’s the other 10 percent? I wanted to vegetable ragoût. I plead ribs.) ask. I took refuge in the accompanying spoonful The kitchen bakes some kind of quiche evof slaw — a tart salad with ribbons of Granny ery day, but a more memorable lunch entrée is Smith and red pepper, bits of red onion and the platter of tempura-battered sunfish, fried parsley in a sassy champagne vinaigrette.

Save room: warm beignets and silky cheese.

and served with a spicy poblano coleslaw, and house fries as thick as chubby Crayolas. (Their girth comes at a price, though; they need to be a hell of a lot crispier.) If the server tells you that the praline cheesecake is made on-site, he’s lying through his pearly teeth. It’s mediocre anyway. You’re better off with the fine house-made beignets, rolled in vanilla sugar, or a really dense devil’sfood cupcake, topped with espresso meringue rather than with sticky frosting. The ice-cream sandwich is surrounded with house-made chocolate-chip cookies, which are crispy and delicious, but it’s another small-plate-style notion, not a dessert made for sharing. The servers I’ve encountered here so far are as friendly as can be, but their style doesn’t yet have the polish that a sleek room like the Reserve deserves. One regaled us with his life story (a cliffhanger — he just graduated from college), and a lunch waitress another day frequently disappeared to see to her room-service duties. (I spotted her wheeling a tacky-looking cart toward the elevators. Scandalously, the lunch dishes had not been placed under metal covers.) “We have a few kinks we need to work out,” Lenny, a manager here who used to work at the Raphael, told me. But only a few. On the whole, the Reserve is an excellent asset for downtown dining. The Ambassador itself is embracing its own moreis-more style, and van Glabbeek is working day and night to compound public interest in his kitchen. There’s free parking, and the prices aren’t hotel-inflated. For my money, the Reserve is a smart investment.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

pitch.com MTBHE RX X–X 6 - 1 2X, , 2200102X TTHHEE PPI ITTCCHH 19 pitch.comS E PMTOE N 1

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BY JONATHAN BENDER AND CHARLES FERRUZZA

Rounding up restaurants new, gone and coming soon.

Great American and European Dishes with Fresh Ingredients!

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Monday-Saturday: 6:30am-8pm Sunday: 6:30am-2:30pm 6740 W. 75th St., OP, KS 66204 913-236-0003 www.cozyscafe.com

fter a summer of sweets, spice and smoke, local diners can now start packing on the winter weight early, courtesy of some new restaurants (including Reserve, reviewed on page 19). This week, Fat City tells you what’s new, what’s gone and what’s coming. Kansas Citians craving a lunch-hour bite of Mexican food from Barbosa’s don’t have to wait any longer. The well-known Mexican restaurant (with two locations in St. Joseph) has opened a new family franchise, Barbosa’s Express, at 1124 Oak. The St. Jo institution is known for its tacos, made with flour tortillas instead of the traditional yellow corn. Barbosa’s Express is open 10:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Wing Busters, next door at 1128 Oak, also serves lunch but opens at 7 a.m. for breakfast. First meals at this new wing shop mean egg sandwiches, breakfast burritos and omelets. Lunch features chicken and fish sliders, picnic sides (potato salad, okra, red beans and rice) and wings with more than 30 sauces. It’s open 7 a.m.–4 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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opened in the former Café Tandoor space (3623 Broadway) in August. The menu, created by brothers Jeff and Robert Clark (who own the restaurant with their father, Granville Clark), is a mix of soul food and Caribbean dishes. Folks driving on State Line Road are used to smelling barbecue, a scent that typically comes from the Gates near the Interstate 435 ramps. At lunchtime, there’s a new smell here, a competing hickory smoke from Driftwood BBQ. The food truck parks at State Line Shopping Center (103rd Street and State Line) for lunch, 11 a.m.– 2 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. Five Guys Burgers and Fries has put up another outpost. This one is at 3930 Rainbow Boulevard, and it’s open 11 a.m.–10 p.m. daily. Milk & Honey, a new bakery from Karina Parreno and Casey Conner, now sells French macarons at the Roasterie Café in Brookside (and takes catering orders). The duo met while helping launch Bloom Bakery in the City Market and already have a customer favorite in the salted caramel. Twisted Doughnut (14383 Metcalf, Overland Park) will put just about anything on a doughnut. For example: maple bacon, gummy bears and even Lucky Charms. The doughnut shop is the latest idea from Jeff and Brandi Martin, who are behind the Smallcakes cupcakery. Twisted Doughnut is open 6 a.m.–midnight Tuesday through Sunday.

Closings

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he pit at Suzie Q’s Smokehouse has gone dormant. The barbecue restaurant in the former Tommy’s Bar & Grill at 6221 North Chestnut in Gladstone has closed after five months of operation. Pitmaster David Russell used a mixture of his own recipes, culled on the

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NICK GARDNER

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Parreno (left) & Conner from Milk & Honey barbecue circuit, and those of his grandfather, Jim Ramey. The varied menu featured smoked wings and Cajun sausage. The Pinoy Café closed before it ever opened. Theresa Spencer had plans for a Filipino restaurant in the former Grille on Broadway space, but the lease was terminated. Meanwhile, the restaurant shuffle continues at Mission Farms. Less than a month after Lakeside Tavern closed in the Leawood development (Bluestem’s Colby and Megan Garrelts are opening Rye in the space this fall), Avenues Bistro shut its doors there in August. But the spot at 10681 Mission won’t remain empty for long. Tavern in the Village plans to open a second location there in September. After 10 months of operation, Tamale Wizard (527 Walnut) closed in the River Market in July. Owner Bruce Swabb, who ran the shop with his partner and son, Charlie, grew his business from a cart selling tacos and tamales at farmers markets and First Fridays.

Still to Come

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essy’s, the former wing shop on Broad-

way, reopens in the West Bottoms this month, with plans for late-night delivery to downtown and midtown. Owner Titus Bond is busy rehabbing the former Woodswether Café (1230 Woodswether Road), where he says he’ll serve pizzas, burgers and fried mushrooms. But the easy highway access for deliveries until 4 a.m. is why he’s bringing his act to the West Bottoms. The success of the first Parisi Café — a coffeehouse serving locally roasted Parisi coffees, and also offering sodas, fancy teas and a limited food menu — has inspired the coffee company’s owners, Paris Brothers Specialty Foods, to lease space in Leawood’s Park Place. The new coffeehouse, set to be almost twice the size of the Union Station venue, is seeking a liquor license, in order to serve wine and coffee liqueur. The new Parisi Café is tentatively scheduled to open in late November.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

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UNITED WAY G

uitarist and Lee’s Summit native Pat Metheny returns on Thursday to make his hometown debut with his new group, the Unity Band. (It derives its name from the Metheny clan’s longstanding affiliations with this area’s very own Unity Church.) Rounded out by saxophonist Chris Potter, bassist Ben Williams and longtime Metheny drummer Antonio Sanchez, the Unity Band arrives on the heels of its eponymous new album on Nonesuch. Live, the Unity Band’s songs take on a dramatically kinetic quality, thanks in particular to Sanchez’s assertive style. Also lending to the specialness of the occasion: This is the first group that Metheny has led in more than 30 years which features a tenor player. In a sense, E MOR Unit y Band re op en s channels that Metheny first explored on 80/81, T A E IN ONL .COM his 1980 album with bassPITCH ist Charlie Haden, drummer Jack DeJohnette, and saxophonists Michael Brecker and Dewey Redman. Metheny checked in with The Pitch last week to discuss what else is new. The Pitch: At your Lee’s Summit High School Hall of Fame induction speech in 1998, you talked about the impact that locals like your old music teacher Keith House and the Browning family had on you. Metheny: Giving that speech at the Lee’s Summit High School Hall of Fame induction ceremony was the most terrifying 20 minutes of my entire life, including playing for a billion people at Live Aid and everything else. It was quite a thing. Because so many people that I knew were there, and especially considering that my graduating from high school … the most kind way to say it would be to say that it was a mercy graduation. I never had any grade above D — or what they used to call “I” out there, which was “Inferior” — from sixth grade on. I don’t think I officially had enough credits to graduate, but they were kind enough to actually let me leave with a diploma. To go from that to actually being in the hall of fame was pretty cool. It’s not as if you haven’t played with your share of saxophonists, but it has been a long time since you’ve featured a horn player in a band that you’ve led. What had you been trying to explore away from the tenor saxophone all these years with your own groups? For me, a big element of what it means to be a musician is the whole aspect of discovery. All of my favorite musicians were really committed to trying to find alternate ways of exploring the forms they were interested in. That’s been a big priority for me. Even the whole idea of just a guitar-bass-drums trio was relatively unexplored in jazz at the time that I started. There were a couple of records, but not much. With my group [the Pat Metheny Group], fistfights still break out over [the question] “What is that?” There’s all these wacky words that come

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up, like fusion. Even the word jazz doesn’t really fit well for a lot of the things about music that I’m interested in. Trying to find a voice or a point of view — not just as a player but also as a bandleader and a composer — has naturally led me to put together ensembles that were not quite conventional in the same way that a horn plus a rhythm section is conventional. People actually get into fistfights over what labels apply to your records? [Laughs.] Even after all this time, there’s no real consensus. I actually consider that to be a really good thing. There are many musicians where it’s like, “Oh, yeah, it’s that record [that defines them].” With me, it’s kind of equally distributed among all of the records. There’s different people that like this and different people that like that. If there is any frustration in that, it’s that all of those fistfights or discussions miss the point, which is that all of my releases go together. That’s a much more complex idea. I hear very reduced explanations like, “Well, there’s the [Pat Metheny] Group and that’s the commercial vehicle.” Many times, not only is that not the way it is but it’s backward. I mean, the Group is probably the least easy thing for me from a fi nancial standpoint because it’s so big, as opposed to a trio, which is a lot more mobile. But the message is, in fact, the way it all goes together as one way of thinking about what music can be, rather than a bunch of little distinct side roads. It’s one big road. Take your noise-oriented album Zero Tolerance for Silence, for example. In the AllMusic review for that album, it suggests that the music on there might have been your way of “saying ‘screw you’ to the label.”

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Pat Metheny’s new album

BY

leads back to Lee’s Summit.

S A B Y R E Y E S- K UL K A R NI

The three musicians where I can say you could pick any one of them and it would be equally great were Gary, Ornette and Chris. It’s the only time I’ve ever experienced that, where every single version was different and great. That’s also been borne out live. I’ve played with Gary the most, but I probably did a hundred gigs with Ornette, and I’m getting pretty close to a hundred now with Chris, so it’s a pretty good sample size. They’re just amazingly consistent improvisers. Of course, they’re coming from very different places in terms of dialect, but in terms of being able to get to stuff every time, they’re really in a special category. Can you talk more about the ideas behind the Unity Band? I can actually talk about this in terms of Kansas City because it’s the only place on the planet where the actual meaning of the album title might resonate with a few people. The reason it’s called Unity Band is because of [Unity Church world headquarters] Unity Village. The whole Unity Village thing, with my family, my grandfather on my dad’s side, my brother playing in the Unity Band from the time he was really young, and my experiences going there in the summer — first as an observer and then as a participant in the Unity Band — were really great memories for Local jazz freak makes good: Metheny (second from right) and his Unity Band. me. Unity Village in particular is very special to me. Going back to the time I was an Not at all. In fact, it’s the opposite. At that infant, I spent enormous amounts of time time, [Sonic Youth’s] Thurston Moore was inout there in the summers. Knowing that this volved in the A&R decision making at Geffen. was going to be a band put together mostly He heard it and just freaked out and wanted for summer events had this resonant thing for to put it out immediately. It me. I was actually going to actually didn’t quite fit in have an album cover with all with the touring that I was this Unity Band stuff from Pat Metheny Unity Band doing at that time, which the old days. I got all these Thursday, September 6, sorta got bulldozed over by pictures from Unity, and at the Folly Theater the record. They were like, finally [Nonesuch Records “We’re putting this out!” president] Bob Hurwitz said, [Laughs.] “You know what? Nobody It sounds like Geffen was actually enthusiastic has any idea what you’re talking about. Would about that release. you just stop it with this?” [Laughs.] He said, Oh, completely. I don’t even see what the “Unity Band is a great name for a band. You big controversy is with that record. can think about it how you want, but it’s really On some level, it must be a blessing and a just [a great name for] what this music is.” So curse that some of your work is polarizing. It’s we ended up not going in that direction. But, got to be satisfying and frustrating at the same in fact, we’re both right because, of course, my time that people cling to their own notions of memories were included, but also because that what you mean to them. word is a great word for so many things that Well, on the blessing-curse ratio, it’s like 99 I’m interested in … it’s my natural sensibility percent blessing and 1 percent curse. to gather things together — You often speak very highly of Ornette ColeTo mix and match? man and vibraphonist Gary Burton as being two It’s more than mix and match. It’s actual inof the most singular voices you’ve ever come tegration. It’s not arbitrary, like a casual “Oh, across. What is it that puts Unity Band saxomaybe I’ll throw a little of this with a little phonist Chris Potter in that same category? of that.” Right from the beginning, the first The specific, pragmatic piece of evidence eight notes of [debut album] Bright Size Life that I would offer to support that is this: When are saying, “OK, you know what? This is landyou do a record with somebody, in almost ing on a major triad, not a dominant seventh every case you do a bunch of takes. At the end chord.” Why can’t folk-type harmonies exist of the session, you’ve got this whole bunch with this level of improvising? Right from the of stuff, and then you have to go through it beginning, I’ve been trying to figure out a way and pick which version you’re going to use. of really going deep into continued on page 24 pitch.com

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continued from page 22 the idea of inclusion. It’s not as casual as mix and match. That’s what I would not want it to be. What I’m looking for is a way for things to really coexist. That’s what the big long record [of my work] has been about — not just this one but all of them together. So you’ve come to look at your whole body of work as one album and all your shows as one concert. Yeah, and as a tour goes on, I start to think of each gig as one song and each tour as one album. It all starts to merge in terms of time, too. That’s an overarching theme for me in a lot of ways.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

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the ’90s, and Synthetica

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Pussy Riot, Williamsburg in

mily Haines — singer of Canadian newwave act Metric, founding member of indie mega-group Broken Social Scene, well-known smart lady — has never been one to keep her thoughts to herself. She’s openly political and brazenly honest, and Metric’s fourth studio album, Synthetica, finds her busy wondering how our frenetic, computer-interfaced modern way of living might be affecting our lives. She elaborated on this topic and others when The Pitch recently caught up with her by phone in advance of Metric’s September 12 show at the Beaumont Club. The Pitch: Your band has lived in so many different places. Where do you find to be the most conducive to making music? Haines: It’s actually this Toronto–New York hybrid. The studio that we have in Toronto — it’s our headquarters for music as well as a sort of psycho-emotional headquarters. But there’s always a stage in the process where we feel like we need the perspective that New York gives. And there’s the fact that the band met in Brooklyn 10 years ago. It always feels like another birthplace. Do you think that New York is still a good place to play as a smaller band, or has it become more difficult?

S E P T E M B E R 6 - 1 2 , 2 0 1 2 2 pitch.com THE PITCH

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

Haines: the Metric by which all women are judged. I don’t know — I was just talking about this with someone the other night. Because there are some great stories that came out of those years when we were there. Late ’98, ’99, we had this big industrial — they’d call it a loft but it was more like a garage. It was before Williamsburg had really gotten going. It turned out that so many people who were living there went on to do great things: members of TV on the Radio, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Stars, and then obviously Metric. It all kind of came out of this time. Interpol and the Strokes were doing their thing. It sounds great, but in some ways it wasn’t. I don’t know if it’s possible for there to be another wave like that, but I think New York can always be a place for things to come together. One more quick look back. Broken Social Scene had so many people of such a high talent level. Was it hard to wrangle everyone together, or was it something that worked well? Jimmy [Metric bandmate James Shaw] and I were founding members of the band with Kevin [Drew] and Brendan [Canning], and then all our lives went so many different ways. Our primary thing was always Metric. All these other bands already existed before Broken Social Scene started. We all had our main projects, and [BSS] was an amazing way to hang out. Really, it’s Kevin’s ability to bring people together. For me, it’s really a pleasure. I didn’t do a lot of touring. The logistics probably got difficult for the rest of the band. Other than some obvious stylistic differences between your solo work and Metric, does the music created on your own serve different purposes to you or does it all satisfy the same need? The solo records I made, I had to make them because they’re essentially dedicated to my father [Canadian poet Paul Haines], who had just passed away. It’s very much a part of that time. As much as I try to be articulate in describing the process or the reasons or motives for why things happen the way they happen, I just have to be honest…. You just feel this imperative to do something, and later on you can apply some reasoning to it, but a lot of it is just staggering around in the dark. pitch.com

What do you think about the Russian punk band Pussy Riot, whose members were just sentenced to two years in prison for performing an anti-Putin song in a church? I’ve been thinking about this a lot recently, and I’m really at a crossroads. Anybody who knows [Metric] or cares about it knows where we stand. I’m really struggling with whether anyone wants me to say something more. There’s this really fine line between trying to make sure that you bring attention to causes or world events that need attention, and then sort of glomming onto whatever really serious event might be happening and making sure that you’re there waving your hands in the background with your two cents to comment on it. I really struggle with that. I tweeted a week ago a link to the story, which lately has been my way of approaching things. Synthetica has some interesting themes running through it about people being so disconnected that what’s real and what’s not becomes confusing. Are you saying we’re overstimulated or overmedicated or too vain, or all of the above? Well, yeah, it is interesting to note that we live in a time where addiction to prescription drugs that aren’t even psychedelic, drugs that just make you nod off and removed, that those addictions are exceeding those of street drugs that might stimulate some new thought or have some creative purpose. To me, that says a lot about where we’re all at. To be clear, I include myself in these assessments. I feel like a person of the time I’m living in. Maybe I’m just trying to raise a flag for myself, too.… Maybe it’s all leading to some great place. It’s a head-thrashing era. It seems like at every bigger concert I’ve been to in the last few years, some portion of the audience is just watching it through their cameras or phones instead of being actually present. What are your thoughts about how technology is influencing music? I can’t really call anyone out on that because you’ll do whatever feels right in the moment. If you’re watching it through your phone and you’re having a good time … I think a lot of what I’ve tried to address is that I’ve noticed a difference in my own behavior. There was a time in my life where when you played a concert and you were only playing to the people in the room, things could happen. And now, it’s just completely changed the way I approach playing a show, just knowing that out of context, anything I do or say can be transmitted anywhere. On one hand, how amazing! A global broadcast. On the other hand, does it make me want to be brave? Not especially, you know? Maybe the thing we’re seeing, too, is that our generation is going to be the fi rst to take stock of the things we don’t want to do. Maybe the next generation won’t be so quick to give away all of their personal information and become a permanent research pool for governments and advertisers. It’s a pretty good scam, you know? Hopefully what’s happening is, people are taking a better look at how their lives have improved and then fi nding out what they miss.

— A PRIL FLEMING

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MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST

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Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, S E P T E M B E R 6 Jak Progresso, Deuce Fontaine, the Abnorm, Ben Grimm: Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Langhorne Slim, the Natural State: 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds, Ben Miller Band: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Tracii Guns, Pizza Party Massacre: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179.

F R I D AY, S E P T E M B E R 7 Boston, Night Ranger, Starship: Starlight Theatre, 4600 Starlight Rd., 816-363-7827. Tab Benoit: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Sugarpill, Evil Bastards, Azoic Realm, Matej B: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Vital Remains, Torn the Fuck Apart, Decimation, Dischordia, A Plague in Faith, Priests of Ba’al: 8:30 p.m. Aftershock Bar & Grill, 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-384-5646.

Heartless bastards (left) and and Ghostface Killah

Ghostface Killah, with Saigon and Sheek Louch

That Ghostface Killah is coming to Kansas City is notable all by itself, but that the Wu-Tang fan favorite is performing at the little old Riot Room qualifies as truly remarkable news. Why are we so lucky? Ghost and Sheek Louch (of the Lox) are dropping a collab album, Wu-Block, in October, and to pimp it out, they’ve been hitting up small clubs across the United States. Saigon, a rapper best known for his Flaming Lips–on–Beverly Hills 90210–like appearances on the HBO show Entourage, opens. Monday, September 10, at Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Heartless Bastards

Like the Black Keys or one of Jack White’s many bands, the Heartless Bastards make a strong case for the continued relevance of stripped-down, blues-influenced rock music. Since relocating to Austin from Cincinnati, the group — anchored by frontwoman Erika Wennerstrom’s fierce, gritty vocals — has absorbed a little bit of Texas twang, and it’s a good look on them. Wednesday, September 12, at Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Why

Why frontman Yoni Wolf croaks, I want that sharpened steel of truth in every word on “This Blackest Purse,” from 2009’s Eskimo Snow. Rarely are mission statements so affecting, but then Wolf is a pretty rare talent, one of the finest (if overlooked) lyricists of the last decade. Each new Why release — including last month’s

Sod in the Seed EP, which isn’t knocking my socks off but will do for now — seems to creep further from the group’s alternative hip-hop roots and closer to something like art-pop, a progression about which I have no complaints. Friday, September 7, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

VibeSquaD and Opiuo

Jonesing for some live EDM beyond Bassnectar, Deadmau5 and the other usual suspects? This Beatport-sponsored evening showcases two up-and-coming DJs, performing as a duo: Denver’s bass-obsessed VibeSquaD, and Opiuo, a more genre-adventurous Aussie. If those last two sentences read like gibberish, congratulations (and welcome): You are officially old. Saturday, September 8, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Twin Shadow

Everybody seems to love the new Twin Shadow album, Confess. I just don’t know, you guys. I’m having a really hard time stomaching singer George Lewis. Whatever emotion (or nonemotion) he’s trying to sell with that gloomy-detached Morrissey croon, I’m not buying it, and the handful of catchy synth hooks on the record aren’t enough to make up for it. But dark, ’80s-influenced synth pop isn’t really my scene, so I suppose I’m not exactly the last word here. Sunday, September 9, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Tity Boi was the most hilarious rapper name I’d ever heard until earlier this year, when 2 Chainz popped up on my radar. Turns out, they’re the same guy. Tauheed Epps wanted a more media-friendly stage moniker and so changed his name last year. It’s looking like a wise career move: All of a sudden, he’s doing verses on Young Jeezy and Nicki Minaj radio jams and bringing in Kanye and Drake to guest on his album. Chainz’s punch-line-heavy trap rap isn’t shattering any artistic boundaries, but the listening public seems to approve: His studio debut, Based on a T.R.U. Story, is riding along at the top of the hip-hop charts. Sunday, September 9, at the Beaumont Club (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560)

S AT U R D AY, S E P T E M B E R 8 Laura Ellis: 8 p.m. The Living Room, 1818 McGee, 816-221-4260. Eddie Griffin: VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Daryl Hall and John Oates: Starlight Theatre, 4600 Starlight Rd., 816-363-7827. Y’allapalooza with Dierks Bentley, Big & Rich, Kix Brooks, Phil Vassar, and more: 4:30 p.m. Cricket Wireless Amphitheater, 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs, 913-721-3400.

S U N D AY, S E P T E M B E R 9 Grayson Capps: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

M O N D AY, S E P T E M B E R 10 Easy Star All-Stars: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

Crossroads Music Fest

Crosstown Station is no more. (Has it really been only a year since it closed? It feels more like three years.) But Bill Sundahl’s Crossroads Music Festival predated the downtown venue, and this year, its eighth, it officially outlives the station. Things start up Friday night with a preparty at the Grinders stage featuring the Good Foot, the Grisly Hand and a Supernauts reunion show. Saturday night, it kicks into gear with about 20 local acts spread across four venues: Grinders, Czar, Midwestern Musical Co. and the Brick. As usual, the lineup skews Americana: John Velghe and the Prodigal Sons, My Brothers and Sisters, Starhaven Rounders, and Dead Voices, plus others. See cmfkc.com for details. Friday, September 7, and Saturday, September 8, at various downtown venues

T U E S D AY, S E P T E M B E R 11 Negative Approach, Early Graves, No Class, Spine: 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207.

W E D N E S D AY, S E P T E M B E R 12 Metric, Half Moon Run: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Jason Mraz: Starlight Theatre, 4600 Starlight Rd., 816-363-7827.

FUTURECAST SEPTEMBER

..................................................Pick of the Week

..................... Texas Is Larger Than Other Places

................. Simultaneous Brooding and Dancing

................................................... So Many Blunts

..........................................................Underrated

..........................................Best New Music, Y'all

THURSDAY 13 Powerman 5000, Swill, Syn City Cowboys, Razorwire Halo: The Beaumont Club WEDNESDAY 19 Bryan Adams: Uptown Theater Odd Future: The Granada, Lawrence THURSDAY 20 Gigamesh, Brent Tactic, Bill Pile, JT Quick, DJ C-Mac, KCDC, DJ Jochen: The Gusto Lounge WEDNESDAY 26 Masters of Illusion: The Midland FRIDAY 28 Ben Folds Five: Starlight Theatre

............................................................Fish Scale

.................................................. Explicit Content

.................................................. Locally Sourced

OCTOBER

....................................................... Shaolin, Y'all

........................................................ College Kids

........................................................... Downtown

...................................... Non-Corny Blues Music

...................................Dinosaur Belching Noises

............................................Things Will Be Great

F O R E C A S T

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2 Chainz

THE PITCH

SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

pitch.com

K E Y

pitch.com

MONDAY 1 Florence + the Machine, the Maccabees: Starlight Theatre

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1

LS

SIGHTS SOUNDS Food by: IMPERIAL FLAVOR 1531 Grand KCMO (816) 421-0300 czarkc.com UPCOMING LIVE ACTS

FRI 9.14 ZZ Ward SAT 9.22 Jealous Sound SAT 11.10 Neil Hamburger EVERY 1st MONDAY: Slaughterhouse Movie Night | Food & Wine Specials TUE Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco / Taco Tuesday WED Guerilla Movement Presents

2 - 4 - 1 KC’s Best Burgers THU Hot Caution Downtown / Philly Thursday F R I Fish Taco Friday with CzarRita & New Belgium drink specials

The T he SPOT for

BLUES

in Johnson County

Wed SEP 5

Rock Paper Scissors 7-10PM Thu SEP 6

Justin Andrew Murray Open Jam 8-11PM Fri SEP 7

David Shields 5:30-7PM

Jeremy Butcher & The Bail Jumpers 8-11PM Sat SEP 8

Ryan Harvey 5:30-7PM EVERY WEDNESDAY Lonnie Ray Blues Band EVERY THURSDAY Live Reggae with AZ One

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7th

Jason Vivone & The Billy Bats 5:30-7PM Tue SEP 11

Dave Hays Band Open Jam 8:30-12:30AM

Groove Agency - 10pm SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8th Camp Harlow - 5pm Drew 6 - 10pm NIGHTLY SPECIALS

FOOD AND DRINK

PATIO & DECK BANQUET & PRIVATE PARTY FACILITY

135TH ST. & QUIVIRA

12056 W. 135th St. OPKS 913-239-9666 www.quasimodokc.com pitch.com

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NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 6

The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Open mic, Low Dough Beer Night, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jerry’s Jam Night, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Johnny Green Open Mic and Jam Session, 7 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

M E TA L / P U N K

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Samantha Fish. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Curtis Salgado, 8 p.m. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Lonnie Ray Blues Jam. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Justin Andrew Murray Open Jam. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Cadillac Flambe.

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. The F Holes, Amputators, Lords of Fuzz.

DJ The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Goomba Rave, with Team Bear Club. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Kool Ed on the patio, 10 p.m. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Brad Sager.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Ken Lovern. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands Duo. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Rod Fleeman and Dan Bliss. Star Bar at Pachamama’s: 800 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785841-0990. Floyd the Barber with Tommy Johnson, 8:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Bob Sheppard Ensemble.

WORLD Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Maria the Mexican, Living Room session., 9 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Live Reggae with AZ-ONE.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Jo Koy, Thu., Sept. 6, 7:30 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Nikki Glaser, 8 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Loaded Goat. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Quinn Harvey Band.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke, 9 p.m. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, 7 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Ladies’ Night. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Hot Caution Thursdays, 10 p.m. Double Nickel Bar: 189 S. Rogers, Ste. 1614, Olathe, 913-3900363. Texas Hold ’em. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Mac’s Place: 580 S. Fourth St., Edwardsville. Karaoke. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Karaoke on the main floor, 10 p.m. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; free pool, happy hour, 4-6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Ladies’ Night. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke, ladies’ night specials. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 4-6 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Uptown Heat, 10:30 p.m. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Skeeball League. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Blues Jam hosted by RocknRick’s Boogie Leggin’ Blues Band, 7 p.m.

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REGGAE Afrobeat: 9922 Holmes, 816-943-6333. Reggae Rockers, 10 p.m.

F R I D AY 7 ROCK/POP/INDIE Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Johnny Rampage. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Month of May, Attic Wolves, Kyle Blake. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Fields of Fury, the Fluorescent, Paper Anchors. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Gemini Revolution, Mad Spirits, David Burchfield and the Great Stop, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Royalty, Mike Borgia & the Problems, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. The Brody Buster Band. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. E R 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s MO Flying Circus, DC Bellamy, Four Fried Chickens & a Coke, Shinetop Jr., hosted by Lindsay Shannon, 22nd S G IN Annual Blues and Bar-B-Q Benefit for LIST E AT N I Sherwood Center, 6 p.m. ONL M Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. PITCH.CO Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-505-0800. Levee Town. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Cold Sweat. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Jeremy Butcher and the Bail Jumpers, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Danny Cox and friends, 6 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. SUNU, DJ Proof, 6 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-262-7300. KC Rain Dogs. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Samantha Fish.

CLUB

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Dynamite Saloon: 721 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8562739. BRC Sounds. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Brother Bagman.

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. First Friday with Barbaric Merits, FSTZ, 10 p.m. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E.

HIP-HOP Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785832-1085. Anthemous, Ace the Czar, Tactical Finesse, Epsom Pepper Productions, Gash, the Blos, C Major.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Will Matthews. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m.; the Garrett Nordstrom Situation, 9 p.m.; Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Brandon Draper, John Brewer, Ben Leifer. Thai Place: 9359 W. 87th St., Overland Park, 913-649-5420. Jerry Hahn.

WORLD Blvd. Nights: 2805 Southwest Blvd., 816-931-6900. Good Fridays: International Party Experience, 10 p.m.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Jo Koy, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Nikki Glaser, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. First Friday. Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. Karaoke with Jim Bob, 9 p.m. Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913-6429090. Happy Fridays, beer, wine, bloody marys, screwdriver sunsets, and sangria on tap for $3, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. First Friday Pitch Party. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Maker’s Mark Bourbon House & Lounge: 1333 Walnut, 816442-8115. La Femme First Fridays. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Free pool, happy hour, 4-6 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Retro Downtown Drinks & Dance: 1518 McGee, 816-4214201. Trivia Riot, 7 p.m.

ELECTRO The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. The Floozies, Thumpur.

REGGAE Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Soul Rebel and the Beast.

R O C K A B I L LY Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Jason Vivone and the Billybats.

VA R I E T Y VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Cover Wars Final.

S AT U R D AY 8 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Charlie & the Stingrays. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. 3 Son Green. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Solid Gold Easy dinner show, 7 p.m.; Dream Wolf, Vehicle, 10 p.m. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913962-5253. Live music. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Voice of Reason. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Allied Saints. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Super Black Market, O Giant Man, We Are Voices, and more, 9 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Diamond Eyed Jack.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray Jazz Meets Blues Jam, 2 p.m.; Linda Shell’s Blues Thang, Bobby Smith, Levee Town, Shannon and the Rhythm King, Trampled Under Foot, Diane “Mama” Ray, hosted by Lindsay Shannon, 22nd Annual Blues and Bar-B-Q Benefit for Sherwood Center, 3 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. KC Blues Society’s IBC Finals, 1-6 p.m.; Atlantic Express, 8:30 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. The Bluz Benderz.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Crossroads Music Fest with Starhaven Rounders, Dead Voices, Victor & Penny, Rural Grit All-Stars.

DJ Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. Furious Palace. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. DJ Candlepants. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Samurai Saturdays. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Brad Sager.

HIP-HOP Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Strider, Stik Figa, Ebony Tusks, Cuddy Mac and New Suede.

pitch.com

MONTH

than rest esday oustic Showcase

9916 Holmes Rd. Kansas City, MO

THE HOME FOR LIVE MUSIC NORTH OF THE RIVER!

THU 9/6 OPEN MOONSHINE TASTING HOSTED BY LOADED GOAT 7PM FRI 9/7 BROTHER BAGMAN 9PM SUN 9/9 OPEN JAM HOSTED BY TOMMY TAYLOR & THE AFTRO-YES 7PM MON 9/10 BLUE MONDAY TRIO 6PM

TUE 9/11 TELE-TUESDAY OPEN COUNTRY JAM HOSTED BY OUTLAW JIM & WHISKEY BENDERS 7PM THU 9/13 JD MICHAEL KING 8PM FRI 9/14 NACE BROTHERS 9PM SUN 9/16 OPEN JAM HOSTED BY K.C. KELSEY HILL 7PM MON 9/17 BLUE MONDAY TRIO TBD TUE 9/18 TACO TUESDAY TROUBADOURS SONG WRITERS EXPO TBD

7 DAYS: 11AM-1:30AM

816-942-1000

Your favorite local bar out south

REALLY HAPPY HOURS MON-FRI: 3-7pm incredible food & drink specials

6948 N. OAK TRFY, GLADSTONE MO | 816.468.0550 FIND US ON FACEBOOK - THE HIDEOUT BAR AND GRILL

~‚~‚ÚN<JKGFIKÚI;ÚÜڅ~ƒ£†€~£†~„ N<;چ¢‚ TJ’S HINDU COWBOY GOSPEL PIANO K?Lچ¢ƒ LONNIE RAY BLUES JAM =I@چ¢„ TBA J8Kچ¢… ALLIED SAINTS KL<Jچ¢~~ CRITTERS TYE DYE TUESDAY N<;چ¢~ MICHAEL SCHULTZ ACOUSTIC SHOWCASE

LIVE MUSIC. NO COVER

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Groove S tation

WED 9/5 MIKE SNUFF JAZZ DILLON BAND CD RELEASE, SAT 9/8 CROSSROADS MUSIC FEST 7PM TUE 9/11 SCAMMERS, IDAHO JOE WINSLOW THUR 9/13 EVERYDAY, PALE HEARTS SPIRIT IS THE SPIRIT, EVERY NIGHT, SEE THROUGH DR ESSE FRI 9/14 FEDERATION S, SIMPLE LINES ALL STAR EXTRAVAGAN OF HORSEPOWER, SAT 9/15 BENON, MOLLZA Y PICTURE CLUB, KNIFE CRIME

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SALOON

Lunch Buffet, Salad Bar Daily Food & Drink Specials Bloody Mary Bar & Breakfast Pizza Buffet Sundays 11am - 2pm .DUDRNH6XQGD\V‡+DSS\+RXU CHECK 9/7 levee town FACEBOOK FOR 9/14 Quinn Harvey UPDATES

1:+Z\ (3.5 mi west of I-29)

Parkville, MO 816-505-0800

THREADZ BY HEADZ FOR THE HEADS CLOTHING - JEWELRY ACCESSORIES - ART

OFFICIAL CROSSROADS TICKET OUTLET 1607 Westport Rd. KCMO 816-442-8400 4VU;O\YZ WT‹-YP:H[WT‹:\UWT

4VU;O\YZ WT‹-YP:H[WT‹:\UWT pitch.com

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29

JAZZ ‹

VIP Bottle Service starting at $75! ‹Dance Floor, pool, darts Smoking hot bartenders & bikini shot girls

weiser & Sunday $2 Buduila Shot q $2.50 ANY Te $4 EVERYDAY Premium Drinks 0 PITCHERS Tuesdays $3.5 0 Wells Thursday $.5Ladies Free til 11pm

Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Midtown Quartet. KC Live! Block at the Power & Light District: 14th St. and Grand. 14th Street Jazz Festival, 3-10 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & the KC Express, 4:30 p.m. Piropos Grille: 4141 N. Mulberry Dr., North Kansas City, 816-7413600. Candace Evans. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Michael Shults Trio.

AMERICANA The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Gypsy Lumberjacks, Monzie Leo & the Big Sky.

CLASSICAL All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church: 4501 Walnut, 816531-2131. Divergent Dreams, NewEar, pre-concert talk, 7:15 p.m.

COMEDY

$5 Cover 18+

Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Jo Koy, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Nikki Glaser, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

975 Kansas Ave KCK, 66105 | (913) 233-0201

Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 5 p.m.; Mary-oke with Chad Slater, 9 p.m. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Free pool, happy hour, 1-4 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 4-6 p.m.

KANSAS CITY BALLET PRESENTS

FREE FIRST FRIDAYS AT THE BOLENDER CENTER

FRI SEPT 7 | 6-7:30PM | “CARMINA BURANA” EXCEPTS WWW.KCBALLET.ORG FOR MORE INFO

M E TA L / P U N K Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Toxie, Up the Academy.

REGGAE Shark Bar: 1340 Grand, 816-442-8140. Soca Jukebox.

R O C K A B I L LY Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Jason Vivone and the Billybats, 8 p.m.

SINGER-SONGWRITER Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Til Willis and Erratic Cowboy.

VA R I E T Y Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Battle for Freaker’s Ball. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Legal Boot Camp for Musicians with Cherokee Rock Rifle, the Atlantic, John Velghe and the Prodigal Sons, Mikal Shapiro, Kasey Rausch, Shane Ogren.

KCB Public Events 2012-2012 SEASON

Broadway

I-3 5

All events take place in the Michael and Ginger Frost Studio Theater at the Todd Bolender Center for Dance & Creativity

Union Station

Pershing

Bolender Center 500 W. Pershing Kansas City, MO

30 TH H EE PP II TT CC H H 2 T

S EOPNTTEHM X B X–X E R 6X-,1 2 20 , 0 20 pitch.com M X 1 2 pitch.com

COMEDY Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Nikki Glaser, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Game night, beer pong, TV trivia, shot dice. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Hotel California Service Industry Night with DJ Ashton Martin, 9 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913217-7665. Double Deuce Poker League, 4 p.m.; karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. AJ Finney presents Sunday Story Time. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Show Stopper Karaoke, 12:30 a.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Art Battle Season 2, Battle 8, 7 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Sunday Solace with Paul Dipadova, 3 p.m., free. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Free pool. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 4-6 p.m. Wallaby’s Grill and Pub: 9562 Lackman, Lenexa, 913-5419255. Texas Hold ’em, 6 & 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Sunday Salvation with Booty Bass, 10 p.m., $3. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2 p.m., free. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Jazz Jam with Nick Rowland and Sansabelt.

M E TA L / P U N K Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. The Rackatees, Infected, the Shell Corporation, 10 p.m.

M O N D AY 10

S U N D AY 9

ROCK/POP/INDIE

ROCK/POP/INDIE

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. The Outfit, Baby Boomers, Comanche the Horse, Til Willis. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Artifas.

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Calling Home, Five to Midnight, Jib Jab Jones and the Indigo Circus, Le Grand.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors. The Brickyard Tavern: 1001 S. Weaver, Olathe, 913-780-0266. Crosseyed Cat open blues jam, 3-7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rich Berry.

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Retox Sundays, 8 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Bad Music Sundays with Brett Dietrich, 3:30 p.m.

HIP-HOP The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. BrooksOfMHS, Sir Adams, the Arcade, Shauna Knapp, I-r NeKo, Adrian Truth, the KiDD, 6 p.m.

JAZZ

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR WILLIAM WHITENER

The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Second Sunday FUNdays: Gina and Chloe McFadden, 3 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948-5550. A Tribute to Charles Mingus featuring Matt Kane and Ben Leifer.

The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Jazz Trio open jam session, 5 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Blue Monday Trio. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Jon Aanestad, and more, 9 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Mudstomp Mondays. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. James Hunnicutt, Filthy Still, Jayke Orvis and the Broken Band, 8 p.m.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Ben Leifer. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and Michael Pagan, 7 p.m.

COMEDY Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. MANic Monday on the main floor, 10 p.m., free.

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SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

THE PITCH

31

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Monday Mancave: sports, drink and food specials. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m.; karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m., free. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. Green Room Burgers & Beer: 4010 Pennsylvania, Ste. D, 816216-7682. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 8 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Service Industry Night. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; free pool, happy hour, 4-6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam’s Club Karaoke, 10 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. KC Mutual UFO Network, 6:30 p.m.; Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

ELECTRO The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Delhi 2 Dublin.

W E D N E S D AY 12 ROCK/POP/INDIE RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Gospel Lounge with Carl Butler, 7:30 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rick Bacus.

Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Outlaw Jim and the Whiskey Benders, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Sky Smeed.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Tele-Tuesday hosted by Outlaw Jim and the Whiskey Benders.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Whatshisname, service industry night, 9 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. #Cake with DJ G Train. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Tasteless Tuesdays, rock, punk and more, Nintendo games, Missouri beer specials and midnight riot, 9 p.m., free.

JAZZ Finnigan’s Hall: 503 E. 18th Ave., North Kansas City, 816-2213466. Abel Ramirez Big Band, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

AMERICANA The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. David Wax Museum, David Mayfield Parade, and Gak Attack (after the show).

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Clash of the Comics, 7:30 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. It’s Karaoke Time! Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Critters Tye Dye Tuesday. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway. Sonic Spectrum Trivia: the Bizarre, Pop Culture and Travel, 7 p.m. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; free pool, happy hour, 4-6 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Replay Horror Picture Show on the patio. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 4-6 p.m. Tower Tavern: 401 E. 31st St., 816-931-9300. Trivia, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Tango Nights: lessons and dance. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Beer Pong. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess Club, 7 p.m.

pitch.com

SINGER-SONGWRITER The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Scott Ford Songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m.

ROCK/POP/INDIE

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Trampled Under Foot. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Mark Montgomery.

SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Miss Major and Her Minor Mood Swings, 7 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

THE PITCH

R O C K A B I L LY

T U E S D AY 11 The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Scammers, Idaho Joe Winslow, Pale Hearts.

32

Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Sonic Spectrum with DJ Robert Moore, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Pure.

HIP-HOP RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Midwest Got Next 6 with Qwazaar & Batsauce, Vertigone & Trystyl, Missing Link, Lucid, Lady Daisy and more, hosted by Sephiroth, 9 p.m.

ACOUSTIC Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Michael Schultz Acoustic Showcase.

JAZZ InterContinental Kansas City at the Plaza: 401 Ward Pkwy., 816-756-1500. Candace Evans Trio. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. A La Mode.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. The Kick Comedy. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Jim Florentine, 8 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. Brodioke. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Super Nerd Night. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Liquid Lounge drink specials. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Open jam blues, bike night specials.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 7 p.m. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816-8335021. Blues, country and classic rock, Rick Eidson and friends.

R O C K A B I L LY Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Miss Major & Her Minor Mood Swings, 7:30 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

VA R I E T Y

Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Mic Acoustic Jam. DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends.

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Amy Farrand’s Weirdo Wednesday Social Club, 7 p.m., no cover. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. SUNU with DJ Kimbarely Legal, My Brother, the Vulture with DJ G Train, Making Movies with DJ Brent Tactic and DJ B-Stee.

pitch.com

SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

THE PITCH

33

S AVA G E L O V E

B URNED OUT

Dear Dan: I’ve been in a long-term relationship with a wonderful woman who doesn’t have a lot of people she socializes with in her daily life. She is a Burning Man person and converses online with other “burners.” I confronted her when I realized she was discussing the ups and downs of our relationship in a public online forum. She still hung out on that forum, but her presence diminished. I assumed she was socializing in private e-mails. A few months later, I discovered that she was actually moderating a different forum. I deleted the site from my history and decided to avoid it. Last week, while she was at Burning Man, I checked out the forum she moderates, even though I knew I shouldn’t have. What I found was that she never mentions having a boyfriend, even when it might be relevant to a discussion. I was never mentioned, not even in passing. I don’t mind that guys compliment her, and I understand the benefits of positive attention from the opposite sex. If she came to me and told me that that is what she was seeking and that it was chaste, I would be fine with it as long as she made that clear to other forum members. We are both attractive, and I get attention at times from other women. I often mention that I have a girlfriend, to avoid someone getting the wrong idea. I also feel like she saves the spontaneous, uninhibited and adventurous part of herself for these people at Burning Man. Does it sound like she is cheating emotionally? How can I bring this subject up in a way that doesn’t make me seem like just more of a depressing part of her life? I don’t want her to lose her outlet, but I feel like she is not showing me the respect one should show a partner of 10-plus years.

Her Burning Man Dear HBM: I don’t want to alarm you unnecessarily, but partnered people who go to Burning Man sans partner are typically planning to cheat cheat, not cheat emote. Casual straight sex, like sandy ass cracks and seeing my friend Eric naked, is a huge part of the Burning Man “experience.” But the kind of straight guy who goes to Burning Man for casual sex — and the art and the experience and the transcendence — doesn’t give a shit if the girls he fucks have boyfriends back home. Or in the next tent. Your girlfriend could post your picture to Burning Man forums, mention you in every face-to-face conversation she has, and wear a shirt with your picture on it everywhere she goes on the playa, and she’d still fi nd plenty of guys willing to fuck her brains out. Mentioning you in online forums, not mentioning you in online forums — neither action is proof that she plans to cheat or not cheat. So I’m sitting here racking my brain trying to come up with some other reason that your girlfriend might not have mentioned you in an online Burning Man forum that she moderates.

34

THE PITCH

SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

pitch.com

BY

D A N S AVA G E

because he wanted to “lock it down.” It’s been a week, and he’s still on Scruff and Growlr. I’m a little put off because he was the one who pushed for exclusivity and the title of boyfriend. Should I be concerned? Can hookup apps be part of a healthy, monogamous relationship? Obviously a talk is needed.

Sick of Scruff Dear SOS: Obviously.

Thinking, thinking, thinking. Hey! Maybe it’s because the last time you caught her talking about you and your relationship in a public online forum, YOU BLEW THE FUCK UP AT HER. Remember? You were angry then because she was talking about you on the interwebs. And you’re angry now that she isn’t talking about you on the interwebs. If you’re looking for a reason that your girlfriend feels inhibited around you, maybe it’s the mixed signals. She gets in trouble for talking about you; she gets in trouble for not talking about you. If your girlfriend feels like she’s going to be in trouble with you no matter what she does, then she’s going to feel inhibited around you. And she’s going to err on the side of sharing less of what she does with you. When your girlfriend gets back from Burning Man, here’s what I think you should say: “I realize this makes me sound crazy, and maybe I am crazy. But remember when I was upset about you talking about me — about us — in that public online forum? Well, I stumbled on another online forum and you weren’t talking about me. And that upset me, too.” Acknowledge your insecurities, take some responsibility for the impact they may have on her behavior, and then have a long talk about how you can both enjoy a little attention from members of the opposite sex without making the other person feel like shit.

Dear Dan: I’ve been dating someone for a little

more than two months. After the second week, he was saying things like, “We need a word between ‘like’ and ‘love’ because ‘I like you’ doesn’t seem sufficient.” After weeks of telling him to slow his roll, I agreed to make it official and stop dating and sleeping with other guys

Maybe your boyfriend wants to cheat but doesn’t want to be cheated on — he wants his boyfriend locked down but doesn’t want to be locked down himself — or maybe he thinks it’s too soon to delete his online personal profi les. Or maybe, like a lot of gay men, he treats hookup apps like a virtual gay bar, that is, a place where he can hang out and socialize with friends and exes and, perhaps, get his fl irt on now and then. But if lurking on Scruff and Growlr makes his newly locked-down boyfriend feel insecure, he should stay off hookup apps. Or, if he simply can’t give ’em up, your new boyfriend should allow you to look at his chats whenever you care to so you can see for yourself that they’re either wholly innocent (just talking with friends) or wholly innocent flirting (swapping photos and compliments with hot guys but not making plans to hook up).

Dear Dan: I’m a gay man who gained 30 pounds after I met my current boyfriend. I started dieting about a week before you ran a letter from a woman who was wondering about withholding sex until her husband lost some weight. I told my boyfriend not to have sex with me until I lost 15 pounds. It took me three and a half weeks to lose the weight, but it really strengthened our relationship. He was supportive of my weight-loss goals, he had an incentive to help me make healthier choices, and it brought an erotic tension to the process that we both dug. My only suggestion for the woman who wrote you: Don’t tell people about it! The people we told were angry at my boyfriend for “withholding” sex unless I lost weight. But, hey, it worked!

Lighter in Loafers Dear LIL: As I said in my response to Like Boys Slimmer, if a couple can make the withholding of sex into an erotic game that they’re both playing and both enjoying — and not an asshole move one partner is pulling — I could maybe see this sort of arrangement working. And I’m pleased to hear that at least one couple out there was able to successfully eroticize a diet by combining it with chastity play. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net pitch.com

MONTH

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SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

THE PITCH

35

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Case Number: 1216-CV02419

NOTICE OF ELECTION AND REQUIREMENT TO APPLY FOR BALLOT IN ADVANCE TAKE NOTICE that by Order of the Circuit Court of Jackson County, Missouri, Hon. Charles E. Atwell, Presiding, an election by mail-in ballot has been called for the purpose of considering the questions of imposing a one percent sales tax and levying certain special assessments in that area VSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FDOO\GHVFULEHGLQWKH$PHQGHG3HWLWLRQLQWKLVSURFHHGLQJRQĂ&#x20AC;OHLQWKHRIĂ&#x20AC;FHRIWKH&RXUW $GPLQLVWUDWRURIWKH&LUFXLW&RXUWRI-DFNVRQ&RXQW\0LVVRXULDQGORFDWHGJHQHUDOO\ EXWWKHVSHFLĂ&#x20AC;F legal description controls) in those areas of Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri commonly referred to as River Market, the Downtown Loop, Crossroads and Crown Center/Union Station, for the purpose of funding the development of the following transportation project: the design, construction, RZQHUVKLSDQGRURSHUDWLRQRIDGRZQWRZQĂ&#x20AC;[HGUDLOVWUHHWFDUOLQHDQGDOOHOHPHQWVWKHUHRI, including without limitation a maintenance facility, operating within the boundaries of, or serving and EHQHĂ&#x20AC;WLQJWKH'LVWULFW In order to vote in this mail-in election, you must 

Â&#x2021;Reside within the boundary of the District Â&#x2021;Apply for a ballot Â&#x2021;Be a registered voter at the time you apply for a ballot Â&#x2021;Provide proof of voter registration at the time you apply for a ballot as discussed below Â&#x2021;Return the application for a ballot no later than 5:00 p.m. on October 2, 2012



Â&#x2021;Download from http://www.16thcircuit.org/streetcar (internet access required), or Â&#x2021;Pick up at the Jackson County Courthouse, 415 East 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106, Third Floor, Room 303, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays

You will not receive a ballot unless  

Â&#x2021;\RXVXEPLWDYDOLGDSSOLFDWLRQLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWKWKHLQVWUXFWLRQVRQWKHDSSOLFDWLRQDQG Â&#x2021;\RXUDSSOLFDWLRQLVreceivedE\WKH&LUFXLW&RXUW$GPLQLVWUDWRU¡VRIĂ&#x20AC;FHEHIRUH  5:00 p.m. on October 2, 2012

Ballots will be mailed on October 30, 2012, only to those who have timely and validly applied for a ballot. Ballots will be due for return no later than 5 p.m. on December 11, 2012 in accordance with instructions on the ballot. You must include proof of voter registration from the election authority when returning the application. IMPORTANT: You must be a registered voter residing within the boundary of the Transportation Development District in order to submit an application for a ballot. A map of the boundary of the District may be obtained at the Jackson County Courthouse, 415 East 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106, Third Floor, Room 303, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, or view the map online at http://www.16thcircuit.org/streetcar. Contact the Kansas City Board of Election Commissioners at (816) 842-4820 if you wish to register to vote. Proof RIYRWHUUHJLVWUDWLRQLQFOXGHVDFRS\RIWKHDSSOLFDQW¡VRIĂ&#x20AC;FLDO9RWHU,'FDUGRUDZULWWHQVWDWHPHQWIURP WKH.DQVDV&LW\%RDUGRI(OHFWLRQ&RPPLVVLRQHUVFRQĂ&#x20AC;UPLQJYRWHUUHJLVWUDWLRQVWDWXVRIWKHDSSOLFDQW or go to www.kceb.org to print proof of registration using the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Check Your Voter Statusâ&#x20AC;? box. Voter UHJLVWUDWLRQZLOOEHFRQĂ&#x20AC;UPHGSULRUWRPDLOLQJRIEDOORWV Questions should be addressed to (816) 881-1300.

38

THE PITCH

SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

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SEPTEMBER 6 -12, 2012

THE PITCH

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The Pitch: September 6, 2012