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PUBLISHED BY THE ASSOCI足 ATED STUDENTS OF SNOvV COLLEGE UTAH

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EPHRAliYI,

VICTOR RASilV US足

SEN,

EDITOR

DEE

YOUNG,

lVIANAGER.

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JON

B U S IN E

SS

1942

SNOWONIAN 3

FOREWORI1 Commencement wiiJ soon close another year at Snow, a year eventful to individuals and nations. Though the books are dosed, the experiences will live as influences during days to come. There has been acquisition of information that has broadened viewpoints, molded attitudes, and set objectives. Sl<ills have been increased; habits formed. Enriching friendships have been made. Lest the days to come efface the days that have been, this volume has been prepared as a reminder of associates and events. Many of the most vital experiences do not yield to recording in 'vord and picture, but it is hoped the more obvious will help to reconstruct the subtle. The editor and staff wish their readers bon voyage and many happy hours as they scan these pages, recalling life at Snow College in 1941-42.

I1 EI1 ICATION We dedicate this book to the youth of America ... in whose heart exists a perpetual restlessness vvith things as they are . . . an eternal seeking for a better way .. . a continual striving to,vard some good end greater than himself. We salute his ability to face reality clearly and steadily, to keep always before him a faith in living and a dream of the world as he hopes to make it. We admire his strength and self-relianr:e and his aggressive loyalty to the persistent desire for better things .. .We have faith in the nobility of his ideals and in his ability to give those ideals tangible expression.

5

An early snap of the Dorm.

A CHALL E NG E TO Y O UTH YOUTH, you are confronted , today as a lways , W'ith vital prob l em s , th e exact nature of w h i c h is not too clear. Yet you must decide th em . YOUTH, dare t o d reamT Dream deep in faith t h at sees objectives beyond immediate h o rizons. Be not

impa­

tient seekers w h o V\roul d jum p into the future with out regard for what h a s gone before. l i fe ' s g reat values.

Prepare

for

Discover and h o l d change ;

to

dedicate your

creative genius and potent i a l p owers toward realizing your sane, const ructive drea m s .

YOUTH, p l a n a n d act in the assurance that out of t he nig h t cmnes t h e dawn, t hat out of t he trained h eart and mind come th e \ÂĽi ll and vision to bui l d .

6

L. D. S. "Institute

"-Up the trai l the e1nblein "S" is shin i ng, Sh i ni_ng 'nea t h t he clear b lue s l<y " ;

7

LEARNING, OR CIVILIZATION, IS NOT IN足 HERITED.

ITS

CONTINUATION

DEPENDS

UPON EACH GENERATION'S ACCEPTING, THROUGH ITS OWN EFFORT, THAT WHICH HAS BEEN BEQUEATHED AS A RACIAL HER足 ITAGE.

A MASTERPIECE OF ART, OR AN

INGENIOUS MECHANICAL INVENTION, RE足 MAINS JUST MATERIAL UNTIL YOUTH AC足 QUIRES APPRECIATION AND SKILLS.

THE

CHARACTER OF EACH GENERATION AND OF CIVILIZATION DEPENDS UPON

Th e world-w i de events of t h e past year has caused everybody to pa use and ask wh at s h a ll I do? Plans h ave been sh attered , hopes l o s t, and i dea l s given up. Catastro颅 phe has cras hed t h e p h i losoph i es of a l l peopl e . And now it seem s as though the future is but a great b l eak unknown, i nto w h ich no one dares to project himsel f. To attemp t t o def ine the future w ou l d be preposterous at t h i s time , b u t w e do l<now that there wil l be a fut ure a n d w hen it dawns , i t \vi ii h ave w i t h it a cha l l en g路e for al l to w o rk and to ach i eve. To find h a ppiness and contentm ent , one rnust l ook forwa rd to that future and plan to l ive in i t and to m ake the m ost of it. As we read t h i s yearbook and t hrou g h it relive th e experiences of t he year, m ay we find i n i t a cha l l enge to p lan our l ives for continuous work and devel opm ent, to live each day to its fullest in preparin g for a g reat tomorrow, and t hus span the immediate future w i th i ts uncertainties as though i t d i d not exist, and i n this way keep our fai th and our i dea l s and d e t erm i nation to l ive a l i fe of w orth颅 whi l eness. President Nuttal l

President James A. Nuttall 10

H. E. Jensen

E l aine F Rasmuson 1

Biology

Librarian

H. A. D e an

H. R. C hristensen

lVl u sic

Exact Science

J. H. Stan s field

Don Simmons

Art

Bio l og路y, Coac h

E. J. l\1ortenson

H.

Parley Kilburn Ed u ca t i on Physchology

J. Orrin Anderson

A. I. Tippetts Social Sc i ence

路C. A. \i\1 ali Business

Custodian

Earl V. Hills A uto Trades

Fern A. Young

J. S. Ch ri stensen

English Debate

Business

Lucy A. Ph;Il;p En gli sh

Glen Alexander Building Trades

Wyn o n a Han sen Phys ica l Edu cation Busin ess

Helen A. Ne lson Speech

Elna Stevenson Secre tary

Alta Hirst Foods Nutrition

Alice B. Cumming Clothing Textiles

F. J. Gurney Chemistry

Gwen Greaves Librarian

J. Lie,,veli y n Youna Physic Ge olo g y

lrel Longhurst Bu i l di n g Trades

'Ireasurer Registrar

Mathmatic

Eldon D. Br in ley Hygiene an d Physical Edu cation (On leave of absence)

Dr. R a lp h E. Jorgensen School Physician

ll

A. Russe l l Gray English, Languages (On leave of absence)

Rasmussen, Painter, Newby, Christensen, Brinton, Sorenson, Nuttal l, Blackham, Svedin, Nelson, Larsen.

ST UIJ E NT OFF I C E RS Hartley Ne w by

President Vice-president

Phy llis Painter

Secretary-auditor

Una Gwen Chri stensen

Editor of Snowonian

\lictor Rasmussen Jane Brinton

Editor o f Snowdri ft

Marie Sved i n

. Program Chai nnan

fv1onty N e lson

Activity A ge nt

Kirl< Larsen

.

C h eer Leader

Ath letic M a na ger

DeVon Osborne

Forensic M ana ger

Corne l l Blackhmn

Lower Divi sion Representative

Zelma Nuttall

. Lower Division Representative

LaMar Sorenson

. Facuity Adviser

H. P a rl ey Kilburn

12

A MESSAGE

As the pages of this book are turned, memories by t he score w ill be reca l l e d,.....- m emories of th e days at Snow spent i n making new friends and associatin g with the old ones. W hether they were new or o l d, It makes l ittl e d ifference ; they are s ti l l true and l oy a l

friends

and

therr

friendship is w orthy of being cher­ ished from year to year.

They are

tru l y superior young· n1en and vvo­ Inen and are i ndeed a representative group

of Americ?-n youth.

Th eir

ideals are high and embedded 'vi thi n t heir souls is a spirit of patriotism . They are far-sighted individual s and are possessors of aJ,nbition and de­ term i nation to '� ubdue all obstacles confronti n g them in thei r continuous j ourney

upward.

May v v e

keep

those g l owing friendships g l o· w ing, is my sincere wish for the future. Hart l ey Newby Studen t President

H. Newby

Joint Council

13

Our days as students at Snow C o l l e ge a re a l m ost over. They a re a concl usion and a beginning. We are ex periencing a confl ict o f emotions in which reluctance, anticipation, backward and forward l ooking thoughts are contesting for supremacy. The very uncertain ty of the next chapter of our lives makes us more keenly aware of th e p eace , the security, the conuadeshi p , and the opportunity for quiet and purposeful pursuit of our individ ua l objectives that have been ours during our two yea rs at Snow. Today we are a p art of Sn ow ; tom o rrow and a lw ays we s h al l b e a part o f Snow' s tra dition. With a sense o f the deep s i gnificance of this tradition, we bid our c l assm ates God speed ; to the facul ty we voice our appreciation for th e i n s piration and cha ll en ge you h av e given us . T o y o u w h o fil l o u r p lace s , w e exten d congratul ations and admonition : enjoy Snow as much as we have , h o l d dear her standards and achievem ents , carry on h e r traditions. We go forth with courage, born of the -k nowl e d ge and fel l o -w 足 ship that comes from our study a n d associ ations, with th e enthusias1n gained through testing our mental p owers with those of our col 足 leagues ; a n d \vith the loyalty and trust that h a s c o m e from o u r being privileged to be an integral part of the l ife and very fibre of Snow Col lege. Senior Class President, O le Maxfiel d

R . Rees, V. Rasmussen, 0. Maxfield, F. Larsen.

FANNlE JOHNSON, ready for a .

good time. ready to mal<e one .

. GA RTH BELLISTON, used

to be a woman l"later, something changed him . . . KATHLEEN PAULSON, knows just what to do at the right time

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BOYD

GREENWOOD.

a

lightning

football field

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on

the

streak

of

DOROTHY PEDERSON.

p ractical

,

efficient

and

useful.

H E B E R HALL. "Doc" who ceJ­ tainly mends heart breal<s . . . JANE B R I NTON, as charming­ an editor as you could find . . . K I RK LARS EN, talks faster than VIRGINIA . . . he thinh ACORD, blonde and business lil<e.

�lAR GU E R ITE iV I ADS E N. blonde but n ot lightheaded . . . FITZGERALD, SHERMAN knows a ll ifs and ands about music ... FERN LARSEN. a . . . scholar, loob a queen HARTLEY NEWB Y , an equal mixture of sense and humor.

iVIAYNA R D BAILEY, en erget i c, optimistic and full of fun . . . LU RAE iVIUNK, a mind lil<e the moon, there's a man in it . . . the PETER S ON, V\! E S LEY l<ind of guy we wil l ali miss . . . LEO R A CALLOWAY. s h e .. irdsT lil<es 'em with wings,...b

UDEAN LARSEN, laugh and be merry . . G E O RGE S P ERRY, so witty he should have been twins . . V I R G I NIA LUND, you can tell he r by her laugh . . . DEVON OSBORNE, lil<e elec­ tricity, a magnetic attraction, g·ood at sparking.

V ICTOR RASMU S SEN, good sense, good nature in him are LAU R A MAE . joined CHA PMAN, knowledge w iII not' escape me . . . EDWARD COX, good things run high . . . �II L D RE D O CKEY, a p lenty cute gal whose pastime is just living.

D OYLE MAXFIELD, he's in the Army now . . . V E RA D ENN I S ON. she discontinued school to ,vorl< . . . D EWA YNE BECK, thinh a lot and never savs much EVELYN . JEN S EN, quiet. yet beg-uiling . personality.

15

CLAIR BLACK, h e's a regul ar " Casanova" . . . BILLY WASHBURN, his hair i s as sunny as h is h eart . . . VERL SUDWEEKS, an a l l aroun d athl e te with personal i t y plus . . . RHODA REES. a gal bubbl ing over w i t h gags.

BETTY WING, l ike a s hip, us­ ual l y attached to a buoy . . . CORNELL B L A C KHAJ\1, brown eyes and b oy ,......, what a p hysiqu e . . A RTHUR ROGERS, optimism a n d a smil e brin g t hings wor t h while ... WAYNE PETERSON, mis­ sion bells ring for him.

REX CHRISTENSEN, b lo n d Romeo learn i n g t o be a den tist ... ALLEN ALLRED, he sings love son gs to the gir l s . . BRYCE HINCKLEY, he came, he saw, he conquered . . . PHYLLIS PAINTER, her i n de­ pendence i s her c harm.

UNA GWEN CHRISTEN­ SEN. flashes a diamond-t h ird fin ger, left hand . . . ALLAN GREEN, finds joy in livi n g and laughin g . . . MILTON TEW, has a voice as w e l l as a smile . . . JACKSON W ANLASS, a case where i n telligence and person al­ ity join .

DUANE MATTSSON, skipped to Wa s h i n g ton , D. C., to worl< for Un cle Sam ... STANLEY BEAL, a l i t tle guy with plenty to say . . . QUE BARTON. thinks a l o t. says l it t l e . . . STELLA OLSEN. her ambition in l i fe,......,Home Ec. for hvo.

REED DRAPER, good t h i ngs come in small padmges . RICHA R D T HO M P SON, where does he spend h i s t ime . . . ERNEST THOMAS, gir l s are t he lea s t o f h i s troubles . ARUS BIRD, h i s friends are m any, his enemies few.

LESLIE SJVHTH, p i anos h ave felt the touch of h er talented fingers . . . CHERRON SEELEY, what would we do with out him . . . VEORA DALLEY, knows nothing about war, but likes to be in arms . . . BILL PETERSON, now t here' a man for youT

LEE CARTER. a fel low v h o . . play the game quare . AUDREY BECK. who's heart belongs to no daddy . . . ELYIN HANSEN, a radiator occupier . . . ELLA THOMPSON, a lov­ abl e gal who talb in her Ieep.

AJVIY NORRI . alway

happy, J<ind and p l easant . . . ALLEN BLACK, "Carry Me Back To O l d Virginia" . . . MELBA BECK, wow 'em with word s in debate . . . BOYD CHRISTE1 L SEN, argues most convincingly.

OLE JVIAXFIELD. he i afe who does h i best . . . MARCIA REID, s h e's tops i n h i story . . . MONTY NELSON. used his mother's wash board for a pil l ow . . . BEULAH ALLRED. h er charms s tr i ke the s ight, h e r mer­ i ts win the soul .

KARMA LARSEN. h e r red hair shows po tentialities . . . I'-1IIL­ f_)RED PUZZEY, carne to scho o l a 1Vlis and left a Mrs. . . . DEVON LARSEN. what an ambitious tease . FRANK PEA COCK. h e's big, h e' s tall. but that ain't a ll .

PHYLLIS DAVIS, a good port, need we say more ... PERRY BLACKHA�1, proves t h a t mar­ ried men can rem a i n peppy . . . JANET H I N CKLEY. joined Bryce in t h e midd l e aisl e . . . pends DON ANDERSON, most of his t ime in the sho p .

V. Morle

T,

C. Anderson, R. Nielson.

JUNI�R� The Junior class i s the "melt i ng pot " of the C o l l ege. From far and near in the autu m n , cam e s t rangers w ho w ere to be congealed i nto the friend ly group th at w i l l go diverse ways at Com m encement. Some of the class w · il l return next year to carry on as seniors ; some wil l enter indus try ; and sti l l oth ers expect to become m embers of the National Defense progranl. A ll w i l l recal l w ith hap piness the fel l owships of t h i s year. All w il l fin d o pportuniti es for i ncreased services because of classroom tra i ni n g and of opportuni ties to devel op leadership and insigh t. Each m en1ber of the class appreciates t h e College, i t s trad itions, and its g·uidance . T here has bee n a p lace for everyone. A l l hope to show appreciation by liv i ng the friend ly, pro gress i ve enth usiasms ch aracteristic of Snow Col lege.

18

De lana Jensen

Boyd Seeley

De E tta Woffinden

B laine Chri stensen

lzola Blackham

Roger A ll red

Harol d Pettey

Zelia Rae C hristensen

Dell B lacl(ham

Mildred Draper

C lair Rosenberg

Verdean Morley

Helen Hansen

Perry Christe nsen

Carol Smythe

Evan Nielsen

Iris Goodwi n

Frank Nielsen

Roger Nielsen

Grace Newt o n

Delmar H i gh am

lVlargaret Cox

Gail Hougaard

Phyll i Johnson

19

G lenna Dean

Royal Bagley

Evelyn Carpenter

Paul Ch ristensen

Mary Austin

Jon Dee Young

Conrad Kel l er

Bettie Ande rson

Wayne Madsen

Lila. Rae Justesen

Jim Killpack

Betty Crane

Maxine Jensen

Kent Thursby

Ruth Niel on

Merril l Jacobson

Bernice Strate

Clement Richardson

lYloy l e Anderson

B essie Peterson

K e it h Anderson

Virginia Brady

Grant Nielsen

Car o l Anderson

20

Cath leen Deakin

Kennet h Hoyt

Erma Olsen

Jam e s Gre gerson

Elaine Thompson

Clair Truscott

Ray Blackham

Verna Anderson

Willis O lsen

Luella Ham p ton

David Pickett

Glenna Dee Beal

Martha Alice Nielson

Doris Niel son

Lester Baker

R h ea Blackham

Barbara Lazenby

vVard O lson

Bennie Heath

Dixie Murphy

Adele O lsen

Warren Thompsen

Elna Coll in g s

Nlaud Frischknecht

J�Nl�R� 21

Z. A n derson, G. Anderson, L. Jen sen , P.Anderson (absent fro m p icture).

The sophomores 揃wil l be grad uated from t h e Lower D ivision i n May . S o m e wil l enter col lege ; others w il l turn t o industry i n its vari ed forms . Com mencement day w i l l m ean that "the o l d order c h angeth ." The past two years h ave been rich in l iving , stri vi n g , and achiev足 i n g . H orizons h ave been broadened, and new standards of attain足 m ent have been set. Experiences in the class room and out of jt h ave given perspective to th e opport unities and responsibilities of m embership in a dem ocratic socie ty . Snow College i s m o re t h a n a name , for i ts traditions and stan d足 ards are a l iving force . The soph omores have brought h onors to the school i n a th l etics , debate, musi c , speech, and vari ous oth er activitie s. They h ave been co-part ners in the annual Lower Division B a l l , and have sought to add t o t h e I nstitution i n return f o r i t s great ervice to th em.

22

Zelma Nuttall Helen Thorpe Calvin Thomson

Perry Olsen LalYiar Sorenson Gwen Jensen

Phyllis Olsen Zelia Anderson Lenard Olsen

Philip Anderson Elmo Green Mildred Larsen

Doris Anderson Wanda Peterson Donald Ben on

Paul Daniel LaWayne Lund LaRane Jensen

23

fRt�HMtN The Fresh1nan class h a s , duri n g the year, ha d t h e priv i lege of associating' vvi t h coll ege stud e n t s and b e i n g i n i t iated into j un ior college as an ins t iu t i o n . There have been added opportun it i es and ch a iJenges. A rich pro gram of extra - cu rri c ular act i v i ty h as g iven n1any opportunities for personal deve lo p m e nt. Freshmen h ave won h onors in debate, ora tory , athleti cs , essay and oth er compet i ti ve act i v i ti es. The year h as brought t he real i za ti o n t h a t rich opportuni ti es for attai n m ent and serv i ce awa i t the s t udent vvho is eager to succeed. Acc e p t a nce of t h e colle ge t raditions serves as an i nce n tive to Jneet better the daily ch allen g·e . Under t h e l eadersh i p o f Davi d Chri stensen, pre s i dent: and associate officers,_...,D ale Nielson, Va lene Denni son, Ch arles Niel son, Winona Greav e s , E layne Thom son, and J. S. Chri s t e nsen, advi sor, t h e class n1ade i t s cont ri b u ti on to t h e act i v i t ies s ponsored th i s year.

E. Thomso n . D. N i el so n , V. D e nniso n , C. Nielson , D . Chris t e n sen , W. Greav e s .

Charles Nielsen Gwen Bjerregaard D ori s Olsen !'vlary DeM il l

Robert Anderson

Robert vV e rl y

24

Harvey Draper

Miriam Fitzgerald

Winona Greaves

Shirley Dean

Jacl< Armstrong

Robert Larsen

Halcyon Larsen

Barbara Peterson

Sarah Anderson

Wayne K. Olsen

Reid Jensen

Fern Poulson

Delore Peterson

Ruth Herman en

David C h ri stensen

Dale Nielson

Bett Cherr

E l ayne Thomson

Valene Denison

A l lred Robert

Bruce C h ristensen

Ellen Christensen

E l a ine Chri s ten en

LuDeen Daniel s

Jacl< Hansen

Bil lie Larsen

Lil a Jackson

Dorothy Jensen

Maxine Bri ggďż˝

Vo nda Hansen

25

YOUTH

IN

AN

ORGANIZED

SOCIETY

MUST ALWAYS ACCEPT SOCIAL PATTERNS YET RETAIN THE RIGHT TO BE ITSELF, TO REALIZE ITSELF-INDIVIDUALLY AND COL足 LECTIVELY.

IT MUST DEVELOP SKILLS AND

JUDGMENT, THE POWER OF SELF-EXPRES足 SION, THE WILL TO MEET ISSUES OF LIFE COURAGEOUSLY.

IT MUST LEARN HOW

TO COOPERATE, YET POSSESS LEADERSHIP. SUCH SKILLS ARE FOSTERED IN

27

1942 S NOW O NIAN Victor Rasm_ussen . Vera Dennison . Laura Mae Chapm a n Dee Young 0 l e Maxfi e l d Wil liam Peterson F. J. Gurney Edward Cox .

Editor E ditor Assistant E ditor Business Manager Photography Photography Photo graphy . . Photography Vir g i nia Lund

LuRae Nlunl< Wes ley Peterson Verna Anderson . M i ldred D raper Lucy A . Phiiiips . Ruth Nielson . C . A. Wail vVynona Hansen . Picture Editor

Picture Editor Copy Cop足 Copy Copy Typist Adviser Adviser

SALESMEN Royal B a gl e y R oger Nielson

Hel e n Thorpe D avid Chri stensen Bessie Peterson

Clair B lack DeVon O sborne D eEtta W offin den

Jackson W anlass Moyle Anderson

S N O WD R I FT STAFF Jane Brinton . Wes l ey Peterson Dee Youn g Lucy A . Phi l l ips . l\1ae Chap1nan Marguer i te Madsen Keith Anderson Evan Borrowman Lu Rae Munk . \li r g inia Lund Doris O l sen Boyd C h r istensen Rhoda Rees Frank Peacock I--Iel en T horpe Glenna Dee Beal Perry Ch ristensen Gai l Hougaa rd Royal Bag-ley . Edward Cox Verna Anderson Mild red Ockey Janyce Jtley

J. D. Young, J. Brinton, V\1. Peterson.

Editor As ociate Editor Business Manager Adviser . . . Exchange Manager Exc h ange Manager Snorts lubs l ub Club lub Features eatures Features Fea ture eature E ditori a l Contributor Contributor Contributor Contributor Contributor Contributor

I. Madsen, H. Thorpe, R. Bagley, K. Anderson, P. Christensen.

E Cox, M Baile y , R Niel sen,

B. Greenwood.

THE ASSOCIATED M EN'S C LUB was directed by R oger Nielsen, president, aided by Edward Cox , activity manager ; M aynard Bai ley, and B oy d Greenwood. As special activities, a Sadie HaV\r-k ins D ay , the annual beard grovv­ ing contest, and the snow ca�nival were sponsored. The offici a l displ ay o f beards dosed the winter term. Helen Thorpe was awarded the trad i ­ tional s now crow n , during a pause i n the winter sport contests , conducted o n the hil ls east o f the college .

THE ASSOCIATED WOMEN' S SOCIETY, l oc a l chapter of the national, m otivated friend liness among its own and campus memberhip. D irectors of the activities were M arguerite Madsen, p resident ; Beulah A llred, vice-president ; l--Iel e n Thorpe , secretary ; Janet B. Hind<­ ley, activity agent. Fannie Joh nson, Ruth N i e l son, Ze l m a Nuttal l and Winona Greaves represented the various classes. Alta Hirst and A lice B. Cummings were advisers . B ot h formal and inform a l social s were conducted. The outstan d i ng ones were the Patrons' tea, the Preference Ball and A . W . S . day.

J. Hinckley, B. A llred, M. Madsen, H. Thorpe.

P. Davis, W. Greave

,

P. Painter, E. Thompson.

THE PEP C LU B , one of the largest and most active of the campus groups, was directed by Phyl l is Painter, pre s ident. Her assisti ng officers were W i nona G reaves, vice-president ; El l a Th om pson , secretary; Phyllis Dav i s, activity manager ; W ynona 1-Iansen, adv i ser. Earl y in the year, t h e club began t o plan for i ts annual "booste r" t ri p , s e lecting Uta h ' s D ixie as its itinerary. The organization functioned as the service c l ub , hel pi ng w h enever needed in the various a ctivitie�.

THE CO-ED ATHLETIC CLUB sponsors a recrea tion program annual­ ly, for a l l w o m en of the college inter­ ested in sports . This year, tournaments of basketball, badminton , h andbal l , and t h e vari ous out -of-door s ports w e re h e ld. Iris Good­

win was presiden t ; Fe rn P oulson, vice­ president;

Zelia

Anderson,

activity

agent ; Mar i a m Fi tzgeral d, secretary; J\ li ss I-fansen, advi s e r.

The Internats ready for a discussion oF some vital problem.

H. Hall, D. Young, C. Blackham, G. Newton, and J. Brinton prepare to scribble.

'T'HE I NTERNATIONAL RELATIC)NS CLlJB . l ocal chapter of the Internationa l organization, conducted seim - mon t h l y m eeti n g s in w hich current problems were discussed and books revi ewe d . Carne gie Founda足 tion b ooks were added to the l ibrary. There was a l ar ge membership and a v isiti n g group at each meeti n g . The officers w e r e V i ctor Rasmussen , president ; Marcia Reid, vice-presi足 dent ; Phy l l i s Painter, program chairman ; lzo l a B lackham, secretary ; Evan B orrowman, activity a gent. The c l ub advisers were A . I. Tippetts, and H. Parley Kil burn. THE SCRIBBLERS CLUB sponsore d the annual short story writ足 ing contest, and each member scribb l ed in his own w ay. Som e of the members were particularly active in publ ication and speech activities . During the spri n g term, new mem bers were a dded, and the c lub was ful l y organized to function again n ext year. The club is the o l dest s tudy organization on the campus. 32

C. Blackham, F. Young, A. Bird, lVI. Bed<

UTAH GAMMA is t h e l ocal c h a pter of t h e nati o n a l Phi R ho Pi speech fra ternity. Students who have been active in i nterco l l e giate speech competition are eli gible for m em.bersh ip. In the January national ratin g, t h e local c hapter rated thi rd among a ll chapters of t h e n ation for its activities.

SIGMA DELTA CH.I, campus study club of drama, chose Boyd Chri stensen as president and R hoda Rees and P hy l lis Pai nter as his aid s . Helen A . Nelson 'vas. a dviser. T h e tradi tiona l initiation and banquet \Vere held.

B. Chr istense n, R. Rees, P. Painter

Rees, C. Black H. Hall, V. Dalley and A

0.

Few

Stragglers:

Maxfield,

I.

R.

Goodwin,

J. Killpack.

Some of the Home Economic Club membership.

STRAGGLERS is a social group intended to include everybody frmn outlying districts. It aims to mal<e all strangers feel "at home." Early in the year, tv1onty Nelson was host at an informal party for the group. Several socials were held for the club members and for special guests. When organization was effected, Duane Mattsson was named president. Clair Biad< fiHed the vacancy created -vvhen Duane accepted a ci.vd service appoinhnent. Other officers were Viora Dalley, Phyllis Davis, Delana Jensen, and Heber Hall. THE HOtv1E ECONOI\.1lCS CL-UB. under the direction of Stella Olsen, of the LTpper -Division, and Zelma Nuttall, of the Lower Division, met semi-monthly as a study g路roup. The emphasis was placed on the development of personality. Alta Hirst and Alice B. Cummings vvere the club advisers. Special reports and demonstrations \\7ere given by the gro up

.

34

SHARPS AND FLATS, t h e youngest of the cam pus study club s , h a s y e t to observe i ts first b irthday. h has th is year h a d a l arge and i nter­ ested Jnembership . The progran1 was under the direction of Evan Borrowma n , a ided by R h oda Ree s , Sherman Fitzgera l d , G lenna Dean , and }\!li l ton Tew. The program consisted of s tudying the hves and works of eminent composers and perforn1ers . A contest in reco gniti on of music sel ections w a s conducte d . J n addition , the club sponsored a musi c com ­ position contest. JUAB CLUB is a soci a l org·anization , consi sting of s tudents from Juab county. The officers were Lee Carter, p resident ; Phy ll i s Painter, vice-president ; Marie Svedin , secretary and t reasurer; Edward Cox, activity a gent. Merobersh ip of the c lub ·w e re promi nent in extra curricu­ lar activiti e s , parti cularly s ports and s tudent body.

lVI. Tew, G. Speery, C. R i c hardson, M. B a i l ey B. Gre e n wood, fvl. Sved i n , L. Carter, P. P a inte r , E. Cox.

Th e m us i c lovers.

,

Tea time for the cast.

TH E M A L E A N I M A L B y T hurber and Nugent Directed by H el e n A. Nelson CAST Cleota E llen Turner Tom my Turner Patricia Stanley .

Wal l y Myers . . Dean Frederick Damon . Michael Barnes J oe Ferguson . Mrs . B lanche Damon Ed Kel l e r l\'1yrtle Keller "Nutsy" Mil l er Newspaper Reporter .

l'vlarie Svedin Phyl lis Painter Perry Chri stensen Delana Jensen M i l d red Ockey B oyd C hristensen . C l ai r B l ack Hartley Newby Heber Hall Grace Newton Evan Borrowma n . Zelma Nuttall Sh erman Fitzgerald . Keith Anderson The " m a l e a n im a l " weaken .

Freedom o f s peech.

i th capable p layers was conclusively s hoV\rn in the presentation of ' 'Th e M a l e Animal , " b y Thurber an d Nugent. The audience had a n evening o f m erri ment and took home something to t h i nk about. Just what can happen when a clever drmn a i s cast

The curt, meanin gful l ines a nd i ntri g ui n g s i tuations port rayed a comedy o f domestic and p rofessional li fe. p l acing in definite focus theories t rivial and v i ta l . J ust w h at " t h e m a l e animal" does w hen h is lair is i nvaded was cont rasted with the s i g ni fi cance o f thou g ht and academic freedom . A cross -section of Ameri can interests and type character pre足 sented t hi s nation as a people who can boast and play, yet think and take a definite stand, even w i th i m pe n d i n g loss to i n d i vi dua l s , for th

A merican way of l ife .

T h e Female decide .

The cast o f " S l< idd i n g . "

L O W E R DI V I S I O N

F O R E NS I CS

Lower Division speech activ i ties of t h e year cul minated i n th e s tudy and presentat i o n of " Sk iddi n g . " by Rouveral . M embers h i p of t h e cast Included a l l th e member o f t he s peech cl ass . This comedy of youth was even m ore a m using as t h e characters perm i tted t h e i r personal i ties to interplay w it h each oth er t h rough thei r roles. Speci a l act i v i ties dominated each term , b u t t h ey were so b a lanced as to prov i de a genera l , unified s peech experience . T he retel ling of stories and th e rea d i n g of p oetry were some of t h e basic i ntrpretative activities . O ratory, extempore speabn g , and pa nel were s tressed duri n g t h e winter t e rm . The annual I nvitation Speech n 1eet and the American Legion con颅 test i nvo lved a larg路e number o f contestant s . Mi ss Nelson acted as instructo r a n d as ch ai rm a n of t h e forensic committee for Lower D ivis i o n . She 路was a i ded by Mrs . Cun1mings and Miss Young. So me of the con test , n!;Im bers w ere devel oped i n the Eng l i s h c lasses .

3

IN

R E V I EW

Speech Arts was one of the popular e xtra-curri cula r acti v ities . There \vas wide student participation in both -u pper and Lowe r Div i sion, under the direction of �lanager Cornel l B lacl<:hmn, Coaches Nel son and Y oun g , a n d members of the forensic committee. The P hi Rho Pi D i strict j\1 ee t was th e fi rst i nter-col le giate event, sponsorin g contests in debate, o ratory, extem pore s peaki n g , and inte l·­ p retative reading. Snow won rati ngs in each even t . T h e Utah - I daho tournmnent, held at Carbon C o llege in l ate March, had a ful l quota of representatives from Snow . Other meets were held in Provo and at \Vestminster College. In the Snow I nvitation Yleet, February 28, a l arge number of Lower Division students participate d . There vvas the maximum quota i n a ll events but one. Cmnpus competition in oratory and essay, and the duction of a p l a y added opportunities.

pro­

"Fly Away Horne" was presented in t h e Autumn term as the p l ay producti o n class activity. The cast consi sted o f Virgi n ia Lun d , LuRae Munk Arthur Rogers , Rhoda Reese, �llarguerite Madsen, De\1o n Larsen , Evan Borrowman, �Iaynard Bailey, E l l a Thom pson, Betty Win g , Heber 1--Iall , and Perry Christensen .

Pro fessor Dea n

T h e Orche stra

M US I C A L

I M P R ES S I O NS

Two m a j or c h ora l n u mbers were p resen t ed by the Music De­ part me n t , under the l e a d e rs h i p of M r . Dean : "The Messiah" and "Th e Holy City. " As a feature o f t h e Yule season, t h e eigh th annua l rendi tion of Hande l' s i m press ive oratori o was conduc ted. T he Inusicians o f the c o l l e ge and the commun ity, to gether with several alumni , comprised the ch orus and orchestra. A ca paci ty h ouse fe l t the i ns p i ration of a great t h em e interpreted by artists. "Th e H o l y C i ty, " by G aul, the m ore d ra1natic parts of the "Vision o f St . John, " was presented Apri l 1 2 . G lenna Dean and Les l ie Smi t h were at the p iano ; H. A. Dean a t t h e baton. Th e re was a ful l o rchest ra acco m pan i m en t . So l oists were Wi l l is O l sen, Kitl Larse n , Verdean M o r l ey, Phyl lis J ohnson, Wynona Hansen , Allan G reen , and Paul Ch r i s t ensen. Th ere w ere a l so duet and quarte t numbers . �fh e rel i gious s i gnificance and hope of Easter became m ore vital as 1nusic interpreted the Scr i ptur a l t exts and t h e words of M i lt on , as co mbi ned by A . R . Gar-d .

40

Festive days and all other days at Snow C o l l ege are colored by mus i c . I t is the band that goads the team s to v i ctory , th e members of the parade i nto ste p . Musici a n s and t heir art a r e

p a rt

of every p ro g ram ; th e

tone of every banquet ; the prologue and i n t erl ude of every p l ay. Th e band, orchestra , soloists, and gro up organizations have served !'reely duri ng t he year, and t h ei r i ns pi rati.on 'vi l l be felt long after t h e events have passed. T hey h ave contri_buted f ree l y t o t he comrnunity l i fe of E p h ra i m and surroundi n g路 tow ns .

The co l l e ge chorus , g l ee dubs, and varied vocal combinat i o n s were part of a l l col l e ge p ub lic program s and many in the community . The program c h a i rman a l w ays felt she cou l d depend u pon the mus i c as vital ph ase of the weekly meeti n gs .

A t random w i t h the note s .

a

Archery i s S n ov.r.

a

favori te spor t a t

A prac tice scr i m m age.

oF

The trad i t i o n a l cla s s sack rush " S " Day.

COACH SIJVLJ\10NS AND

AT H L E T I C S

SQUAD

G. Sperry, C. R i ch a rdso n

H . Pette

F O OT B A L L Th i s year's footbal l season w a short, snappy, and not very soft for th e B ad gers. T heir first g ame was won b y a 20 to 0 score over Richfield high , b ut the rest o f the eason was a tory of hard worl< and no g lory. At the tart of the season, Coach Simmon faced a task of double proportion H had to coach both ba k field and l ine ; and a l l but four of his quad were completely l acki ng in experience . A lthough Snow was known as ' 'the hard l uck team' ' be足 cause of in juries and unexpected d ifficu l ties, it was res pected by opponents for hard hitt i n g and h a rd fi g h ti n g , as we l l as for good s port s mans hip . .

R. N i e l se n , B. N e l s o n

B. Wa s h burn . K. Larse n , vV. Peterson, R. Thom pson , B. Heath , D. Osborne.

44

B. Greenwood.

D ixie the defendin g champions were the first to invade the Snow gridiron and, after a hard fou g h t batt l e , came off the fiel d with a 6 to 0 win . Later in the eason, B .A . C . m et the B ad gers here and were victori ous by a greater marg i n . Th e games avv a y from home were p l ayed against W est 足 mins ter and Carbon. I n both of these games, the B a d gers exhibi ted the same h i gh spirits and good sportsm anship that characterized thei r p l ay a l l sea 足 son, but they were unab l e to gain a victory i n ei ther game. On the a ll - confere nce team , four of t h e Snow players were given honorabl e m ention . Th ese w e re Boyd G reenwood, h alfback ; H eber Hal l , ri gh t tac -k l e ; O l e Maxfie l d , left g uard ; Wesley Peterson, ful l back and captai n .

G R IDIRON TEAM L I N E-UP Wes l ey Peter s o n , Capt a in , Ful l bacl< Ends : B l ai n e Christen sen , Evan Nielso n , Clem R i ch ardson , DeVo n Osborne, Ben n i e Heath ; guards : Royal B a gl ey, Richard Thompson, R o ger Nielson, C l air Truscott, Robert N e l so n , Ole Maxfiel d ; h a l fb ack s : Har o l d Pettey, Boyd G reenwoo d , G a r t h Bel l i ston , A l l a n Green, George S perry, Maynard Bailey ; quarterback : Ro ger Al l red , Kirk Larsen ; ful lback : B i l l ie Washburn ; Tack l e : H eber H a l l , Ray B lackham ; Centers : Rex C h r i s tensen, Warren Thom pso n .

H . Hall

Left to righ t : W . Thomp o n , R . B l ackh am , 0 . Maxfield , B . C hr istensen , W . Peterson , Cap足 ta i n ;

B. C h ri sten sen , 0. Max足

field, B. Washburn .

U P P E R DI V IS I O N B A S K ET B A L L

The Tip-o ff.

Under the able leadershi p of Coach Sim m ons, t h e Bad gers enjoyed a suc ­ cessful season of basketb a l l and sportsmansh i p w hi l e representing Snow in com­ petition w ith other col leges . A lthou gh the season was marked b y severa l l osses o f c l ose scorin g, t h e spirit o f the hard f ightin g Bad ger crew w a s never d ampened. I n p reparation for the season, the hoopsters j ourneyed i nto Arizona where th ey received much valuab l e experience , p laying· such tean1s as Tempe Senior and Phoenix Junior College. I n th e opener aga i nst Mesa J unior C Jl l e ge at Grand Junction, Col orado, the Bad gers lost by a sma l l margin, then c ame bac.k vvi t h a ven geance to defeat the Carbon Ea gles o f P rice, in a one-sided g a me. A trip into the South proved even less successfu l , a s the B ad gers returned with tvvo more defeats , administered b y B .A . C . and D ixie. Fol lowin g this trip , Sno"\lv h ad several successful encounters on th e home floor and took the last trip of the season to Weber and Wes tm i nster. Here they lost to the Wil dcats o f Weber in a t i g h t game but "\'V on hand i l y from th e P a rsons.

01la n a ge r Osbor n e

T h e Sq uad

E. N i e l son

\1. S udweeb

R . N i e l son

C. R i c h a rd s e n

l\11. B a i ley

A. Rogers

G. B ertel so n

W . Peterson

TH E TE A M Arthur Ro gers , Captain . Guard Press .AJ I - Conference T earn H o n o rable M enti on

Bovd G reenw o o d . . . . Forward Press All-Conference Team Honorabl e Mention

Maynard B ai ley . Forward Press Al l - Con ference T ea rn_ Hon orabl e Mention

Gene Bertel son

Forward

Evan Nielson

Forw ard

-

.

Roger N ielson

.

Devon Osborn

Cente r

Center

C la i r Rosenberg路

Forward

Keith A n derson

Forward

47

Ray B l ac l<ham

G uard

C lem R i chards en

Guar d

H arol d Pettey

Guard

.

Bennie Heath .

Forward

\lerl Sudweel<s

Center

R . B lackham ,

D.

Osborne

B. H e a t h

C . Rosenberg, B . Greenwood, K. A n derson

S C O R ES

H. Pe t tey

Y EAR

OF T H E

HOME GAMES

,

AWAY GAMES

Snow

43

Weber

39

Snow

41

Mesa

47

Snow

55

Carbon

41

Snow

43

Web er

49

Snow

53

Dixie

51

Snow

58

Carbon

20

Snow

47

B.A.C.

58

Snow

38

Dixie

39

Snow

66

Westminster

48

Snow

45

B .A . C .

58

Snow

43

Mesa

47

Snow

60

Westminster

35

POST- SEASON GAMES Snow

69

Utah Vall ey All-Stars

45

Snow

46

Gemmell Club

6

Snow

64

Broadway Clown

47

48

Snow Col lege n1en fail to live the rol e o f hilarity usua fl y depicted on the screen or printed page ; but they d o like the gmne"""""' n ot just as onlookers but a l s o as partici p a nts. To satis fy the interest i n sports , and as part o f the heal th progrmn of the col ­ lege, a series o f intra-mural games was i nitiated, under the d i rection of Manager Osborne and Coaches Simmon s and Beck. The men organi zed i nto teams , e a c h having a characteristic nam e . Softb a ll w a s the autumn interest. It was displ aced b y the h oop sport, and l ater by tenni s . I nterest ran so high that contestants forgot mea l tim e"""""' a nd some­ tim es bool{s and dates . A different i ntra - Inural sport develop­ ed a s a beard growin g contest. After two ·weeks of serious " production effort . ' ' there were varying results"""""' s ome b eard­ less faces ; some l on g , some short, some highly colored stubbl e . A n a ggregation of the winners \Vas captured hy the camera. Just to show that it cou ld b e done,_. and for the fun of it,_.a group of the intra­ m ural artists, variousl y sty l i n g themselves as the Seven Wonders or the Dizzy Half Dozen and one oth er, \vent over to Ferron and came home with a title, a car load o f m eda l s , a n d t h e ch ampi onship trophy. I ncidentally, they returned with their pajanms . The cheer l eaders of the year, l( i rl{ and his aids , Virginia and l-fel en , put mean i n g into the coll e ge songs and c heers .

49

Coach Wood row Bed<

ln the Sanpete d iv i s ion b asketball race this year the Snow High cagers met and conquered each of their opposing teams hvice, winning the championship with a record of 1 0 wins and no losses. During the season, they scored a total of 398 points and allowed thei r opponents only 2 5 1 , or an in颅 dividual game average of 40 to 2 5 . I n the annual High School Tournament, they 路were eliminated after two very close games, the first with Logan and the second with Murray. Durin g the tournament play, the team members received much praise for their exceiient playing and good sportsman颅 ship . This i s the second s traight year that Snow has 路won the champio nship of the district. There will undoubtedly be a strong temn next year, made up of several returnin g letter men and a fine crop of transfers from the Junior High. The team members vvho graduate this year are LaDale Bailey, Mel Chri stensen, Ferd Hansen, Lal\1ar Sparks and Gordon Anderson. Those who are returning are LaMar B ailey, Dale Nielsen, Bob Werly, Charles Nielsen, Jack Arm strong, and R obert Allred.

L OW E R

L. Bailey

L. Sparks

B. Werly

M. Christensen

F. Hansen

L. Bailey

D I V IS I O N B AS K E T B A L L 50

J. A rm s t ro n g , R. A l l red,

D . Nielson

G. Anderson

C. N ielson.

The team in action.

SCORES OF TI-IE GAMES Snow

42

Manti

14

Snow

52

Wasatch

36

Snovv

38

Manti

32

Snow

35

Moroni

24

Snow

34

Gun n ison

30

Snow

39

Gunnison

35

Snow

40

Moroni

28

Snow

46

North San pete

Snow

41

Wasatch

21

Snow

31

North Sanpete

22

Snovv

39

South H i g h , S a l t Lal<e

33

Snow

29

L o gan

30

Snow

28

Mu r r a y

41

51

9

Th e tennis team s garnered l aurel s duri n g the entire season of competition. May足 n ard Bai l ey , l etterman of last year, B ryce H inddey, veteran of two years , and Gordon Anderson, medal winner of the Lower Divi s i on , formed the nucleus for the teams . I n th e l ocal I nvitation meet, Gordon p l aced fi rst i n singles fo r th e men. H e p l ayed to the th ird round semi-final s in Provo. Ze l ia Anderson and LaRane J ensen took fi rst for th e women ; M i riam Fitzgeral d second i n singles for w om en . Only two battles out of s ix went th ree sets in competition with Westminster in Salt La-ke City. The victors in s i n g l e events were M aynard B a i ley, Perry C hristensen, Cornel l B l ad<ham , and B ryce Hinckley. The d oubles combinations of B a i ley -C hri sten足 sen , Hinck ley-B lack h a m a l so em erged victorious . I n B . Y . U . I nvitation m eet, M aynard Bai ley and Perry Christensen too -k first in t he d o ub l es event fo r j unior col leges, bringing the champions h i p to the cam pus . They w i l l com pete i n Logan, May 9 , for t h e I nter-mountai n c rown . The year opened and c losed with in t ra - m ural series for bo t h m e n and women. Coach es Beck and Hansen were i n ch arge of th e activi t ies.

Upp er D ivis i o n t ennis

Lower D i vision t e nnis

T R A C il The t rack squads in both Divisions w ere sma l l in members h i p , but gave good account of themselves i n competition , und e r the d i rection of Coach Si m m o n s . Competition f o r the Upper Division was mainly i n th e B . Y . U . I nv i tationa l Meet , Apri l 2 5 . Wesley Peterson p laced second in jave l i n a n d sixth in l ow h urdles ; Evan Nielson fourth in pole vault ; Keith Anderson fifth in p o le vaul t ; Bennie Heath . sixth in 880. Third s pot in the 880 relay was tak en by Rog·er Nielson, Harold Pettey, Boyd G reenwood , and \i\1 esley Peterson. Peters on will enter the Logan m eet, May 9 . I n t he Snow Invitational meet, Robert Werly received t h e h onor of h i g·h point man, totaling 1 80 points. The team placed fourth in the m eet . Tearn m embers h i p were LaDale Bai ley, LaMar Bailey, Robert Werly, Calvin Th omson, C la rl< Th omson, Paul Daniel s , E l mo G reen, and Bruce C hristensen. LaD a l e Bailey tied first in the pole vault at t h e B . Y. U . Invitational Ineet i n Provo , Hamlin of Murray rat i n g with him . The new athletic fiel d was initiated for the cinder and field events thi year, bei n � brou ght to a usable condition just before t h e l ocal meet. Early p ractice was con ducted on what is l e ft of the o ld fiel d , east of the building s i te .

Ze l i a a n d LaRane i n a pause as they prepare

M ar i e and Jane tal<e a pose i n m odern

fo r t h e spr i n g con tests.

i n terpretative d ance.

C O - EIJ

P H YS I CA L

EDU C AT I O N

Co-eds at Snow Col le ge are not just i nterested on-lookers at the sport rin gside. They cheer for the varsity squads , but they also "play the games . A program of intra-mural sports w a s conducted during t h e year under the direction of the W . A .A .

and

d i rector Wynona

Hansen.

Autumn activities included archery, softb a l l , and other out-of-door sports. During the winter, tourneys of b adminton, b as.ketba l l , and v o ll ey bal l w e re conducted. \Vi t h the comi n g o f s prin gtime, tennis held sway. Social and creative dancin g were a l so ph ases of the ph ysical educa足 tion program . Membership of the dance classes participated in school and community function s . Duri n g the morning of " S " Day, the vari ous class co-ed team s com足 peted for laure l s in field sports, particul arly races.

Badmin t o n and arc h ery attract coeds.

S NOW G R OW S

On Septe m ber 9, 1 94 1 , the grou n d w路as b roken for a new gym nasium a n d h eati n g p l ant, by Ma rl< Nicl<ol s , supervisor of Voca ti onal Agriculture of the State, representing C ha rles I-I. Sl<idmore, Superi n颅 tendent of Sch ools.

Since that t ime, th e w o rk h as

been going steadily on.

\Vorkmen exca vate for the h eat i n g plan t.

new

THE DAILY

LIFE IS A COMBINATION OF

COMMONPLACE AND NEW EXPERIENCES. THE

COMMONPLACE

IS

TAKEN

FOR

GRANTED. AND SOMETIMES CONSIDERED DULL.

THOUGH

IT

IS

THE

SOURCE

MANY HARMONIES OF LIVING.

OF

IT IS THE

NEW THAT PROVIDES GROWTH. SOME

PHASES

OF

LIVING

REPRESENT

HONORS EARNED THROUGH HOURS OF PREPARATION WORTH.

OR

THROUGH PERSONAL

SOME PHAASES DEVELOP FROM

UNEXPECTED EVENTS.

S 'I T U A T I O N S

OR

GALA

ALL ARE REMEMBERED AS

Beul ah A l l red from Spri n g C i t y was chosen Senior C l ass Val e d i ctorian because of hi gh s c h o l arshi p. She w i l l represent the class in th e Com m encement exercises. Last year Beulah

received the award of the

B us i ness Men of Ephrai m .

Sh e is vice­

president of t h e A.W. S.

Beulah Allred

Har t l ey Newby

H a rtley N ewby 'Y?'�- selected by the -'f>'l

.

facu l t y for the annual Efficiency Student h onor, the award b e i n g ._. tnade by the Eph­ raim Lions C l u b . The selection was made o n the basis of sch olarship, social service , a n d character meri t. H e p laced on t h e honor rol l for h i gh scholarship.

By popu l a r b a l J o t of the s tudent body, H artley was sel ected for the honor of b e i n g Representati v e Man of t h e Col lege.

Perry O l se n Lov.7er

Valedictori an ,

Divi sion

LuRae tvl un 1< Represen t a t i ve Lad ·

U n a Gwen C h ri sten se n Represen t a t i ve Lady

Perry O l sen h as been h onored as v a l�dictori an of the Lower D ivision because of outstanding scho larship during five terms of worlc

He w i l l represent th e graduati ng class May

sev enth . D urin g the year, Perry a l s o rated o utstanding in debate . Una Gwen Ch ristensen and LuRae M unk were tied by popular vote for the h onor of Representative Lady. Both are m em bers of the g raduat i n g class, and both m erited h onors in extra-curricular activities.

l\1iss Ch ristensen was

secretary­

aud i tor of the student body.

HIGH

S C H O L A R S H IP

59

H O N O R R OLL

C ORNELL B LA C K H A�l, debate . . �IIL­ DRED D R A P E R deb ate, s c h o l ar s h i p ; H. C . S n e l l e s s a y , fir s t p lace . . . A R U S B IR D . oratory, P h i Rho P i , t h ird p l ace. .

.

DELANA JENS EN . rea d i n g , P h i R h o Pi, first p l ace ; Scrib b l er story, second p lace JIM K I LL P A C K . deba te . . . RUTH N IELSON. ora tory, P h i Rho P i , secon d p l ace. .

.

.

MAYNARD B A I LE Y . S i mm on s award VERNA A N DE RS O N . d eb a te . H. C . S ne l l e s s a y , second p l ace ; s tudent b o d y e s s ay , second p l ace ; sch o l ar s h i p . W AR D O L SEN. extem ­ pore, P h i R ho P i , t hird p l ace ; F.F. A . , first p lace. .

.

.

.

.

J AN E B RINTON . R y tt i n g p ub l ic a t io n award . C O N R A D KELLOR . extempore, P h i R h o P i . second p l a ce ; Gurney award , C h em i stry 4 , ) 6. sch o l ars h i p . . . MAUD E F R I S C H K N E C HT. e x tempore ; Gurney award, C h e m i stry 1 , 2 . 3 ; s c h o l ar s hi p . .

.

,

W E S LE Y P ETE R S O N . S i m m o n s award . . . CAROL SMYTH . extempore . . ROYAL B A G LEY e x te mpore. .

.

R H O D A REESE. debate . . . DEE YOUNG. scholars h i p , debate ; P h i ll i p s Pub l ic a t i o n Service a ward . . . P H YL L I S P A I N T E R read i n g , dram­ a t i c award . .

P ER R Y C H R I STEN SEN. d e b a t e , oratory, sch o l arsh i p , dramatic award . . PHYLL I S JOHN S O N . rea d i n g , o r a tory . . GAIL H OU GA A R D . essay, second p l ace, s c h o l ars hi p . .

.

K A Y FRI S C H KNECHT, H . C . S ne ll essay, t h i rd place . . . VERNA A N D ER S O N Ephraim B u s iness M e n ' s 1 94 3 s c h o la r s h i p . . B E U LA H A LL RE D . sch o l ar s h i p award �IILDRED ALLRED, sc h o l ar s h i p . .

.

.

60

.

.

MAX I N E B R I GG S . ex tempore . . . P A UL DA N I E L S . p an e l . . . ZELLA A N DE R S O N . te n n i s , sch o lars h i p . . . M I LTON TEW. vocal . . . LE S L I E S �1ITH . Dean Servi c e a ward . . . A LLAN GREEN. voca l , MELBA BECK. deb ate. ELA I N E THOMP S ON . s tri n g . . . C LA I R B LA C K , oratory . . . L U R AE M U N K . s c h o l a r s h i p awar d , Yo u n g poetry ; art, secon d p l a ce . . . FRANK PEA COC K . o rato ry . . . B O Y D C H R I ST E N S EN . S cri b b l e r s tory , t h i r d p l ace . . . GLENN A D E AN , s o c i a l serv ice . . . A LLEN ALLR E D . social serv i ce. MARCIA R E I D . a r t . fir s t place . . . DEL�IA R H I G HA �!J , b rass . . . G RACE N E WTON . Scribb ler s to ry, f i r s t p l ace . . . EVELYN C AR PENTE R . read i n g , secon d p l ace . . . V I CT O R R A S M U S SE N . P h i i J i p s pub l i c a tion avvard . . . MAR Y A USTIN. debate, essay, first p l a ce ; art , t h i rd place . . . HEBER H A L L, dramat i c award. B E S S I E PETE R S O N . S n o wo n i a n sa l es . . . LI LA R AE J U STE SEN, scho lars h i p . . . D EVON O S BORNE. sch o l ars h i p . . . FERN LAR SEN, sch o larsh i p . . . IZOLA B LA C K H A M , s c h o l ar s h i p . . . H A RTLEY N EW B Y . scho l ar s h i p . . . D OR I S N I E LS O N , sc h o l ar s h ip. �1 A R GU E R ITE ;v[ A D S E N . art ; h o norab l e m e n t i o n . . . CA R L CH R I STEN S E N . s c h o l arsh i p a wa rd .

PERRY OLSEN, deb a t e , schol arsh i p award . . . PHYLL I S OLSEN, oratory, American Legion, secon d p lace ( Se ymour C hri s tensen award) . . . CALYIN TH O M S O N , deb a t e , sch o l arsh i p , socia l service . . . M I R IA M F ITZGE RALD, H umphrey Es say, seco n d p l ace, schol arship . . . LEONA R D OLSEN, debate, F. F. A . oratory . . . M I L D RE D L A R S E N , oratory . . . GWEN JEN S EN , read i n g. D O R OTHY JEN SEN , oratory . . . ROBERT A N DER SON, ex tem­ pore . . . WINONA GREA YES, e x te mpore, sch o l arship . . . WANDA PETE R S ON , debate, voca l p roficiency, schol a rs h ip . . . B ETTY C HE R R Y , read i n g . . . ZELMA N UTTALL, debate, schol arship award . . . LA D ALE BAI LEY , B eck award. H ELEN THORPE, read i n g , soci a l service, scho l arshi p . . . E LAYNE T H O M P S ON, H um p h rey essay, fir s t p l ace . . . D ONALD B EN S ON, vocal pro fi c i e n cy . . . JAC K AR�1 STRONG, brass . . . S H I RLEY DEAN, stri n g . . . LA M A R S O REN S ON , debate . . . YA LENE DENN I SON, read i n g. ZANE TAYLO R , debate . . . DALE J O R GE N S ON , debate . . . BETH PETE R S ON, oratory , Legion , first p lace ; i n vi t a t i o n m eet h i g h ho nors . . . CLAI R ERICK SON, scho larship . . . GORDON A NDE R S ON , ten n i s s i n g l e s , firs t p l ace . . . M I RI A M FITZGERALD. tennis s i n g les, seco n d p l ace . . . ZELLA ANDE R S ON and LARANE JEN S ON, ten n i s doubles, first p l ace . . . ROBERT WERLY, h i gh poi n t ath l ete Snow m eet, Fro st Award.

V i rg i n i a Lund

S N OW O N I A N

Vir ginia Lund from l\1 anti

Cra i g Davi s

P O P U L A RS

a nd

Cra i g

Davis

fro m

Chester received t h e h o n ors of the U p per D i v i s ion in the annual Snowonian Popul ar contest. V i rgi nia w i l l be among t h e graduates.

Th i s year s he

was assistant c heer l eader and a m em ber of t h e yearbool<

sta f f. Both years s h e \Vas a l eader in cluss a nd student body act iv i ties and p laced h i gh in sch o l arshi i-:> . C rai g , a junior, made a h i ch s c h o l arsh i p r a t i ng and

rece ived reco gnition in creat i v e l i t era r y a ct i v iti e s .

63

Calvin Thomson and Miriam Fitz gera l d of the L ower D ivision were selected for Popu l ar honors i n t h e Snowonian Celebrity contest. Miriam was prominent in mus i c circles and won recognition in literary activities. She p laced on the sch o l arship h i g h h onor roll . Her partici足 pation i n club a n d class activities was "ride and varied. Calvin was on th e s c h ol arship roll and rated h i gh in debate . He h e l d several offices l a s t year and t hi s , meriti n g a social service award.

M i r i am Fitz gerald Snovvon i a n Popular, Lower Division

Ca lvi n T h omson S n owonian P o p u l a r Lower D ivision ,

64

JUNI O R P R O M

Ze l i a Rae Chr i s t e n se n , Prom Lad

J i m K i l pack, Prom Man

The annual J unior Prom w a held February 1 3 and 1 4 , and, as usua l , was a uccess. The class this year, in keep i n g w it h t he fee l i n g of the day, chose as a theme, " Steps to Victory . " It was developed in decorations o f patriotic colors. A s a si gnifi­ cant feature, portraits of George Washin gton , Abrah a m Lincol n , and President Franklin D . Roosevel t--- t hree great l eader ---� t he American f l a g and the f lags o f twen­ ty-six Allied Nations were disp l ayed a s centers of decoration. Mr. Kil burn , the class adviser, gave � s hort tal k exp laining the decorations and the theme ; the Junior class led in a marc h and wal tz . T'he march depicted "Step to Victory" by the form ation of th e wel l-known "V. "

65

lVlar gu e ri te Madse n , Coed Q ueen Hartley Newby, Pre fe rence Man

Lu Rae Munk Senior Ho stess De V o n Osborne, S e n i or Host

A. W . S . B AL L B y p o pular vote of th e coeds , H artl ey Ne路wby was hon ored a s Preference Man at the Annual A . W . S . Ball January 2 9 . He 路was formall y presented , together w i th H e l en Thorpe, snow Carnival Q ueen , d uri n g the floor show. Margueri te Madsen , p resident of th e A . W. S . , was selected by th e Coeds to p reside over t h e Spri n g Festi va l , April 2 5 . S h e was forma lly p resented at th e c lub b a ll . Assis t i n g 路with the A.\IV . S. functi ons w e re Ruth Nielson, Zelma Nutta l l , Fan n i e Johnson, Miriam Fitzgera l d , Helen Thorpe, Janet Bertel 颅 son, B eu l ah A l l red, and advisers, Alta H i rst and Alice B . Cummin g s .

S E NI O R

B AL L

D e Von Osborne from. Spri n g City and LuRae Munl< from Man ti were selected by the Seniors as h ost and hostess at th e annua l class b a l l , March 2 1. " S"v i ng i nto S p r i n gtime , " w as t he t h e m e . O l e M ax f i el d , R hoda Ree s , Fern Larsen , and Virgi nia Lund assi sted 'v i th the arran gem ents .

66

Gwen

J ensen

and

Cal v i n

Thomson

were chosen as Prom Lady and Prom Man of the Lower D i v i si o n B a l l . Colorful p a tri o t i c decorations devel oped th e them e " Be l l s of Freedom . " Six teen s tu足 dents partici pated i n t h e floor sh ow. I t was one of the h i gh li gh ts of th e school social events .

Gwen Jensen P rom Lady

C a l v i n Thompson P ro m Man

L O W E R DI V IS I O N

B ALL

Yo u t h a n d t h e be l l s o f freedo m .

S n ow College, first lmown a Sanpete Stake Academy, was founded November 5 , 1 888, in an upstairs room o f what i now th e Erickson Garage buil d in g . It was spon sored i n p i oneer hard s h i p s for the purpose of tra i n i n g the head, the heart, the h an d , and the health o f the youth o f this secti o n for ful le r l iv i n g and for service to their comm u ni t i e s . Th e years brought expan s i o n during wh i c h a permanent campus w a s acquired, bu i l d i n gs con s tructed, and basic equi p­ men t i n stal led. The s a m e purposes and object ive rem a i ned, even though the l eadersh i p an d the s t uden t person n e l chan ged . Campu faci l i ti e s are s t i ll b e i n g e panded to sat i s fy ch anging requ i rement s . A n e w t rades buil d i n g , a dor m itory, a n d ath l e t i c f i e l d a r e rece n t acqui s i t i o n . Un­ der cons t ruction i a physical education bu i ld i n g , so p l anned a s to i n clude faci l ­ i t i e s for a n enriched social program . The p rese n t gym n asium i s to be c o nverted i nto a sci ence buil di n g which w i l l provi d e fo r bo t h s peci a l i zed and gener a l course s . Fly i n g h as become part o f t h e curri culum , an d the n umber o f courses h a s been grea t l y m ul tipl i e d . O n March 3 1 t h e offi ci a l letter from Governor Maw authorize d the purchase o f a t h i rty-five acre plot and the construc­ tion of bui l d i n gs,......, a l l to b e the n udeu for work in Vocati o n a l Agricu lture. The present student body and facul ty hope to carry forward th e b a s i c tradi ti o n wh i c h p rom pted th e foun d in g o f t h e co l­ lege a n d wh i ch h a s fo s tered i ts growth duri n g h azardous years. It hopes to know the respon sibi l i ty o f liv i n g i n a Dem­ ocracy. Th e Jun i or C l a s s won recognition t h i s y e a r for i ts mass participation i n t h e activ­ i t i e s of Founders' D ay , and th i s page i e ntered as a specia l tribute to them and their loya l t ies.

68

Mr. Wes ley Peterso n o f Gunnison and :Lvliss De E tta Wo ffinden of S panish Fork were cho en by popular vote of the stu足 dent body to reign over Fo u nders' Day.

F O UND E RS '

D AY

Founders ' Day, as before , was a g reat s ucce s s . People from far and near met once again to renew old friendships and to make new ones. Th e audi torium was packed to its capacity with Snow students, old and new . The s peaker of the day was a former student body president of Snow Coll e ge, Attorney Thera l d N . Jensen of P rice, Utah . After Assembl y , t he remai nder of the day was s pent i n varied activities , including a banquet wi th Bruce Jennings, a former editor 0f the Snowd rift. acting as toastmaster. The other activi ties of the day were sports and a dance.

Eph ra im H i g h School band in Founders' Day parade.

Banque t that followed t h e Founders ' D a y Assembly.

The p a rade d i s p l ayed very e ffective l y th e f i v e p i l l ars o f Democracy.

Helen Th orpe,

s

n ow car足

n iv a l queen. Snow carnival pon sored by the A.M. C .

A . M . C. C A R N I V A L A n n ua l l y Snow College h ol d s a snow carniv a l on Taylor ' s Flat.

Here a l l devotees

o f skii n g and s l edding try th ei r skil l in the s ce n i c east m ountains . T hi s year l-lelen Thorpe, an ardent fan o f skii n g , \vas e lected by t h e A . M . C . to reign a s Queen. Sh e p roved a worthy r u l e r b y partici 足 pating in the s l\:iing and activities of the day. Th e s now was just deep enough to be favora b l e for ski i n g and to m ak e a soft l anding bed. Th e occasion was m emorabl e to specta 足 tors and p articipants .

N OTABLE D AYS Two o f the l o n g -to-be-remembered oc­ cas ions of the year were " S" D ay and Mapl e Canyon day. They were enjoyed in

the vast out-of-doors . Probabl y m any students first defi­

n i tely became aware of each other as they met in the busses, or on the trai l s ,

or

roas ted weiners over the dying e mbers of the bonfire . The col orful M ap l e C anyon , w ith its crags and gorge s , was an experi­ ence

that

September

afternoon

and

eveni ng. T,-h e giant " S " on the hil lside took on ne'v meaning and b ecmne

even

more

a live as the embl e m of Snow when i t received its annual rejuvenation.

M any

times the buckets w ent up the h il l and back a gai n before the l ast boulder had been whitened. The student body 'vas a "big happy family" on a picni c party w hen a l l as­ sem bled for l unch.

Everyone was ex­

pectant a l so concerning who were th e newly e lected officers to be i ntroduced durin g the program . Both of the occasions w ere conducted by the student body officers .

D A I LY

A CT I V I T I ES

Col lege offers dail y ch a l lenges in the cia room,....., s ometi m es quests i nto th e mysterie

of

l ife . sometimes the acqu isiti o n o f m o re sl<ill

i.n

the art of d a i l y l i ving. Miss Ne lson i nstructs on t h e art of inter足 p re t i n g and po rtrayi n g ch aracter . Karma , Am y , a n d Janet prepare who l esome food for t h e noon足 day cafeteri a . G l enna , Heber, a nd A l lan discove r t he n'licrobes,....., m aybe the ones th at cause spri n g fever. ciency.

Verna a nd M i l d red p ract i ce f o r proh-

Science l aboratories pro v i de opportunity to l earn t h e known, and perch ance discover the unknown. A col le ge year i s i ncomplete w i t h out an e lectric s h ock or a w h i ff of H:2SO-!. Bernice, Beul a h , and Evelyn fashion t h eir spring frocl< s.

Lee, A l len, and Cornel l seel< to

l<now why t h e world spi n s . D a l e , Audrey, E l ayne and W inona practice for speed. G a il , Kei t h and Conrad wonder what the reaction wil l be.

73

INS TIT UTE H. A l va h Fi tz ger a ld, D irec to r S i la s L . C h eney, P ri n ci pa l

Mr . Fi tz ge r a l d,

A llre d, W . Pe te rso n ,

and B. P e te rs on .

Thorpe, Pede r s o n , Tew, Peterson , a n d Fitzgeral d .

AND

S E M INARY The L atter-day Saints I nstitute at Snow Coll e ge i s a vital factor in the experiences of m any of the students , not only because of the varied opportunities , but a l so because of socia l activities and leadershi p training. The I nstitute Sunday Sch oo l , under the d irection cJ Milton Tew, superintendent ; Dorothy Pederson, first coun足 selor ; W i lliam Peterson, second counselor ; Sherman Fitz足 gera l d , chori ster ; and Helen Thorpe, secretary, was h e l d regularly during t h e school year. A course of study w a s fol lowed , a n d social activiti es fostered. Each class of t h e vari ous units of study, in b oth the Sen1inary and Institute , h ad a corps of officers , and con足 ducted a supplementary socia l program. Clubs and c l asses appreciate the privil e g e of h o lding many of their social functions in the I nstitute Bui l ding. Director H. Alvah Fitzgeral d and Princip a l Sil a s Cheney have cooperated a t a l l times and have b e e n personal advisers to their students. 75

D urin g the year , vocational opport unities at the col lege were expande d . Separate departments of foods and clothi n g were s e t up , d efense courses , first aid , and adult educatio n classes were held . The additio n of a \location department of A gricul ture gives p romise for further d ev e lopment . The buil din g o f the new airfi e l d . jus t three miles frorn town , made possible one o f the best straightways in the state . The h angar, classroom, and machine s h o p were p lanned and equip ped under government supervision. The rock from the old heatin g p lant became part of t h e house of President Nutta l l as an experience in Buil ding Trades students . The carpenters assemble f o r recess. Dr. Jorgenson and Mayor Hum phrey demonstra te F i rst Aid ; l\1r. Aiken, a Defense instructor, uses the torch. Edward and G ene a t home. D ee poses as the man with the hoe ; Mr. Pratt tunes the old engine in the D efense ni ght class.

:76

P 0 E T R Y From W inning Co l l ect ion by LuR ae Munk

SNOWFLAKES

J UNE N IGHT

Down come the snowflakes Gentl floating through space, They fal l upon my m ittens And brus h against my face. I catch t h em o n my coatsleeve Each fleeting fra gile one, A delicate m a sterpiece, Exqu i s i te l y done.

The nigh t is gently c loaked i n song A softened melody, A n d by the o pen garden gate, A ta l l exalted p ine tree 'Neath the darl< and s tarry sky S i l h o uetted by the moon , Bathed i n gentle fragran t breezes Oh T a l ove l y n i g h t in June.

These lacy, whirling pieces S o daintily formed are they, A quickly a s I touch them They vanish r i g h t away. Each snowflal<e is a pattern O f straight and curving lines. Wh o is i n spired t o originate S uch beauti fu l design s ?

The darl< sky lool< s l ike velvet, The s tars are d iamond bright T h e g arden, an ocean o f perfume, The moon, a l antern o f l i gh t S ti ll s i lently s tands t h e p i n e tree, With the breezes p l ayin g a tune A m o n g the piney branches Oh T a lovel y nigh t i n June.

T O VI RGINIA To you, my dear, with heart as l i g h t as s i fted s n ow, T s i n g thee pra i ses. You r bubbling l a u g h ter l i l<e a brool< Is sweeter than the fa i ry-book Pri n ces s , when she l au g h s .

CO SMIC SYMPHONY The c l i n ki n g, t i nkle o f ice on a sweltering day, The cool m ou n t a i n stream sp l ash i n g merrily o n i t s way, The crisp, pop, crackl e o f a qualdng-aspen fire aglow, The crunch ing sound a s I tread t h e frozen snow, The dry rus tling o f autumn l eaves in fal l , T h e reso undi n g echo o f a canyon call, A ch eery " he l l o ' o n a fro s ty morn, The deep, l o w notes o f a big bass horn, The b aby's l au ghter a fter a sneeze. March winds whisper i n g to the trees , T h e c l ickety-c lack c lack o f a pony' s h oo f, Pa tteri n g ra indrops on a tin roo f. A swarm of buzzing bees in an appl e tree, A rob i n i n the rain singing merrily, A note o f a vio l i n, faint and h i g h , The h um o f an airplane in t h e sky, Ch irping of a cricket, wel l out of s i g h t , Contented s t i l l n e s s o f the new-born n i gh t,...... Harmonious movements in a cosmic symphony.

H o w i i t y o u are never sad ? I've never seen you weep or frown, Your red l ip s a lways smiling And there' s Wiarmth in your presence Lil<e the sunbeams s h i n i n g down . Wou l d i t be possible for you to give away A l i t t le of the happine ss you hold ? I t seem s you're run n i n g over W i th t h i s very en vied treasure We'd l ike to s te a l a l i t t l e of the gold.

SHAD OWS Darl< a n d l i gh t they fel l i n patterns o er t h e ground, And in that misty forest, I could not hear a sound Except the rapid beat i n g of my heart. B l ack and white th ese sh adows fel l Among t he trees, the mossy ferns ; And yet the si lence s ti l l prevailed, For in my heart deep anger burned.

SIGNS OF FALL

I paused to rest, t o close my eyes , and think i t through, And i n this silence, I found mys e l f forgiving you, And sunbeams c h ased ali s h adows from my sigh t .

Yo u 'll always k n ow when Fal l is nigh S top : Flaming s carlet leaves, Look : Golden grain in sheaves , Listen : R a i n drippin g from the e aves.

77

Mealtime : breakfast i n t h e P . P . R . R . quarters of the dorm ; t h e Coeds sta ged a hobo-scaven ger p arty and enj oyed the contributions as th e curi 足 ous males pee-k ed ; Leora tal<es a bite between sessions. Marryin g Sam finds both Daisy Mae and L; l ' Abner w i l i i n' ( Abner changed h i s attitude w h e n h e cam e to Col l ege on Sad ie Hawk i n s ' Day) ; AJI-conference star Bai ley ; Clem and Al l an w ant a noth er bag of nuts. Fern and D oroth y someho\v or o ther i nterest "campus l i o ns " ; tin1e turns bad<ward on E l n a ; G lenna sits for ideas during school on Saturday ( sh e l ooks the way everybody fee l s ) ; Bessie ca l l s on the nei ghbors earl y,_.., or late .

78

A cross - section of campus life s hows serious sea rc h for understand足 ing and s ki l l s , seasoned by dashes o f f un and frolic. It is p a rt of the colorful l<al eidescope of youthful I r v i n g . During th e sch o o l yea r , Civi l i a n P i l o t tra i ning prepared two groups o f m en for their ' 'vvin g s . " Billie was the first to qual ify o f th e autumn class ; Doyle the first t o fly for Uncle Smn . Roger, and Evan a re cau g ht

in

Monty, H eber, Arus , DeVone ,

a ty pica l pose.

The bumper get s a tes t as \7i ctor, l'vl r . Mortenso n , and H eber watch for the first blade of gras s . Sna pped from the pilot p lane en route north . Betty must have forgott en to shuffle th e t ic l<ets , or Jess bought a l l b ut t w o . Ruth, Ze l ia Rae, Erma, C l a i r and Ray " h o ld up" t h e radiator in th e usual way.

Once each year the S i gm a Delta Chi g o o n "dress parade," d i s t i n guish i n g the goats from the herders. Always there is a reve­ lation o f new t al e n t . Hunt i n g season i s o n , so C l a i r l eaves town i n search o f another. Time o u t for a gl i m pse of t h e vast chasm s of M a p l e Canyo n . Mon ty d i spl ays h i s favori t e beverage, hal t i n g fo u r c o- e d s en­ route o n a picn i c . O r i s i t a case o f wait i n g for the m al e ? Velores h a s a fi rm foun dation as she is sn apped o n the h ile trail. "Five ga l l o n s a n d a w i n d s h i e l d wipe p l ease," as t h e pe p c lub a n d o t h er s stretch at Cedar City en route to St. George. ,

Clair is caught b e fore lea vi n g town .

As t he d ays passed, t h e col le ge became a list of speci a l events . Th ere were t h e c l a s s and club parties , t h e s c h o o l dances, plays , contests a n d games g a lore . There were l yceum s that presented to the campus outstanding a rtists in various field s . H i gh s c h o o l d a y b rou g h t t h e seniors a n d athletes of this section to be guests oÂŁ the school and to compete in tennis, t rack nnd fiel d . Th is year the cinders on the ne'v ath letic plot received their fi rst work-out. In early May, h onor day revealed the m any winners in varied i nterests o f campus activity. Th e yearbool(s arrived, bri n g i n g with them the t h reat of writers' cramps. Com mencement, advanced because of th e six-day sch ool week is yet to b ring the ex periences o f graduation and th e bidding of fare w e ll to friends and A l ma Mater.

80

Y��IH, [ARRY �N This i s the challenge of your State and your Country.

Snow College is maintained to assist you in this vital responsibility. You can prepare yourself for positions in business, auto trades , bui l d­ ing trades , or household arts . You can satisfy the first two years of requirements for the professions. Every course is standard.

The building pro gram will foster another era for the College. The new gym and heating p lant will be completed as fast as priorities permit. A farm of about thirty-five acres has been purchased for the purpose of initiating Vocational Agriculture . Building has a lready be gun and wil l continue until equipped.

Snow College wishes all of its students success and appreciates their work and fellowship. It invites them to return often to the "home campus " and to tell their friend s of the opportunities available here.

81

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Co.

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COURTEOUSLY PRESENTED ALWAYS

Phone 80

CHRISTIANSEN' S

Ephraim, Uta h

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Co.

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THRIFT

EPHRA I !\1

MORONI

KEMMERER

D EPARTMENT GEPHART

STORE

S T O RE S

CO.

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llcckJ for Home and

Compliments To

School L ibraries

a

FINE GROUP OF

School Supplies, Party Favors, Greet in g Card s , Fou nt a i n Pen s , Pen c i l s ,

STUDENTS

Stationery, G i fts, Etc .

D E SERET E O Oli C O MPANY tl -1

E a s t South Templc

YOUNG D RY

Salt Lake City

CHAPMAN

CLEANERS

S TUDI O

Portraits and Commercial

Pressing - Repairi n g - Altering

PH OT O GRAPHY

\VE C ALL AN D DELIVER 0 . D . YOUNG. Mgr.

If Pleased , Tell Your Friends,....., I f Not, Tell Us Phone

1 06- \V

NEPH I . UTAH

Mt. Pleasant, Utah

82

P HIL LIP S E R O S . SPRINGVILLE. UTAH

Breeders of Purebred Shorthorn Cattle, that are prize winners i n -k een competition. Our sires come from the best herds in America. Call and see our herd w hen you wish to see the best and buy the best.

We are proud o f Snow College and

Compliments of

its Students , and we congratu late the

MAG I C

Graduates of 1 942. We also think of the Snow College boys i n the Service

CHEMI CAL

CO.

SALT LAKE CITY, lJfAH

who would have been graduates this year,

if they had not heeded their

country's call .

SHIRLEY'S

Best of l uck t o all of you.

lee Cream - Soft Drinks - Candy

EPHRAIM

MARilET

Fe aturing Triple Thick Malts

Your I . G . A. Store Phone 1 27-J

83

Ephraim, Utah

S ee me about your sigh t and

Service Is the Basis o{ Friendship .

Perfect Fit ti n g Glasses

DR. E . G. MILL S

Then

Op tometrist

·we are

"A FRI ENDLY JNSTITUTIO

MT. PLEASANT. UfAH

Because We

"Eve ry t h i n g

for O ffice

"

arry

and S ch ools"

Utah-Idah o Schoo l S u p p l y Company

Our Complirnents to

J 55

Se� T t Lake Cny

outh S tate

Snow College . . .

G RANITE FURNITURE

On Scenic H i gh way 89

CO.

S leep on a "BEAUTY R E ST "

H o t el K eystone and C afe

Moro n i , U t a h

r'o ye K . Erickson, Mgr. EPHRA I M . UTAH

ED ' S AND RUTH' S KOZY INN

PEP SERVICE STATION

O ur A im is t o . . .

Phone

S erve You the Best :rv'leals At the Best Prices

57

B. E. Tucker, Mgr.

Ephraim, Utah

Car Con servation Headquarter

EPHRAIM. UTAH

Vico Motor Oil

4

P e p 88 Gasoline

S PE N CER' S S I N CLAIR S E RVI CE

FOR . . .

IJ istinctive Printing

W e A i m t o Please We Sell

THE EPHRAIM ENTERPRISE

GOODYEAR TIRES - WILLARD BATTERIE S - S INCLAIR PRODUCTS EPHRAIM, UTAH

SAFEWAY Sanpete 's Modern Food Store Guaranteed Meats - Farm Fres h Vegetables

T h at Personalized Service

Mt. Pleasant, Utah

WE SUPPORT SNOW

Compliments of

FRANZ

S

&

10

Ephrai m , Utah

Phone 7

ONE HUNDRED PER CENT

S T O RE

MT. PLEASANT. UTAH

Compliments of

D REAMLAND

J.

C. PENNEY

HALL

CO.

rviT. PLEASANT, UTAH

" \Vhere Savings Are Grea tes t "

Ephraim

SQUIRES JEWELRY G. E. S quires , Prop. Dealers i n Jewelry a n d Flowers Phone 1 40

Mt. Pleasant, Utah

ERICKSON GARAGE Storage - Parts - Repairs

S now College's Dance Home

Evan Erickson,

Proprietor

EPHRAIM. UTAH

We Believe in S now College

85

An International Institution

C OLLE G E CITY

of Service

S E RVI CE S TATI ON Texaco Products

INIJEPENIJ ENCE

Certified Lubrication

MAIJ E AME RI CA

Tire Repa i r i n g Phone 1 05

Buy

-

Accessories Ephra i m , Utah

Independent

BEST WISHES FOR A PROSPERO U S

Progr�ss Mark�t

FUTURE TO ALL GRADUATES

Your Red and White Store

Compliments o{ Ephraim, Utah

Phone 69

T OWNE THEATER

. . . the h ome of S now College

THE

"L. IJ . S. TRAININ G PAY S !"

BANll

I t takes an ARMY of skilled workers

OF

to keep track of the nation's business. You can play your part better if you

EPHRAIM

are thoroughly trained to give expert service.

"The People's B ank"

W i n te r and summer, day and eve­ n i n g , the L. D. o ffers i ntensive,

ACCOUNTS

S. Business College practical training

at

low cost.

RESPECTFULLY INVITED Write {or our "Bulletin of Information" Member Federal Reserve Syste m and the

L. IJ. S. B U S INE S S C OLLE G E

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

S a l t Lake C ity, Utah

86

"'

0 v

1

STEVENS C OFFEE S H O P

l

l

...

z

;:)

.....

z

0

CHRIS TIANSEN

Clean, Qua l i ty Food

FURNITURE

Po p u larl y Pric e d Phone 2-W

C O MPANY

Eph ra i m , Utah

Deal ers in D i s ti n ctive

E IJVIN J E N S E N P l u mb i n g, A i r Cond i ti onin g, Hea t i n g, Shee t Me t a l vVork

"F URN ITURE and HO-U SEHOLD

W here t h e Desire lo Please is Po mmount

FURN ISHI NGS

PH ONE

1 40

EPH RAIM, UTAH

WASAT CH

S E RVI C E

S t o re s i n Eph ra i m - R i ch fi e l d - S a l t Lake C it y

Sells for Less

Salina

G A S - O I LS and GATES TIRES Lloycl L.

Service and Qua l i t y O u r Molto Scow. Mgr. Ephraim, Utah

7

THE CITY O F EPHRAIM Extends an I nvitation t o Hi g h Sch oo l Grad ua tes t o E n ro l l a t

I n t h e fiel d of l earning S N O W h a s estab lished a reputation that any institution coul d w el l be p ro ud o f. Fifty-four years o f continuo us service to l<n ow l edge seel<ers of Centra l and Southern Utah h a s prov e n t h a t SNOW CO LLEGE deserves the wholeheart ed support of a l l citize n s of th is section o f Ut a h

.

Inve stig-at e an d Enroll at

S N O W l: O L L E li E

THE

CITY

OF

E P HRA IM


1942