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SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW

VOLUME 13 ISSUE 2

FIRST LOOK Take a glimpse inside the Joe and Loretta Scott Law Center

DEAN’S MESSAGE

IN THIS ISSUE SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW

VOLUME 13 ISSUE 2

Dear Alumni and Friends, Transitions. As I look through the pages of this issue of Saint Louis Brief, I’m struck by how this theme comes up time and again, in different but equally important ways. Several of the stories in this issue touch on the hard work our alumni, faculty and students are doing to help the community’s underserved and underrepresented make successful transitions to life after incarceration. You’ll read about Dr. Dora Schriro’s (‘02) philosophy on pro-social living for prisoners, Professor Susan McGraugh’s work with students in her Criminal Defense Legal Clinic to help minimize convicted criminals’ chances of reoffending after release, and the student-run SLU Innocence Club, dedicated to helping exonerate wrongfully convicted and imprisoned individuals. You’ll also hear from students in our part-time evening program, who impress the faculty and staff every day with their enthusiasm and appreciation for the opportunity to earn a law degree in an environment that suits their personal and professional lives. Their transitions are also evident, as they tirelessly make their way from busy days to busy nights and, in some cases, return to the classroom after many years away. This issue also highlights the 2012 Hooding Ceremony, where we welcomed our newest graduates into the SLU LAW alumni family. Please join me in congratulating them on this exciting new chapter in their lives. Of course, one of the law school’s biggest transitions will be the move to our new building in downtown St. Louis. Now scheduled for the summer of 2013, the additional time spent to design the building and prepare for our

move has allowed us to evaluate and design the floor plans to best suit the school’s space and academic needs. You can see renderings of the building on pages 29-30. We are very excited about the physical transformation of the building into a truly remarkable space to teach, learn and collaborate. We’re also enthusiastic about engaging more deeply with the downtown community, which has already welcomed us with open arms as we begin to discuss and plan for programs, events and service and learning opportunities. This message also concludes my first year as Dean. It has certainly been an eventful and exciting year, and I thank each and every one of you for helping make my transition to Saint Louis University School of Law such a positive experience. Best regards,

ANNETTE E. CLARK, M.D., J.D. DEAN AND PROFESSOR OF LAW

ON THE COVER The Joe and Loretta Scott Law Center Building rendering courtesy of The Lawrence Group DEAN Annette E. Clark DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Laura Garner EDITOR Lauren Brucker GRAPHIC DESIGNER Josh Booth CONTRIBUTORS Paul Byrne, Julia Gigliotti, Adrienne Knopp, Suzanne Sierra PHOTOGRAPHY Steve Dolan, Jay Fram, Juan Pablo Sartor, Bill Sawalich, Chad Williams, Yuqing Xia ILLUSTRATION Matthew Elliott SPECIAL THANKS Terri Andrews, Erica Blume (‘11), Matthew Bodie, Suzette Carlisle (‘96), Adrienne Cochrane (’97), Maura Connors, the Gunn Family, Justin Farishon (‘09), Adam French, Justin Hansford, Chris Johnson, Michael Kolnik, Susan McGraugh, Antonia Miceli, Kim Novak Morse, Laura O’Sullivan (‘91), Matt Orso (‘09), Candace Ruocco, Dr. Dora Schriro (’02), Marie Scott, Stewart Shilcrat, SpearIt, Elizabeth Stookey, Lisa Sonia Taylor, Derek Velazco, Alan Weinberger, the Honorable Donald G. Wilkerson, Mary Ziegler Copyright © 2012 Saint Louis University School of Law All rights reserved. Saint Louis Brief is published twice annually by Saint Louis University School of Law. The Office of Communications is located in Queen’s Daughters Hall, Rm. 320, 3700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63108 e-mail: brief@law.slu.edu

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Law Briefs

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SLU Innocence Club’s Fight for Justice

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Faculty Profile

Susan McGraugh

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The Gunn Family - Being of Service

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Faculty Profile

Justin Hansford

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Washington, D.C. Reception at the Supreme Court

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Alumni Lunches

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Scholarship Day

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Faculty Scholarship

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Development and New Building Update

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Committed Students Find Balance in the Part-time Program

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Alumni Profile

Dr. Dora Schriro (‘02)

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Multicultural Affairs and Outreach Update

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Alumni Profile

Adrienne Cochrane (‘97)

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2012 Hooding

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Service Spotlight

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Class Notes

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Focus on Giving Back

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LAW BRIEFS DR. RICHARD T. MIDDLETON HONORED

HONORS AND DISTINCTIONS U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT RANKS HEALTH LAW PROGRAM NO. 1 IN NATION For nine consecutive years, the School of Law’s health law program has been named the best in the nation by health law scholars, according to the 2013 U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate Schools Rankings. Also this year, the Center for Health Law Studies is celebrating 30 remarkable years of national leadership in health law scholarship and education, and this ninth No. 1 ranking further supports the School of Law’s role as a pioneer in the field of health law.

HEALTH LAW PROFESSORS SIGN AMICUS BRIEF Professor Sidney Watson was co-counsel on an amicus brief filed in the U.S. Supreme Court supporting the constitutionality of the Medicaid expansion in the Affordable Care Act. Professor Watson was joined by 53 health law professors on this brief, including SLU LAW professors Tim Greaney, Jesse Goldner, Efthimios Parasidis, Elizabeth Pendo and Kathy Cerminara.

PROFESSOR CHERRY BOOK PROJECT RECEIVES AWARD Professor Miriam Cherry was awarded a semester leave under SLU’s new Faculty Research Leave program. Cherry will spend a semester next year working on her book project, entitled “Virtual Work.”

PROFESSOR REDDING TO PARTICIPATE IN FORUM AT HARVARD Congratulations to Assistant Professor Jeff Redding on the selection of his article, “The Case Of Ayesha, Muslim ‘Courts,’ And The Rule Of Law: Some Ethnographic Lessons For Legal Theory,” for this year’s Junior Faculty Forum at Harvard. Recent SLU LAW faculty to participate in the forum include Professor Matthew Bodie and Assistant Professor Monica Eppinger.

Dr. Richard T. Middleton, IV, Adjunct Professor of Law, was selected as one of 20 “Young Leaders” in St. Louis by the St. Louis American Foundation.

SPEARIT INDUCTED INTO SALT Assistant Professor SpearIt was elected as a member of the Society of American Law Teachers (SALT) Board of Governors. SALT is open to all ranks of faculty, deans, admissions and career officers, librarians, adjuncts and academic support staff. The organization promotes a three-part mission: making the legal profession more inclusive; enhancing legal education through innovative teaching methodologies and incorporation of social justice into curricula; and extending the power of law to underserved individuals and communities. Other esteemed SLU LAW faculty who are members of SALT include Dean Annette Clark, the Honorable Michael Wolff and Professor Roger Goldman.

SLU LAW ORGANIZATIONS HONOR ALUMNI On April 4, the Women Law Student Association’s bi-annual judicial reception celebrated the Honorable Lucy D. Rauch (‘79), St. Charles County Circuit Court; the Honorable Melissa A. ChapmanRheinecker (‘83), Illinois Court of Appeals, Fifth District; and the Honorable Barbara W. Wallace, St. Louis County Circuit Court. In addition, the members created a service award to recognize exemplary leadership and service to women in the legal profession and the community as a whole. Because of her tireless commitment to ensuring a welcoming environment for female law students, the members voted to both award it to emerita faculty member Eileen H. Searls and to name it in her honor going forward. On April 18, the Black Law Students Association hosted the 2012 Judicial Reception. SLU LAW faculty, students and alumni recognized the Honorable Jimmie Edwards

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(’81) with the Judge Theodore McMillian Award, and Stefan Bradley, Associate Professor, History and AfricanAmerican Studies at Saint Louis University, received the BLSA Service Award.

SLU LAW WOMEN HONORED AT WOMEN’S JUSTICE AWARDS Saint Louis University School of Law students, faculty and alumni were honored at the 14th annual Women’s Justice Awards April 19, sponsored by Missouri Lawyers Media. The awards celebrate Missouri’s leading professionals, and several SLU LAW women were honored. Students Nkechi Ekwunife and Stephanie Hudson received the Leaders of Tomorrow Awards. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor Elizabeth Pendo was awarded the Legal Scholar Award for her commendable work with the justice system, her research and scholarship, as well as her ability to inspire students in the classroom. SLU LAW alumni were also recognized. Amy Hoch Hogenson (’01) received the Rising Star Award, Sarah Hellman (’00) was awarded the Litigation Practitioner Award and Joan Killgore (‘00) was awarded the Business Practitioner Award. The 2012 Woman of the Year is alumna Doreen Dodson (‘74), who was honored for making an extraordinary difference in improving the quality of justice and exemplifying the highest ideals of the legal profession.

sponsored by SLU’s Student Government Association Academic Affairs Committee, and students nominate faculty based on their contributions to the SLU community. Gatter was one of eight honorees who were acknowledged during a ceremony in April for their outstanding teaching and service.

STUDENTS RECOGNIZED AT END-OF-YEAR AWARDS CEREMONIES SLU LAW once again honored several remarkable students for their many accomplishments at various end-of-year ceremonies. At the annual Academic Excellence Awards on April 20, Mark Keaney was awarded Volunteer of the Year Award for Community Service, Chelsea Mortimer won Volunteer of the Year Award for Legal Service. The ALI-ABA Scholarship and Leadership Award went to Denise Childress. On May 17 Mary Beekman and Kelly Tyler were the recipients of the David Grant Clinic Student Award, and Alana Green received the Clinical Legal Education Association Award for Outstanding Student.

PROFESSOR WALKER CHOSEN AS FACULTY MEMBER OF THE YEAR

PROFESSOR GATTER HONORED AT FACULTY EXCELLENCE AWARDS Congratulations to Professor Robert Gatter, a recipient of the 2012 Faculty Excellence Awards. The awards are

Associate Professor Anders Walker was chosen by the Student Bar Association as Faculty Member of the Year for the second straight year. Beginning in the 2012-2013 academic year, Walker will also serve as the Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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PUBLIC SERVICE INITIATIVES HELPING THE CHILDREN OF HAITI The Le Roseau Initiative is a project that helps the underserved children of Haiti by providing education and educational facilities. Supervised by Assistant Clinical Professor Dana Malkus in her transactional clinic, student Tyler Short worked with Dr. Gary Albers, a pediatrician at Cardinal Glennon and SLU Professor of Pediatrics, to obtain a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status for a new nonprofit that is supporting education and health for children in Haiti.

was first appointed to the bench in 1997, after serving the city as Alderman and Assistant Circuit Attorney. He has mentored hundreds of SLU LAW students and serves the community in many ways, including giving countless hours as president of the board of directors of the St. Louis Public Library.

2012 EXCELLENCE IN PRO BONO AND PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD – NONPROFIT Places for People is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide innovative and effective mental health services to people with the greatest needs but the fewest resources, while creating a system of care that promotes personal recovery. In addition to providing its many services, this organization works closely with alternative courts in St. Louis, specifically the mental health and drug courts. Places for People also has a history of working closely with SLU LAW Legal Clinics. Executive director Joe Yancey and board president James Fox accepted the award on behalf of Places for People.

2012 EXCELLENCE IN PRO BONO AND PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD – LAW FIRM Simon Law Firm has a tradition of providing pro bono representation to many St. Louis area residents. The firm also has a tradition of representing consumers and workers in class actions and impact cases that affect millions of citizens. The firm’s attorneys have achieved great results in cases against payday lenders and unscrupulous employers. The firm also spearheads the nonprofit group XOXO, which raises funds for local charities.

2012 CLARENCE DARROW AWARD

PUBLIC INTEREST LAW GROUP DAGEN FELLOWSHIP AUCTION The Public Interest Law Group held its annual auction March 30 at Il Monastero. Funds raised from the event, in combination with contributions from the SLU LAW Dean’s Office and Dagen Fellowship Fund, will provide more than 60 law students with summer stipends totaling more than $84,000. The stipends will allow student members of the PILG organization to spend their summers serving the legal needs of the St. Louis community at organizations such as the Public Defender’s Office, the Circuit Attorney’s Office, Missouri Human Rights Office, HUD and ArchCity Defenders, Inc. The group also presented the following awards the night of the auction:

2012 EXCELLENCE IN PRO BONO AND PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD – INDIVIDUAL The Honorable John Garvey has been a valued adjunct professor of the law school for many years, teaching Trial Advocacy, Domestic Relations and other courses. He

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PILG students also selected Assistant Director of the Legal Clinics Barbara Gilchrist as this year’s winner of the Clarence Darrow Award for her lifetime commitment to public interest law. Gilchrist has devoted more than 25 years to SLU LAW and ill and elderly clients.

LAW STUDENTS RETURN TO JOPLIN Law students Chelsea Harris, Joe Harvath, Claire Kaltenbach, Katherine O’Dell, Julie Laville, Cliff Martin, Aaron Moores, Nichole Pour and Candace Ruocco spent their spring break in Joplin, Mo., to provide legal services and manual labor to the community still recovering from last year’s deadly tornado. The students also presented the Joplin High School Constitution Team with a $400 check, raised from the law school community, toward their trip to the

national “We the People” competition in May. Projects during the students’ trip included reviewing homeowners’ insurance policies, educating residents of the FEMA trailer community (which houses 500 families) on their rights and cleaning dozens of acres of prime farm land to make it tillable for the spring. The students were joined by Marie Kenyon of Catholic Legal Assistance Ministry, who arranged funding for the trip through Catholic Charities. SLU LAW students have visited Joplin three times in the last year to provide much-needed legal services.

STUDENT EXPERIENCES STUDENTS ACHIEVE SUCCESS OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM In the 2011-2012 academic year, dozens of students successfully represented SLU LAW among many of the country’s best law schools as they competed in 20 regional and national professional skills competitions, including the Andrews Kurth Moot Court Competition, where students Stephen Bosky, Adam Doerr and Jacqueline Graves placed second in the national competition in Houston that brings together the 16 top-ranked moot court schools in the country. To see the full list of competitions, visit the News and Events section of law.slu.edu.

LEGAL CLINICS WINS SETTLEMENT IN CLASS ACTION FOR THE DEAF SLU LAW Legal Clinics students, serving as part of a legal team, won final approval to a federal class action lawsuit settlement that promises to significantly improve the mental health services that the State of Missouri provides to deaf Missourians. The settlement affects more than 1,000 deaf Missourians who will now have greater availability of qualified interpreters and new standards of care for mental health treatment. Legal Clinic students who assisted in the case included Megan Holloway (‘11) who in the early stages of the case traveled to Jefferson City, Mo., for numerous hearings, deposed some of the witnesses in the case and reviewed medical records, and Samantha Mabry, who assisted in the negotiations to resolve the case and in drafting the settlement agreement. The students were supervised by Professor and Clinic Director John Ammann.

FIRST ANNUAL NONTRADITIONAL CAREER AND INFORMATION FAIR On March 1, the Office of Career Services hosted its first annual Nontraditional Career and Information Fair showcasing the versatility of a law degree. This fair provided students the opportunity to gather information from and network with various industry leaders – all of whom are using their law degrees in nontraditional ways. Organizations such as AT&T, Quest Diagnostics, Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Platinum Sports & Entertainment Management, LLC, SSM HealthCare System, Gateway Government Relations and Merrill Lynch attended the fair.

COURT WEEK The law school bustled with Court Week activities March 1923. Events included a presentation on a week in the life of a trial attorney by Ryan Dickherber (’05); arguments in front of the Missouri Court of Appeals Eastern District over which the Honorable Kathianne Knaup Crane (‘71), the Honorable Lawrence E. Mooney (‘74) and the Honorable Gary M. Gaertner, Jr. (‘90) presided; the presentation “Equal Access to Justice” from Jurist-in-Residence, the Honorable Richard B. Teitelman; and the final arguments in the Moot Court Competition. Congratulations to students Sophie Zavaglia and Victoria Alvarez, who won the Judge Robert G. Dowd Sr.

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Appellate Advocacy Award for the first place team in the competition.

JOURNAL OF MISSOURI BAR TO PUBLISH STUDENT ARTICLE Third-year student Alexander Muntges’ article about Batson v. Kentucky will be published in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the Missouri Bar. Muntges credits the guidance of Associate Professor Anders Walker and the Honorable Michael Wolff in helping him secure placement of his article.

President of the United States (by video conference); Ira Shapiro, author of “The Last Great Senate” and former long-time senate staff member; Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan; the Honorable Rodney W. Sippel, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri; and Professor Murray Weidenbaum, former Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers and Assistant Secretary of the Treasury.

Through the work of the Missouri Clemency Coalition, faculty from the four Missouri law schools have been successful in securing parole for women who were serving lengthy prison sentences for killing their abusers. This forum brought together the attorneys involved in these cases to present their stories to the audience. The symposium explored current legal legislation on domestic violence and aimed to discover areas of reform to the legal system. For more information on the coalition’s work, visit www.batteredwomenwhokill.com to watch a documentary, which includes Assistant Clinical Professor Patricia Harrison.

CONFERENCES, SYMPOSIA AND EVENTS

SLU’s School of Law and the School of Public Health welcomed David R. Williams, M.P.H., Ph.D., Harvard School of Public Health; Lisa A. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H., Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and School of Public Health; Alvin Starks, W.K. Kellogg Foundation; and from Saint Louis University, Vence Bonham, J.D., Adjunct Professor of Law; Keith Elder, Ph.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor of Health Management and Policy; and Sidney D. Watson, J.D., Professor of Law to dialogue with students and faculty March 21 about social justice and the role of individuals and institutions in addressing health inequities in the U.S.

ALLIES FOR INCLUSION EXHIBIT SLU LAW opened its doors to the “Allies for Inclusion” exhibit Jan. 17-20. Created by Saint Louis University graduate students in the Disability in Higher Education and Society course, this traveling exhibit is designed to promote the inclusion of people with disabilities through respect for others and awareness of disability issues. The exhibit went on to receive the Ignatian Medal for an Outstanding Campus Program during the Jesuit Association of Student Personnel Administrators (JASPA) annual spring conference hosted in Phoenix. To view photos of the exhibit, visit www.slu.edu/x52510.xml.

On Feb. 24 the Public Law Review hosted “Control of Police Misconduct in a Post-Exclusionary Rule World: Can it be Done?” a symposium about the control of police misconduct in a post-exclusionary rule world. The event brought together attorneys and scholars including Colonel Daniel W. Isom, Chief of Police, City of St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department, to discuss remedies for effectively controlling police behavior.

2ND ANNUAL VINCENT C. IMMEL LECTURE ON TEACHING LAW

INVISIBLE CONSTITUTIONS: RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS AND CULTURAL CONFLICT The Center for International and Comparative Law hosted the spring symposium “Invisible Constitutions: Religious Traditions and Cultural Conflict” March 2 to discuss the interpretive risks involved in abstracting constitutional texts from their larger cultural/temporal contexts and the role those contexts play in creating constitutional meaning. The program was co-hosted by SLU’s Center for Intercultural Studies.

On March 22, Professor Steve Johansen of Lewis & Clark Law School explored how incorporating storytelling strategies into the law school curriculum improves teaching and better prepares law students for the practice of law. As part of the Vincent C. Immel Lecture on Teaching Law, the annual lecture honors the legacy of long-time professor Vincent Immel and was followed by a reception with members of the Immel Society.

REMEMBERING THOMAS EAGLETON

BATTERED WOMEN WHO KILL SYMPOSIUM On Feb. 17 the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Law and the SLU LAW Legal Clinics hosted the “Battered Women Who Kill” symposium, bringing together scholars and advocates in the domestic violence area involved in the Missouri Clemency Coalition.

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In honor of the fifth anniversary of the death of U.S. Senator Thomas Eagleton, SLU LAW presented the panel discussion “Celebrating Public Service: Remembering Thomas Eagleton” March 5. Panel discussions focused on the contributions Eagleton made to public service and the character traits that made him such an extraordinary public servant. Speakers included Walter F. Mondale, former Vice

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SLU LAW HOLDS FIRST SOCIAL JUSTICE SPEAKERS SERIES On March 26, the inaugural installation of the Social Justice Speaker Series hosted Trudy Strassburger and Ben Wolff of the Bronx Defenders. The Bronx Defenders are a non-profit organization providing free legal representation to Bronx, N.Y. residents charged with crimes. The group employs a groundbreaking system of holistic defense to fight both the causes and consequences of involvement in the criminal justice system.

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On March 30 at the 24th annual Center for Health Law Studies Symposium, Drugs & Money, national experts examined the influence of public and private funds on the development of, and access to, medications. The event was co-presented by the Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy.

EEOC COMMISSIONER CHAI FELDBLUM VISITS SLU LAW

ELIMINATING HEALTH INEQUITIES

PUBLIC LAW REVIEW SYMPOSIUM

DRUGS & MONEY

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In celebration of the William C. Wefel Center for Employment Law’s 25th Anniversary, Saint Louis University School of Law hosted Chai Feldblum on April 19 for the presentation “The Rejuvenation of the ADA: Towards True Equality for People with Disabilities.” Feldblum was nominated to serve as a Commissioner of the EEOC by President Barack Obama, and was confirmed by the Senate, for a term ending on July 1, 2013. Prior to her appointment to the EEOC, Commissioner Feldblum was a Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center, where she has taught since 1991. As Legislative Counsel at the American Civil Liberties Union from 1988 to 1991, Commissioner Feldblum played a leading role in helping to draft and negotiate the ground-breaking Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Later, as a law professor representing the Epilepsy Foundation, she was equally instrumental in the drafting and negotiating of the ADA Amendments Act of 2008.

IN REMEMBRANCE REMEMBERING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR LIZ GLANKLER Assistant Professor of Legal Research Liz Glankler passed away on June 13, 2012. Glankler served in numerous roles within the library since joining SLU LAW in 1998, notably investigating and implementing new technologies for use by the law school. She was also an active member of the American Association of Law Libraries. She is survived by her husband, Bill, sons Sean and Eric, and three grandchildren.

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FIGHTING FOR

JUSTICE

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE MIDWEST INNOCENCE PROJECT, STUDENTS LAUNCH THE SLU LAW INNOCENCE CLUB TO DO THEIR PART TO HELP THE WRONGLY CONVICTED. BY JULIA GIGLIOTTI ILLUSTRATION BY MATTHEW ELLIOTT

The Jesuit mission centered on public service is a cornerstone of legal education at Saint Louis University School of Law. Recently, several students have taken that mission to heart and formed the SLU Innocence Club – a student club inspired by innocence projects around the country dedicated to exonerating the wrongly convicted and leading to criminal justice reform. The SLU Innocence Club was launched in March 2011 after a first-year Torts class ignited the curiosity of two students. During class lectures, Assistant Professor Mary Ziegler mentioned cases she had worked on as part of the Harvard Project on Wrongful Convictions. After hearing about Ziegler’s experiences, students Shay Irby and Stacey Brake asked her if they could form their own chapter of the organization at the School of Law. Inspired by the students’ initiative and passion, Ziegler agreed to oversee the club, with Irby and Brake serving as student leaders. “Working with the SLU Innocence Club is an invaluable experience for law students,” said Ziegler. “They learn how to build an innocence case from the ground up, request documents and deal with witnesses.” This past academic year, the 20-member club worked on cases assigned by alumna Laura O’Sullivan (’91), legal director of the Midwest Innocence Project (MIP). The students assisted the MIP by researching public records, reviewing documents and developing investigative plans to help determine if a valid innocence claim exists.

exposes students to the inner workings of innocence law. And finally, the project lends itself to helping the students live out Saint Louis University’s Jesuit mission. “This organization really reminds you of why you came to law school in the first place,” said club member Chris Johnson. The students working with the SLU Innocence Club all express their intentions to continue working toward justice after graduation. Irby specifically spoke of her involvement with the club as a confirmation of her decision to become a criminal defense attorney. Members of the SLU Innocence Club emulate the University’s Jesuit mission and are a model of compassion and leadership for the SLU community, as well as the legal community in St. Louis. WORKING SIDE-BY-SIDE WITH PRACTICING ATTORNEYS The newest development for the organization involves a partnership with Bryan Cave and other area firms that are starting a wrongful convictions project in St. Louis. The idea for the project began when Stephen Snodgrass and Charles Weiss, counsel at Bryan Cave, took on the case of Josh Kezer. When he ultimately went free in 2009, Kezer had served 16 years in Missouri prisons for a murder he did not commit. Kezer’s dramatic story caught the attention of the national media and was featured on CBS’s “48 Hours Mystery.” In the

“The Midwest Innocence Project strives to uncover wrongful convictions and to achieve the release of those suffering as a result of these injustices,” said O’Sullivan. “We are so pleased to have students donating their time and incredible talent to fight for the innocent.”

“Students founded this group,” said Ziegler. “They came up with the idea and determined its mission and its future. I am just a facilitator.

A UNIQUE LEARNING EXPERIENCE

Beginning this summer, SLU LAW volunteers will be able to work closely with attorneys at local firms in reviewing and evaluating wrongful convictions claims. These volunteers will help attorneys screen cases and determine the merits of particular claims. In the future, attorneys at Bryan Cave hope to create opportunities for SLU LAW students to work for credit on actual habeas cases filed in Missouri courts. For SLU LAW students, the new partnership will build on the exciting social justice work already being done at the law school. Assistant Professor SpearIt is planning to incorporate some of these new opportunities into his Sentencing Law seminar and his Corrections Law course. “This will be a great opportunity for students to develop practical lawyering skills and simultaneously get a first-hand glimpse of access to justice issues,” SpearIt said. Students in the SLU LAW Legal Clinics will also be part of the new initiative, building on the work they have done with Clinics faculty for the past 10 years through the Battered Women’s Clemency Project. The partnership, as SpearIt notes, aims to “train the type of attorney the SLU mission envisions.” SLB

The SLU Innocence Club hosted the panel discussion, “THE GOLDEN THREAD: WRONGFUL CONVICTIONS, THE DEATH PENALTY AND THE LAW,” on February 14. This event brought together SLU LAW faculty and nationally recognized speakers to discuss the law and science of wrongful convictions. It included a discussion of the Reggie Clemons case, currently before the Missouri courts, and hosted a panel featuring the Honorable Michael Wolff; Assistant Clinical Professor Susan McGraugh; Randy Steidl, a former death row inmate and exoneree; and renowned death penalty attorney and U.S. Supreme Court veteran Rick Sindel, who is now a regional leader of Amnesty International.

Ziegler serves as faculty moderator for the student-driven club. She is excited by the level of commitment shown by the students, not only to the cases they are assigned, but also to innocence work as a whole.

“The students who founded our club wanted to do innocence work because they feel a deep commitment to social justice and legal reform. They do this work for free, and get no academic credit for it. They do it because of a basic sense of what legal practice and SLU LAW represent. I am extremely proud of these students.”

wake of the Kezer case, Snodgrass and Weiss were inundated with requests for legal assistance, and area attorneys stepped forward to offer their help. Snodgrass and Weiss heard about SLU LAW students’ interest in access-to-justice issues and reached out to the law school about forming a new project.

BACK ROW, L TO R: CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON, SHAY IRBY, JON SKRABACZ AND STEPHANIE ALLEN FRONT ROW, L TO R: KATHY POWERS, MARY ZIEGLER AND CHANDRIKA CHRISTIE CLUB MEMBERS NOT PICTURED: ANTONIO ARTHURS, SUSAN BAUER, STACEY BRAKE, KIRSTEN BREMER, ALI BURNS, DAVID DRESCHER, ALLYN KELLEY, T.J. KIRSCH, MARYBETH McCARTHY, KYLE O’DRISCOLL, WILL SCHOFIELD, RACHEL SHKLAR, TIFFANI SMITH AND LINDSEY TAYLOR

Alumni interested in becoming involved in the SLU LAW Innocence Club should contact Assistant Professor Mary Ziegler at mziegle6@slu.edu.

Ziegler believes the SLU Innocence Club enhances student learning in three ways. First, it provides students with handson experience analyzing and researching real cases. Second, it

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FACULTY PROFILE

Growing up outside of Chicago, Associate Clinical Professor Susan McGraugh knew she wanted a fulfilling job that gave her a sense of achievement. After receiving her bachelor’s degree in sociology and English, she attended law school at Washington University in St. Louis. It was McGraugh’s legal education that gave her the foundation for working as a trial lawyer. “I had a great criminal law professor who was an old-school teacher who’d scare students into preparing for class and participating. It was important to me to do well in his class and to walk the fine line between being respectful and showing no fear. He made me think on my feet, and it was the best possible training for being a trial lawyer. I figured if I could stand up to him, I could stand up to anyone.”

“My experience has taught me that no one is the worst thing they have ever done. Everyone has a reason that they become involved with the criminal justice system.”

Though McGraugh originally planned to work in civil rights or poverty law, she finally settled into criminal defense, where she found people most needed protection. “People charged or convicted of criminal offenses are the most disenfranchised persons in our country,” said McGraugh. “No one is on their side except their families, and even those bridges have been burned sometimes.”

SUSAN McGRAUGH BY ADRIENNE KNOPP

As supervisor of the Criminal Defense Clinic, Assistant Clinical Professor Susan McGraugh teaches students the ins and outs of criminal defense while they help those most in need in our community. She shares her experiences defending indigent citizens, her teaching philosophy and the unique qualities of her clinic.

McGraugh’s professional career spans several state and social service agencies, including the Missouri State Public Defender’s Office, Legal Services of Eastern Missouri and the St. Louis Archdiocesan Human Rights Office, as well as serving as a provisional municipal judge for the City of St. Louis. Her experience includes working with felony cases, advocating for restorative justice and counseling clients who were homeless, victims of abuse and suffered from mental illness. “My experience has taught me that no one is the worst thing they have ever done,” said McGraugh. “Everyone has a reason that they become involved with the criminal justice system.” In 2003, McGraugh joined SLU LAW as the supervisor of the Criminal Defense Clinic. One of the most unique aspects of the SLU LAW Criminal Defense Clinic is that it operates like a law firm. “We take cases in our clinic and act as counsel rather than sending students out to a public defender office,” said McGraugh. “This way, I can model good criminal defense lawyering for our students while they handle their own small docket of cases. They learn how to work up a whole case, rather than represent a client in a small part of a large case.” With a smaller caseload, the clinic can spend more time with each case, giving students the opportunity to learn all aspects of trial work.

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“My goal is that my students will emerge from the clinic practice-ready, that they can take a job at a criminal defense firm or a public defender’s office and step right in. I teach them not only to prepare a case for disposition, but also docket management skills, motion writing skills and trial skills.” Criminal defense is an area where the consequences are especially high, as any mistake a new criminal defense attorney makes could result in jail time for the client. Inside the clinic, McGraugh’s students are given the opportunity to trust their legal education and their intuition while they learn how to handle a case.

“I allow students to make mistakes here, where I can intercede,” said McGraugh. “I tell them I will never give them a task that I can’t fix if they mess up, and that gives them the freedom to use their own instincts and training without the risk to the client.” McGraugh and her students are tasked not only with understanding the details of the case, but also with understanding the people they represent and their circumstances. “Part of what we do in the clinic is to look behind the offense itself to see the cause of the behavior,” said McGraugh. “The number one cause we find is addiction, followed by mental illness, or a combination of the two. We try to figure out what, if anything, we can do to alleviate the client’s problems so they will be less likely to reoffend in the future.” The clinic recently embarked on a new program with the Saint Louis University School of Social Work where a student pursuing a master’s in social work assists the clinic’s clients in accessing services such as medical appointments, housing assistance and counseling. The clinic also works with Places for People, a nonprofit that provides housing services. “I realized that so many of the people who came through the misdemeanor court were there on minor offenses like trespassing, which were a direct result of their inability to properly access healthcare and other services,” said McGraugh. “These partnerships make a huge difference in our ability to assist our clients.” While the priority of the clinic is to teach students the skills they need to practice as attorneys after they leave SLU LAW, McGraugh also works to instill in her students the values that drive all lawyers, especially those representing underserved populations. “I try to help our students develop the spirit of compassion that we all carry with us, the ability to see a person as a valuable human being regardless of the crime with which they have been charged.” SLB

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BACK ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: PATRICK BOYLE, JOHN GUNN, MONICA (JON) GUNN, MICHAEL GUNN, AMY COLLIGNON GUNN, KEVIN GUNN, MEG FOWLER CALLAHAN, PATRICK GUNN, KATHERINE (RADER) GUNN, DANIEL GUNN, KATIE FOWLER HAJEK FRONT ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: DONALD GUNN JR., TOM GUNN NOT PICTURED: DON GUNN SR. (DECEASED), JIM GUNN, JIM HAJEK

Saint Louis University School of Law students are drawn to the law school for many reasons – a passion to learn the law, a desire to serve the community and a belief that a legal education will help them pursue their dreams. For many School of Law students, they are also part of a rich tradition of families who share a calling to be lawyers and pursue that calling within the Jesuit tenets of advocacy for social justice. There are many stories of families across generations who chose SLU LAW as the place to pursue their legal education, and in this issue of Saint Louis Brief, we sit down with a family that has many SLU LAW graduates – THE GUNN FAMILY – and learn how SLU LAW has been an integral part of their history. The 16 Gunns who are SLU LAW alumni (four of whom married into the family) have embraced the Jesuit philosophy and are using their law degrees and education to take care of others in St. Louis and beyond.

BY SUZANNE SIERRA

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y all accounts, the many generations of the Gunn family who have attended Saint Louis University School of Law have wholeheartedly embraced the Jesuit motto, “For the Greater Glory of God,” beginning with the Honorable Donald Joseph Gunn Sr., who graduated from the law school in 1931. Don Sr. and his wife, Loretto Hennelly, were secondgeneration Irish Americans whose “merger” as Don lovingly referred to it in his family book, “In the Hollow,” resulted in nine children – five sons and four daughters. The boys followed in their father’s footsteps through St. Louis University High School, Saint Louis University and Saint Louis University School of Law, while the girls attended Fontbonne College as their mother had done. From the start, Don and his wife, who led by example, stressed the importance of two fundamental principles: hold fast to their faith in God and in themselves, and use their education to help others, particularly those in need. Don was the first in his family to attend and graduate from college, and he considered his education a privilege to be used for the greater good. Throughout his legal career, if a client could not pay for his services, he accepted payment in

meat. “My dad was one of the greatest individuals, ever,” said Jim Gunn (’65), partner with Thompson Coburn, a sentiment repeated over and over by all the Gunns. By day, the younger Gunn recalls, his father was “a giant of a man” and by night… he did the dishes. Undeniably, Loretto Hennelly Gunn was an equal to her husband. Like Don, she was the first in her family to attend and graduate from college. In addition, she became a devoted wife who helped raise nine children, while still finding time to teach kindergarten, give piano lessons, serve two terms as president of the Archdiocesan Board of Education and serve for thirteen years as co-chair of the Mother’s March on Polio (known today as the March of Dimes). Don enjoyed his legal practice immensely and regaled his children with stories about the law. Jim and his siblings vividly recount evenings spent around the dinner table with the family discussing politics, current events and history. Just as significant, the discussions focused on the importance of volunteering, which all the Gunns were expected to do in some capacity. Success was important, but it was defined by how you helped society, not by how much money you made.

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MEN AND WOMEN FOR OTHERS Don Gunn Sr.’s first job out of law school was working for Mark D. Eagleton (father of Sen. Thomas F. Eagleton), one of the most well-known and respected trial attorneys in St. Louis. In his book, Don describes the privilege of sitting in second chair, which required taking notes, calling witnesses to inform them when they would be needed, keeping track of exhibits used or to be used throughout a trial and, during final arguments, running out to the hallway water fountain keeping Eagleton’s water glass full at all times as he was “a voracious water drinker.” But, he wrote, “The job was well worth the knowledge a young lawyer obtained by watching the master at work.” Don was known as an unwavering champion for the underdog and for minorities. During his illustrious professional career, he served as president of the Board of Alderman in the 1960s and ushered in a 20-to-4 victory for a public accommodations bill that guaranteed equal rights for minorities in all public places in the city of St. Louis. “My grandfather was so kind and compassionate…and he had to be brave,” said Katie Fowler (’00), partner at Fox Galvin, LLC. She often talks to her own children about having the courage of one’s convictions, much as her grandfather did in blazing a civil rights trail. In fact, Don received death threats at times, because his opinions were not popular. “And yet he was on the forefront and persevered,” Katie adds, citing that when faced with a challenge in her practice, she lets her grandfather’s actions guide her.

immigrants suffered from discrimination. In the 1840s, the Irish could not find employment on the East Coast and many settled in St. Louis to work in the coal mines and on the railroads, jobs most Americans disdained. For a time, Loretto’s mother and many of her relatives lived in Kerry Patch, an area of St. Louis named after County Kerry Ireland and populated with Irish immigrants seeking the companionship and support of fellow countrymen and women. The residents of Kerry Patch worked hard and steadfastly assisted each other, but the conditions were hard and the Irish were often treated as second-class citizens. Loretto’s mother also witnessed the horrible mistreatment of blacks during the Fairground Park Riot in June 1949. These experiences left an indelible mark on Loretto’s mother, who shared the stories with her children and grandchildren to reinforce her abhorrence of discrimination while emphasizing the importance of family and tradition. A TRADITION OF FAMILY CARRIED OUT THROUGH SLU LAW Don and Loretto Gunn were proud of their family and knew the value of sticking together in good times and bad. While they raised their nine children to be of service to others, they also strongly encouraged being of service to each other. Tom Gunn (’67), president of the global marketing consulting firm The Gunn Group Inc. and retired Boeing executive, remembers his father’s uncanny ability to sense if even the slightest bit of conflict was brewing between any of the Gunn siblings. “He would call us to lunch to discuss it and strongly urge us to resolve the issue. He realized early on that if you fan the fire you can lose control of the situation, and he did not want anyone to hurt the family that way.”

It’s likely that Don and Loretto’s legacy of compassion and devotion to protecting the rights of others grew from witnessing and hearing about how their own family of Irish

The Gunn Family THOMAS “TOM” GUNN ( ‘67 )

KEVI N GUNN ( ‘9 6 )

PATR IC K GUNN ( ‘73 )

AMY ( COLLIGNON ) GUNN ( ‘96 )

D O NALD G UNN SR . (‘31)

K A T HL EE N ( G UN N ) M A RT IN

KA T HE RIN E ( R AD ER ) GUNN (‘95)

D ON A L D G U N N J R. ( ‘ 60 )

DA N IEL GUNN (‘92)

M A RY GUNN BOY L E

It’s safe to say that Don and Loretto, who passed away in 1986 and 1989 respectively, would be proud that their commitment to family is as strong among the Gunns today as it was during those conflict-resolution lunches. Family definitely comes first for all the Gunns and upholding the family’s reputation is of utmost importance. Don set the standard of professionalism, integrity, respect and tolerance. When he was a probate judge in the city of St. Louis, a lawyer appeared before him and asked the judge why he was so tolerant of the young lawyers who were making mistakes in front of him. Judge Gunn replied, “I’m sure my sons, who are young lawyers, are out there making mistakes in front of other judges.” Being a Gunn lawyer in St. Louis means always being asked, “Who do you belong to?” or, “Who is related to whom?”, all of which serve as reminders of the long-lasting and common bond the family shares, not just with each other but with so many St. Louisans whose lives they’ve touched. Patrick Boyle (’87, son-in-law of Donald Jr.) is a partner at Gunn & Gunn and tells of clients who come to the firm for representation because Don Sr. or another Gunn lawyer counseled them at one time or another, and they want to continue working with a Gunn.

While several Gunn lawyers are in practice together, others are associates, partners or in-house attorneys at firms or corporations throughout St. Louis. In addition to their name, they share a deep appreciation for their alma mater and what their law degrees have allowed them to do. Michael Gunn (’68), president and partner at The Gunn Law Firm, admires SLU LAW’s focus on educating law students to think about justice and the rights of other people, instead of simply about billable hours. “SLU LAW trains lawyers to represent people, not conglomerates,” said Michael. Michael’s son John (’00), partner at The Gunn Law Firm, was not sure what he wanted to do after completing his undergraduate degree. Despite growing up in a family of attorneys, it was never a foregone conclusion that he would become a lawyer. He eventually attended SLU LAW but without a clear-cut idea of how he would use his law degree. Then, studying for a tort final at the end of his first semester, he knew he was where he was supposed to be. “I realized my mind worked like a lawyer,” said John. Like her cousin John, Meg Fowler (’02, granddaughter of Don Sr.) also questioned whether the law was her calling or if she

LO R E T T O ( HE NNE LLY ) GUNN

JAME S “JIM” GUNN ( ‘ 65 )

MICH AE L GUNN ( ‘ 68 )

P AT R ICK B O YLE ( ‘ 87 )

JO H N GUNN ( ‘ 00 )

SIST E R DO NNA LO R E T T O GUNN

MO NICA ( JON ) GUNN ( ‘ 00 )

GUN N

S L U L AW

IN-L AW

N ON - S L U L AW

MAR GAR E T ( GU NN ) FO WLE R

MAR GAR E T “ME G” FO WLE R ( ‘ 02 )

B R I D G ET ( G U NN ) C A L C A T ER R A

K A T HER I N E “K AT I E” F O WL ER ( ‘00 )

J A MES “ J I M” HA J EK ( ‘00 )

FAM I L Y M E M B E R S I N THE THI R D GENER A TI ON LI NE R EPRE SE NT ONLY THOS E G UNNS WITH A DIRE CT SLU LAW CONNE CT IO N.

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was pursuing a law degree because it was “what Gunns do.” Her brother suggested she volunteer for the Jesuit Volunteer Corp to try the practical side of helping people. She spent her time in Mobile, Ala., working for the Mobile Fair Housing Center to investigate whether African-Americans were being steered toward unfavorable housing and her experience cinched the deal. “I knew that having legal knowledge would allow me to help people when things aren’t right,” said Meg. She currently works as an associate at HeplerBroom in civil defense. Kevin Gunn (’96, son of Tom Gunn), Missouri Public Service Commission Chair, recalls a Street Law seminar that opened his eyes to what the law could do for others. During the seminar, Gunn and his classmates taught basic law to students at an inner-city high school. As part of the course, they analyzed a case study about drug testing in the athletic programs of public schools. As the high school students argued their points on both sides of the issue – making the same kind of arguments that judges in the Supreme Court make – Kevin realized how knowledge of the law has the ability to impact everyday lives. “These kids understood what was at stake because the topic mattered to them,” said Kevin. “Unfortunately, the average individual may think the law is not accessible to them, and it’s up to us, as lawyers, to help them see how it applies…and to guide them.” Katie Fowler was one of the first Gunn women to attend law school and did so because at a very young age, she too realized that legal knowledge empowers you to do the right thing. “I remember driving in the car with my grandfather (Don Sr.) who would get annoyed when anyone passed him,” Katie recalled. “To him, it was about breaking the law. To my four-year-old

self, it was about the importance of following rules.”

the scared, the homeless and the hungry.”

It’s no coincidence that 16 Gunns attended the School of Law; most never considered going anywhere else. And just as the philanthropic gene is carried by each and every one of them, so are fond memories and positive experiences of the law school. The older Gunns enjoyed how the small class sizes created strong camaraderie among classmates that still exists today. “You knew everyone,” said Donald Gunn Jr. (’60), partner and principal at Gunn & Gunn. “We would all get together every Friday night to share thoughts and ideas and have study groups. In fact, many of us still get together.”

Many leaders of St. Louis community organizations would alter the invocation slightly to thank Tom and Kate Gunn, along with the legions of Gunns who have tirelessly helped them fulfill their respective missions. Talk to many of the organizations or boards on which the Gunns serve and you’ll hear the same refrain: they are there at the drop of a hat, they are loyal through thick and thin, and their desire to help is selfless.

Kevin Gunn has an especially wonderful memory of his time at SLU LAW – it’s where he met his wife, Amy Collignon (’96), attorney at The Simon Law Firm, citing it as “one of the best things about [law school]!” For her part, Amy, who moved from Kentucky to attend SLU LAW, was drawn to the school because of its size and proximity to home. She recalls being “terrified” to attend law school in general because she’d heard it was “cutthroat” and very competitive, with students hiding books from one another. Instead, she found it extremely warm and welcoming from the start. GIVING BACK What makes SLU LAW special is a quality many of the Gunns share – a focus on giving back and serving others. If you gather with Tom and his wife Kate for dinner, the meal will begin with this prayer: “Thank you God for all your gifts, especially the gift of family and friends. Please bless all who are in need, especially the sick,

The Gunn family’s pledge to be of service also extends to SLU LAW, where Tom Gunn has worn many hats, from serving as an adjunct professor to chairing the School’s Dean Search Committee in 1999 that brought Dean Jeffrey Lewis on board.

ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF SLU LAW ARCHIVES

JAMES “JIM” GUNN (‘65)

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AMY (COLLIGNON) GUNN (‘96)

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Scott Hummel, executive director of Our Little Haven, echoes those sentiments. “We think the world of the entire family, and I can’t think of another family who better represents the Jesuit spirit of men and women for others. The Gunns help us keep our eye on the ball and always encourage us to serve better and be better stewards.” Let’s Start is an organization that aims to break the cycle of incarceration in families by working with formerly incarcerated women and their children to support recovery and reentry. Katie Fowler serves as board president, and director Sister Jackie Toben praises her energy and dedication to the women of the organization. “Katie is so committed to the children of incarcerated families because she knows they’ve done nothing to deserve their situation,” said Sr. Toben. She has started a legal clinic and has recruited other attorneys to assist.

SEVERAL GUNN FAMILY MEMBERS PICTURED FROM THEIR DAYS AT THE SCHOOL OF LAW.

KEVIN GUNN (‘96)

Patty Arnold served as vice president of St. John’s Mercy Foundation (now Mercy Health Foundation) when Tom became the first board chair for the foundation. “Tom and Kate are the most incredible people,” said Arnold. “Tom’s vision and leadership with the Foundation was instrumental in getting us off to a successful start. He helped with our strategic direction and brought key community leaders to the table.”

KATHERINE (RADER) GUNN (‘95)

DANIEL GUNN (‘92)

MEMBERS OF DELTA THETA PHI IN 1967. PICTURED IN THE BACK ROW ARE TOM GUNN (5TH FROM LEFT) AND MICHAEL GUNN (7TH FROM LEFT)

PATRICK BOYLE (‘87)

JOHN GUNN (‘00)

MONICA (JON) GUNN (‘00)

KATHERINE “KATIE” FOWLER (‘00)

JAMES “JIM” HAJEK (‘00)

“In order for me to make a move to St. Louis from Florida, I really had to have a reason,” said Dean Emeritus and Professor Lewis. “Tom was clearly committed to the law school, and he convinced me to take the position.”

the event a huge success. “Through his energy and time commitment, he showed his love for the school,” said Goldman. The strength of their education combined with resilient determination has led to much professional success for many of the Gunns. Most recently, Michael Gunn was honored with the Lawyers Association of St. Louis’ most prestigious award, the Award of Honor, in April 2012. Michael is the third Gunn family member to receive the award, following Don Gunn Sr. (1969) and Donald Gunn Jr. (1999). But beyond the awards and the accolades, the Gunns are creating a legacy of service for others that will leave a lasting impression for generations to come. In the words of Sister Donna Loretto, C.S.J. (daughter of Don Sr. and Loretto), “We age well if we can come to the end of life in joy and in gratitude. To be for each other is a way of life for everybody, not just the Gunns.” SLB

THE GUNN FAMILY’S DEDICATION TO SERVICE IS EVIDENCED BY THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH AREA ORGANIZATIONS AND CHARITIES. BELOW IS A SAMPLING OF THE MANY ORGANIZATIONS THAT BENEFIT FROM THEIR HARD WORK, DEDICATION AND JESUIT SPIRIT. Cardinal Ritter Senior Services . Fontbonne University . Habitat for Humanity . Jesuit Volunteer Corps . Legal Services of Eastern Missouri . Let’s Start . Mercy Health Foundation . The Missouri Bar Foundation . Our Little Haven . Peter & Paul Community Services . Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet . St. Joseph’s Academy . St. Louis Archdiocesan Development Appeal . St. Louis University High School

Tom also served on the board of trustees at SLU and he and his brother Jim were instrumental in co-chairing a fundraiser to honor Judge Theodore McMillian, one of the first AfricanAmericans admitted to the School of Law in the 1940s. Professor Roger Goldman, interim dean at the time, admired Tom’s relationships with alumni and his efforts toward making

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FACULTY PROFILE

JUSTIN HANSFORD BY JULIA GIGLIOTTI

Assistant Professor Justin Hansford joined the Saint Louis University School of Law faculty in fall 2011. Recently recognized by the National Bar Association as one of the Top 40 Lawyers Under 40, and with political experience in campaigns and at the White House, he brings a new perspective to classroom learning at SLU LAW.

While at Georgetown, Hansford founded the Georgetown Journal of Law and Modern Critical Race Perspectives. “Until then, no journal at Georgetown focused on racial injustice,” Hansford said. “They had journals on poverty, international law – everything except racial inequality. We had protests and submitted proposals, and the administration eventually decided to publish this journal.” After graduation, Hansford clerked from 2009-2010 for his mentor and hero the Honorable Damon Keith, a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. He also served as a law fellow with both the University of Maryland School of Law and Georgetown University Law Center. “It is really my clerkship that provided me with the most insight into the legal profession. Through my time with Judge Keith, I feel that I gained more legal experiences than many who spent several more years in practice with big firms.” After his clerkship, Hansford worked as a staff member with the Obama for America presidential campaign, and most recently worked in the White House Office of Presidential Personnel. The Office of Presidential Personnel oversees the selection process for presidential appointments. Staff members recruit qualified candidates to serve the president in departments and agencies across the government.

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After much reflection, Hansford decided the law was the career for him. “In the end I think things have turned out well. I’m barely 5 foot 10 inches tall, so if I continued in the pursuit of that basketball career, I think someone would be sinking a three-point jump shot in my face as we speak.” Hansford received his bachelor’s degree in English from Howard University as a third-generation legacy, and he received his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

After each class Hansford teaches, he has found that his passion for teaching is renewed and his energy and enthusiasm for the legal profession and all that it stands for is replenished. The exchange of ideas brings him a simple joy that he continues to feel every day of his classroom experience. In his classroom, Hansford most values respect and dignity. “I make a concerted effort to implicitly acknowledge the value of each individual person who demonstrates that he or she is willing to participate in the discussion.” Hansford’s research incorporates legal history, legal ethics, critical race theory, human rights and the Global Justice Movement in a broader attempt to interrogate injustice in society. He brings this passion for justice and ethics to his classroom.

“I make a concerted effort to implicitly acknowledge the value of each individual person who demonstrates that he or she is willing to participate in the discussion.”

His educational and legal experiences, especially with Judge Keith, have led Hansford to uphold the highest concept to which lawyers aspire, “Equal Justice Under the Law,” which is engraved on the front of the United States Supreme Court building in our nation’s capital. “When I think of that high-minded phrase on the front of the Supreme Court building, I think of Judge Keith. I have a picture of Judge Keith in my office, and I have to contend with the standard he sets every day when I sit down at my desk.”

As a child, Justin Hansford dreamed of being a professional basketball player, but in college his professor in a logical reasoning class suggested he consider the legal profession. Having no real exposure to lawyers or other legal professionals, Hansford read books about famous lawyers to become more familiar with the profession. “As fate would have it, one of those books was the biography of Thurgood Marshall written by our own Professor Roger Goldman. It was enough to convince me,” said Hansford.

students and brilliant legal scholars,” said Hansford.

Hansford was called to the academic side of the law a year after graduating. On the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., he was asked to sit on a panel with some other prominent legal professors at Georgetown. “We discussed Dr. King, and his impact on legal thought and the philosophies that have driven all the subsequent thinkers who have a passion for equal justice. I felt deeply honored to be on that panel, and I was filled with joy during the discussion. It was then that I realized I wanted to spend many more years in law school classrooms, engaging in that type of exchange of ideas with enthusiastic

“I hope to give my students a strong grasp of the black-letter rules of law and to teach them how to apply those rules to new fact patterns. Sometimes I hope to get them to see­– through problems and hypotheticals – how a seemingly minor change in the facts can produce a change in the outcome of a case. I also think that, when appropriate, it is helpful to teach the historical development of doctrinal rules and to give students an appreciation of the policies upon which the rules are grounded.” Hansford uses his education and professional experience to show students the intricacies of the law. “My final hope is to help students see the larger jurisprudential or philosophical framework inherent in a subject, or the race or gender or class implications, or the ethical dilemmas inherent in most of the famous legal disputes that we study in our classes,” said Hansford. “One of the joys of teaching is trying to instill as much as possible in the minimal time allotted in a class session.”

Hansford understands that law professors should strive for three things in their academic careers: excellence in scholarship, teaching and service. He believes that lawyers themselves play a leadership role in society, and it is his job to help shape his students to be the best attorneys they can be. “There are many run-of-the-mill cases, but every once in awhile, a lawyer is able to help create justice in society, or promote equality or the rule of law,” said Hansford. “If any of my students are privileged to be present during one of those times and to promote one of those core values, then we here at SLU LAW will have made a great contribution to our society by helping to have trained such a person.” SLB

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30 th Anniversary

Celebration

FOR THE CENTER FOR HEALTH LAW STUDIES

AND

Alumni Reception

HOSTED BY SUPREME COURT JUSTICE CLARENCE THOMAS

THE GREAT HALL

THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES, WASHINGTON, D.C. TUESDAY, JUNE 12, 2012

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Alumni Lunches ARAKA

CLAYTON THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2012

CARMINE’S STEAK HOUSE DOWNTOWN ST. LOUIS TUESDAY, MAY 15, 2012

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SCHOLARSHIP DAY On April 20, Saint Louis University School of Law held its inaugural Scholarship Day, a new event to recognize and showcase faculty and students’ scholarly accomplishments among colleagues, alumni and the law school community. This year’s event focused on three areas: highlighting SLU LAW faculty’s 2011 scholarship, honoring the annual Thompson Coburn Faculty Award winners for Exceptional Legal Scholarship and featuring the work of law students during their annual writing symposium.

STUDENT SYMPOSIUM The Student Legal Writers’ Association’s (SLWA) Law Student Symposium featured students selected for excellence in their research. Under direction from Kim Novak Morse, associate director of writing support services, the annual symposium is SLWA’s biggest event of the year. Students from law schools in Missouri and all bordering states are invited to submit unpublished seminar papers, comments and case notes for blind evaluation by a panel of SLU LAW faculty members. Six finalists are then chosen to present their papers in the SLU LAW courtroom in front of students, faculty and area attorneys. “It was important to give students more opportunities to share their research and then have to defend it,” Morse said. “By providing this outlet, students further develop their critical grasp of material along with the indispensable skill of communicating complex ideas to a broader audience.”

“With Dean Clark’s support, we wanted to bring together the excellent scholarly work taking place here and share it more widely with the law school, the University and our neighboring academic communities,” said Matthew Bodie, professor and 2011-2012 associate dean for research and faculty development. “This day gave students and faculty a chance to share in the excitement we have for our research and to collaborate and discuss new ideas for future works.”

STUDENT PRESENTERS (from SLU LAW unless otherwise noted): Ainsley Bochniak, Missouri Child Support Laws: Who

Benefits? Sarah Creasman (University of Arkansas School of Law), First Amendment Protection for Prisoner Art on Public Display

FACULTY PANELS

Liz O’Brien, The Content Approach and Signage Provisions: A Self-Defeating Test

Complementing an already robust portfolio of recent scholarship (see pages 24-27), SLU LAW faculty participated in a series of panels to discuss their articles, essays or book chapters that were published in 2011. Topics included health care reform, business law, legal theory and the U.S. Supreme Court, health law and practice, criminal law, civil rights and property and intellectual property. For a complete list of faculty panelists and their scholarship topics, visit www.slu.edu/x56093.xml.

THOMPSON COBURN AWARDS FOR FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP The winners of this year’s Thompson Coburn Faculty Awards for Exceptional Legal Scholarship were presented with their awards and a celebratory luncheon on Scholarship Day. The awards began in the 1982-1983 school year as recognition for faculty articles, books and book chapters that best represented the school’s contribution to the academic research of law. Thompson Coburn has generously supported these honors, and the law school is grateful for this continuing relationship. Associate Professor Anders Walker was honored for his book “The Ghost of Jim Crow: How Southern Moderates Used Brown v. Board of Education to Stall Civil Rights” (Oxford University Press, 2009). In the category of law review article or book chapter, Professor Stephen Thaman took first place for his work A Typology of Consensual Criminal Procedures: an Historical and Comparative Perspective on the Theory and Practice of Avoiding the Full Criminal Trial, in “World Plea Bargaining” (Stephen Thaman ed., 2010). Assistant Professor Efthimi Parasidis received honorable mention for A Uniform Framework for Patent Eligibility, 85 Tulane Law Review 323 (2010).

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Michele Parrish, From Junkie To Murderer: How Prosecutors Are Using the Heroin Epidemic To Criminalize Addiction Adam Schneider, Predatory Lending: How the Affordable Care Act and Congressional Budget Office Have Mortgaged Resident

Physicians and Axed America’s Teaching Hospitals Jessie (Gasch) Steffan, Payday Lending in Missouri through the Critical Race Theory Lens: How State Payday Loan Laws Encourage Exploitation and Racial Discrimination

Michele Parrish’s article was selected as best student paper, and Liz O’Brien was chosen for the best presentation.

REFLECTIONS FROM RECENT SLWA PARTICIPANTS SLU LAW alumni shared their experience as recent student presenters at the SLWA Law Student Symposium and how this opportunity helped to enhance their legal education and professional careers.

“I learned that legal scholarship is better served when it is shared with your peers and not just submitted for a grade.”

“When you present a paper to a group, you can’t gloss over counterarguments, and you can’t hide faulty logic. It helps to sharpen your argument to a fine point so that you are prepared to meet head-on the array of different viewpoints from a diverse group of people.”

“It was good practice for oral advocacy in the courtroom, where much time and effort has gone into a sometimes lengthy brief, but you only have a limited time to argue your points.”

ERICA BLUME (‘11)

JUSTIN FARISHON (‘09)

MATT ORSO (‘09)

ASSOCIATE AT BROWN & JAMES, P.C.

ATTORNEY AT U.S. BANKRUPTCY COURT FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS

ATTORNEY AT SMITH PARSONS

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FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP SLU LAW faculty’s national and international reputation of excellence continues to develop through their extensive production of legal scholarship. Below is a collection of our faculty’s scholarly successes from 2011. Please note: scholarship citations are listed in accordance with bluebook citation guidelines.

___, Norman Redlich & John Attanasio, 2011 Supplement to Understanding Constitutional Law (3rd ed. LexisNexis 2005). Choosing Justices: How Presidents Decide, 26 J. L. & Pol. 425 (2011).

JOHN AMMANN, DIRECTOR, LEGAL CLINICS; CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF LAW

CHAD W. FLANDERS, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW

No Need for Comprehensive Immigration Reform: The Incomplete Compassion of U.S. Immigration Policy, 79 UMKC L. Rev. 853 (2011).

What Do We Want in a Presidential Primary? An Election Law Perspective, 44 U. Mich. J.L. Reform 901 (2011).

Beyond the Tide: Beginning Admiralty with The Steamboat Magnolia, 55 St. Louis U. L.J. 521 (2011).

How Do You Spell M-U-R-K-O-W-S-K-I? Part I: The Question of Voter Assistance, 28 Alaska L. Rev. 1 (2011).

Leading the Court: Studies in Influence as Chief Justice, 40 Stetson L. Rev. 717 (2011).

___, Dan Markel and David Gray, Beyond Raw Experience: Getting Retributive Justice Right, 99 Cal. L. Rev. 605 (2011).

THOMAS L. (TIM) GREANEY, CO-DIRECTOR, THE CENTER FOR HEALTH LAW STUDIES;

MATTHEW T. BODIE, ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR FACULTY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT; PROFESSOR OF LAW

The Uncorporation and the Unraveling of ‘Nexus of Contract’ Theory (with Grant M. Hayden), 109 Mich. L.Rev. 1127 (reviewing Larry E. Ribstein, The Rise of the Uncorporation (2010)). NASCAR Green: A Case Study of Sustainability and the Nature of the Firm, 46 Wake Forest L. Rev. 491 (2011) (Symposium: The Sustainable Corporation). Law Students and Legal Scholarship, 1 J. L. 223 (2011).

MAGGI CARFIELD, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LEGAL WRITING Land Justice in Uganda: Preserving Peace, Promoting Integration, in Lessons Learned: Narrative Accounts of Legal Reform in Developing and Transition Countries (International Development Law Organization ed., 2011). Participatory Law and Development: Remapping the Locus of Authority, 82 U. Colo. L. Rev. 739 (2011).

Spelling Murkowski: The Next Act, Reply to Fishkin and Levitt, 28 Alaska L. Rev. 49 (2011).

MIRIAM A. CHERRY, PROFESSOR OF LAW

The Affordable Care Act and Competition Policy: Antidote or Placebo?, 89 Or. L. Rev. 811 (2011).

ROBERT GATTER, CO-DIRECTOR, THE CENTER FOR HEALTH LAW STUDIES; PROFESSOR OF LAW

Resisting Another Threat to Competition in Health Care (with Barak Richman, Clark Havighurst & Ted Frech), FTC Watch (April 2011).

___, et al., Addressing Sexual Offenses and Misconduct by Law Enforcement: Executive Guide (IACP June 2011).

A Taxonomy of Virtual Work, 46 Ga. L. Rev. 951 (2011).

JESSE GOLDNER, JOHN D. VALENTINE PROFESSOR OF LAW

Introduction: Influential Voices, 9 Seattle J. Soc. Just. 209 (Fall/Winter 2011).

JOSEPH A. CUSTER, DIRECTOR, OMER POOS LAW LIBRARY; ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW Making the Leap to Being a Law Library Director, 21 Trends L. Libr. Mgmt. & Tech. 43 (2011).

Claims of Psychotherapist-Patient Privilege in Child Custody and Child Abuse Cases after Jaffee v. Redmond, 37 The Register Report 30-37 (2011).

JOEL K. GOLDSTEIN, VINCENT C. IMMEL PROFESSOR OF LAW ___, Norman Redlich & John Attanasio, 2011 Supplement to Constitutional Law (5th ed. LexisNexis 2008).

Death Decisions After Terry

Health Care Reform (with Thomas L. Greaney, Barry R. Furrow, Timothy S. Jost, and Robert L. Schwartz) (Supplement, West 2011).

YVETTE JOY LIEBESMAN, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW Downstream Copyright Infringers, 60 Kan. L. Rev. 1 (2011).

DANA MALKUS, SUPERVISOR, COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CLINIC; ASSISTANT CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF LAW

MARCIA L. MCCORMICK, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW

Book Review, 32 J. Legal Med. 337 (2011) (reviewing Tom L. Beauchamp, Standing on Principles: Collected Essays).

Beyond Profit: Rethinking Corporate Responsibility After the BP Oil Disaster (with Judd Sneirson), 85 Tulane L. Rev. 983 (2011).

ANNETTE E. CLARK, DEAN AND PROFESSOR OF LAW

Health Care Reform (with Sandra H. Johnson, Barry R. Furrow, Timothy S. Jost, and Robert L. Schwartz) (Supplement, West 2011). Regulating to Promote Competition in Designing Health Insurance Exchanges, 20 U. Kan. J. L. & Pub. Pol’y 237 (2011).

Book Review, 98 J. Of Am. Hist. 585 (2011) (reviewing Seth Stern & Stephen Wermiel, Justice Brennan: Liberal Champion (2010)).

and

Helping Your Client Create and Grow a Successful Nonprofit Organization, 67 J. Mo. Bar. 276 (2011).

CHESTER A. MYERS PROFESSOR OF LAW

Book Review, Notre Dame Phil. Rev. (Dec. 16, 2011) (reviewing Jason Brennan, The Ethics of Voting).

Pandemic Flu Vaccine Sharing and Global Politics, in Globalization of Health Care: Legal and Ethical Challenges (Glenn Cohen ed., forthcoming 2011).

To Me: Making Life Schiavo (2009)).

LEAH CHAN GRINVALD, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW Shaming Trademark Bullies, 2011 Wisc. L. Rev. 625. Book Review: Trademark Law and Theory: A Handbook of Contemporary Research, 2 IP Law Book Rev. 23 (2011).

PATRICIA HARRISON, SUPERVISOR, YOUTH ADVOCACY CLINIC; ASSISTANT CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF LAW

Consensus, Dissensus, and Enforcement: Legal Protection of Working Women from the Time of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire to Today, 14 N.Y.U. J. Leg. & Pub. Pol’y 645 (2011). Federal Regulation and the Problem of Adjudication, 56 St. Louis U. L. J. 39 (2011). Implausible Wrongs and Dissimilarities: The Supreme Court Continues Its Anti-Litigation Trend, This Time With a Class Action Focus in Wal-Mart v. Dukes, 8 Antitrust Chron. (online), www.competitionpolicyinternational. com/aug-11/ (2011).

ERIC J. MILLER, PROFESSOR OF LAW Problem-Solving Courts, in Oxford Bibliographies Online, April 25, 2011, at www.oxfordbibliographiesonline.com.

CAROL A. NEEDHAM, PROFESSOR OF LAW

JOYCE SAVIO HERLETH, DIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC ADVISING; INSTRUCTOR OF LAW

Globalization and Eligibility to Deliver Legal Advice: Inbound Legal Services Provided by Corporate Counsel Licensed Only in a Country Outside the United States, 48 San Diego L. Rev. 379 (2011).

The Art and Science of Academic Advising, The Learning Curve (Winter 2011).

EFTHIMIOS PARASIDIS, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW

Childhood Obesity: A Policy Perspective, ICAN, Vol. 3, Issue 2 (2011).

SANDRA JOHNSON, PROFESSOR EMERITA Nothing’s Settled, 41 Hastings Center Report 50 (Jan-Feb 2011) (reviewing Lois Shepherd, If That Ever Happens

___& Mildred Cho, Financial Conflicts of Interest for Physicians and Clinical Researchers, Physician’s Information and Education Resource (American College of Physicians 2011). CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

AMMANN

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BODIE

SAINT LOUIS BRIEF

CARFIELD

CHERRY

CLARK

CUSTER

FLANDERS

GATTER

GOLDNER

GOLDSTEIN

GREANEY

GRINVALD

HARRISON

HERLETH

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CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

The Essence of Being Human, in Hague Institute for the Internationalisation of Law: Law of the Future and the Future of Law (2011). Patients Over Politics: Addressing Legislative Failure in the Regulation of Medical Products, 2011 Wisc. L. Rev. 929.

ELIZABETH PENDO, ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS; PROFESSOR OF LAW Shifting the Conversation: Disability, Disparities and Health Care Reform, 6 FIU L. Rev. 400 (2011).

KAREN PETROSKI, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW Is Post-Positivism Possible?, 12 German L.J. 663 (2011).

JEFFREY A. REDDING, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW Book Review, Islamism and Democracy in India: The Transformation of Jamaat-e-Islami, 113 American Anthropologist 162-63 (2011).

PETER W. SALSICH JR., MCDONNELL PROFESSOR OF JUSTICE IN AMERICAN SOCIETY Governmental Housing Policies and Programs, in Housing and C ommunity D evelopment (4th ed. 2011). State and Local Regulation Promoting Affordable Housing, in The Legal Guide to Affordable Housing Development (Tim Iglesias & Rochelle Lento eds., 2d ed. 2011). State Sources of Housing Finance, in The Legal Guide to A ffordable H ousing D evelopment (Tim Iglesias & Rochelle Lento eds., 2d ed. 2011). The Constitution and Land Use Controls: Origins, Limitations and Federal Remedies, in Planning and Control of Land Development: Cases and Materials (Daniel Mandelker et al., 8th ed. 2011). Historic Districts, Landmarks and Transfer of Development Rights as a Historic Preservation Technique, in Planning and Control of Land Development: Cases and M aterials (Daniel Mandelker et al., 8th ed. 2011).

ANN M. SCARLETT, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW Investors Beware: Assessing Shareholder Derivative Litigation in India and China, 33 U. Pa. J. Int’l L. 173 (2011).

JOHNSON

26

LIEBESMAN

SAINT LOUIS BRIEF

MALKUS

McCORMICK

Imitation or Improvement? The Evolution of Shareholder Derivative Litigation in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia, 28 Ariz. J. Int’l & Comp. L. __ (2011).

ANDERS WALKER, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW

SpearIt, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW

The New Common Law: Courts, Culture, and the Localization of the Model Penal Code, 62 Hastings L.J. 1633 (2011).

Enslaved by Words: Legalities and Limitations of ‘PostRacial’ Language, Mich. St. L. Rev. (forthcoming 2011).

Cases in Brief, Appraisal J., p. 181, Summer 2011.

Shotguns, Weddings, and Lunch Counters: Why Cultural Frames Matter to Constitutional Law, 38 Fla. St. U. L. Rev. 345 (2011).

Cases in Brief, Appraisal J., p. 273, Fall 2011. Book Review, 55 St. Louis U. L.J. 1133 (2011) (reviewing Jonah Lehrer, How We Decide (2009)).

MOLLY J. WALKER WILSON, CO-DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR THE INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY OF LAW; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW

Child Pornography Sentencing & Demographic Data: Reforming through Research, 24 Fed. Sent’g Rep. 102 (2011).

When Gangs Were White: Race, Rights, and Youth Crime in New York City, 1954-1964, 54 St. Louis U. L. J. 1369 (2011).

Cultural Understandings of Risk and the Tyranny of the Experts, 90 Or. L. Rev. 113 (2011).

Gang Intervention in the United States: Legal and Extra-legal Attempts at Peacemaking, in Peacemaking: A Comprehensive Theory and Practice (Andrea Bartoli et al. eds., forthcoming 2011).

Book Review, 46 J. La. Hist. 115 (2011) (reviewing Keith Finley, Delaying the Dream: Southern Senators and the Fight Against Civil Rights, 1938-1965 (2008)).

OF LAW; PROFESSOR OF LAW

Why Obama is Black: Language, Law & Structures of Power, ___ Colum. J. Race & L. ___ (forthcoming 2011). Prison Religion, Girard, Rene and Prayer Beads in Encyclopedia of Global Religions (Mark Juergensmeyer & Wade Clark Roof eds., Sage Publications, 2011). Legal Omission: A Reaction to Asian Americans and Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure, 2 Geo. J. L. & Mod. Crit. Race Persp. 207 (2011). Gender Violence in Prison & Hyper-masculinities in the ‘Hood, 37 Wash U. J.L. & Pol’y 89 (2011).

STEPHEN C. THAMAN, PROFESSOR OF LAW Königin Absprache. Erzwungene oder konsensuelle Justiz in Russland und den postsowjetischen Republiken (Queen Plea Bargaining: Coerced or Consensual Justice in Russia and the Post-Soviet Republics), in Von Kontinuitäten und Brüchen: Ostrecht im Wandel der Zeiten (On Continuity and B reaks : E astern L aw in T imes of C hange ), F estschrift für F riedrich -C hristian S chroeder zum 75. G eburtstag 23-44 (Herbert Küpper ed., 2011).

SIDNEY D. WATSON, PROFESSOR OF LAW

THE HONORABLE MICHAEL WOLFF, CO-DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR THE INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY Stories of Civil Rights Progress and the Persistence of Inequality and Unequal Opportunity, 1970-2010, 37 William Mitchell L. Rev. 857 (2011).

Transdisciplinary Public Policy: The Roles of Law & Public Health, forthcoming in Transdisciplinary Public Health: Research, Methods, and Practice (Timothy McBride and Debra Haire-Joshu eds., 2011).

Incorporating Collateral Consequences into Sentencing Guidelines and Recommendations Post-Padilla, 31 St. Louis U. Pub. L. Rev. 183 (2011).

Creating Multi-State Qualified Health Plans in Health Insurance Exchanges: Lessons for Rural and Urban America from the Federal Employees Health Benefits Plan (with Yolonda Campbell and Tim McBride), 5 St. Louis U. J. Health L. & Pol’y 1 (2011).

Framing Change: Cause Lawyering, Constitution Decisions, and Social Change, 94 Marq. L. Rev. 263 (2011).

Implementing Health Reform at the State Level: Access and Care for Vulnerable Populations (with John V. Jacobi and Robert Restuccia), 39 J.L. Med. & Ethics 69 (2011).

ALAN M. WEINBERGER, PROFESSOR OF LAW

MARY ZIEGLER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW

The Terms of the Debate: Litigation, Argumentative Strategies, and Coalitions in the Same-Sex Marriage Struggle, ___ Fla. St. U. L. Rev. ___ (forthcoming 2011). Remaking Roe: Intermovement Dialogue and the Reinterpretation of Roe v. Wade, 87 Chicago-Kent L. Rev. 571 (2011). The Bonds that Tie: The Politics of Motherhood and the Future of Abortion Rights, 21 Tex. J. of Women & L. 47 (2011).

What’s in a Name? - The Tale of Louis Wolfson’s Affirmed, 39 Hofstra L. Rev. 645 (2011). Cases in Brief, Appraisal J., p. 1, Winter 2011.

Edelin: The Remaking of a Headline Abortion Trial, 55 St. Louis U. L.J. 1379 (2011).

Cases in Brief, Appraisal J., p. 93, Spring 2011.

Should Juries Give Reasons for Their Verdicts?: The Spanish Experience and the Implications of the European Court of Human Rights Decision in Taxquet v. Belgium, 86 Chicago-Kent L. Rev. 613-668 (2011). Constitutional Rights in the Balance: Modern Exclusionary Rules and the Toleration of Police Lawlessness in the Search for Truth. 61 U. Toronto L. J. 691-735 (2011).

MILLER

NEEDHAM

PARASIDIS

PENDO

PETROSKI

REDDING

SALSICH JR.

SCARLETT

SpearIt

WALKER

WATSON

WEINBERGER

WALKER WILSON

WOLFF

ZIEGLER

THAMAN

VOLUME 13 ISSUE 2

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Dear Alumni and Friends, The story of Saint Louis University School of Law is a rich one, spanning nearly 170 years. Although our history runs deep, our faculty, staff, students and alumni continue to be inspired to explore new ways of crafting legal education, scholarship and practice. Every day they are adding exciting, meaningful chapters to our ever-evolving story. This year, we are turning the page to begin one of the most significant chapters in the story of SLU LAW, as we plan for the renovation and subsequent move to our new law school building in downtown St. Louis. After months of meetings among the law school community, University, project architects and contractors, we’re pleased to be able to show you through the architectural renderings on pages 29-30 how our shared vision for a modern, multipurpose, state-of-the-art teaching and learning space is coming to life. These are more than sketches – they are windows into the future of SLU LAW. From an open, expansive courtroom where students will hone their advocacy skills to tiered classrooms accommodating a variety of learning styles to warm and welcoming gathering spaces for brainstorming, networking and collaboration, we hope you see what we see – a truly state-of-the-art law school that will give our students a competitive edge as they pursue their professional dreams. Building on the foundation from previous donors and new gifts from our generous alumni and friends, we are committed to an ambitious capital campaign and are looking to you to help us make this project a success. With such important changes on the horizon, we can’t lose sight of the importance of the Annual Fund in supporting the law school community and our operations. Contributions to the Annual Fund allow a quick response to both need and opportunity through student scholarships, emergency student loans and travel for student competitions. These are just a few of the many ways the Annual Fund helps ensure the heart of SLU LAW remains as strong as the bricks and mortar that will house us.

EXTERIOR - DAY

THE JOE AND LORETTA SCOTT LAW CENTER 100 N. TUCKER BLVD., DOWNTOWN ST. LOUIS

On the following pages, we hope you enjoy seeing how your generous contributions have and will continue to make SLU LAW a vibrant learning community – and one poised for an exciting future of new growth and success. With grateful appreciation,

TERRI S. ANDREWS DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT AND A L U M N I R E L AT I O N S

T :: 314-977-3303

E :: tandre11@slu.edu

We need your financial support to ensure a strong future for our school and our students. Please consider a gift to the Building Transformation campaign and the SLU LAW Annual Fund. You can complete the online giving form at law.slu.edu or mail your contribution to: Saint Louis University School of Law Attn: Development and Alumni Relations, 3700 Lindell Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63108

ROOFTOP PAVILION

OFFICE OF

DEVELOPMENT

AND ALUMNI RELATIONS

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SAINT LOUIS BRIEF

3700 LINDELL BLVD.

ST. LOUIS, MO 63108

314.977.3300

LAW.SLU.EDU

STUDENT COMMONS AREA ALL RENDERINGS PROVIDED BY THE LAWRENCE GROUP

ROOF DECK

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EVERY YEAR. EVERY GIFT. EVERY SIZE. EVERY STUDENT. YOUR ANNUAL GIFT SUPPORTS STUDENT LEARNING EXPERIENCES EVERY DAY. Donations to the Annual Giving Program, whether to the Annual Fund or a specific fund such as a student scholarship, the library or Legal Clinics, enhance learning. Large, small or somewhere in between, all gifts matter and all gifts make a difference. Please join us in giving the gift of an exceptional legal education. Make your annual gift today.

ANNUAL FUND

IN CELEBRATION OF THE WILLIAM C. WEFEL CENTER FOR EMPLOYMENT LAW’S 25TH ANNIVERSARY, SLU LAW HOSTED EEOC COMMISSIONER CHAI FELDBLUM.

ROOF DECK, OPEN TO PAVILION LEGAL CLINIC STUDENTS TRAVEL TO JOPLIN, MO. TO HELP WITH TORNADO CLEAN-UP AND LEGAL ASSISTANCE.

THE ANDREWS KURTH MOOT COURT TEAM WON SECOND PLACE IN THE NATIONAL COMPETITION.

SYMPLICITY (CAREER SERVICES DATABASE)

OTHER POPULAR ANNUAL GIVING FUNDS COURTROOM

STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS

LEGAL CLINICS

MAURA CONNORS CLASSROOM

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SAINT LOUIS BRIEF

ANNUAL GIVING PROGRAMS

OMER POOS LAW LIBRARY

314.977.3395

brenname@slu.edu

law.slu.edu/alumni/giftform

LIBRARY READING ROOM

VOLUME 13 ISSUE 2

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While most students attend law school full time, spending many hours each day studying, attending classes and participating in student organizations, professional skills programs and the SLU LAW Legal Clinics, the School of Law is also home to 127 part-time students who take part in the same activities while maintaining a career outside school. SLU LAW’s program attracts students from a variety of career fields, including public relations, accounting, business information technology, medicine, teaching, banking, law enforcement and insurance. SLU LAW is the only law school in the region to offer a part-time program, filling an important need for students who may not otherwise be able to pursue their dreams of a law degree.

Committed Students Find Balance in the Part-Time Program By Julia Gigliotti

“A law degree is incredibly versatile inside and outside the traditional practice of law,” said Assistant Dean for Admissions Michael Kolnik. “We feel strongly that we are offering talented students the opportunity to follow their passion, diversify their careers and help the community in new ways by offering a part-time program.” With the same course requirements as the full-time program, students in the part-time program complete their J.D. in four to five years while attending classes three to four nights a week. Many current part-time students share the view that the program can be extremely challenging, but they also believe it’s worth the commitment. Part-time student “The program affords its graduates Adam French the ability to show prospective employers the discipline, work ethic works as a contract specialist at Express and time management required Scripts, Inc. and to simultaneously complete law started the program school and all that entails while maintaining and gathering valuable in fall 2010. He believes the key and practical real-world skills.” to completing the program is to work efficiently, find a way to study that works best for your individual learning method and, most importantly, set aside time for enjoyable activities. French hopes to apply his career experience, prior education and legal education to the corporate law or management fields, and he believes the part-time program will give him an edge with future employers.

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“Part-time legal education affords its graduates the ability to show prospective employers the discipline, work ethic and time management required to simultaneously complete law school and all that entails while maintaining and gathering valuable and practical real-world skills,” said French. As a native of St. Louis, Derek Velazco chose SLU LAW’s part-time program because of its prominence and reputation. A married student with a mortgage, he also appreciates the opportunity to continue his career full time while attending law school.

Velazco believes the parttime program offers a unique environment that fosters educational success, from professors’ flexible evening office hours to camaraderie among students. After graduation, Velazco wants to start a private practice and hopes to one day run for a political office at the federal level. SLU LAW’s part-time program is aiding Velazco in accomplishing his goals of being a leader in his community and a strong advocate of the law. Marie Scott is another student with an unmistakable drive to further her career path with a law degree. Not only is Scott able to continue working in clinical research at Covidien Pharmaceuticals, but the part-time program also allows her additional time to research new career paths, which she hopes will combine her healthcare background with international law.

commitment. What often sets evening students apart is their cheerfulness and delight at being back in the classroom after, in many cases, lengthy absences.” SLU LAW’s part-time program has graduated many successful alumni including Federal Magistrate Judge Donald G. Wilkerson (‘93). With a master’s degree in education, Wilkerson taught in the East St. Louis public school system for 17 years before deciding to pursue a law degree. “I always wanted to go to law school,” said Wilkerson. “But I couldn’t stop working. SLU LAW’s part-time program was perfect for me.” Alumna Suzette Carlisle (’96), an administrative judge for the Missouri Division of Workers’ Compensation, dreamed of being an attorney since she was 12 years old. That dream, however, became less of a reality after she got married as an undergraduate student and started a family. After receiving her master’s degree in business administration and working for several years as an investigator with the state of Missouri, Carlisle decided it was time she embarked on fulfilling her childhood dream.

hard-working students who want to make a difference in the world. The program provides them with a unique opportunity to take on the challenge of working while obtaining a quality legal education. “In 25 years of teaching evening classes, it’s been my pleasure to have had elected officials, journalists, physicians, policemen, academics, engineers and accountants, to name just a few of the fields from which our evening students are drawn,” said Weinberger. “I hope they feel they have learned as much from me as I know I have from them.” SLB

“The only way I could attend law school was to go part time,” said Carlisle. “With five children to raise, full-time law school was not an option for me.” Carlisle was able to maintain a balanced life by having a strong family support system and by being able to take summers off to attend her children’s sports activities and dance recitals. Similar to the traditional full-time program, SLU LAW’s part-time program attracts driven, disciplined and

Encouragement from outside the walls of the law school is also crucial to the success of part-time students. The support of family, friends, co-workers and fellow students is a key component in achieving their dreams. “I’m also lucky I have a manager who is flexible with my scheduling and works with me to ensure that I can both meet my office requirements and make it out of the office in time to get to class,” said Scott. “A supportive cast is crucial in the part-time program.” While students often credit their professors with helping them succeed in the part-time program, the professors are just as enthusiastic about the energy these unique students bring to the law school. “Whenever I’m tempted to gripe about having to teach until 10 p.m., I simply remind myself that my students have already put in a full day of work before arriving at the law school, having skipped dinner,” said Professor Alan Weinberger. “These students are truly an inspiration in terms of their energy and

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ALUMNI PROFILE

Bringing Innovation and Fresh Thinking to the World of Corrections DR. DORA SCHRIRO (‘02) BY PAUL BYRNE

“I

’m alive today because Dora had patience.” That’s what corrections officer Lois Fraley told Phoenix magazine in December 2004 after surviving the longest prison hostage situation in U.S. history. The 15-day ordeal took place at Arizona’s Lewis Prison just six months after Dora Schriro (‘02) was appointed by Governor Janet Napolitano to serve as director of the 32,000-inmate system. Officer Fraley was one of two corrections officers taken hostage. Both officers and the two inmates who took them hostage all lived because of the leadership shown by Schriro. Schriro didn’t flinch. She didn’t follow tradition of “not negotiating with hostages.” She didn’t take the Wild West route and storm the armed tower (the hostages were literally being held in a prison tower that housed an arsenal). Instead Schriro took control and managed things her own way – with strategy, patience and persistence. And after 15 gut-wrenching, agonizing days of strategizing and negotiation, everyone came out alive. And it’s the only time in U.S. history that everyone involved has survived a major hostage situation in a correctional setting. Despite her legendary stand in Arizona and her choice of working in what has to be one of the toughest working environments, Schriro is nothing like the stereotypical image of the old-school warden. Rather, she’s a quickwitted, smartly dressed woman who describes herself as “pound for pound one of the toughest, strongest and hopefully nicest people in the business.” Schriro, the oldest of four children, grew up in Long Island, N.Y. After high school she moved to Boston where she received a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Northeastern University. Schriro ran several different retail

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stores while pursuing her master’s degree in psychology at night at the University of Massachusetts, which she earned in 1974. The theme of working all day and studying all night would become a regular part of her life for years to come. After graduation, Schriro ran one of the state’s early pre-release programs and gradually took on positions of increasing importance working with inmates. She quickly became known for her work ethic and passion for ensuring that prisoners were educated and prepared for release. After 13 years in Boston, Schriro wanted to pursue her doctorate degree and chose Columbia University in New York. Her thesis looked at inmate education, which led her to the realization that inmate education as it existed wasn’t working. The programs were built on several false assumptions. They assumed one strategy or “silver bullet” would work for all inmates, and most programs didn’t begin trying to rehabilitate prisoners until closer to the end of their sentences. But Schriro knew it wasn’t working. It had never worked. And she intended to change things. “In corrections we have a finite amount of time, and the vast majority of prisoners will re-enter society. So I believed we needed to change their thinking. Rehabilitation and preparation for prisoners to re-enter society needs to begin on the first day prisoners arrive,” said Schriro.

University School of Law. Because she was working in Jefferson City, Mo., this meant a 240-mile round-trip drive three or four times a week. Schriro would work a full day, drive to St. Louis for night classes and then return to Jefferson City late that evening. “Four years and three cars later I had my law degree,” said Schriro. “SLU was such a fantastic experience. It was terrific to be in a school that welcomed part-time students who had jobs and brought real-life experience to the classroom.”

Simply put, parallel universe means that life inside jails and prisons should replicate life on the outside whenever possible. Schriro believes this helps prepare inmates to reenter society when they’re released. Prisoners practice prosocial living and problem-solving every minute of every day throughout their incarceration, just as they would in the community. Schriro also believes in “restorative

Schriro cites Professor Roger Goldman and the Honorable Michael Wolff as two of the most influential professors during her studies at SLU LAW. Schriro was also allowed to serve in an adjunct faculty role while she was a law student to co-lead the Sentencing Seminar with Wolff. “It didn’t occur to me not to go to law school even though I didn’t want to be a lawyer,” she said. “I wanted to go to learn how to think, to problem solve and to better understand the case law, and SLU was the perfect environment. The school had an outstanding reputation and offered the only accredited part-time program in the state of Missouri, which was also important to me.”

In 1984 she was appointed by Mayor Ed Koch to be the assistant commissioner of the New York City Department of Correction. Five years later, Schriro accepted the position of correctional superintendent of St. Louis’ medium security prison, also known as the “city workhouse.”

In early 2009, Schriro was named special advisor to now-Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano on immigration and customs enforcement and the founding director of the Office of Detention Policy and Planning at Immigrations and Customs Enforcement. She resigned that position in September 2009 when she was appointed commissioner of the New York City Department of Correction by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, where she continues to work today. She is the only woman ever selected to run four correctional systems (Arizona, Missouri, New York City and St. Louis).

In 1993 Governor Mel Carnahan appointed Schriro to director of the Missouri Department of Corrections. While there, Schriro somehow found time to attend Saint Louis

Everywhere Schriro has served she’s been known for bringing creativity and radical changes. She treats the correctional system as a “parallel universe,” which has

It’s that kind of revolutionary thinking that has made Schriro a legend.

been the guiding principle throughout her career.

justice,” where prisoners face their victims and take accountability for the crimes they committed. And because the vast majority of inmates will eventually be released, she wants all of them to be civil and productive when they re-enter society. She demands three things from each inmate: literacy, employability and sobriety. On April 20, Schriro was further recognized for being a pioneer in her field when she was awarded the Allied Professional Award by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), presented by Attorney General Eric Holder. The OVC presents the award each year to recognize an individual or individuals from a specific discipline outside the victim assistance field for their service to victims and/ or contribution to the victims’ field. In the little free time she has, Schriro is a passionate gardener and loves cooking, boating and spending time outdoors. She recently purchased and is restoring a 100-year-old house in New York City. When asked if she would retire, Schriro laughs. “Retire? Those are fighting words! No. Heaven forbid.” SLB

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After conducting a nationwide search last year, the School of Law welcomed LISA SONIA TAYLOR, J.D., as the school’s Director of Multicultural Affairs & Outreach at the beginning of the 2011-2012 academic year. Here, Taylor gives alumni an update on her office’s initiatives and programs during her first year.

ALUMNI PROFILE ADRIENNE COCHRANE (‘97) BY LAUREN BRUCKER

A Dear Alumni, It is with great pleasure that I introduce you to the new Office of Multicultural Affairs and Outreach (OMA). With the help of the School of Law’s Multicultural Affairs Committee (MAC), we have been designing a diversity program to serve SLU LAW students, staff and faculty and continue to build an inclusive environment for everyone at the law school. First, as part of this process, we drafted a new diversity statement that reflects this vision and the mission of SLU LAW. As part of our Jesuit tradition, Saint Louis University remains faithful to the value of promoting justice and the dignity of all human beings. Likewise, the School of Law advances academic excellence, freedom of inquiry and respect for individual differences. These principles underlie our desire to provide an inclusive environment where differences, whether in religion, age, race, gender, sexual orientation and identity, ethnicity, ability, socioeconomic background or ideology, are heeded, supported and valued in the academic experience. We strive to demonstrate this inclusiveness in all areas of our admissions practices, academic advising, student services and activities, curricular offerings, in the classroom and administrative policies. Our goal is to produce well-rounded and culturally competent professionals who will respectfully serve their diverse communities. Guided by this statement, the MAC developed a list of diversity goals and suggestions for accomplishing them. Broadly, we identified the need to: 1) OFFER MORE PROGRAMMING CENTERED ON DIVERSITY AND DIVERSE LEGAL ISSUES 2) PROVIDE ADDITIONAL SUPPORT AND OUTREACH TO ALL STUDENTS THROUGH COLLABORATION WITH VARIOUS LAW DEPARTMENTS AND STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 3) ASSIST WITH OUTREACH TO THE ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY To achieve these objectives, the Committee’s first priority was to issue a student survey to assess where the law school was on its progress with diversity and cultural awareness. We launched the survey in February 2012 and followed up with a roundtable discussion on some of the key issues that were raised in the survey such as defining diversity at SLU LAW, the importance of cultural competency in professional training and exploring the concept of inclusiveness in the SLU LAW community. I would like to thank the SLU LAW community for the extraordinary welcome that I received and for the outpouring of support throughout the year. I would especially like to thank the members of the MAC and the student organizations with which I had the pleasure of working. Please stay tuned for information on more OMA programs and activities over the coming year, such as a presentation by civil rights activist, professor and author Dean Spade on October 10, and our new partnership with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri. Sincerely,

drienne Cochrane (’97) has devoted her career to helping those who are not in a position to help themselves. Armed with her SLU LAW degree, she was immediately able to apply the knowledge she gained when she joined the City of St. Louis Family Violence Council as its first executive director in 1999. The position gave Cochrane the opportunity to advocate for women and children and solidify her passion for non-profit social services work. When her husband’s job transfer moved the Cochranes to Aurora, Ill., in late 2003, she joined the Quad County Urban League in a senior management position and quickly began to feel like she had found her calling. From there, Cochrane’s career with the Urban League has flourished as the chief program officer for the Urban League of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. to her current position as president and CEO of Urban Leauge of Greater Hartford in Connecticut, which she has held since 2010. In this role, Cochrane serves as the face and voice of the organization, managing senior staff and board meetings, making decisions on partnership and collaborative opportunities, engaging with existing and potential donors and attending various social and civic events. “I have a very deep social consciousness that has been bolstered by how the underserved and disenfranchised in our society seem to disappear into the landscape politically,” she says. “Voiceless means powerless; in the social services arena we help these populations gain their voice.” Cochrane’s tireless work in fundraising and advocating for educational, occupational and economic equality within the community was recognized by the NAACP when she was named one of the 100 Most Influential Blacks in Connecticut in 2011. Cochrane recently discussed her role with the Urban League and reflected on her time at the School of Law. SLB What are the biggest challenges facing the Urban League? AC Sustainability is certainly a challenge both locally and nationally given the combination of the economic downturn, political climate and general assault on programs serving the very low to low income populations. Although there are certainly some signs of economic recovery for the general population, the unemployment and foreclosure rates among the predominantly black and brown people that Urban Leagues serve are not feeling that recovery just yet.

SLB What is your favorite part of your job? AC The people. Everyone has a story. There are a lot of people struggling and hurting in so many ways. We cannot solve every problem, but we can offer assistance and hope. Sometimes people just need to know you care. I do not want people leaving the Urban League feeling helpless or hopeless. We empower people to see the possibilities, and we accept them. It is not where you have been, it is where you are going. SLB What is the most rewarding aspect of what you do? AC Knowing that this important work is positively impacting the lives of individuals and families in our service communities. I have been brought to tears by the sheer jubilation of families at a GED graduation ceremony. It’s a sobering reminder to keep looking outside the narrow confines of my own world. SLB Why did you choose SLU LAW? AC A quality legal education and top-flight instruction, including the inimitable Professor Vincent C. Immel. He could be intimidating but he had a heart of gold. Those who could not see beyond the seemingly gruff exterior missed that. And he loved the law. SLB How did SLU LAW prepare you for your current profession? AC The body of knowledge acquired in a legal education transcends traditional legal careers. Most everything in life has legal implications. As a chief executive, I hire and terminate staff; I sign contracts that are legally binding; I negotiate locally and with the state and federal governments; and I am asked to opine on important legislation affecting the Urban League’s constituents. The legal education and life experience that I gained at the School of Law helps to assure that the Urban League is well represented when I am seated at the table. SLB Do you have any advice for law school students and recent graduates? AC There are so many directions from which to choose. There are the traditional career choices but there are a variety of non-traditional opportunities. You don’t have to be cookie cutter to be successful. SLB

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CONGRATULATIONS TO

THE CLASS OF

SLU LAW FACULTY AND STAFF WISH A HEARTFELT CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OF OUR GRADUATES – WELCOME TO THE ALUMNI FAMILY.

2012 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW HOODING CEREMONY THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

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CLASS NOTES THE

PLEASE NOTE: Class notes are compiled from alumni submissions and news items.

SBA

1965 By Candace Ruocco, SBA President efore arriving at SLU LAW, Dean Clark once explained that her priorities as dean included helping the school to “more fully engage with a social justice mission that flows so naturally from the Jesuit, Catholic tradition.” Her vision for a more service-oriented educational experience aligned perfectly with the objectives of the 2011–2012 Student Bar Association (SBA) Service Initiative.

B SERVICE INITIATIVE RECAP $29,614.88

3,579 1,174 44 23

FUNDS RAISED

HOURS VOLUNTEERED ITEMS DONATED TO CHARITIES

CHARITIES SERVED

ORGANIZATIONS PARTICIPATED

2011 2012

SBA serves as an umbrella organization for all SLU LAW student groups, and its purpose is to provide SLU LAW students with a forum for the expression of ideas concerning the social, moral and intellectual aspects of the legal profession. SBA plays two distinct roles of both a student government and a professional bar association. Through SBA we continually look for ways to enhance students’ law school experience and help prepare each other for our futures in the legal profession. SBA has long considered pro bono work a part of our calling as future legal professionals. Public service is a hallmark of a SLU LAW education and something many student groups already strive to integrate into their activities. This year, however, we made a concerted effort through the SBA Service Initiative to strengthen SBA’s commitment to SLU’s Jesuit mission through an increased focus on public service programming. Our goal was to encourage every student group to develop or participate in a philanthropy project tailored to their organizational mission. With nearly 30 student organizations, we were excited to see the variety of ways this commitment to service would come alive. Most groups hosted events similar to their normal programs that incorporated causes aligned with their organizational mission. SLU LAW’s two legal fraternities, Phi Alpha Delta and Phi Delta Phi, enthusiastically incorporated charities into their social and networking events. SBA held a CAREoke Night to raise money for Our Little Haven, and the Public Interest Law Group traveled to Warrenton, Mo. to serve homeless veterans Thanksgiving dinner. The Mark Twain Law Students Association, dedicated to raising awareness about men’s legal issues, sold snacks and fake mustaches to raise money for the Movember Foundation’s prostate cancer research initiatives. These events, and a myriad of others, demonstrated SLU LAW students’ commitment to being men and women for others. We look forward to continuing these efforts next year with new projects and ideas to make a positive impact in our community and the legal profession. SLB

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Thomas Simon, retired clerk for the Missouri Supreme Court, is a winner of the 2011 Missouri Lawyers Weekly Influential Lawyers Award.

one of three recipients of the Food and Drug Law Institute’s Distinguished Service and Leadership Awards given to recognized leaders in the food and drug law community.

1966

1972

Hon. James Hartenbach, a retired St. Louis County Circuit Court judge, joined the mediation panel at United States Arbitration & Mediation Midwest, Inc., an alternative dispute resolution provider.

Hon. Patrick Hitpas retired as a circuit judge in the Illinois Fourth Judicial Circuit in January 2010. He now works as a mediator in southern and central Illinois as well as metropolitan St. Louis.

1968

Allan Iskra was installed as president of the Morris County (N.J.) Bar Association.

Michael P. Gunn was presented the Award of Honor by The Lawyers Association of St. Louis, the organization’s most prestigious award.

1969 John Robert “Bob” McBrien retired from the federal government in December 2011 after 42 years of service. He is consulting and writing on sanctions, national security strategy, transnational threats, AML and related areas.

1971 Eugene M. Thirolf Jr. was

1973 Rabbi Manuel Magence successfully argued before the Illinois Supreme Court in December 2011. He also retired in December 2011 after more than 25 years as an assistant state’s attorney in Cook County, Ill.

1974 Hon. Thaddeus J. Armstead announced his recent retirement as a federal administrative law judge. His 36-year legal career also included employment as an in-house corporate attorney for three Fortune

500 companies and as an assistant Ohio County prosecutor. He currently resides in Dayton, Ohio. John Beeson is sad to report he has confirmed stage 4, small cell, lung cancer. He is fighting it as best as he can and the chemo is working at this time. He encourages other alumni to enjoy every day that they have…we are now! Doreen Dodson received the 2012 Women’s Justice Award Woman of the Year by Missouri Lawyers Weekly. Francis O’Connor took office in May 2012 as the vice president of the Pennsylvania Bar Association. He will become president-elect in 2013 and then president in May 2014. Daniel Sokol was named the St. Louis Family Law Lawyer of the Year for 2011 by Best Lawyers in America. John Walsh joined the law firm Spencer, Fane, Britt & Browne, LLP as an of counsel attorney. He concentrates his practice in the areas of commercial transactions, secured lending, mergers and acquisitions, securities law, and general business law matters.

1975 Judson Calkins finished co-authoring a coffee-table

edition on the athletic history of his alma mater John Burroughs School in St. Louis, available through the JBS alumni office. He left law in 1999 to manage his own real estate holdings, although his law license remains current. With his wife, Pilar, he also celebrated his 20th wedding anniversary this year. Hon. Francisco Canseco won a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives as a Republican in the 23rd District of Texas in November 2010. Gerard Carmody was named a “Most Influential St. Louisan” by the St. Louis Business Journal. John Temporiti was named a “Most Influential St. Louisan” by the St. Louis Business Journal.

1976 Russell L. Nekorchuk received a Master of Arts in Linguistics from the University of Florida at the Summer 2011 commencement. He also was awarded a Graduate Certificate in Modern European Studies. Kathleen Sherby, a partner at the law firm Bryan Cave, was named board vice president for the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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1978

Russell Watters of Brown & James was named third Winningest Defense Attorney by Missouri Lawyers Weekly.

Edward Blake Jr. is a partner in the Belleville, Ill., law firm of Blake & Allen, PC, focusing his practice on real estate, business law, estate planning, trusts and estates, and family law.

1977 Howard Adelman, of the law firm Adelman & Gettleman in Chicago, was named a Top 10 Attorney by the Illinois edition of Super Lawyers. Hon. Gary Jacobs retired as a circuit judge for the State of Illinois in January 2011. Since his retirement he has been spending time between Charleston, Ill., and Santa Fe, N.M., where he has two grandchildren. Amy Rubin was hired as managing partner by Fox Rothschild in its West Palm Beach, Fla., office. J. Joseph Schlafly III has launched Arch Grants, a global business plan competition in St. Louis.

Christopher Hunter formed the law firm Hunter & Johnson, PC, located in Godfrey, Ill. The firm provides legal services including: civil litigation, domestic relations, estate planning, unemployment appeals, real estate, business counseling and transactions, personal injury, workers compensation claims and municipal law. Frederic Knapp was reelected as trustee of the Morris County (N.J.) Bar Foundation for 2012.

1979 John Cullinane has practiced in the health law transactional area for 30 years representing hospitals, health systems and physician groups, with no plan to retire any time soon.

Hon. Lucy D. Rauch was honored at the Women Law Students’ Association Judicial Reception with a Disginuished Honoree award on April 4. Gregory Smith was named a “Most Influential St. Louisan” by the St. Louis Business Journal.

1980 John Boyle joined the law firm Carmody MacDonald as a partner and was named St. Louis’ Banking Lawyer of the Year in 2012 by Best Lawyers in America. Hon. Rex Burlison was named a “Most Influential St. Louisan” by the St. Louis Business Journal. Mayor Francis Slay was named a “Most Influential St. Louisan” by the St. Louis Business Journal.

1981 Dr. Randall Bickle is CEO of a 500-physician organization in suburban Detroit. He continues to practice medicine part time

while pursuing medical executive duties, and, most importantly, watching his three daughters grow up and pursue their careers. Hon. Jimmie Edwards was honored at the Black Law Students’ Association Judicial Reception with the Judge Theodore McMillian Award. John R. Munich was nominated by Gov. Jay Nixon to the Missouri Ethics Commission. Grace Nichols will assume the position of vice chair with the Missouri Highways & Transportation Commission. She has served on the commission since March 2008.

1982 Kathryn Reback recently joined the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) in Rockville, Md., as a member of its Patient Safety Organization team. She will also be dedicated to AHRQ’s Medical Liability and Patient Safety Initiative. Her husband, Richard, is counsel to the Inspector General of the Department

PREPPING FOR THE BAR EXAM? SLU LAW CAN HELP! Whether you’re sitting for your first bar exam or seeking to be admitted to an additional jurisdiction, SLU LAW can assist you with the application process and help you identify, assess and rebuild the necessary skills to pass the bar exam. From tutorials and essay workshops to one-on-one counseling, let us walk you through the unique challenges alumni can face when preparing for the bar exam.

For more information or to set up an appointment to discuss your bar exam plans, contact: PROFESSOR ANTONIA MICELI, Director of Bar Examination Preparation at 314.977.344 or amiceli1@slu.edu. You can also follow us at www.facebook.com/SLULawBarPrep for news, tips and support.

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of Homeland Security.

1982 Hon. Denise O’Shea Watson was elected a family court judge in Dutchess County, N.Y., in November 2011.

1983 Hon. Melissa A. Chapman was honored at the Women Law Students’ Association Judicial Reception on April 4. Robyn Greifzu Fox was hired as a principal at Pitzer Snodgrass PC. Thomas Moga is a partner with the Washington, D.C., office of Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLC. He was recognized in the 2010, 2011 and 2012 editions of Best Lawyers in America and the 2011 edition of Legal Media Group’s Guide to Leading Practitioners: China. His multi-volume treatise on Asian patent practice (West) is in its 18th year of publication.

1984 Hon. Angela T. Quigless, St. Louis circuit judge, was appointed by Gov. Jay Nixon to the Missouri Court of Appeals Eastern District.

1985 Carl Markus is an attorney at the St. Louis law

firm Paule, Camazine & Blumenthal, PC. Brian Sparks of the law firm Hill Ward Henderson has been named to the 2012 Florida Super Lawyers list. Michael Ward of Brown & James is a winner of the 2011 Missouri Lawyers Weekly Law Firm Leader Award.

1986 Steven Cockriel was named the 2012 St Louis LitigationConstruction Lawyer of the Year by Best Lawyers. Todd Muchnick became the managing partner of the St. Louis law firm Muchnick & Haber LC. Stephen Woodley of Gray, Ritter & Graham, PC is a winner of the 2011 Missouri Lawyers Weekly Appellate Advocates Award.

1987 William Perry accepted an appointment as special litigation trial attorney with the Office of General Counsel, Executive Office of the U.S. Trustees, U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., in January 2011. John Shanahan is the recipient of the Father Joseph L. Davis Alumni Merit Award given by the John Cook School of

Business at Saint Louis University.

1988 Concetta “Connie” Ahrens, senior compliance counsel at Edward Jones, has been named a principal with the firm’s holding company, the Jones Financial Companies, LLLP.

at the law firm Frank & Mueller, has assumed the position of vice president of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis. Jennifer Joyce was named a “Most Influential St. Louisan” by the St. Louis Business Journal.

1991

Nancy Koors was hired as an associate attorney by the law firm Brinker & Doyen LLP. She focuses her practice on medical malpractice defense, insurance defense and coverage.

Steve Clark has been recognized by Super Lawyers for the fourth time and the third consecutive year (2005, 2009-2011) in the field of complex business litigation.

John Nations was named a “Most Influential St. Louisan” by the St. Louis Business Journal.

Mary Frontczak, vice president and assistant general counsel at Peabody Energy, was among the 2011 YWCA Leaders of Distinction for business and corporate management.

Mary Reichard is a legal correspondent for the national radio newsmagazine, “The World and Everything In It,” currently on 180 stations nationwide and on the internet. She continues as an attorney for Ozarks Community Hospital in Springfield, Mo.

1989 Deborah Henry of the law firm Stewart, Mittleman, Heggie, Henry & Albin, LLC, is a founder and member-at-large of the newly formed Hispanic Bar Association of St. Louis.

1990 Joseph Frank, a partner

1993 Joan Lockwood of Gray, Ritter & Graham, PC is a winner of the 2011 Missouri Lawyers Weekly Appellate Advocates Award. Ruth Streit of Thompson Coburn was named the St. Louis Employee Benefits (ERISA) Lawyer of the Year by Best Lawyers in America.

1994 Tracy Litzinger of the law firm Howard & Howard in Peoria, Ill., was named CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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a 2012 Illinois “Super Lawyer” in the field of employment litigation defense. Margaret (Meg) Tebo is a lecturer at Columbia College Chicago, where she teaches Media Law and Ethics, Covering the Courts and other courses in the journalism department. She is the author of “Shakespeare for Lawyers - a Practical Guide to Quoting the Bard” (ABA Press 2010).

1995 Gregory Gold was named one of the ten Colorado Lawyers of the Year for 2011 by Law Week Colorado. He was also named a Colorado “Super Lawyer.” Sally Venverloh joined U.S. Trust as a senior vice president and wealth strategist. She will help clients with tax, estate and charitable planning.

1996 Robert Cantwell was hired as a partner at the law firm Lathrop & Gage LLP. He concentrates his practice in the areas of corporate and regulatory law with an emphasis on gaming, banking, franchise,

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corporate finance, mergers and acquisitions and business transaction services. Eric Kukoski, an of counsel attorney at the law firm Evans & Dixon, LLC, assumed the position of treasurer of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis in May 2012 for a one-year term.

1997 Jonathan D. Fleece, principal with Blalock Walters in Bradenton and Sarasota, Fla., spoke at the St. Louis Health Lawyers Association on April 13 and discussed his best-selling book “The New Health Age: the Future of Health Care in America.” John McCracken was added as partner at Goldenberg, Heller, Antognoli & Rowland PC, focusing his practice on commercial litigation. John Powers, associate vice chancellor and deputy general counsel for Washington University School of Medicine, was named a 2012 “40 Under 40” honoree by the St. Louis Business Journal.

1998 William E. Brown, an attorney in the U.S. Army JAG Corps and a Bronze Star receipient as a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom, has been selected for promotion to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

Donald M. Flack was appointed as associate judge in Madison County, Ill., by the Illinois Third Judicial Circuit’s nine elected judges. He was previously a personal injury attorney in Wood River, Ill. Christopher K. Geldmacher was named a partner of the St. Louis law firm Sauter-Sullivan, LLC. His areas of practice include personal injury, workers compensation, wrongful death, premises liability, products liability and business litigation. Heather Hays, a partner at the law firm Rynearson, Suess, Schnurbusch & Champion LLC, assumed the position of president of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis. Matthew Shorey of the law firm Armstrong Teasdale was named a member of the Top Defense Verdict Team by Missouri Lawyers Weekly for 2012.

1999 Jessica Liss was hired by the law firm Jackson Lewis LLP as its resident partner in its office in Creve Coeur, Mo. She focuses her practice on employment litigation. Charissa Mayes was hired as an associate by Jackson Lewis LLP in their St. Louis office. Amy Rubin joined First American Title Insurance Co. as vice president and underwriting counsel. Rochelle Woodies, assistant

circuit attorney in the St. Louis City Circuit Attorney’s Office, was named a 2012 “40 Under 40” honoree by the St. Louis Business Journal.

2000 Amy Bender-Levy is serving as chair of the Young Lawyers Section of the Missouri Bar. Residing in Chesterfield, Mo., she is married with three children and works as an attorney for Catholic Legal Assistance Ministry. John Gunn was elected a member of the Missouri Bar Board of Governors. Sarah Hellmann, a partner at the law firm Husch Blackwell, was named by Missouri Lawyers Weekly as a winner of the 2012 Women’s Justice Awards in the “Litigation Practitioners” category. Joan Killgore, a shareholder at the law firm Polsinelli Shughart, was named by Missouri Lawyers Weekly as a winner at the 2012 Women’s Justice Awards in the “Business Practitioners” category.

2001 Joseph Blanner was honored by the St. Louis County Bar Association with its Outstanding Young Lawyer award. He is a partner with the Claytonbased law firm of Behr, McCarter & Potter, P.C. where he focuses primarily

on construction law, real estate law, municipal law and commercial and general civil litigation. John Bruegger was hired by Hawkins, Parnell, Thackston & Young, LLP as a senior associate attorney. Amy Hoch Hogenson, a principal at the law firm Paule, Camazine & Blumenthal, was named by Missouri Lawyers Weekly as a winner at the 2012 Women’s Justice Awards in the “Rising Stars” category. Mary Machon was named a partner by the law firm Armstrong Teasdale, LLP. She is a member of the firm’s real estate practice group and counsels local and national owners, users, investors, developers and bank and non-bank lenders in a wide variety of real estate and banking matters. Bradley Hansmann of Brown & James was named third Winningest Defense Attorney by Missouri Lawyers Weekly. Simone Morrison Hollins is an associate in the Kansas City, Mo., law firm of Arnold, Newbold, Winter, & Jackson, P.C., focusing her practice on ERISA compliance for multi-employer pension and welfare plans in the construction industry.

Jarrod Sharp was elected partner at Thompson Coburn. He represents lenders, operating businesses and developers in all types of commercial finance and real-estate-related finance transactions. He also represents businesses and developers in the acquisition and sale of real and personal property and the development and leasing of commercial real estate. William Zychlewicz was named partner by the law firm Armstrong Teasdale, LLP. He is a registered U.S. patent attorney and a member of the firm’s intellectual property services and future energy practice groups.

2002 Chellie Butel was appointed a shareholder by the law firm Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard. She joined the firm in 2005 and is a member of its health law practice group. John Fischesser II, an associate at the law firm Pitzer Snodgrass PC, was elected member-at-large of the board of the Young Lawyers Division of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis. Cardina Johnson was hired as associate general counsel by the Illinois Education Association. Mandy Kamykowski earned

membership in the Claims and Litigation Management Alliance (CLM), a national organization committed to advancing the highest standards in claims and litigation management. Todd A. Lubben, who practices in the areas of professional liability and business litigation at Brown & James, gave a presentation on May 2 on Ethics in Attorney Advertising as part of a program on Legal Ethics in Missouri hosted by Lohrman Education Services. M. Quinn Murphy was named a partner by the law firm Armstrong Teasdale, LLP. Quinn is an experienced litigator with a practice focus on general business and commercial litigation. His experience includes trial and arbitration proceedings both locally and nationally. Dr. Dora Schriro was awarded the Allied Professional Award by the Office for Victims of Crime at an April 2012 ceremony in Washington, D.C. Alan Singer was promoted to counsel by the law firm Bryan Cave. Patrick Stufflebeam was elected a partner at the law firm HeplerBroom, LLC in their Edwardsville, Ill., office. He is a litigation attorney in the areas of products and premises liability with a special emphasis on toxic tort

defense, including asbestos, manganese and silica. Ronda Williams, senior corporate counsel at Savvis, Inc., was among the 2011 YWCA Leaders of Distinction for business and corporate management. She was also chosen as one of St. Louis American’s 2012 Young Leaders. Dawne “Dede” Zupanci was elected partner at the law firm HeplerBroom, LLC in their Edwardsville, Ill., office. Zupanci focuses her practice on healthcare defense litigation and regulatory matters.

2003 Teresa Baird joined the law firm Baird, Lightner, Millsap & Harpool P.C. as an associate in Springfield, Mo. She focuses on estate planning and trust administration, probate litigation, corporate law, nonprofit organizations and intellectual property. Uyless M. Dewberry was named a partner by the law firm Husch Blackwell. He focuses his practice in environmental and natural resources law. Giuseppe S. Giardina was named a partner by the law firm Husch Blackwell. His focus is in products liability and toxic torts, representing manufacturers of consumer and industrial products. He also practices in the area of nursing home litigation defense. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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Brian Hockett was elected as a partner by the law firm Thompson Coburn. His practice focuses on protecting and advancing the financial interests of secured creditors, unsecured creditors and debtors in all aspects of debtor-creditor relationships, including workouts, litigation and bankruptcy. Kathryn Hoehn, an associate at the law firm Lashly & Baer PC, was elected as a member-at-large to the board of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis, expiring in April 2014. William M. Hof was named a partner by the law firm Husch Blackwell. He practices real estate and development law. In addition, he is an accredited LEED Green Associate, certified by Green Building Certification Institute Accreditation Program, and is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council’s St. Louis Chapter. Joseph A. Kilpatrick was named a partner by the law firm Husch Blackwell. He focuses his practice on defending toxic tort and products liability cases involving exposure to chemicals. He represents petrochemical and products manufacturers in cases across the U.S. Dawn Besserman, an associate at the law firm Paul J. Passanante PC & Associates, was elected a member-atlarge to the board of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis, expiring in April 2014.

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Kathryn R. Mihalevich was named a partner by the law firm Husch Blackwell. She practices healthcare law, working with large health systems, hospitals and individual physicians. She also assists pharmacy benefit manager clients with regard to Medicare Part D issues. Cassandra Sanford, CEO of Kelly Mitchell Group, was named a “Most Influential St. Louisan” by the St. Louis Business Journal. Charles Vantine was promoted to partner at SNR Denton in its St. Louis office.

2004 Michael Adrian was hired as of counsel by the law firm Lathrop & Gage LLP, joining their corporate department. He concentrates his practice in the areas of corporate law, corporate finance and governance, mergers and acquisitions and securities law. John Challis was promoted to shareholder by the law firm Polsinelli Shughart, PC. Kathryn Dugan was hired as an associate by the law firm Bryan Cave, joining their product liability service group. Stephen Durbin was named a member by the law firm Lewis, Rice & Fingersh LC. Rachel Jeep, an associate at the law firm Copeland Thompson Farris PC, was elected chairperson of the Young Lawyers Division

of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis. David LaPlante is assistant vice president and assistant managing counsel for Fidelity National Title Group based in Omaha, Neb. He and his wife, Edith, welcomed their sixth child this year. Brennen D. Soval was named a partner by the law firm Husch Blackwell. He is a member of the real estate and development group, representing clients in the sale, acquisition and development of commercial and residential properties.

2005 Adam Birenbaum, CEO of Buckingham Asset Management, was named a 2012 “40 Under 40” honoree by the St. Louis Business Journal. Sara Gillette, an associate at the law firm Senniger Powers LLP, was elected as chairperson-elect of the Young Lawyers Division of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis. Clark Hedger, an associate at the law firm Greensfelder Hemker & Gale PC, was elected as secretary of the Young Lawyers Division of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis. Brian Love joined Dobson, Goldberg, Berns & Rich, LLP as an associate. The firm focuses on employment law and workers’ compensation cases. Ryan E. Mohr was named

partner at Fox Galvin. He has concentrated his practice in the areas of environmental compliance and litigation, product liability, toxic tort, maritime and general commercial litigation.

as a 2012 “Rising Star” by the Illinois edition of Super Lawyer. She practices in various areas including civil litigation, personal injury, personal injury defense and workers’ compensation.

W. Thomas Smith was named the University of Florida College of Pharmacy’s 2011-12 Teacher of the Year.

Rachel Roman was named a 2012 “Top 40 Under 40” in the state of Missouri by The National Trial Lawyers Association.

2006 Angela Alvarez Simmons of State Farm Insurance is a founder and treasurer of the newly formed Hispanic Bar Association of St. Louis. Jennifer Kincaid was named partner in the firm of McGehee, Olson, Pepping, Balk & Kincaid, Ltd., located in Silvis, Ill. Tim McFarlin was recognized as a “Rising Star” by Super Lawyers in the field of complex business litigation. Andrea McNairy was named a 2012 “Top 40 Under 40” in the state of Missouri by The National Trial Lawyers Association. Scott B Mueller was hired as a special counsel by the law firm Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith in its St. Louis office in the firm’s title resolution team. Erin M. Phillips of the law firm Unsell & Schattnik in Wood River, Ill. was selected

James Stever was hired as an associate by Gori Julian & Associates PC.

2007 Mary Taylor, an associate at the law firm Greensfelder Hemker & Gale PC, was elected as secretary of the Young Lawyers Division of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis.

2008 Robert Caldwell joined the law firm of McMichael & Logan in Kirkwood, Mo. He will work primarily on criminal defense, employment discrimination and personal injury cases. Kevin Carnie was hired by The Simon Law Firm in its product liability practice group.

Anglea Fletcher, an attorney with the law firm Armstrong Teasdale, was named to the board of Nonprofit Missouri, an alliance of the state’s nonprofit organizations.

Office, is a founder and community service chair of the newly formed Hispanic Bar Association of St. Louis.

2009

Natalie Kean will spend two years serving the Catholic Church as a volunteer of Fidesco in the Phillippines, moving to Manilla to live and work at the Tempo Tondo Life Project Center. Kristen Ratcliff is special assistant to the national coordinator at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Tiffany Schwartz was hired as an associate by the law firm Armstrong Teasdale. She is a member of the intellectual property practice group, guiding brand owners in matters involving trademark selection, registration, policing and protection strategies. She also counsels clients in copyright, internet and anticounterfeiting matters. Sandra Zambrana, of the St. Louis City’s Counselor’s

Jessica Benton has been employed as an assistant state’s attorney in Clinton County, Ill., since March 2011. Dr. Richard T. Middleton IV was chosen as one of St. Louis American’s 2012 Young Leaders. Middleton is a tenured associate professor of political science and prelaw advisor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. He is also an adjunct professor of law at Saint Louis University.

was hired by Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. in the law firm’s healthcare section in its Baton Rouge, La., office. Salim Awad, of the law firm McQueen Awad, is a founder and member-at-large of the newly formed Hispanic Bar Association of St. Louis. Erin Brooks joined the law firm Bryan Cave as an associate in their commercial litigation and environmental client service groups. Timothy Cronin was added to The Simon Law Firm’s product liability

Megan Nolan is an attorney at the Blake Law Group, PC. She focuses her practice in the areas of real estate, business law, tax, estate planning trusts and estates, divorces and family matters.

practice group.

Patrick Pedano is an associate at The Stange Law Firm.

Constantino “Tino” Ochoa, of the law firm Bryan Cave, is a founder, member-atlarge and assistant treasurer of the newly formed Hispanic Bar Association of St. Louis.

Robert Plunkert is an associate at the St. Louis law firm Pitzer Snodgrass in their litigation practice group.

2010 Stephen Matthew Angelette

Emily Kiser was hired as an associate by the law firm Lathrop & Gage, concentrating her practice on business litigation.

Kristin Steinkamp joined the law firm Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith as an associate in its CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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St. Louis office. She is part of the firm’s newly-added title resolution team. Matthew S. Vanderpool was hired as an associate by Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren in Milwaukee, Wis. As part of the firm’s health care practice, he provides counsel on transactional and regulatory matters to large and small institutional providers and physician groups. Jeremy Williamson is an in house attorney with Energy Systems Group in Evansville, Ind. His work entails all legal and regulatory aspects of the energy services and renewable energy markets.

2011 Amy Ball accepted a position as director of risk management at Ranken Jordan Hospital. Miles Bardell started work

as a staff attorney for the Prairie State Legal Services, Inc., in Peoria, Ill. Brandon Belt was hired as an associate by the personal injury law firm of Gori Julian, PC in Edwardsville, Ill. The firm focuses its practice on representing plaintiffs in asbestos and other occupational disease litigation. Matthew Bigham is an attorney at the Blake Law Group, PC. He focuses his practice in the areas of real estate, business law, tax, estate planning trusts and estates, divorces and family matters. David Brady was named assistant general counsel in the multi-family division with Gershman Mortgage. He is responsible for processing and analyzing HUD-insured multi-family loans. Erin Conner was hired as an assistant public defender by the St. Clair County (Ill.) Public Defender’s Office. Steve Dellinger is a research attorney at the

Illinois Appellate Court in Springfield, Ill. Larissa Drohobyczer joined the law firm Brooks Bauer LLP in their Las Vegas, Nev., office. She will be focusing her practice on real estate litigation, representing banks and creditors. Lauren Groebe joined the law firm Polsinelli Shughart as an associate in their Kansas City, Mo., office. Timothy Hiller was hired as an associate by Foreclosure Law LLC, a foreclosure defense firm in St. Louis. Michael Kelley was hired as an associate by Evans & Dixon, LLC. He will focus his practice on workers’ compensation cases. Sarah Luem was hired as an associate by the law firm Capes, Sokol, Goodman & Sarachan, PC. Katlin Mahley and Erika Wentzel opened a general practice law firm together, Mahley Wentzel Law. Katherine Strutz was hired

as an assistant general counsel by Gershman Mortgage. Phillip Terrell was hired as an associate product manager by Press Ganey Associate, Inc. in the clinical products division. Brett J. Travers was hired as an associate by the law firm Farrell, Hamilton & Julian, P.C., concentrating his practice in the areas of estate planning and probate, corporate and business planning, real estate, and taxation. Timothy Weil was hired as an associate by Haar & Woods LLP. The firm focuses its practice on commercial and business litigation and law. David A. Zobel has been promoted to associate in the litigation department of Danna McKitrick, P.C. He primarily represents individuals and corporations in the defense of civil litigation, including contract, negligence and real estate matters.

IN MEMORIAM

48

MR. EUGENE WALSH, 1 9 5 0

MR. ROBERT COLSON, 1 9 5 7

MR. DONALD L. WILLIAMS, 1 9 7 8

MR. MELVIN BAHLE, 1 9 5 2

MR. CHARLES RICE, 1 9 5 9

MRS. CAROL CHAZEN-FRIEDMAN, 1 9 8 0

MR. WILLIAM NOVICK, 1 9 5 2

THE HON. FLOYD McBRIDE, 1 9 6 0

REV. GERHARDT LEHMKUHL, 1 9 8 3

MR. DAVID COLSON, 1 9 5 5

MR. RICHARD RABBITT, 1 9 6 0

MR. MICHAEL CATALDI, 1 9 9 6

MR. RICHARD LITTMANN, 1 9 5 5

MR. SAM VIVIANO, 1 9 6 5

MR. JOHN K. PRUELLAGE,

MR. EARLE LEADLOVE, 1 9 5 6

MR. ANSON EICKHORST, 1 9 7 4

DEAN’S COUNCIL EMERITUS

MR. JOHN NANGLE, 1 9 5 6

MR. CHARLES WOLFF, 1 9 7 7

SAINT LOUIS BRIEF

K C A B G N I V I G N O FOCUS The Development and Alumni Relations Office is highlighting why alumni give to the School of Law and the different avenues available to you to support future legal education at Saint Louis University. In this installment, we take a look at the LOYAL TO LAW program.

LEONARD CERVANTES

PRINCIPAL, CERVANTES AND ASSOCIATES, CLASS OF

1973

I am grateful for the legal education I received and the opportunities that education provided me. I believe in the importance of Catholic education and support the Jesuit mission of educating women and men in service to others. While in law school, I received tremendous support from my teachers and other members of the law school community. This support guided me and helped shape the kind of lawyer I am today. My annual contributions sustain a SLU LAW education for current and future students. I established the Leonard A. Cervantes Scholarship in honor of my late father to help make law school a little more affordable for a deserving student. I have received so much because of my legal education and in return much is expected of me. Each year when I make my annual gift, I am contributing to the continuation of the law school’s mission and am supporting students who will benefit from the standard of excellence provided at Saint Louis University School of Law.

LOYAL TO LAW PROGRAM The Loyal to Law program provides special acknowledgement to consecutive annual donors giving at any level and brings distinction to these individuals who support SLU LAW each year. Loyal to Law donors create and sustain important academic programming, launch outreach initiatives that improve the community and provide educational opportunities for law students. Loyal donors who give each and every year are the cornerstone of a SLU LAW education. With consecutive annual gifts of any amount, these donors are partners in educating women and men in service to others.

HOW YOU CAN BECOME A LOYAL TO LAW MEMBER Become a Loyal to Law member by making a gift to any law school fund two years in a row. Graduates of the last decade (20032012) become Loyal to Law members by making a gift in our current fiscal year (July-June) regardless of prior giving. Loyal to Law members sustain their membership and continue receiving recognition in the program by making a gift in each subsequent fiscal year.

To check your progress toward membership or to learn more about the Loyal to Law program, please contact: Maura Connors School of Law Annual Giving Programs 314-977-3395 brenname@slu.edu School of Law Development Office 3700 Lindell Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63108 314-977-3300 law.slu.edu/alumni/giftform

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SCHOOL OF LAW 3700 LINDELL BLVD. ST. LOUIS, MO 63108

SLUSCHOOLOFLAW

PHOTO BY STEVE DOLAN

@SLULAW #SLULAW

calendar of

AUGUST

20

SEPTEMBER

EVENTS ’12 Visit law.slu.edu for more information.

Classes Begin

12

Jan Shelly: “LGBT Employment Discrimination and the Current State of Title VII Law”

SLU LAW Trivia Night

14

28-30

SLU LAW Reunion Weekend

28

CLE at Noon (visit law.slu.edu/CLE for more information)

29

PILG Ambulance Chase

OCTOBER

12

Childress Lecture

19

Alumni Lunch as part of the Missouri Bar Annual Meeting, St. Louis

26

Center for Health Law Studies 30th Anniversary Symposium

DECEMBER

14

Alumni Reception as part of the Illinois State Bar Association Midyear Meeting, Chicago


Saint Louis Brief v13i2 Alumni Magazine