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SAI NT LOU IS U NIVE R SIT Y SCH O O L O F LAW ALUMN I MAG A Z I N E VO LU M E 1 5 ISSUE 2

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Jay Fram

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Dear Alumni and Friends,

Hellos and goodbyes. Beginnings and endings. It’s the life cycle of academia. In May, we said goodbye to our new batch of graduates, who I know will go on to make us proud. And in a few weeks we will say hello and welcome in another class of students, inspired and determined to start their legal careers. This past year we settled in to our new beginning in Scott Hall. It required adjustment, patience and cooperation from the entire School of Law and University, but I can safely say it was a year of great accomplishment and success. The achievements of our students, many of which you’ll read about in the following pages, help shape their reputations as committed professionals and bolsters our reputation as an institution committed to justice and to the education of the future leaders in our region and nation. Another era of the law school is also ending as we bring the 2013-2014 academic year to a close. While we hope it’s more of a “see you later” than permanent goodbye, we recently bid farewell to nine cherished and long-serving faculty and staff members as they begin retirement: Isaak Dore, Barbara Gilchrist, Roger Goldman, Alan Howard, Nan Kauffman, Peggy McDermott, Colleen Murphy, Kathy Patrylo and Pete Salsich. With 259 years of combined service at the University, these colleagues have left an

immense impact on those they taught and worked with, and their contributions to the legal community are vast. We give them, I hope, a fitting tribute starting on pg. 29. And nestled between the beginning and the end is what we do in the day-to-day. Building upon what came before and what is to come is the essence of what the Center for Health Law Studies has displayed for more than 30 years. In this issue’s cover story, you’ll see how an idea spurned from a Humphrey’s cocktail napkin continues to evolve through the decades into one of the country’s most prominent programs. As healthcare remains in the national spotlight – in many ways as a result of our alumni’s work – the School of Law continues to stay at the forefront of health law education. Thank you for your continued support and the patience you yourselves have shown as we transitioned to our new location. I hope to say hello again to you soon. Best wishes,

Michael A. Wolff Dean and Professor

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DEA N MI C H A E L A . WO L F F DIREC TO R OF CO MMU NI CAT I ONS JE SS I C A C ICCO N E EDITO R L AURE N B R U C K E R

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P H OTO G RA P H Y A A RON B A N KS (‘ 1 4 ), STE V E D O L A N , F E N TR E SS P H OTO G R AP H Y, JAY F R A M , BI L L SAWA L IC H , JAME S V ISS E R , C HA D W IL L IA M S S P EC IA L T H A NKS JOHN AMMANN (‘84), PATRICK CONNAGHAN (’83), JOE CUSTER, SUSAN A. FITZGIBBON (‘84), NICK GERHART (’02), AMANDA GOLDSMITH (‘07), TIM GREANEY, LYNN HARTKE, SHERIDAN HAYNES, SANDY JOHNSON, SAM JORDAN, DAVID KULLMAN, MARY PAT MCINNIS (‘87), HENRY ORDOWER, ELIZABETH PENDO, AMY SANDERS (‘03), STEWART SHILCRAT, ELIZABETH STOOKEY, STEVE THAMAN, DOUG WILLIAMS, MICHAEL A. WOLFF

FEATURES

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L AW HONORS AND DISTINCTIONS D E A N WO L F F S E L E C T E D I N F L U E N T I A L L AW Y E R Missouri Lawyers Weekly selected Dean Michael Wolff as one if its 2014 Influential Lawyers of the Year. At a ceremony on Jan. 24, Wolff was honored among Missouri lawyers for making substantial contributions to the legal community in 2013.

A A R O N TAY L O R 50 UNDER 50 DISTINCTION Lawyers of Color ’s 50 Under 50 list, a comprehensive catalog of minority law professors making an impact in legal education, selected Assistant Professor Aaron Taylor. The list was published in the April 7 Law School Diversity issue.

M I S S O U R I L AW Y E R S W E E K LY H O N O R S S L U L AW WO M E N Seven women in the SLU LAW community were honored at Missouri Lawyers Weekly ’s Women in Justice Awards event on April 24. Alumnae Susan Denigan (’83), VP and general counsel at Nestle Purina PetCare Co, Mary Caola Kullman (’85), senior VP and chief administrative officer at Laclede Gas Co., and Elaine Spearman (’79), chief staffing officer/legal advisor to Comptroller of the City of St. Louis were selected in the Enterprise category and Sarah Pleban (’81), a solo practitioner, in the Public Service Practitioner category. 2L Paige Elbe and 4L parttime student Nicole Pleasant were recognized as Leaders of Tomorrow, while Associate Professor Kerry Ryan was honored in the Legal Scholar category.

BRIEFS N E W D I R E C TO R O F T H E LEGAL CLINICS

The School of Law is pleased to announce the appointment of Patricia Hureston Lee as an associate professor and the new director of the SLU LAW Legal Clinics. Lee joins SLU LAW from West Virginia University College of Law where she directed and advanced the Entrepreneurship and Innovation Law Clinic, a passion she hopes to evolve at SLU LAW. She assumes her post on July 1, 2014 and succeeds interim clinical director Barbara Gilchrist and longtime director John Ammann (‘84), who led the clinic for 17 years. Professor Gilchrist will retire at the end of the 2013-2014 school year. Professor Ammann will continue to serve as the Litigation Clinic supervisor. Look for more on Lee in the next issue of Saint Louis Brief.

SERVING OTHERS

FAC U LT Y M E M B E R O F T H E Y E A R The SLU LAW Class of 2014 selected Professor John Ammann (‘84) as the Faculty Member of the Year. Ammann, who served as director of the Legal Clinics from 1994-2013, is the supervisor of the Litigation Clinic and served as the faculty advisor for the Public Interest Law Group for the past 19 years. He previously won the award in 2003 and 2007. Ammann addressed graduates at the Hooding Ceremony on May 15 (see photos on pgs 24-25).

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 N AT U R A L I Z AT I O N C E R E M O N Y The School of Law hosted a naturalization ceremony presided by U.S. District Judge E. Richard Webber on March 26. SLU Interim President Bill Kauffman was also present to welcome 47 people from 26 countries as new citizens. The event was coordinated by the Public Interest Law Group.

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year. Professors Sue McGraugh and Brendan Roediger will step in as PILG faculty advisors in the fall.

CONFERENCES, SYMPOSIA AND EVENTS CO U R T I S I N S E S S I O N

 S T U D E N T S S E RV E L U N C H TO T H E H O M E L E S S Students from the Civil Practice class joined with students in the Civil Advocacy and Criminal Defense Clinics to serve lunch to 200 homeless individuals on March 25. Led by Professors Susan McGraugh and John Ammann (‘84), with help from Assistant Dean Jon Baris, 50 students cooked and served lunch and sang and danced with the guests at The Bridge, Centenary United Methodist Church’s homeless drop-in center, which is just a few blocks from SLU LAW.

 2 01 4 P I L G AU C T I O N The 2014 PILG Auction, held at Moulin on March 28, brought together students, faculty, staff and friends of the School of Law to raise funds for the Irvin and Maggie Dagen Fellowship Fund. This year’s fund provided stipends to more than 50 students working in unpaid public interest and public service positions this summer. Led by 2L auction co-chairs Ashley Turkowski and Kristin Swain, the event also honored St. Louis area attorneys, law firms and non-profit organizations that have shown a commitment to servicing the needs of those within the St. Louis community. Presented by Dean Michael Wolff, the Excellence in Pro Bono and Public Service Award recipients were Great Rivers Environmental Law Center and St. Louis Winter Outreach. Additionally, Professor John Ammann (’84) received special recognition with a Lifetime Excellence in Pro Bono and Public Service Award. For the past 19 years, Ammann served as faculty advisor for the Public Interest Law Group, helping make it one of the largest student organizations at SLU LAW. With his leadership, PILG has successfully coordinated annual volunteer opportunities and charity events. He is stepping down as advisor at the end of the academic

The John K . Pruellage Courtroom served as the court of record for two special visits this semester. On March 19, the Missouri Court of Appeals, Eastern District heard two panels of cases. The judges on the first panel were Chief Judge Robert M. Clayton III, Judge Robert G. Dowd Jr., and Judge James E. Welsh (’75) of the Western District. The second panel included Chief Judge Clayton, Judge Sherri B. Sullivan (’75) and Judge Angela T. Quigless (’84). Additionally, April 17 saw SLU LAW host a special session of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. The panel of judges – Roger L. Wollman (South Dakota), Kermit E. Bye (North Dakota) and Bobby E. Shepherd (Arkansas) – heard three cases in courtroom followed by a question and answer session with students.

H E A LT H C A R E R E F O R M , TR ANSITION AND T R A N S F O R M AT I O N I N LONG TE RM CARE On March 28, the Center for Health Law Studies and the Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy presented “Health Care Reform, Transition and Transformation in Long Term Care.” More than 220 attendees took part in the 26th annual symposium, as panelists, including leading legal and policy academics, officials from the Department of Justice, the Office of the Inspector General at Health and Human Services, industry experts, and practitioners with national reputations, examined how the Affordable Care Act is transforming financing, coordination and delivery of care, quality evaluation, and protection from waste, fraud and abuse in the long term care industry.

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT FO UR CLI NI CS CASES A MO NG MI SSO URI’S TO P FO R 2 013 Missouri Lawyers Weekly named four cases handled by students and faculty in the SLU LAW Legal Clinics among its list of Major Opinions, what it deems are the most important opinions of the previous six months. Youth Advocacy Clinic student Stephanie Allen (‘14), under the supervision of Professor Patricia Harrison, successfully argued an appeal in a juvenile delinquency case that was the only juvenile case selected to the newspaper’s list. The Missouri Court of Appeals for the Western District held, in a case of first impression, that unlawful entry into a building cannot be the sole

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evidence to support the element of intent on a charge of second-degree burglary. The Court reversed the judgment of delinquency. Three of the six cases selected in the unemployment category were handled by the Litigation Clinic. Sophie Zavaglia (’13), 4L part-time students Paul Schmitz and Chris Stuffle argued cases on behalf of workers denied unemployment benefits. Two of the cases were in the Eastern District and one was in the Western District.

Oralist in the second round. The SLU LAW team of 3Ls Andrea Sokolich, Kate Broderick and John Bowen placed first in the written and third in the oral competition at the Loyola Transactional Health Law competition on March 22 in Chicago.

 S T U D E N T E XC E L L E N C E AWA R D S

 S T U D E N T S P E A K S O F AC A S U CC E S S Third-year law student Nathaniel Carroll participated in a press conference with U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius and St. Louis Mayor Francis G. Slay (’80) on Jan. 31. Carroll spoke about his successful experience signing up for health insurance using the online marketplace.

CLINIC STUDENTS HELP MOBILE HOME PA R K R E S I D E N T S A group of SLU LAW Legal Clinics students were responsible for helping ensure that 200 families at the Brookside Estates Mobile Home Park in Jefferson County, Mo., continued to have water and sewer service. Brookside residents risked losing service after the park ’s owner was delinquent in paying the bill. The park owner owed the Northeast Public Sewer District more than $50,000, and the District sent the families a notice stating their water would be turned off due to the delinquent bill. Under the supervision of Professor John Ammann (’84), SLU LAW Litigation Clinic students Ben Tiller, Angela Kunz and Chris Stuffle visited the park to meet with residents about their concerns. The students presented their case before the Court, and Circuit Judge Gary Kramer entered an order that allows the residents to send their rent checks to a receiver who will ensure that the park ’s sewer bill gets paid. Read more at law.slu.edu/sidebar.

CO M P E T I T I O N W I N S At the Pace Environmental Moot Court Competition Feb. 20-22 in White Plains, N.Y., 3L Philip Scanlon won Best Oralist in the first round and 3L Rachel Harris won Best

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On April 11 more than 400 SLU LAW students, family and friends gathered in the Riethmann Pavilion to honor student achievements from the Spring, Summer and Fall 2013 semesters. Additionally, several students were highlighted for their remarkable leadership and volunteer work outside the classroom: Candace Ruocco, the Jaime Ramirez Student of the Year Award; Rachel Harris, Award for Leadership; Michael Morton, Award for Diversity and Cultural Competency; Christine Archer, Award for Pro Bono Legal Service; and Amanda Ward, Award for Community Service.

T H E P OW E R O F T H E P E N As part of the Health Law Grassroots Advocacy Class, three students had letters to the editor published to garner support for Medicaid expansion. The students also helped others around the state ghost-write their own editorials. After 4L dual degree student Katelyn Daniel’s letter was published in the St. Louis PostDispatch, it was read in the House committee, which then voted to send the bill to the floor on April 30. 3L Chelsea Merta, writing about her experience speaking with Sen. Schaeffer and the meaning of public service, and 3L dual degree student Srishti Miglani, writing that dreams of Medicaid expansion echo the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., were both published in the Columbia Tribune.

 DAV I D G R A N T AWA R D A few hours before the hooding ceremony on May 15, the School of Law gathered to recognize the exceptional work of students from the Legal Clinics with the David Grant and CLEA Awards. The David Grant

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Award finalists Christine Archer, Emily Elam, Justin Mulligan, Shannon O’Neal and Jenifer Snow, along with recipient Darren White were celebrated for their dedication to protecting the rights of the poor and disenfranchised through their clinical work. In attendance for the 25th anniversary of the award was Gail Milissa Grant, daughter of the award’s namesake, David Grant, an area lawyer and civil rights leader. The CLEA Award for outstanding student went to Patrick Collins, with Michelle Meyers selected as a finalist. This award, handed out by the Clinical Legal Education Association, is given to one student who excelled in both the field work and classroom components of the clinic. Read more about these impressive students at law.slu.edu/sidebar.

N E W D E AT H P E N A LT Y R E S E A R C H I N I T I AT I V E In Fall 2014, SLU LAW will be partnering with renowned criminologist and statistician Raymond Paternoster to form the Missouri Capital-Sentencing Research Program, which will examine the administration of Missouri’s modern era death penalty in relation to the mandates of Missouri and federal law. The program will incorporate students from SLU LAW’s criminal defense clinic, overseen by Professor Susan McGraugh. The Missouri Capital-Sentencing Research Program will present unique opportunities for SLU LAW students to contribute to the groundbreaking research of the Missouri death penalty. Clinic students will investigate cases on file with the Missouri Supreme Court to gather needed data for the research as well as receive training through hands-on experience working with attorneys specializing in death penalty appeals.

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Supreme Court, Chief Judge Catherine Perry of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri, Judge Michael J. Reagan (‘80) of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois, Judge Nannette Baker (‘94) of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri and Dean Michael Wolff, former chief justice of the Missouri Supreme Court.

A CO L U M N I S T L O O K S AT T H E L E G A L S YS T E M Students got a chance to meet and talk to St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist and “Donnybrook ” fixture Bill McClellan about his perspective on and experiences with the legal system on Feb. 6.

CIVIL RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM SLU LAW hosted a Civil Rights Symposium on Feb. 21 to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and the 70th anniversary of SLU’s integration. The day featured panels on urban development, education and criminal justice. Cheryl Brown Henderson (pictured) and Linda Brown Thompson served as keynote speakers; their father, Oliver L. Brown, was the lead plaintiff in the suit against the Topeka, Kan., Board of Education.

The SLU LAW move downtown is more than just changing our physical space. It represents a new way for us to teach, learn and mentor in an inclusive environment. As the role of lawyers and legal education continues to change, our new building embodies our response to this changing environment. With that in mind, the Inaugural Year of Events series was created. The series is a celebration of the new downtown location and an effort to supplement our normal programming with some high profile events relating to law or public issues of interest to students, faculty, staff, alumni and others in the community. SLU LAW continued to welcome many distinguished speakers in the second semester of this inaugural year at Scott Hall.

A DISCUSSION WITH THE BENCH On Jan. 16 the first Inaugural Year Event of the spring semester featured a panel discussion with Judge Duane Benton of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, Judge George W. Draper III of the Missouri

 P L R TAC K L E S C I T Y- CO U N T Y M E R G E R This year’s Saint Louis University Public Law Review symposium on Feb. 28 brought in a packed house to SLU LAW as regional leaders and other distinguished guests explored the possible rejoining of St. Louis City and St. Louis County. The symposium, “United We Stand or United We Fall: The Reunification of St. Louis City and County,” featured numerous government officials, academics and business leaders engaging in candid discussions of the potential effects of such a reunification. St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay (’80) and St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley began the

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discussion, followed by the day’s keynote speaker, former U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar, who, while mayor of Indianapolis, oversaw a similar reunification of city and county known as Unigov. The panels drew about 350 guests to the John K . Pruellage Courtroom, as well as overflow rooms where the symposium was simulcast. For a recap of the day, visit law.slu.edu/sidebar.

T H E F U T U R E O F L E G A L E D U C AT I O N

 A L E C T U R E BY J U D G E C H I N Judge Denny Chin visited the School of Law on Friday, March 21. He presented “Reflections from the Bench: From Megan’s Law to Bernie Madoff,” offering an inside look at some of the more interesting and high profile cases he has presided over throughout his illustrious career on the bench. He dished on U.S. vs. Bernie Madoff and Fox Television vs. Al Franken, in addition to precedent-setting cases like Google Book Search, where he rejected Google’s plan to digitize all published books and New York ’s version of Megan’s Law. Judge Chin currently sits on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He was previously appointed to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. Born in Hong Kong, Judge Chin is the first AsianAmerican appointed as a U.S. District Judge outside of the 9th District.

 A CO N V E R S AT I O N W I T H S E N . M CC A S K I L L U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill spoke at the School of Law on March 24 as part of the Scott Hall Inaugural Year of Events series. McCaskill stressed to students the versatility of a law degree. She then took questions about a variety of topics, including women in politics, student loan forgiveness, the minimum wage, gerrymandering and intelligence privacy.

Prior to the dedication of the Vincent C . Immel Law Library (pg 8), the Vincent C . Immel Lecture on Teaching Law took place on April 24. The Future of Legal Education: Continuing Progress discussed the past, present and future look of legal education. Several of the most significant changes in the Standards of Accreditation recommended by the American Bar Association’s Standards Review Committee and adopted by the Council were highlighted. Discussion was also focused on curricular innovations, experiential courses and practice-ready law school graduates, as well as some of the most important recommendations of the ABA Task Force on the Future of Legal Education. Speakers on hand were: Jeffrey Lewis, dean emeritus and professor at SLU LAW and current member of the ABA’s Standards Review Committee; Catherine Carpenter, professor of law at Southwestern Law School, former chair of the ABA’s Section Survey of Curriculum in American Law Schools and current member of the Standards Review Committee; Barry Currier, managing director of the ABA’s Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar; and Michael Downey, litigation partner at Armstrong Teasdale and former member of the ABA’s Task Force on the Future of Legal Education.

REMEMBERING JACK DUNSFORD John E. “Jack ” Dunsford, longtime School of Law professor and one of the nation’s foremost arbitrators and labor law scholars, died April 14 at the age of 86. A 1950 graduate of Saint Louis University and a 1956 cum laude graduate of the School of Law, Professor Emeritus Dunsford was a fixture at the law school for more than 50 years, where he taught labor law until his retirement in 2008. He was an early and active member of the Labor Law Group of scholars who wrote labor and employment law textbooks. In addition to a book, “Individuals and Unions,” he wrote numerous articles and chapters on labor law, arbitration, and the U.S. Constitution and personal freedom, and held the school’s Chester A. Myers Professorship. He earned an LL.M. at Harvard Law School in 1961. Professor Dunsford held several leadership positions with the prestigious National Academy of Arbitrators,

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including serving as president in 1984-1985. In 2000, he was named a fellow in the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers. From 19871994, he directed the School of Law’s Wefel Center for Employment Law and remained a senior consultant after his retirement. He was the McDonnell Professor of Justice in American Society from 1982-1987. As Professor Dunsford’s reputation as a thoughtful and unbiased arbitrator grew, so did his client list. Over the span of his career, he arbitrated nearly 1,000 disputes for groups such as U.S. Steel and the United Steelworkers of America; the National Football League and the Bert Bell Retirement and Pension Plan; Southwestern Bell and the Communications Workers of America; and the Internal Revenue Service and the National Treasury Employees Union. He arbitrated for virtually all of the U.S. airlines and their unions, including as a participant in an interest arbitration between Alaska Airlines and the Transport Workers Union to set rates during the difficult economic times following 9/11. He served as a permanent arbitrator for John Deere & Company and the United Auto Workers. Jack influenced the lives of thousands of lawyers, and left a profound impact on his colleagues and friends at the School of Law. Some of them shared their thoughts: I grew up hearing about Jack Dunsford and his work as a labor arbitrator. He held the greatest respect and admiration from both labor and management for his integrity, sense of fairness and brilliance. It was my great honor to later have him as a colleague. Jack was, indeed, brilliant. He was a productive scholar who brought national recognition to our school. The Arbitration Seminar that he and Joe [Rohlik] taught for many years was groundbreaking and innovative, not only in ADR but for its practical skills approach to teaching. Most especially, though, Jack was a good friend to his colleagues. He took time to be supportive and thoughtful. I'll miss him.

— SANDY JOHNSON, PROFESSOR EMERITA Jack was a true rock and foundation of the Law School. And kind to all he met. — John Ammann (’84), Professor and Litigation Clinic Supervisor

I was fortunate to know Professor Dunsford as both a professor and a colleague. He defined class and what it meant to be a man for others. He will be missed. — MARY PAT MCINNIS (’87), ASSISTANT DEAN OF CAREER SERVICES

Jack enjoyed a great and successful career and brought credit to SLU LAW. He always was a good and supportive colleague, a model for us all. Even in instances of strong disagreement, Jack remained a gentleman and listened with care and humor to voices of those with whom he disagreed – including me at times. I only hope to be able to emulate him in such behavior. I miss him since his retirement and will continue to miss him at the law school. — HENRY ORDOWER, PROFESSOR

Jack is survived by his five children, Clare Dunsford, Mark Dunsford, Cathy Dunsford Birdnow, Dr. Maggi Dunsford Coplin, Ann DunsfordConway; sons-in-law Timothy Birdnow, William Coplin, and Dr. Charles Conway; and six grandchildren. His beloved wife of 60 years, Margaret (Mari) Dunsford, died in 2012.

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Social Scene HERE’S WHAT TWITTER’S BEEN SAYING ABOUT SLU LAW: @jrosenbaum Woah: Has former Mo. Supreme Court judge and current SLU Law Dean Michael Wolff joined Twitter? @MikeWolffSLU @MikeWolffSLU @jrosenbaum I have linked it to my Underwood typewriter. @SLULawJournal #SLULAW Prof. Sidney Watson quoted in @stltoday special report on Medicaid enrollment. http://ow.ly/tk0Ap @LacyClayMo1 Great time speaking at the fantastic new @SLULAW in downtown STL today! #legalleaders @AntonioFrench Had a great time @SLULAW today. Always fun being around bright young people optimistic about the future #BeTheChange @SophieZavaglia Just registered for @SLULAW’s Symposium on the Reunification of #STL City and County! Can’t wait to hear @MayorSlay, among others! @SLU_ PLR #MergeSTL is trending! Thank you for joining the convo! We’re here to provide an open & uncensored forum #SLULaw @MayorSlay It is always nice to be back at my alma mater. Thanks, @SLULAW. #fgs @jwilson0505 @SLULAW you guys need to get footage of Prof. Sue McGraugh on #StayTunedSTL cause she is rocking it. @ward24stl Thx @davidwsweeney, @SLULAW, & interns for putting together law student internship at Board of Aldermen Get in on the conversation and follow SLU LAW on Twitter and Instagram for announcements, photos, live tweeting of events and more! @SLULAW

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Members of Vince’s family came from out of town to be in attendance for the dedication. From left, Mark Immel, Pat Butterworth, Barbara Page and Laura Ventre.

Right: Interim President Bill Kauffman speaks at the Immel Library dedication. Left: A plaque from the old law school, where the atrium in Morrissey Hall beared Immel’s name, was relocated to the 6th floor of Scott Hall.

Dean Wolff offers a toast with Vince’s trademark Dewars

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VINCENT C. IMMEL

LAW LIBRARY DEDICATION APRIL 24, 2014

Emceed by Dean Michael Wolff, the Vincent C. Immel Law Library dedication brought together nearly 100 members of the SLU LAW community to honor the revered professor and dean. Preceded by a panel discussion on the future of legal education (see pg. 6), the formal dedication of the law library featured speeches from Interim University President Bill Kauffman, Dean Emeritus Jeff Lewis, Doreen Dodson (’74), Professor John Griesbach and Vincent C. Immel Professor of Law Joel Goldstein. Dean Wolff also announced the naming of the library’s Reading Room in honor of Professor Emerita Eileen Searls, longtime director of the Omer Poos Law Library and the person credited for building the library’s vast collection.

A ARON BANKS (‘ 14)

Alumna Doreen Dodson (’74) and Joel Goldstein (right), the Vincent C. Immel Professor of Law, chat before the ceremony, where each spoke about Immel. School of Law professors John Griesbach (pictured, left) and Jeff Lewis also shared stories.

“Probably no professor in the history of this law school was so feared by students and yet so revered by graduates…Today we dedicate this law library as the Vincent C . Immel Law Library with the prayer that it will be used to further the legal education of all who come within in memory of the man who educated so many and touched so many more.” – INTERIM UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT BILL K AUFFMAN “I was in the first large class of women at the law school, 25 women out of about 225 . The gift Professor Immel gave the women was to treat us with the same high expectations, the same demands for strict legal thinking and analysis, the same clarity, confidence and strength in discussions and giving our opinion as he expected of the men. He taught us we could stand with the best and that was a gift without price. He also gave us the gifts of his humanity, compassion and faith. He taught us with love and discipline, and I have been forever grateful.” – DOREEN DODSON (‘74)

“In honoring Vince Immel, we celebrate someone for whom teaching was a form of service, a way a humane and caring person helped others achieve their dreams. Most importantly, in honoring Vince Immel we again associate this law school and this university with the virtues that marked this man… So it ’s appropriate that the name of this model of teaching excellence, of professionalism, of serving others adorns the library in this law school he served, in the legal community he taught, as another recognition of a giving and gifted man, but even more so as an inspiration for those who teach, study, and work at this law school and this university.” – PROFESSOR JOEL GOLDSTEIN VO LU M E 1 5 I SS U E 2

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B E YO N D THE BOOKS: THE IMMEL L AW L I B R A RY

A TRUE RESOURCE CENTER Fentress Photography

BY M AU R EEN B R A DY While SLU LAW’s downtown move has been heralded for the benefits brought to faculty, staff and students, the library staff have been making an effort to ensure SLU LAW alumni are also reaping the rewards. The law school’s new central location downtown makes it easier than ever for local alumni to take advantage of the library’s numerous resources, and visits from alumni have noticeably increased. Joseph Custer, director of the Immel Law Library, and his staff want to showcase the library as more than something alumni just stop in and tour. It is a place built for getting work done, and the librarians are there to aid students and alumni alike with whatever queries they have. Saint Louis Brief takes a look at the many ways to explore the law library and the new opportunities being created.

A L U M N I ACC E S S There are a wealth of library resources available to SLU LAW alumni at no cost. Knowing that research needs can come calling at any hour, alumni can fill out a SLUcard application, which allows access to the library beyond regular law school business hours on both evenings and weekends (the SLUcard application and library hours can be found at law.slu.edu/library or by calling 314-977-2755). Any books that can leave the library can be checked out for two weeks at a time, and reference librarians are available daily to assist alumni with research. In the physical library, more than a dozen electronic resources are 10

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accessible. Alumni can also sign up online from anywhere to have access to the HeinOnline collection of law reviews and journals. This collection is broader than both Westlaw or LexisNexis offerings and its coverage much more retrospective, in almost all cases going back to the first issue. There are also a variety of online databases available to recent law graduates for the first six months after graduation, provided the graduate registered as a student for the services prior to commencement. These databases are a terrific offering to help prepare for bar exams.

N E W LO C AT I O N , N E W S E RV I C E S Wanting to enhance an already impressive list of service offerings, alumni access to both the HeinOnline collection and additional WestPac terminals were added almost immediately after Scott Hall opened in anticipation of a greater alumni presence in the library. More comfortable seating areas and public access terminals were added for the enjoyment and use of library visitors. And as a result of the move, the library added an Outreach and Public Services position to work with SLU LAW alumni on matters outside of reference help.

D I G I TA L D O C K E T One of the greatest incentives to move SLU LAW downtown was to allow students to be fullyimmersed in the area’s legal

community. A key part of this is getting them into the nearby courtrooms to observe trials, sentencing, hearings and other court proceedings. Per Dean Wolff ’s suggestion, the dockets of the surrounding courthouses are now viewable on a screen at the entrance to the library. Every day, librarians select a few items from the area dockets, summarize them and present them on the docket screen. It serves as a quick, easy way for students to find court proceedings that interest them when they have available time in their schedules.

FROM 5 & 6 BLOG Named in reference to the two floors on which the library resides, the new From 5 & 6 blog informs patrons about services and resources as well as shares trivia. All library faculty and staff – in addition to outside contributors – can weigh in on topics they’re passionate about, and thus far posts include everything from Q&As to book reviews and other insights. Check out their entertaining and informative takes at law.slu.edu/library.

ALUMNI

PRO FILE

PATRICK CONNAGHAN (‘83) BY MAUREE N BRADY

Lunch with a Judge program that started in Fall 2013. He, along with other area judges, has journeyed to SLU LAW over his lunch hour to informally chat with students about their interests and answer their questions about the profession. While Patrick admits that the downtown location helps make interactions such as Lunch with a Judge easier, it is not his only reason for getting involved with his alma mater. He appreciates the educational value that students and professionals alike get to experience. SLB: How did your SLU LAW education prepare you for your current profession? PC: SLU LAW taught me how to think like

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atrick Connaghan (’83) made his decision to attend SLU LAW as if it was his destiny. In addition to his father being an alumnus, Connaghan knew he wanted to stay in St. Louis after graduating; thus, a natural fit was born. Fast forward 30 years, and he is now the Probate Commissioner for the 22nd Judicial Circuit in St. Louis. However, there were some big steps between law school and his current appointment, one of which were the 12 years he spent as legal counsel for the St. Louis Board of Alderman. As to his current position, Connaghan enjoys the unpredictability of each day, which in large part depends on the variety of his duties. As Probate Commissioner, Connaghan administers all decedent and guardianship estates in the city and hears all civil commitment cases involving mental health and addiction issues, as well as all cases regarding the condition or unconditional release of patients under the jurisdiction of the Missouri Department of Mental Health. Beyond his career, Connaghan has played a large part in giving back to his alma mater by helping to organize the new

a lawyer. It gave me an understanding of the role of law in society and helped me develop the ability to see issues and situations in the context of their legal ramifications. SLB: How is your perspective on the law now different from your time as a student? PC: As a student you focus on learning how

to be an advocate for your client and how best to present their point of view. As a judge you have to understand and appreciate all points of view and be an advocate for the proper application of the law. SLB: What made you want to help initiate the Lunch with a Judge program? PC: The close proximity of the law school

to the courthouse allows for greater interaction between judges and future members of the Bar. There are many opportunities for this interaction to be educational for both the judges and the students. The casual atmosphere of lunch seemed like a good place to start. SLB: What benefits do judges and students get out of the lunch? PC: I think that people generally get a great

deal of satisfaction from being able to share experience and knowledge. As judges we regularly witness the struggles that young attorneys go through learning the practical

aspects of being in a courtroom representing a client. We all clearly remember our own struggles in that regard. Having the opportunity to talk to students is a great way to share our experience and be part of their legal education. Hopefully this interaction will help the students be a little more relaxed when they appear in court for the first time. SLB: What did you and the students discuss at your lunch? PC: The most interesting question was

from a student who had Googled my name and came up with an article about a very difficult case I handled more than 20 years ago. The question was, how, as judges and attorneys, do we represent someone in a situation which is not only legally difficult but also emotionally difficult? How do we separate our feelings so that we can properly advise someone without letting our emotions or personal feelings play a part? It was a very interesting conversation that I was not expecting. SLB: What is your typical day as Probate Commissioner like? PC: Generally my morning docket consists

of guardianship, decedent estates and trust matters. The afternoon docket is always civil commitment cases. The thing that I enjoy most about probate is that there is no such thing as a typical day. Every day is different. You cannot make this stuff up. SLB: What is your favorite SLU LAW memory? PC: My favorite memory is the time I spent

in the library and classrooms with my study group. They were an important part of the learning process for me and continue to be great friends today, despite the fact that not all of them live in St. Louis. I also remember the time I said something that made Professor Immel laugh. Not an easy feat. Other than that, these awards are all for yesterday’s news. Today, it is “show time” all over again, and I’ll only be as good as the worst experience that anyone has in their dealings with me. VO LU M E 1 5 I SS U E 2

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FACULTY FE AT URE

ELIZABETH PENDO VICE D EA N A N D P R O F E SS O R O F L AW BY MAUREE N BRADY

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ollowing in the tradition established by her parents, both of whom are teachers, Elizabeth Pendo began her career in legal education in 1999 when she joined the faculty at St. Thomas University School of Law in Miami. She taught health law, disability law and civil procedure there until 2007, when she was invited to visit SLU LAW. “Although I had never been to St. Louis before, it was an easy decision to accept the invitation and to spend a year with the top-ranked Center for Health Law Studies. When I got here, I discovered many more reasons to stay,” recalls Pendo about her decision to relocate to SLU LAW.

lawyers can play in addressing injustices and creating better societies. Pendo always knew she wanted to make a positive difference with her life and work, and decided that law school was the correct path for her. After graduating from UC Berkeley School of Law, Pendo clerked at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit before becoming an associate in the litigation department of a New York law firm. Next, she served as associate counsel for MetLife as an ERISA expert before beginning her work in legal education.

“In addition to centers devoted to health law and employment law, two of my areas of interest, I was very attracted to the SLU mission about being a ‘person for others’ because I am passionate about issues of equality, dignity and inclusion, especially for people with disabilities.”

Pendo is a member of SLU LAW’s Center for Health Law Studies and the William C. Wefel Center for Employment Law, and holds a secondary appointment as professor of health management and policy at SLU’s College for Public Health and Social Justice. A focus on disability law has been a cornerstone of Pendo’s legal scholarship; however much of her time at SLU has been occupied by her work within the Office of the Dean.

That passion is what inspired Pendo’s initial interest in the law. While studying for her Bachelor of Arts degree at UCLA, she became increasingly aware of the role

Pendo has served as associate dean of academic affairs since 2010. With each passing year her role expands, this past year being no exception, as she was named vice

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dean, reflecting her role as the senior faculty administrator and the scope of her leadership across multiple areas of the law school. As a leader within SLU LAW and legal education, Pendo says she is most passionate about providing stability and forward movement throughout periods of change, and promoting the expertise of her colleagues. “I enjoy learning what each member of our community brings to the table and how those strengths can be combined and magnified. I enjoy putting people, projects or programs together and giving them what they need to create something bigger.” Being vice dean has also afforded her the opportunity to learn about the challenges facing legal education, law schools and recent graduates today. While the variety of these pursuits has led to a rewarding experience working within the dean’s office, Pendo also spends time teaching and pursuing her own scholarly interests. “I have a passion to ensure that all of us, including those with disabilities, receive equal and adequate healthcare, have equal access to education and work opportunities and fully participate in society.”

FACULTY FEATURE

community engagement and social justice, two pursuits that she also transfers into her teaching methods. Pendo will teach disability law next year, but with a twist. There is a service learning component integrated into the class, which focuses on changing a public right of way.

This desire has steered Pendo’s scholarship towards examining the difference that disability makes in the healthcare setting, as well as how the healthcare system can be better structured to provide equal and adequate care for those with disabilities. One specific area of her concentration centers upon health care access for women with disabilities. Her research reveals that it had been common for such women to be denied medical examinations that allow for early detection of life-threatening diseases. The problem for many of these women is simply that most physicians’ offices and hospitals do not provide accessible examination tables and chairs. Beyond her legal analysis, Pendo has become involved in advocacy efforts around the issue. “Imagine the impact on women who have never received the examinations and tests that are advocated as basic health care for all women.” Pendo has taken this interest and transferred it into practical applications by providing testimony and comment on her findings for federal agencies as well as the Department of Justice. Her examination into health care disparities for women led her to one of her current projects, which documents the problem of people with disabilities not being included in prior federal initiatives to reduce health disparities. The results of this initiative will offer a legal and policy framework for acknowledging and addressing these inequities. What all her academic pursuits have in common is they reflect Pendo’s dedication to

“My goal is to foster a scholarly community of thoughtful activism and promote this enthusiasm in the classroom. I want to ensure that my students understand both the theory and structure of the law and its potential impact on the lives of individuals. I encourage them to become involved in our community.” Pendo’s previous service learning project, which also focused on a public right of way, was considered extremely successful by the students and community members involved. Students were tasked with fixing the walkway between SLU LAW’s old home in Morrissey Hall and the Legal Clinics building. The curbs were not accessible along this route and, after being alerted to the problem by a friend, Pendo decided this would be the perfect project to assign to her disability law class. She divided the project into steps for her students, including learning the law, surveying the site and documenting the findings, deciding on appropriate corrective action and framing and following through on a request. By the end of the project, students had gained a valuable opportunity to strengthen their lawyering skills and explore the issues surrounding disability law and the disability rights movement. Perhaps most importantly, the sidewalk at Lindell and Spring was reconstructed and made accessible.

service learning project in order to share her experience and inspire more teachers to incorporate the technique into their classrooms. Pendo was recently recognized for her successful teaching style within SLU LAW when she was presented the first SLU Faculty Excellence Award for Excellence in Diversity & Social Justice in 2013. It recognizes one SLU professor for dedication and service to the SLU community, outstanding performance and career as an educator and living out the oath of inclusion. “It is exciting to be recognized for work on behalf of people with disabilities, as disability is often missing from the conversation about diversity and equality,” shared Pendo after being announced the award’s first winner. Adding to the award’s distinction is that the recipient is completely chosen by the students. Growing up in San Jose, Calif., with two public school teachers as parents, Pendo quickly learned the impact that teaching has, not only on the students, but also on the community at large. Everywhere she went in her hometown she would meet people who knew one or both of her parents. That legacy has stayed with not only her, but also her brother and sister, as all have chosen paths in fields which focus on service to others. Pendo likes to believe that her devotion to education and service is simply how she chose to follow the family tradition.

Pendo took the experience of her class a step further by writing and speaking about the VO LU M E 1 5 I SS U E 2

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COVER STO RY Members of the Center for Health Law Studies: (from front, left to right): Assistant Director Amy Sanders, Vice Dean Elizabeth Pendo, Professor Emerita Sandra Johnson, Co-Director Robert Gatter, Professor Barbara Gilchrist, Program Coordinator Cheryl Cooper, Co-Director Tim Greaney, Professor Sidney Watson, Professor Jesse Goldner, Assistant Professor Kelly Dineen and Health Law and Policy Fellow Lisa D’Souza

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COVER STO RY

THE INTERSECTION OF

MEDICINE &

LAW T H E C H A N G I N G S T U DY O F H E A LT H L AW B Y M A R Y M c H UG H

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eforms resulting from the rollout of the Affordable Care Act, regulatory changes in Medicare and Medicaid, ongoing research advancements in genetics, nanotechnology, stem cells, bioethics and other medical and science-related issues, will continue to crowd the intersection where medicine and law meet. It’s often a messy convoluted scene full of hospital administrators, bioethics experts, medical practitioners, physicians, advocacy groups and lawyers all trying to make sense of the myriad of rules, regulations and laws that are tied to the health care industry. And somewhere in the middle of it all, are the individuals just trying to get anything from a knee surgery approved to insurance coverage itself. Somewhat as visionaries to the future, and a little more than 30 years ago, Saint Louis University School of Law professors Sandra Johnson, Jesse Goldner, Michael Wolff and Nic Terry jotted down a few notes on a bar napkin at Humphrey’s Restaurant & Tavern and set in motion the foundation for what has become one of the nation’s premier health law programs. And the notes? “Simple,” Johnson said recalling that night at the bar many years ago. “The idea of establishing a Center at a law school was pretty unique at the time. No other school in the country had a program like this. The industry itself was not even in existence. Our mission was to create a program that would educate law students for health law practice. It was really that simple. And that’s what we wrote down.” Educate law students for health law practice. “All of our efforts, every decision and choice we made over the next three decades were all made with that one simple mission in mind,” Johnson said. VO LU M E 1 5 I SS U E 2

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Indeed. The program’s four founders and current professors all attribute the success of the program to the consistency of the staff, strict adherence to the program’s simple mission statement and a camaraderie that has resulted from years of teaching alongside one another. As history continues to knock at the door, perpetually transforming healthrelated issues, reforms and legislation, and challenging laws that were once considered closed, the program continues to evolve to both anticipate and respond to the changing needs. In fact, specialized classes in Medicare and the Affordable Care Act were added to the 2013-2014 curriculum. Johnson is quick to point out that the program didn’t just appear out of thin air. In the late ‘70s, SLU LAW was offering a few medical-related classes, including Goldner’s Law & Psychiatry course that included both law students and residents from SLU’s School of Medicine. The school had already hosted a couple health-related clinics and recently admitted its first students to a J.D./ Master of Health Administration joint degree program. Under Goldner’s direction, law students were representing Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center patients at SLU’s Mental Health Law Clinic. Missouri’s new nursing home law was the topic of a law review symposium at the school. But the courses and events were more of an undirected effort to address issues as they arose. “We didn’t have an official program,” Johnson said. “But we had tremendous resources available to us in the form of our faculty, which gave us some incredible depth that other schools didn’t have. We already had faculty working on child protection issues at an area hospital, others who were teaching at both the medical and law school, one with a secondary appointment in pediatrics, and still others who helped direct a federally-funded clinic for nonprofit organizations that focused on serving the needs of an early health 16

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center in St. Louis. Through our work in these areas, we knew the health care environment would be growing and we wanted SLU to be a part of it.” At the time, St. Louis was already a healthcare mecca with numerous area hospitals and the research coming out of them. Passage of the Affordable Care Act was still lightyears away, but healthrelated issues were continuing to emerge. Medicare and Medicaid were in their preadolescence, end-of-life cases were making headlines and scientists were still trying to define what constituted brain death. Law firms were fielding more and more calls from hospitals looking for legal counsel. The group developed four strategies that night at Humphrey’s that would help them adhere to their mission and serve as their guiding light for the next 30 years. These included the development of a health law alumni network, the addition of interdisciplinary courses, partnerships with health-related government agencies and lawyers, and a staff for the program that would be inclusive, meaning that any SLU law professor could be invited to teach a class as part of the program. In fact the talent pool was so deep, the health law program hired only one professor to add to its teaching ranks in the first 20 years of its existence. Today the Center’s faculty accounts for more than 200 years of collective health law teaching experience. The napkin strategy worked. In the three decades since, the Center for Health Law Studies has grown to include more than 20 health law courses offered annually. Students, who hail from all over the country, can participate in numerous externship opportunities, as well as intern for a semester in a health-related federal agency in Washington, D.C. Students can also obtain a concentration in Health Law or work toward one of five health law related dual-degree programs. Already, more than 1,200 health law alumni have taken positions at law firms, federal

health agencies, state governments, patient advocacy groups, insurance companies, hospitals and universities nationwide. In addition, Johnson and Professor Thomas (Tim) Greaney, along with three colleagues at other law schools, are co-authors of the leading health care casebook, “Health Law: Cases, Materials and Problems,” now in its seventh addition (2013). The casebook and its companion treatise, which have been cited more than 500 times in scholarly articles and judicial opinions – including several times by the U.S. Supreme Court – is recognized as one of the most influential texts written, and has been used by more than 150 universities around the country. Furthering the Center’s scholarship is the student-edited Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy, published semi-annually. Anywhere between 18 and 25 SLU LAW students participate in the production of the Journal as issue, lead and staff editors. One issue of the Journal is devoted to the Center’s Health Law Studies annual symposium, and the other to coverage of emerging issues within health law and policy. SLU’s health law students continue to represent children with disabilities and their families in the Child Advocacy Clinic and advocate for the elderly and disabled in the Elder Law Clinic. They also participate in case development and appellate advocacy regarding substantial legal matters such as state health policy. Additionally teams of students annually compete in national professional skills competitions. SLU LAW teams have consistently ranked among the top teams in these competitions, including first place wins for the Transactional teams in 2012 and 2014. “In today’s work environment, lawyers must often provide business counseling along with legal counseling,” Greaney said. “Having to develop a solution to this business proposition, requires them to look at a situation from both angles when presenting to the client. They need to explain not only why or why not a merger, venture or partnership will most benefit their business, but what legal issues they will need to address when executing the plan.” Greaney, who joined the program in 1987 and currently serves as co-director of the Center with Professor Robert Gatter, has offered expert testimony at hearings before the Federal Trade Commission, as

COVER STO RY

population health outcomes research as a tool for measuring the effectiveness of laws in achieving a public health goal.

well as submitted invited testimony to the U.S. Senate and the Justice Department on healthcare reform, further showcasing the school’s expertise and reputation in the health law field. Greaney has also added a component to his health care financing and business planning class in which the students actually write testimony and comments about the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. He said it provides them with the experience of writing both as an advocate and as if they were serving a client. For his part, Gatter was selected to participate in the Future of Public Health Law Education Faculty Fellowship Program. He will expand SLU’s existing public health law curriculum by incorporating interdisciplinary mock exercises into class for the 2014-2015 school year. Additionally, the expanded curriculum will introduce law students to

Professor Sidney Watson’s grass roots advocacy class is a testament to the manner in which the Center continues to predict and respond to emerging health care issues. Through a grant she received from the Missouri Foundation of Health, Watson along with Health Law and Policy Fellow Lisa D’Souza and their students are now advocating for improved access to Medicaid services for people with disabilities by working side by side with farmers and community groups throughout Missouri. Watson, who joined SLU LAW in 2001, has decades of experience advocating on behalf of low-income people, including migrant and seasonal farm workers in New Orleans, and residents of 32 native villages in southwest Alaska. [Ed. Note: Read more about this class, as well as students’ participation in Lobby Day in Jefferson City, Mo., on behalf of Medicaid expansion, at law.slu.edu/sidebar] Her class and the work she does with the students has served as a model for law schools around the country. “This class combines teaching both the substance of law with advocacy, two skills that are essential if you’re going to end up working for a public interest group or a law firm, because law firms today do plenty of advocacy work,” Greaney said. “The students learn not only how to speak to the legislators but also how to communicate to physicians, nurse practitioners, educators, health care administrators and small business owners on medical and legal issues.

This program is a real feather in our cap.” With health care reform issues and the Affordable Care Act continuing to dominate U.S. policy and the news, Greaney said well-trained legal experts are needed more than ever. In 2011, realizing the school’s large number of alumni already established in D.C., and with these health care issues at the forefront, SLU LAW initiated the Health Law Semester in D.C. program, in which law students intern with health-related federal agency for an entire semester. The program is offered annually in the spring and is available to students working toward a health law concentration program or enrolled in one of the dual degree programs. Since its inception, 20 students have participated. While in D.C., they are paired with an alumni mentor, a teacher and supervising attorney, and can work up to 40 hours a week learning about health care regulation. Through a combination of experiential and course work, students can earn between 12 to 14 credits. They also enroll in a two-credit health law agency practice course which addresses both professional responsibility issues that arise in agency practice and advanced topics in administrative law. The course is taught by Mal Harkins (’76) in his office at Proskauer Rose LLP. “The Semester in D.C. is really a handson experience,” Greaney said. “Students spend most of their week practicing as lawyers at these federal agencies and are given the same amount of experience a junior attorney could expect. It teaches them about complex regulation, as well as offers an incredible experience on networking with our alumni who are VO LU M E 1 5 I SS U E 2

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health law firms to hospitals, managed care companies, patient advocacy groups, government agencies and back to in-house counsel. Health law provides our students with a web of employment possibilities.”

already working at these agencies. There is no other program like this offered anywhere else in the country.” Karla Hutton Pinkerton (’12), currently a health law attorney at Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren, in Madison, Wisc., worked with the Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Division during her third year in law school. “While the work I do today is for the private sector, the externship and accompanying class provided me with an insider view of government health care programs and processes, which has been beneficial for assisting clients in government-related actions,” she said. “Instead of acquiring this base knowledge as a first-year associate, I was able to build upon the foundation and focus on the more nuanced rules and regulations associated with the practice group I joined.”

Sandra Johnson reminisces on the program’s growth the past three decades and how it has evolved into a health law community that now extends across the country, both in terms of alumni served by it, and the issues they continue to address for anyone who finds himself at the intersection of law and medicine.

Alumnus Michael Flood (’12), who currently works at Polsinelli PC in Washington D.C., was placed in the Antitrust Division at the Department of Justice during his spring semester. “The program served as an incredible springboard from the last semester of law school into the legal profession,” Flood said. “The program did an excellent job preparing me for professional life after graduation and helped plant the seeds of a professional network in Washington.”

From Johnson and her colleagues’ simple plan more than 30 years ago, SLU LAW’s Center for Health Law Studies has evolved into one of the most sophisticated, recognized and sought-after programs in the country – quite an evolution from the original notes on that bar napkin.

According to Greaney, the health law field continues to offer graduates quite a bit of career mobility.

And the napkin? Discovered in an old box in the basement of Queen’s Daughters Hall, framed and unveiled at the 30th anniversary of the Center’s 30th anniversary event in 2012.

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ASLME HEALTH LAW PROFESSOR OF THE YEAR AWARDS

FIVE

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

HEALTH LAW FACULTY HEALTH LAW SEMESTER IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PARTICIPANTS

“I look back to when we first started teaching health law, and while you can’t predict which health-related issues will emerge in the next five years, it’s readily apparent that some of the same issues will keep reappearing in a different form,” Johnson said. “Take the definition of brain death, for example. Thirty years ago, laws were written defining brain death. Today, you have new cases that reopen the issue on when that moment actually occurs. But that’s the nature of health law. We settle it and something unsettles it years later. “So many people have taken a turn leading this program and leaving their mark on it,” Johnson said. “That’s been an enriching characteristic and one that has allowed the program to evolve and remain fluid based on societal and regulatory changes that continue to occur in the healthcare industry. We never dropped what we were doing when someone new took over the program, we just continued to add on to what we had.”

“It’s a much more fluid market today,” Greaney said. “There’s plenty of mobility with graduates continually moving between

BY THE NUMBERS

And the notes? Mission, still intact.

ANNUAL HEALTH LAW SYMPOSIA

STUDENTS PURSUING A CONCENTRATION IN HEALTH LAW

COLLECTIVE YEARS OF HEALTH LAW TEACHING EXPERIENCE

315+

PUBLICATIONS BY HEALTH LAW FACULTY

HEALTH LAW ALUMNI

ALUMNI PRO FILE

NICK GERHART (‘02) BY MA RY M c HUG H

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very Sunday evening Nick Gerhart (’02) writes down his to-do list for the week. By noon on Monday, however, the list often becomes irrelevant as the work to decipher the regulations and reforms associated with the passage of the Affordable Care Act piles up. Gerhart, Insurance Commissioner of the State of Iowa, said it’s all too common to receive an updated 300-page document on a new rule related to the program. In the beginning of the rollout phase, the number was almost unmanageable. “The law is so new, and is such a massive reform unlike anything we’ve ever experienced as consumers, regulators and providers,” Gerhart said. “The biggest challenge is really trying to dissect everything that is out there concerning the Affordable Care Act. It’s our job to review and approve the qualified health plans and then assist in educating consumers and business owners.” But it’s also what Gerhart enjoys most about his position – interacting with and initiating the dialogue between insurers, consumers, and providers. “Since passage of the ACA, I have been amazed at the level of consumer engagement that has occurred,” he said. “Consumers are really taking the time to become increasingly informed on issues of insurance and health care.” At some point in the near future, though, he feels the dialogue will shift to what people will pay for health care services. “People will spend hours and hours researching what car or refrigerator they want to buy, or even how much they’re going to pay for a plane ticket for a vacation. But that same consumer walks into a doctor’s office and has absolutely no idea what a procedure, a surgery or hospital stay costs. So I think that discussion is on the horizon.” After receiving his law degree and health law certificate from SLU LAW, Gerhart went on to get his Masters of Health Administration from SLU’s School of Public Health. He credits his time in St. Louis for preparing him for the issues he deals with today in his governorappointed position. Prior to his appointment

in February 2013, Gerhart worked as the vice president of compliance and regulatory affairs for Sammons Financial Group. Because Iowa is one of seven states that forged a State Partnership Marketplace with the federal government in implementing the Affordable Care Act, Gerhart and his staff of nearly 100 employees are allowed to make key decisions and tailor the marketplace to local needs and market conditions. This includes everything from reviewing and certifying the plan’s design and consumer educational efforts to working with carriers to make sure they are financially sound. Gerhart also spends time in Washington, D.C. He met with former Secretary of Health and Human Services Director Kathleen Sebelius and continues to work with staff in that office, in addition to coordinating rollout efforts with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Additionally, he reviews policy with Iowa Governor Terry Branstad and provides technical guidance to state legislators. “When a consumer in Iowa has a problem or a question regarding his or her insurance plan, they do not call D.C. to get the answer. They call us,” Gerhart said. “So we’ve had to do a lot of interfacing between the federal regulators and consumers to respond quickly to all of these inquiries.” He works closely with the other 55 state insurance commissioners nationwide and throughout the U.S. territories. Many of Gerhart’s peers are attorneys, former insurance agents and insurance company executives. “I am so impressed with the level of talent and knowledge on these issues among my fellow commissioners,” Gerhart said.

“It is a group of very talented people trying to work together to make this program work and run as smoothly as possible for all their constituents.” Not to be overshadowed by the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, though, Gerhart said there are numerous other issues that warrant his department’s attention. “Health care products and technology have changed remarkably in the last five to ten years,” Gerhart said. “For every new product invented or creative investment strategy developed, we have to find an expert on our staff, or outsource to one, to keep up with the new reforms and regulations that come with these advancements.” This semester Gerhart spoke to one of Professor Tim Greaney’s health law classes. His key message to them was to continue networking with the program’s increasingly connected alumni already working at health-related federal agencies, patient advocacy groups, law firms and insurance companies across the country. “My career has already gone full-circle. I went to school to focus on health care law, policy and management. I spent nearly a decade in the life insurance business and now I am focusing again on health care issues,” Gerhart said. “Students today have endless opportunities to move in and out of various positions that are all involved with the complexities associated with health law regulation and reform. The Affordable Care Act and all the changes coming along with it are creating unique opportunities for future students.” Opportunities, yes – and a heavy workload. To that end, Gerhart will continue creating his weekly to-do list.

DEVELOPMENT A ND ALUMNI RELATIONS

SLU LAW

GOLDEN

BILLIKENS

Dear Alumni, This year was all about SLU LAW making connections: with our new neighbors, with each other and, most importantly, reconnecting with our proud alumni base. Some of the most inspiring connections I witnessed were between students and alumni. Time and time again our students embraced the chance to interact and network with our alumni and the entire legal community, through lunches, visits to the courthouses, CLEs and lectures. I was fortunate enough to witness firsthand the coincidental meeting of a student and alumnus on the 12th floor. This chance meeting led to an incredible internship for one of our outstanding 3Ls. These types of connections are invaluable, and we are excited about the future opportunities that our new location will bring. In April we aimed to make personal connections between scholarship donors and recipients by hosting our inaugural scholarship reception, giving SLU LAW students the opportunity to say thank you firsthand to the people whose generosity directly impacts their education. As we transition into a new year, we turn our focus to gaining support for the top needs of the School of Law, including scholarships and program development for students. In order to achieve this goal, we introduced you to three new annual giving societies in addition to the Loyal to Law Annual Fund. It is with

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sincere gratitude that we thank those who have helped kick start our efforts by joining the Dean’s Leadership Circle, Partners in Excellence Society or the Immel Society in 2013-2014. Look for a listing of our generous donors in the next issue of Saint Louis Brief. While SLU LAW continues to grow in reflection of the changes in legal education, we earnestly ask you to make a gift. Big or small, your support makes a difference and your participation matters. We have included a pledge card in the Brief to make your donation more convenient. I hope those of you who took part in one or more of our events this past year enjoyed your experience interacting (formally or informally) with the law school community, but especially our students. They are eager to learn and join you in the profession, and I thank you for taking the time to share with them. Rest assured there will be many opportunities for further connection in the future. Warmest regards,

Sheridan K. Haynes Assistant Dean of Development & Alumni Relations T: 314-977-3303 E: hayness@slu.edu

DEVELOPMENT A N D ALUMNI RELATIONS

Howard Adelman (’77) credits Professor Pete Salsich for his career and in small part for his family. As the 1974-75 school year was about to begin, Adelman remained on the SLU LAW wait list. Determined to start law school, he packed up his belongings and drove to St. Louis, arriving the day classes were to begin. He parked out front and sat on the steps, waiting to make his case. Salisch was the first to arrive that day and after being inquired upon, Adelman told the professor he was on the wait list, but felt he had what it took and wanted to start with this class. Impressed with his drive and determination, Salsich met with Dean Childress and found Adelman a spot in the incoming 1L class. Fast forward 40 years, he is now partner and co-founder at Adelman & Gettleman, Ltd. in Chicago, with expertise in the fields of bankruptcy, insolvency and corporate reorganization. He was honored as one of Illinois’ Top 10 Super Lawyers in 2012 and 2013.

THE PROFESSOR PETER W. SALSICH JR. SCHOLARSHIP Paying it Forward: The Gift of a Legal Education

In addition to his professional success, Adelman says Salsich deserves partial credit for his family as well. His wife, Patricia Tobin Adelman, graduated from SLU LAW one year after Howard and they are proud parents of three children, including youngest daughter Mara Adelman, a 2011 SLU LAW alumna. Throughout the years, Professor Salsich has remained a dear friend to the Adelmans. Therefore, to commemorate him, the family has generously endowed the Professor Peter W. Salsich Jr. Scholarship in his honor, which will be awarded annually to a deserving law student. If you would like to donate to this newly created scholarship, please send gifts to the attention of the Office of Development and Alumni Relations at 100 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101. Please note PROFESSOR SALSICH SCHOLARSHIP in the memo line.

S A I N T L O U I S U N I V E R S I T Y S C H O O L O F L AW THE BARRISTERS CLUB is a new opportunity for recent graduates to engage with SLU LAW and take part in a long legacy of alumni support. Graduates from the last ten years are encouraged to reconnect with SLU LAW and in return receive a host of professional and personal benefits. Your involvement will help SLU LAW continue the tradition of excellence in teaching and educating the whole person, even after you leave the classroom.

MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES:

ALLOCATION OF FUNDS

• Invitation to Barristers Club events • Exclusive CLE opportunities

Membership dollars will be used to support the SLU LAW Loyal to Law Annual Fund

• Networking opportunities

$25 /// 1-3 YEARS OUT

• Professional development events

$50 /// 4 -7 YEARS OUT $75 /// 8-10 YEARS OUT

UPCOMING BARRISTERS CLUB EVENTS Aug. 21, 2014

The Barristers Club Kickoff Event at SLU LAW

Sept. 18, 2014

The Barristers Club + SLU LAW Night at the Ballpark An exclusive reception will be held for Barristers Club members at the ballpark

Nov. 7, 2014

SLU LAW Trivia, St. Louis

Jan. 6, 2015

The Barristers Club Informational Event, Washington, D.C.

Feb. 26 & 27, 2015

The Barristers Club Professional Development Lunches Downtown & Clayton, Missouri

May 2015

The Barristers Club “The Art of Networking”

June 2015

The Barristers Club Washington, D.C. Professional Development Event

Summer 2015

The Barristers Club Informational Event, Chicago

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DEVELOPMENT A ND ALUMNI RELATIONS

2014

ALUMNI LUNCHES

CLAYTON

DOWNTOWN

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE

CARMINE’S STEAK HOUSE

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SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY s c h o o l o f l aw

2003

10TH REUNION WEEKEND APRIL 12-13, 2014

Class of ‘78 Photos by Aaron Banks (‘14)

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35TH REUNION WEEKEND APRIL 25-26, 2014

CLASS OF ‘78

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY s c h o o l o f l aw

CLASS OF ‘03

VO LU M E 1 5 I SS U E 2

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SCHOOL OF LAW

HOODING MAY 15, 2014 STEVE DOLAN

VO LU M E 1 5 I SS U E 2

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FAC ULT Y

SCHOLARSHIP

SLU LAW faculty’s national and international excellence continues to develop through their extensive production of legal scholarship. The following is a collection of our faculty’s scholarship successes from 2013. *Scholarship citations are listed in accordance with Bluebook citation guidelines.

FACU LT Y

SCHOLARSHIP M AT T H E W T. B OD IE ,

PR OFE SSOR

Chapter 7: Employee Privacy and Autonomy, § 7.08, in R e statem ent (Th i r d) O f E m ploy m ent L aw , Tentative Draft No. 6, March 30, 2013. Approved by ALI Membership, 2013. Participation as a Theory of Employment, 89 N otr e D am e L. R e v. 661 (2013). The Roberts Courts and the Law of Human Resources, 34 B er k ele y J. E m p. & L ab . L. 159 (2013). Collaboration and Community: The Labor Law Group and the Future of Labor and Employment Law Casebooks, 58 St. L o u is U. L. J. 61 (2013).

M I R IA M A . C H E R RY,

PR OFE SSOR

Cyber Commodification, 72 M ary l an d L. R e v. 381 (2013). Virtual Whistleblowing, 54 S o uth Te x a s L. R e v. 9 (2013). Learning Contracts through Current Events, 35 H aw . L. R e v. 129 (2013) (book review). The Infinite Citation, 2 J o u r nal Anders Walker).

of

L aw 493 (2013) (with

J OS E P H A . C U ST E R ,

ASSI STANT PR OFE SS OR

Ideological Voting Applied to the School Desegregation Cases in the Federal Courts of Appeals from the 1960s and 1970s, 16 S ch o l ar : St. M ary ’s L. R e v. O n R ace & S oc . J ust. 1 (2013).

Legal Issues in Critical Care, in C r itic al C ar e N u rsi n g : D iag n osis an d M anag em ent (Linda D. Urden, Kathleen M. Stacy & Mary E. Lough eds., 7th ed. 2013). Patients as Victims, in, Toxic N u rsi n g : M anag i n g B u llyi n g , B ad At titu d e s an d Total Tu r m o i l (Cheryl Dellasega & Rebecca L. Volpe eds., 2013).

I SAA K I . DO RE,

PROFESSOR

Acès a La Justice and Overview of the Doctrines of Justiciability in the United States, in L’accè s A u J ug e : R ech erch e S u r L’ effec tivité D’ u n D roit 90 (Virginia Donier & Beatrice Laperou-Scheneider eds., 2013).

MO NI CA EPPI NG ER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

Reality Check: Detention in the War on Terror, 62 C ath . U. l . R e v. 325 (2013). Sages, Savages, and other Speech Act Communities: Culture in Comparative Law, 57 St. L o u is U. L. J. 407 (2013).

SUSA N A . FI TZG I BBO N,

PRO F ESS O R

Teaching Employment and Labor Law Symposium: Foreword, 58 St. L o u is U. L. J. 1 (2013).

CH A D W. FLA NDERS,

ASSI STAN T

PROFESSOR

KELLY DI N E E N ,

ASS I STA NT PR OFE SS OR

Moral Disengagement and Provider Neglect of Treatable Pain, 13 H o us . J. H e alth L. & P o l’ y 163 (2013).

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What is the Value of Participation?, 66 O k l a . L. R e v. 53 (2013). Pardons and the Theory of the “Second Best,” 65 F l a . L. R e v. 1559 (2013).

FAC U LTY

The Case Against the Case Against the Death Penalty, 16 N e w C r i m . L. R e v. 595 (2013).

O rgan iz atio n

Can We Please Stop Talking About Neutrality? Koppelman Between Scalia and Rawls, 39 P epp. L. R e v. 1139 (2013).

L iab i lit y (Paperback 7th ed. 2013)

More on Veils: A Reply to Muller and Levitt, 65 F l a . L. R e v. F oru m 1 (2013). Book Review, 18 Th e E u ro pe an L egac y 761 (2013) (reviewing Pau l O sli n gto n , E d ., A dam S m ith a s Th eo log ian (2011)).

BRA D L E Y E .S . F OG E L ,

PR OFESSOR

When Babies Retire: Using Trusts as Beneficiaries of IRAs, Probate & Property, March/April 2013 at 10.

an d

SCHOLARSHIP

F i nan ce (Paperback 7th ed. 2013)

B io e th ic s (Paperback 7th ed. 2013) Controlling Medicare Costs: Moving Beyond Inept Administered Pricing and Ersatz Competition, 6 St. L o u is U. J. H e alth L. & P o l’ y 229 (2013).

BI LL JO H NSO N,

ASSOCIATE

PROFESSOR

Analysis of Incoterms as Usage Under Article 9 of the CISG, 35 U. Pa . J. I nt ’ l L. (2013).

SA MUEL P. JO RDA N, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

ROB E R T G AT T E R ,

PR OFE SS OR

The New Global Framework for Pandemic Influenza Virus and Vaccine Sharing, in G lobaliz atio n o f H e alth C ar e : L egal an d E th ic al C hallen g e s 272 (Glenn Cohen ed., 2013).

ROG E R L . G OL D MA N ,

T H E CAL L I S FA M I LY PR OFE SS OR OF LAW

Why States Need to License Police, Th e C r i m e R ep ort (December 12, 2013), http://www.thecrimereport.org/ viewpoints/2013-12-why-states-need-tolicense-police

J O E L K . G OL DST E IN ,

T H E V I NC E NT C . I M M E L PR OFE SS O R OF LAW

Constitutional Change, Originalism, and the Vice Presidency, 16 U. Pa . J. C o n st. L. 369 (2013). Book Review, 128 P o l . S ci . Q. 548 (2013) (reviewing D avi d A listai r Yalo f , P rosecutio n A m o n g F r i en ds : P r e si d ents , At tor n e ys G en er al , an d E xecutive B r an ch W ro n g doi n g (2012)). Introduction to J o h n D. F eer ick , Th e Twent y -F i f th A m en d m ent : I ts C o m ple te H istory an d A pplic atio n (3rd ed. 2013). 2013 Supplement to U n d erstan di n g C o n stitutio nal L aw (4th ed. 2012)(with John Attanasio). 2013 Supplement to U n d erstan di n g C o n stitutio nal L aw (5th ed. 2012)(with Norman Redlich & John Attanasio).

State Power to Define Jurisdiction, 47 G a . L. R e v. 1161 (2013) (with Christopher Bader).

MA RCI A L. Mc CO RMI CK ,

PRO F ESS O R

From Podcasts to Treasure Hunts – Using Technology to Promote Student Engagement, 58 St. L o u is U. L. J. 127 (2013). Gender, Family, and Work, 30 H o fstr a L ab . & E m p. L. J. 309 (2013). Constitutional Limitations on Closing the Gender Gap in Employment, 8 F l a . I nt ’ l U. L. R e v. 405 (2013). Implausible Injuries: Wal-Mart v. Dukes and the Future of Class Actions and Employment Discrimination Cases, 62 D epau l L. R e v. 711 (2013).

H ENRY M. O RDOWER,

PRO F ESS O R

Preserving the Corporate Tax Base Through Tax Transparency, 71 Ta x N ote s I nt ’ l 993 (2013). Utopian Visions toward a Grand Unified Global Income Tax, 14 F l a . Ta x R e v. 361 (2013). United States of America, in Th e B u r d en L aw (Gerard Meussen ed., 2013).

ELI Z A BETH PENDO,

of

P roo f

in

Ta x

PROFE SS O R

Identifying (With) Disability: Using Film to Teach Employment Discrimination, 58 St. L o u is U. L. J. (2013).

T H OMAS L . G R E A N E Y,

CH ESTE R A . M YE R S PR OFE SS OR O F LAW

H e alth L aw : C a se s , M ater ial s an d P rob lem s (7th ed. 2013)(with Furrow, Johnson, Jost & Schwartz)

VO LU M E 1 5 I SS U E 2

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FAC ULT Y

SCHOLARSHIP KA R E N P E T R OS K I,

conflicts in criminal cases: the U.S. system), 33 L eg isl a zio n e P enale 451 (2013).

ASSOC I ATE PR OFE SS OR

Visual Legal Commentary, in L aw , C u ltu r e , A n d V isual Stu di e s 671 (Anne Wagner & Richard K . Sherwin eds., 2013).

CO NSTA NCE Z . WAG NER, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Legal Fictions and the Limits of Legal Language, 9:4 I nt ’ l J. L. C onte x t 485 (2013).

Contributor, Corporate Social Responsibility, Year in Review, 47 Th e I nter natio nal L aw y er 183 (Summer 2013).

Texts Versus Testimony: Legal Uses of Non-Legal Expertise, 35 U. H aw . L. R e v. 81 (2013). Interpretation and Accessibility, 57 St. L o u is U. L. 1003 (2013).

A NDERS WA LK ER,

J E F F A . R E D D IN G ,

ASSOC I ATE PR OFE SS OR

Querying Edith Windsor, Querying Equality, 59 V i ll . L. R e v. 9 (2013). Secularism, The Rule of Law, and ‘Shari‘a Courts’: An Ethnographic Examination of a Constitutional Controversy, 57 St. L o u is U. L. J. 339 (2013).

th e

C ivi l R ig hts

Book Review, 31 L. & H ist. R e v. 641 (2013) (reviewing To m i ko B rown -N ag i n , C o u r ag e to D is sent : Atl anta an d th e L o n g H istory o f M ovem ent (2011)).

SI DNEY D. WATSO N,

PROF ESS O R

Medicaid, Marketplaces, and Premium Assistance: What is at Stake in Arkansas? 102 Ky. L. J. 471 (2013).

K E R RY A . RYA N ,

ASSOC I ATE PR OFE SS OR

Kite: IRS Wins the QTIP Battle But Loses the Annuity War, 141 Ta x N ote s 1111 (2013).

AN N M. S CA R L E T T,

PROFESS O R

Strange Traffic: Sex, Slavery, and the Freedom Principle, 46 C o n n . L. R e v. 1125 (2013).

PR OFE SSOR

Ann M. Scarlett, Shareholder Derivative Litigation’s Historical and Normative Foundations, 61 B u ff . L. R e v. 837 (2013).

Embracing Justice Roberts’ New Medicaid, 6 St. L o u is U. J. H e alth L. & P o l’ y 247 (2013). Transdisciplinary Public Policy: The Roles of Law & Public Health, in Tr an sdisci pli nary P u b lic H e alth : R e se arch , M e th o ds , an d P r ac tice (Timothy McBride & Debra HaireJoshu eds., 2013).

A LA N M. WEI NBERG ER,

PRO F ESS O R

The Art of Breaking the Deal: The Case of the Penthouse Casino, 82 M is s . L. J. 651 (2013).

AA R ON TAY LOR ,

ASSI STANT PR OFE SS OR

Reimagining Merit as Achievement, 44 N. m . L. R e v. 1 (2014). Book Review, 82 J. N eg ro E duc . 95 (2013) (reviewing F r an k L am b ert, Th e B at tle of O le M is s : C ivi l R ig hts v. State s ’ R ig hts (2010)).

ST E P H E N C. T H A MA N ,

PR OFESSOR

Balancing Truth Against Human Rights: A Theory of Modern Exclusionary Rules, in E xclusio nary R u le s i n C o m par ative L aw 409 (2013).

C r i m i nal

Report on USA, in Tr an snatio nal I n q u i r i e s an d th e P rotec tio n o f F u n dam ental R ig hts i n P roceedi n gs 509 (Stefano Ruggeri ed., 2013).

Legal Systems: Adversarial and Inquisitorial, in E n c yclo pedia O f F or en sic S ci en ce s (Jay A . Siegel & Pekka J. Sauko eds., 2013) Conflitti transnazione di giurisdizione in materia penale: il sistema statiunitense (Transnational jurisdictional

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DO UG LAS R. WI LLI A MS,

PRO F ESS O R

Toward Regional Environmental Governance, 46 A k ro n L. R e v. 1047 (2013). A Harder “Hard Case”, 57 St. L o u is U. L. J. 931 (2013).

MO LLY J. WA LK ER WI LSON, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

The Expansion of Criminal Registries and the Illusion of Control, 73 L a . L. R e v. 509 (2013).

his summer, Saint Louis University School of Law is saying goodbye to nine long-time faculty and staff members on the occasion of their retirement, as part of the University’s Voluntary Enhanced Retirement Program. To honor their contributions to the law school and beyond – and their 259 years of combined service – we asked their colleagues to pen tributes as an expression of our entire community’s appreciation for their commitment and service to SLU LAW. If you have additional words of congratulations you’d like to share with one or more retiree, feel free to email brief@law.slu.edu, and we will forward them along.

PETER W. SALSICH JR. /// McDONNELL PROFESSOR OF JUSTICE IN AMERICAN SOCIETY J.D., SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW, 1965

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YEARS OF SERVICE TO SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

AWARDS

FACULT Y

1969-2014: PROFESSOR OF LAW (ASSISTANT: ‘69-’71, ASSOCIATE: ‘71-’73) 1995-2014: PROFESSOR OF PUBLIC POLICY STUDIES*

ADMINISTRATION

1981-1983, 1992-1996: ASSOCIATE DEAN, SCHOOL OF LAW 1969-1973: ASSISTANT DEAN, SCHOOL OF LAW

*SECONDARY APPOINTMENT

1983-1984, 1998-1999: THOMPSON COBURN / MITCHELL AWARD FOR FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP 2003: SPURGEON SMITHSON AWARD, MISSOURI BAR FOUNDATION

For 45 years, Professor Peter W. Salsich Jr. has proudly called Saint Louis University School of Law his professional home. That’s a long time and the list of his accomplishments is longer still. Indeed, the list is entirely too long to be captured in a brief tribute. No one doubts that his influence and contributions to the school have been consistent, deep and incalculable. Nor is it necessary here to recall his dedication and wisdom, his scholarly productivity, his invaluable service to the University and, especially, the St. Louis community, or his gentility, humor and supportive presence. The breadth and depth of his accomplishments and attributes are, quite simply, astonishing. Pete has educated, inspired, counseled and enriched the lives of generations of students, faculty and staff. As Pete prepares to retire, his legacy at SLU LAW is secure. It is a profound understatement to say that he will be missed. For me, Pete’s tenure at the law school provides an object lesson on how to live one’s professional life well. It is not so much that the traditional measures of a successful career can all be found in Pete’s overstuffed curriculum vitae. Nor is it simply that Pete has earned the trust and respect of all who have been fortunate enough to work with him. Instead, it is precisely because these things have always been secondary to Pete that his career is so inspiring. A profoundly humble man, Pete has always pursued his work both as a calling and a noble responsibility. Guided by a faith that is unshakeable, he has given concrete content to the law school’s Jesuit mission and the law school’s place in our community. We have all been privileged to have worked with such a fundamentally kind and good man. Thank you, Pete. PROFESSOR DOUG WILLIAMS

ROGER L. GOLDMAN /// CALLIS FAMILY PROFESSOR OF LAW J.D., UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA LAW SCHOOL, 1966

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YEARS OF SERVICE TO SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

AWARDS

FACULT Y

1971-2014: PROFESSOR OF LAW (ASSISTANT ‘71-’74, ASSOCIATE ‘74-’77)

ADMINISTRATION

1998-1999: INTERIM DEAN, SCHOOL OF LAW 1996-1998: ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 1978-1979: ASSOCIATE DEAN, SCHOOL OF LAW

1989-1990, 1992-1993, 1994-1995: THOMPSON COBURN / MITCHELL AWARD FOR FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP 2011: SPURGEON SMITHSON AWARD, MISSOURI BAR FOUNDATION 1986 & 2006: TEACHER OF THE YEAR AWARD, SLU LAW STUDENT BAR ASSOCIATION

Roger Goldman was my first and best mentor at the School of Law. The year I arrived, 1975-76, he and I each taught two sections of Civil Procedure. He not only kept me clued in about the course, and about teaching and grading, but also he was an indispensable guide to the culture of SLU LAW and how to get along with my new colleagues. I remember asking him, for instance, where we got Dean Dick Childress – as elegant a looking dean as ever was created – and Roger said, “From central casting.” Those who remember Dean Childress know how on target Roger’s quip was; those who know Roger know of his ability to deploy his gentle humor to good effect. Roger has been a great role model because he is universally regarded as a great teacher, and he is a deeply committed scholar. His ongoing work on regulation of police misconduct over the past 30+ years has changed the law in many states and is nationally recognized. As important, he is deeply committed to the law school and eagerly has taken on a variety of roles in the life of the law school, many of which – associate dean, interim dean, the self-study for accreditation especially – are as essential as they are thankless. He not only is a great teacher but he has an abiding interest in the well-being of our students and graduates. He has given wise counsel on educational and career goals, and I trust he will continue to do so. When I visit with alumni from the past 43 years, I am frequently asked about Roger. “He was my favorite teacher,” is a common refrain.

2014 SLU LAW FACULTY RETIREMENTS

T

We are grateful that Roger intends to continue his commitment to the police conduct work from his office here at SLU and will be spending time at the law school teaching from time to time as his schedule allows. VO LU M E 1 5 I SS U E 2 DEAN MICHAEL A . WOLFF

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2014 SLU LAW FACULTY RETIREMENTS

ALAN J. HOWARD /// PROFESSOR OF LAW J.D., UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO SCHOOL OF LAW, 1972

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YEARS OF SERVICE TO SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

FACULT Y

AWARDS

1977-2014: PROFESSOR OF LAW (ASSISTANT: ‘77-’80, ASSOCIATE: ‘80-’84)

1991-1992: THOMPSON COBURN / MITCHELL AWARD FOR FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP 1980, 1986 & 1992: TEACHER OF THE YEAR AWARD, SLU LAW STUDENT BAR ASSOCIATION

Professor Alan Howard is a legend at Saint Louis University School of Law. Since 1977, he has captured law students’ minds and hearts with his passionate teaching of Constitutional Law. It is no wonder that students voted him “Teacher of the Year” three times. In his research, Professor Howard focused on issues concerning the First Amendment, for which he received a number of prestigious awards including the top prize at the Research Conference for the Bicentennial of the First Amendment. I am especially delighted to write to honor Professor Howard because I have known him as my professor and as a colleague. And Professor Howard is truly in a league of his own as a teacher. I vividly recall Constitutional Law class and Professor Howard commanding attention with dramatic lectures in his clear, booming voice. Working through the cases, Professor Howard masterfully wove the historical and political factors as well as competing judicial philosophies and personalities into his exploration of the evolution of constitutional law. His Socratic questioning was tough and demanded thorough class preparation and strict attention in class. But, often when students would least expect it, Professor Howard would say something absolutely hilarious and the class would break up laughing. The result was a fascinating, intellectually challenging course which produced a great appreciation for constitutional principles in SLU LAW students for 37 years. It is not possible to capture all of Professor Howard’s talents and gifts to the law school in so few words but he also will be famously and fondly remembered for his fabulous turns as the auctioneer at many of the Public Interest Law Group auctions. Finally, he has been a wonderful colleague who warmly welcomed new faculty members and who always brought a humane and fair perspective to any issue being considered. His intellect, his humor and his voice will be sorely missed. PROFESSOR SUSAN FITZGIBBON (‘84)

ISAAK I. DORE /// PROFESSOR OF LAW LL.B., UNIVERSITY OF ZAMBIA SCHOOL OF LAW, 1972; LL.M., UNIVERSITY OF ZAMBIA SCHOOL OF LAW, 1975; LL.M., YALE LAW SCHOOL, 1976; J.S.D., YALE LAW SCHOOL, 1978 DOCTEUR HONORIS CAUSA, UNIVERSITÉ D’ORLÉANS, ORLÉANS, FRANCE, 2002

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FACULT Y

YEARS OF SERVICE TO SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

1983-2014: PROFESSOR OF LAW, SCHOOL OF LAW 1990-2014: UNIVERSITY OF ORLÉANS, FRANCE* 2003-2014: UNIVERSITY OF BESANÇON, FRANCE* 2005-2014: UNIVERSITY OF TOULOUSE, FRANCE*

ADMINISTRATION

1992-2000: CO-DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW

*ANNUAL VISITOR, ADJUNCT PROFESSOR

AWARDS

1984-1985, 1985-1986, 2007-2008: THOMPSON COBURN / MITCHELL AWARD FOR FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP

With the retirement of my good friend Isaak Dore, SLU LAW is losing not only a brilliant scholar and one of our few true intellectuals, but also a real gentleman whose natural modesty would not permit him to advertise just how special he was. Not only was Isaak co-founder of the Center for International and Comparative Law, its director for many years and the co-founder and editor-in-chief of the Saint Louis-Warsaw Transatlantic Law Journal; not only is he the only SLU LAW professor with an honorary doctorate (from the University of Orleans); but he also has perhaps the most compelling personal history of anyone on our faculty. With all the emphasis on diversity in American education nowadays, we forget that Isaak’s story is drenched in diverse cultures which culminated in adversity, exile and his circuitous route to Saint Louis University. Born of Indian parents in Zambia, he grew up speaking four Indian and two African dialects and got his law degree and LL.M. from the University of Zambia. While a young man in Africa, he also learned French in Madagascar. The independence movements in East Africa eventually led to the ethnic cleansing of the Indian population and their expulsion from East Africa. Isaak’s British commonwealth passport was of no use because his skin wasn’t white enough, so he, among other “people without a country,” looked for a country which would accept them. He made his way to Yale and earned an LL.M. and J.S.D. before taking a job with the U.N. in Geneva as a human rights officer. He began teaching in the U.S. at Southern Illinois University and finally came to SLU as a tenured professor in 1983. From that time, he has left his imprint on the school and on each of us who has gotten to know him. His book, “The Epistemological Foundations of Law,” is a classic. Let’s lift our glasses (of red wine) and toast his health—at least I know, I will still see a lot of him in his more carefree future. PROFESSOR STEPHEN THAMAN

BARBARA J. GILCHRIST /// CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF LAW J.D., WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OF LAW, 1976; PH.D., SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 1999

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SAINT LOUIS B RIEF

YEARS OF SERVICE TO SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

FACULT Y

1986-2014: CLINICAL LAW PROFESSOR, SUPERVISOR OF ELDER LAW CLINIC 2000-2007: SUPERVISOR, EXTERNSHIP CLINIC

ADMINISTRATION

2013-2014: INTERIM DIRECTOR, LEGAL CLINICS

Barbara’s compassion for her clients has been an example to her fellow Clinic faculty members and her many students. In addition to bringing comfort to the elderly by helping them plan their affairs in their final years, she has also supervised her students handling countless guardianships for adults with disabilities or helping clients with estate planning and health care directives. Barbara has served many elderly parents who will themselves to live another day, because they worry what will happen to their adult disabled children when they are gone. In addition to her work with the elderly and sick, Dr. Gilchrist has also been a leader in the fight to recognize the dignity of all people, serving as a leader in the cause of diversity and acceptance, through her time as president of SAGE Metro St. Louis and other organizations promoting diversity. Students in the law school have for years known they can come to her for advice on living in a society that is not always totally accepting of difference. With her Ph.D. in Public Health, she has a unique perspective on the issues her clients face. She served as part of the Center for Health Law Studies faculty, bringing her practical experience to bear for students. Barbara also held numerous positions with the National Association of Elder Law Attorneys, and was appointed by the governor to the Senior Services Board in Missouri.

2014 SLU LAW FACULTY RETIREMENTS

Barbara Gilchrist has served longer than any faculty member in the SLU LAW Legal Clinics. Over the course of her 28 years in the Clinic and supervisor of the Elder Law Clinic, she has brought peace of mind to thousands of elderly, sick and dying people in the community, and prepared many students for the practice of law in the process.

Barbara has been a great mentor to so many students. They often return to school to hug her and thank her for all she taught them – some of it the law, but much of it how to be compassionate in the face of adversity. The Clinic, the School of Law, the University and the community will suffer a great loss as Barbara retires. We wish her the best and thank her for being a kind and compassionate servant to all. PROFESSOR JOHN AMMANN (‘84)

NANCY H. KAUFMAN /// PROFESSOR OF LAW J.D., UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN LAW SCHOOL, 1984

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FACULT Y

ADMINISTRATION

1989-2014: PROFESSOR OF LAW (ASSISTANT: ’89-93, ASSOCIATE: ’93-98)

2000-2002: DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW

In 1989, we invited the enthusiastic Nan Kaufman to join us on the SLU LAW faculty and knew we had a winner. We were right. Professor Kaufman brought the balance of practice experience and reflectiveness that has set SLU LAW apart from other law schools. For me, Nan always has been someone with whom I could talk, a friend and colleague on whom I could rely for thoughtful advice, solid support and a clear perspective. Many times I sought and received (sometimes even followed), Nan’s sound advice. Nan listens carefully and patiently so that she understands an issue before speaking, asks engaged questions and does not speak when she has nothing positive and helpful to say. Many students have shared my experience with Professor Kaufman. For visiting students from overseas, Professor Kaufman has a special place in her heart and strives to make them feel welcome. As a teacher, she is generous with her time, listens with care to what students have to say, explains, directs, cajoles and advises with insight and warmth. Sometimes she invites students to sit on the floor of her office with her and commune on an issue. Other times, she invites them to her home for the annual International Law Students Association barbeque and makes sure that each visiting student has transportation so that he or she does not miss out. Nan’s expertise is considerable: tax, especially international tax, international law and human rights and China. China is probably among Nan’s real loves. She sought to maintain and expand SLU LAW’s relationships with Chinese universities. As Nan contemplated retirement, she shared her considerable store of information about China and Chinese universities so that it would not be lost to the school. Rarely flaunting her expertise unbidden, when asked, Nan is forthcoming and open, offering as much or as little of her expertise as asked. I hope that Nan will welcome my calls and remain willing to be drawn out of retirement when I need her help. I will miss you, Nan. PROFESSOR HENRY ORDOWER

COLLEEN MURPHY /// COORDINATOR

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YEARS OF SERVICE TO SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

1989-1994: EXECUTIVE SECRETARY, SLU HOSPITAL 1998-2007: ASSOCIATE, OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT, UNIVERSITY AND SCHOOL OF LAW 2007-2013: ASSOCIATE, OFFICE OF CAREER SERVICES, SCHOOL OF LAW 2013-2014: COORDINATOR, LEGAL CLINICS, SCHOOL OF LAW

“How is Colleen?” I cannot tell you how many times I run into alumni and they ask this question! In her 17 years here at the law school, Colleen has touched the lives of many students and alumni from her service in the Office of Development and Alumni Relations, the Office of Career Services and most recently in the Legal Clinics. She has always taken great pride in each of her roles. I had the good fortune to have worked with her throughout many of these years and witnessed firsthand how and why she is so beloved. Sure she does her job, but she does so much more than that. She treats every person with whom she interacts with kindness and warmth, regardless of their gender, race or station in life. Whether it’s by her infectious smile or kind words of encouragement to a student or client in the Clinics, she sees the positive in each individual and helps them see and appreciate the positives in themselves. Students know her as the go to person if they have any sort of question, whether it is related to her job function or not. She is affectionately known as the “law school mom” and students are often shocked when they find out she has no biological children of her own. But to Colleen, all of the students are her “kids” and she will do anything she can for them – even cook Thanksgiving dinner for them! Colleen has lived her life “for the greater glory of God” and freely gives her time, talent and treasure to the benefit of all of us at the law school. Though we will dearly miss her, and I will be sad to answer the question that she retired, Colleen will always be a “daughter of Saint Louis University” and a treasure that can never be replaced. ASSISTANT DEAN FOR CAREER SERVICESVO MARY McINNIS (‘87) LU M E PAT 1 5 I SS UE 2 31

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2014 SLU LAW FACULTY RETIREMENTS

MARGARET H. (PEGGY) McDERMOTT /// HEAD OF REFERENCE AND FACULTY SERVICES M.S.L.S., UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN; J.D., WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS

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1996-2002 HEAD OF PUBLIC SERVICES, OMER POOS LAW LIBRARY 2002-2014 HEAD OF REFERENCE AND FACULTY SERVICES, OMER POOS AND VINCENT C. IMMEL LAW LIBRARIES

Willa Cather once said that “there are some things you learn best in calm, and some in storm.” Every law student can relate to that sentiment. But for those willing to take advantage of it there is a third environment that should be added to the list. As a former law student I would describe it as “there are some things you learn best huddling in the eye of the storm.” That is where Peggy has resided for the past 30 years: calmly keeping countless students from giving up and sinking beneath waves of research projects and papers. Peggy began her career as a law school reference librarian in 1981 at Washington University. I met her there during my first year when she hired me as a work study student. Since then she has been my boss, my colleague, my mentor, and my friend. Peggy earned her J.D. in 1997 while working full time as Reference/Public Services Librarian. She joined the library faculty at SLU LAW in 1996 and held a secondary appointment to the law school faculty. International and foreign legal research was always Peggy’s passion. She attended the Institute of European Studies of the Université Libre de Bruxelles in Brussels, Belgium. In addition to several articles, she co-authored two books and contributed to several others. She was an active member of the American Association of Law Libraries and served as a Faculty Senator. To borrow a term often used in library land, Peggy has been in every sense of the word a pathfinder. She was so good at her job that students and faculty were in awe of her ability to track down the most obscure references. After I became a law librarian I had a running bet with my students that they could not stump her. I never came close to having to pay up. One professor said this about her: “Peggy has to be one of the most helpful, service-oriented people on the planet. She’s a gem!” Peggy trained me never to give up until I found what I was looking for. But just this once I’m not ashamed to throw up my hands and predict with no irony that it will be impossible to find another like her. PROFESSOR OF LEGAL RESEARCH DAVID KULLMAN

KATHY PATRYLO /// ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

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ADMINISTRATION

1998-2000 ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETARY, PIUS LIBRARY 2000-2014 SENIOR SECRETARY AND ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, OMER POOS AND VINCENT C. IMMEL LAW LIBRARIES

When Kathy told me she was retiring – I was shocked. She had talked about it in the past, but always said she was going to wait another year or two. SLU’s VERP was an offer she could not refuse. I am happy for her, but sad for the Law Library. During Kathy’s time at the law library, she has assisted two new law library directors, Mark Bernstein and Joe Custer, and worked with Richard Amelung when he was our interim director twice. Kathy did not have this much change during her time at Pius Library, and she took it all in stride. I do not think most people realize everything Kathy does. In addition to her assigned duties, she takes care of us. Kathy is the person who keeps track of the birthdays, knows who to call to fix things, the ins and outs of the University administration and makes sure we have dish washing soap in our kitchen. Granted these may all seem minute when compared to doing payroll and tracking vacation and sick time, but to those of us in the library, it is these unassigned duties that keep us together. Kathy has also been a good friend to many. She still keeps in contact with our former colleague, MaryAnn Samson. When Liz Glankler was ill, she took time to help her. When Peggy McDermott broke her hand, Kathy gave her rides to work. When I broke my ankle, she was the one who took me to the doctor’s office and came and got me. There are too many times when she has gone above and beyond to help those in our law library family to mention. Kathy has been a good friend and keeper of the law library and she will be missed. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LEGAL RESEARCH LYNN K . HARTKE

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THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE! 32

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C LASS

C L ASS 1951 J. PATRICK WHEELER of Canton, Mo., was presented with the 2013 Distinguished Service Award at the annual meeting of the American Agricultural Law Association (AALA) in Madison, Wisc., on Nov. 2, 2013. Wheeler is a past president of the AALA . He has practiced law in Canton since graduation and is a past recipient of the Missouri Bar President ’s Award.

his office from downtown St. Louis to Clayton Road in Ladue. HON. MICHAEL MIHM was reelected to membership on the board of directors of the U.S. Russia Foundation for Economic Advancement of Rule of Law. The foundation focuses on programming involving encouragement of entrepreneurship and rule of law issues. He is a senior U.S. District Judge residing in Peoria, Ill.

1960

1971

JOHN KING, a partner at Lathrop & Gage, was appointed by Missouri Governor Jay Nixon to serve on the St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners.

HON. MICHAEL SHAY published a book, “A Civilian in Lawton’s 1899 Philippine Campaign: The Letters of Robert D. Carter.” He is a Superior Court Judge in Connecticut.

1963

1972

CHARLES HELEIN was conferred the title of Senior Counselor by the Missouri Bar, in recognition of his long and distinguished career as a member of the Bar. He has set an example of devotion and fidelity to the duties and obligations of an attorney and counselor of law, of leadership and unselfish participation in the affairs of his community, state and nation, and of those commendable qualities that characterize and exemplify the high ideals of the legal profession and of officers of the Courts in the administration of justice.

JAMES STEINBERG, a family law mediator since 2002, completed his first novel, “Boundaries,” a story of love and law, betrayal and redemption, overcoming the past, crossing personal and professional boundaries, and getting help from unexpected sources. He will also publish two collections of short stories, “Filling Up In Cumby and Other Stories” and “Last Night At The Vista Cafe, Stories.” Steinberg lives close to his children, grandchildren and friends in Humboldt County, on the northcoast of California.

1964 JOSEPH P. GILJUM was selected for inclusion in Best Lawyers for 2014.

1967 FRANK K AVENEY, owner of the Kaveney Law Firm, recently moved

1973 LEONARD CERVANTES, a personal injury attorney and principal of Cervantes & Associates, known for his service to numerous organizations and for launching an annual Black History Month dinner, received the 2014 Award of Honor from the Lawyers Association of St. Louis.

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NOTES

1974 FRANCIS X. O’CONNOR, a sole practitioner in Great Bend, Pa., became the 120th president of the Pennsylvania Bar Association. He is a former member of the PBA Board of Governors, having served as PBA treasurer from 2008 to 2011.

1976 CHARLES S. ELBERT, a partner at the St. Louis law firm Shands, Elbert, Gianoulakis & Giljum, LLP, was named St. Louis Best Lawyers’ Employment Law-Management Lawyer of the Year for 2014. He was also included in the labor law: management, and litigation: labor & employment law categories by Best Lawyers. K ATHLEEN SHERBY, a partner at Bryan Cave, was elected president of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. HON. DEAN SWEET retired as associate circuit court judge in Madison County, Ill. He was appointed to the bench in January 2010. Prior to that, Sweet had operated his own law practice in Wood River. He also worked as a partner in the law firm Holland & Holland.

1977 THEODORE MACDONALD, an attorney at HeplerBroom LLC , was selected by his peers as a 2014 Leading Lawyer in the fields of civil appellate, medical malpractice defense, toxic tort defense and professional malpractice defense, including legal, technical and financial.

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HON. DONALD MCCULLIN was a recipient of the 2014 Legal Legend Award from the Mound City Bar Association. The Legal Legend Award celebrates African-Americans in the legal profession. He served as a circuit judge in the 22nd Judicial Circuit in St. Louis from 1999 until his retirement in 2011. McCullin serves as a hearing officer for the Parking Commission and the Civil Service Commission. He is also a mediator for Aequitas Corp. and a volunteer mediator for the Missouri Human Rights Commission and served two terms as president of the MCBA. ANTHONY B. QUINN, a solo practitioner at the Quinn Law Offices in Philadelphia, was selected as the Philadelphia VIP ’s Volunteer of the Month for January 2014. Philadelphia VIP, which provides pro bono legal services, noted that Quinn “will take on any homeownership case regardless of how complicated it is. He also stands by his clients no matter how difficult their lives may be. He goes above and beyond what we expect from our volunteers.”

1978 D. LEO HUMAN was elected partner at Shands, Elbert, Gianoulakis & Giljum, LLP. He was previously an associate with the firm and concentrates on business litigation, employment law and school law.

1979 ELAINE SPEARMAN, chief staffing officer and legal advisor to comptroller of the City of St. Louis, was honored with a 2014 Women’s Justice Award by Missouri Lawyers Weekly in the Enterprise category.

1981 HON. JIMMIE EDWARDS, of the 22nd Judicial Circuit Court in Missouri, received an honorary doctorate of laws and delivered the commencement address at Saint Louis University’s graduation ceremony May 17. For more on the commencement and to watch the video, visit slu.edu/ x94196.xml.

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MARIA VITALE PERRON, an attorney at the Perron Law Firm, was honored by Legal Services of Eastern Missouri with its annual F. William McCalpin Pro Bono Award for extraordinary dedication to pro bono work. SARAH PLEBAN, a solo practitioner, was honored with a 2014 Women’s Justice Award by Missouri Lawyers Weekly in the Public Service Practitioner category. JOYCE SLOCUM was appointed president and CEO of Texas Public Radio. She previously served as chief administrative officer of National Public Radio, overseeing legal, human resources, engineering, IT, facilities and consumer products. Slocum also served NPR for nine months in 2011 as interim president and CEO.

1982 JEFFREY HEBRANK , an attorney at HeplerBroom LLC , was selected by his peers as a 2014 Leading Lawyer in the fields of class action/mass tort defense, personal injury defense: general, products liability defense, and toxic tort defense. MICHAEL REDA , an attorney at HeplerBroom LLC , was selected by his peers as a 2014 Leading Lawyer in the field of personal injury defense: general. VINCENT VOLPE , an assistant professor of management at Saint Louis University, was appointed by Mayor Francis G. Slay to a member of the St. Louis Public Library Board of Directors.

1983 SUSAN DENIGAN, vice president and general counsel at Nestle Purina PetCare Co., was honored with a 2014 Women’s Justice Award by Missouri Lawyers Weekly in the Enterprise category. TRACEY ELBEIN retired from government service after 30 years as a federal career lawclerk to the Hon. Stephen N. Limbaugh Sr. and the Hon. Stephen N. Limbaugh Jr.

1984 JULIE FIX MEYER joined Armstrong Teasdale as of counsel to its litigation practice group. Based

in the firm’s St. Louis office, she works primarily on matters alleging personal or catastrophic injury and wrongful death. Meyer defends large companies, manufacturers, utilities, and their insureds against claims of physical harm due to asbestos exposure. Prior to joining Armstrong Teasdale, she was a career law clerk for U.S. District Judge William D. Stiehl of the Southern District of Illinois.

1985 JACK HUMES JR. and Todd Sivia (’04) purchased Certified Title & Escrow, Inc., located in Highland, Ill., in May 2013. Since purchasing the title company, they have added four other offices, including Edwardsville, Brighton, Carlyle and Troy. The company recently changed its name to Midwest Title & Escrow, Inc. MARY CAOLA KULLMAN, senior vice president and chief administrative officer at Laclede Gas Co., was honored with a 2014 Women’s Justice Award by Missouri Lawyers Weekly in the Enterprise category.

1986 JONATHAN DALTON, mayor of Town & Country, Mo., joined Armstrong Teasdale as a corporate and governmental affairs attorney with a government regulatory law focus. JOHN SIMON was included in U.S . News’ Best Lawyers in America in the fields of products liability litigation: plaintiffs and personal injury litigation: plaintiffs.

1987 THOMAS B. LEWIS joined the law firm Stevens & Lee’s labor and employment practice in its Princeton, N. J., office. He represents financial services companies and their executives, as well as other companies, in employment disputes and litigation.

CLASS

JOHN MCCOLLOUGH joined the St. Louis law firm Lashly & Baer PC as a member. He focuses his practice on trials involving complex litigation matters, including premises liability with an emphasis on defending security matters involving criminal attacks, FELA claims, catastrophic claims involving cranes and other construction equipment, product liability and insurance litigation with an emphasis on trucking and transportation. THERESE “TESSA” ROLUFS TRELZ , partner at Armstrong Teasdale, was named head of the firm’s corporate services group.

1988 PATRICK ANDRE was named general counsel and chief compliance officer by Cornerstone Mortgage, Inc. in Chesterfield, Mo. He joined the firm in 2010. MARGARET DONNELLY was appointed Family Court Commissioner in St. Louis County. The appointment is made by a vote of all the circuit and associate judges in the county. PATRICK S. FLYNN was named an associate circuit court judge in Missouri’s 45th Judicial Circuit based in Troy, Mo., by Governor Jay Nixon. He was an associate judge in Lincoln County from 1991 to 2002 before he went into private practice.

1990 LARS ETZKORN opened Lars Etzkorn Law PLLC, in Washington, D.C., specializing in estate planing and administration, and charitable giving. LAURA FRAME was promoted by St. Anthony’s Medical Center to general counsel of both the medical center and its St. Anthony’s Physician Organization. She previously was director of risk management at St. Anthony’s Medical Center, where she has worked since 2002.

1991 MARC BREIT, of Breit Law Office in Louisville, Ky., was featured as

Attorney of the Month by the Kentucky edition of Attorney at Law Magazine.

 JULIA PUSATERI LASATER was installed as president of the St. Louis County Bar Association for 2014.

SIMONE HABERSTOCK MCCARTNEY graduated with her LL.M. in Dispute Resolution in December 2013 from University of Missouri School of Law. JAMES MONAFO, a partner in Husch Blackwell’s St. Louis office, was named Lexology Client Choice Guide-USA & Canada’s Missouri winner in the litigaton category for 2014. He is a member of the firm’s healthcare, life sciences and pharmaceuticals team. ANTHONY SIMON, a partner at The Simon Law Firm, PC , was voted by his peers as Best Lawyers’ 2014 Lawyer of the Year for intellectual property litigation in St. Louis. He was also included in U.S . News’ Best Lawyers in America.

1992 PATRICIA FERRICK BRANDT relocated to New York City and is a principal at PriceWaterhouseCoopers. From 2000-2013, she was at Bryan Cave in St. Louis.

1993 TIMOTHY GEARIN, a partner at Armstrong Teasdale, was one of three Armstrong attorneys who won Missouri’s second-largest 2013 defense verdict by defeating a neurosurgeon’s lawsuit that blamed St. Luke’s Hospital for a fall that ended the doctor’s career. Missouri Lawyers Weekly, which ranks the cases, valued the verdict at $13 million.

1995 MIKE BASIL , a partner with Clausen Miller, P.C . in Chicago, was admitted as a solicitor to the senior courts of England and Wales. He represents U.S. and international businesses in complex commercial disputes and catastrophic losses.

NOTES

JULIE TAYLOR and her husband, Charles, practice law together in St. Charles, Mo., representing clients in family, mediation, bankruptcy, criminal and estate planning matters. Baby Caroline joined siblings Bridget, Frank and Richard in May 2013.

1996 AMY COLLIGNON GUNN, an attorney at The Simon Law Firm, PC , was appointed treasurer for the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis for 2014. She was included in U.S . News’ Best Lawyers in America. CHRISTOPHER LAWHORN joined Carmody MacDonald PC as a principal. SARAANN PARKER, a partner in Armstrong Teasdale’s corporate services practice group, served as cochair of the 2014 Justice for All Ball auction, the largest annual fund raising event for Legal Services of Eastern Missouri.

1998 MATT DEVOTI, partner at Casey & Devoti, was reappointed for a fouryear term by the Missouri Supreme Court to serve on the Regional Disciplinary Committee for Region XI. He has also been appointed to the board of directors of the Gateway Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. STEVEN POZARIC, a partner at Armstrong Teasdale, is a 2014 recipient of the Mel Loewenstein Distinguished Volunteer Award from the Fair St. Louis Foundation.

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Pozaric, who has been involved with the Foundation since 2010, has served as general counsel to Fair St. Louis for the last two years and is the current chairman of the venue management committee as the Fair moves to Art Hill in Forest Park. In addition, he has chaired various committees including those dealing with administrative services and physical arrangements.

1999 PAUL A . MARKS joined Sivia Business & Legal Services, PC’s Edwardsville, Ill., office as a litigation and business transaction associate. He has more than 10 years of experience in private practice and previously worked for Justice Thomas Welch of the Illinois Appellate Court. Additionally, Marks is a past president of the Madison County Bar Association and the TriCity Bar Association. ROBERT REESER, a partner in Armstrong Teasdale’s intellectual property practice group, was named to “Who’s Who in Energy,” published by American City Business Journals.

2000 BETH BAUER, an attorney at HeplerBroom LLC , was selected by her peers as a 2014 Leading Lawyer in the field of class action/mass tort defense. MATTHEW CASEY, partner at Casey & Devoti, was re-elected to a second term as a Richmond Heights City Council member.

BETH CONRAN, an attorney at Greensfelder Hemker & Gale P.C ., was accepted to the national Leadership Council on Legal Diversity (LCLD) Fellows Program, which develops skills in high potential attorneys. Launched in 2011, the LCLD program is a highly structured initiative built to increase diversity at the leadership levels of the nation’s law firms and corporate legal departments. M. GRAHAM DOBBS was named a principal at Gray, Ritter & Graham, P.C . His primary areas of practice are medical malpractice, wrongful death and catastrophic injury, product liability and motor vehicle accidents.

2001 BRIDGET HOY was named vice chair of Lewis Rice & Fingersh’s diversity and inclusion committee. CHRISTOPHER PICKETT was named one of the St. Louis Business Journal ’s 2014 40 Under 40 class. He was also named the new chairman of the diversity and inclusion committee for Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, PC .

2002 EDNA MCLAIN was named a partner in HeplerBroom’s Chicago office.

She focuses her practice on trials involving complex business litigation matters including toxic torts, medical malpractice, and insurance defense. McLain represents clients in Illinois, Missouri and Wisconsin. M. QUINN MURPHY was hired by the St. Louis law firm of Summers Compton Wells LLC as a principal. HEIDI M. NICHOLS was named partner at the Oklahoma City office of the law firm Conner & Winters. Her practice is focused on complex litigation and business transactions, serving clients in many industries, including insurance, oil and gas, medical malpractice and product liability. KEVIN REJENT joined the Keystone Mutual Insurance Company, a Missouri-based medical malpractice carrier, as general counsel. He will be responsible for the legal affairs of both the company and its affiliates, including claims management.

2003 PATRICK CONNER was named a partner in Husch Blackwell’s St. Louis office, where he focuses on estate planning, estate and trust administration, and organizational tax and succession planning for privately held business.

JASON SENGHEISER NAMED 2013 ABA OUTSTANDING YOUNG LAWYER JASON SENGHEISER (‘03), clerk for Judge Robert G. Dowd Jr. of the Missouri Court of Appeals Eastern District, was awarded the American Bar Association’s National Outstanding Young Lawyer at the ABA’s midyear meeting in Chicago on Feb. 8. The award is given annually to a lawyer who exhibits professional excellence, service to the profession and the bar, service to the community, and who has a reputation for the advancement of legal ethics and professional responsibility. He currently serves as the Missouri Bar liaison for the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis and served as chair of the Young Lawyers Division’s Rights and Responsibilities Committee and the Government, Military and Public Sector Committee. For more on Sengheiser and his involvement with the YLD, visit law.slu.edu/sidebar.

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ANN HORNER retired and moved to Colorado. KRISTIN ZUREK was named a partner at Cordell & Cordell, the nation’s largest domestic litigation firm, focusing on representing men in family law cases.

2004 REBEK AH BAHN was named one of the St. Louis Business Journal ’s 2014 40 Under 40 class. JOHN F. MAHON JR. was named a partner at the law firm Williams Venker & Sanders LLC. He has experience in a wide variety of practice areas including health care law involving medical negligence claims, business and commercial litigation, personal injury, products liability, premises liability, construction, toxic torts and insurance litigation. TODD SIVIA and Jack Humes Jr. (’85) purchased Certified Title & Escrow, Inc. located in Highland, Ill., in May 2013. Since purchasing the title company, they have added four other offices, including Edwardsville, Brighton, Carlyle and Troy. The company recently changed its name to Midwest Title & Escrow, Inc. MICHELE HARTMANN TAMENE recently relocated from Boston, where she served as assistant general counsel II for seven years, to Kansas City, where she serves as the first in-house counsel at AxelaCare Health Solutions, LLC on the senior executive team as vice president and general counsel for the corporation.

2005 SARA MELLY, a partner in Armstrong Teasdale’s financial and real estate services practice group, was elected to serve on the MidCounty Family YMCA’s board of directors. She serves as chair of the endowment committee and a member of the executive committee and community fundraising campaign committee. In her law practice, Melly is a litigator who focuses on matters involving debtor and creditor rights, lender liability, loan restructurings and workouts, receivership and foreclosure proceedings, lien priority disputes, and insurance coverage. MATTHEW FRY received the 2014 Bernie Edelman Award from the Missouri Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. The award is presented to a criminal defense attorney who mentors other attorneys.

NOTES

defense field. He is one of 163 attorneys under the age of 40 to make this national list. In his practice, Kaveney strives to protect the nation’s classified information while helping defense contractors, key management personnel and employees obtain and maintain the necessary clearance. He also works with government defense contractors to develop strong compliance programs such as those involving insider threat awareness. ROBERT LEWIS was hired as an associate by the Stange Law Firm in their Ellisville, Mo., focusing his practice on family law. ABBY RISNER was elected as an officer at Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, PC .

JENNIFER GILES is a partner at the Atlanta law firm Waggoner Hastings LLC , focusing her practice on family law.

MARK RYERSON, shareholder at the law firm Howard & Howard’s Chicago office, was named to Illinois Rising Stars for 2014.

CLARK HEDGER was elected as an officer at Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, PC .

2006

BRIAN K AVENEY, partner at Armstrong Teasdale and the founder and leader of the firm’s security clearance and facility clearance task force, was selected as a Law360 Rising Star in the aerospace and

JAMES CRONIN was elected a partner at Stinson Leonard Street LLP where he is a member

SLU LAW ALUMNI MAKING LAWS IN TENNESSEE Pictured on the floor of the Tennessee House of Representatives are, from left, Natalie Essex (’05), Legislative Coordinator & Assistant General Counsel for the Tennessee Department of Human Services; Lowe Finney (’01), Senate member for District 27 (Jackson); and Raumesh Akbari (’09), House member for District 2 (Memphis). The three SLU LAW alumni teamed up to pass Senate Bill 2380, the “Poverty Reduction Plan,” which requires the Department of Human Services to conduct a statewide assessment of Tennessee’s increasing poverty rate and to provide recommendations next year after consultation with stakeholders around the state regarding matters such as lack of healthcare, homeless school children and food scarcity for senior citizens. Finney served as the prime Senate sponsor, and Akbari was the prime House sponsor. Essex was the coordinator who helped draft the language and shepherd it through committee meetings.

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of the firm’s intellectual property and technology practice. A registered patent attorney, Cronin’s practice focuses on all aspects of IP counseling. THOMAS DOWLING was elected a partner at Stinson Leonard Street LLP where he focuses on the creation, ongoing administration and regulatory compliance of health and welfare benefit plans for public, private and tax-exempt organizations. Dowling advises clients on Affordable Care Act implementation and compliance. CHRISTINE KIEFER was made a partner at Van Camp Law Firm, LLC , where she practices workers’ compensation law in Jefferson City, Mo. She also published her first novel, “Light in Darkest Days,” available at lulu.com and on Amazon. MATT PRICE joined the litigation group and ADRIENNE KINDELAN PRICE joined the legal sales transactions and alliances group at FedEx in Memphis, Tenn. Both were formerly with the federal government, Matt as an assistant U.S. attorney with the Western District of Tennessee, and Adrienne as counsel for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He was named to the Memphis Business Journal ’s 2013 Top 40 Under 40 class. They also welcomed a third daughter into their growing family.

2007 ANNE-MARIE BROCKLAND, of The Simon Law Firm, was the recipient of the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis’ 2014 John C. Shepherd Young Lawyers’ Professionalism Award. MICHAEL CONNON joined the Eureka, Mo., law firm of Clark, Pisarkiewicz, Tolin & Wines, LLC, focusing his

practice on wrongful death, auto and trucking accidents, injuries and workers’ compensation cases.

after which he worked at a local law firm on cases involving insurance and product liability defense.

DAVID FRENZIA rejoined the St. Louis law firm The Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC .

FALON WRIGLEY, an associate in the St. Louis office of the national labor and employment law firm Constagy, Brooks & Smith, was appointed to the firm’s diversity council.

K ATHERINE FANSLER MOORE joined the law firm Barklage, Brett, & Hamill as an associate attorney where she continues to practice real estate, land use, corporate, contract and municipal law. KIMBERLY STEUTERMAN (NEE MEANS), joined the law firm Stinson, Leonard Street, LLP as an associate. Her practice areas include business litigation and product liability. EDWARD VISHNEVETSK Y was honored as a Thompson Reuters Rising Star in the area of health law, given to the top 2.5 percent of attorneys in the country. He was also honored by D Magazine as a Best Healthcare Lawyer in Dallas. DAVID WILKINS, an attorney with the firm of Huntsman, Lofgran & Fuller, PLL, was recently admitted to practice by the Utah State Bar and the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah.

STEVEN KUENZEL JR. was named a partner in the Washington, Mo., law firm Eckelkamp Kuenzel LLP, where he is engaged in a general law practice including estate and business planning, civil and criminal litigation, domestic relations and banking. His wife COLLEN KUENZEL (’08) is also an attorney at the firm.

DAVID W. MORIN joined Danna McKitrick, PC’s ligation department where he primarily defends workers’ compensation cases on behalf of employers and insurance carriers.

CARRIE L . CARPENTER joined Polsinelli’s toxic tort and mass tort practice as an attorney. She is also a member of the Arch Rival Rollers Girls Roller Derby Squad, which is the area’s only female flat track roller derby league.

MICHAEL ROUSH was hired by First American Title Insurance, National Commercial Services, as manager and underwriting counsel.

2010

TERRENCE O’TOOLE JR. joined the St. Louis law firm Williams Venker & Sanders, LLC as an associate, practicing general liability defense including transportation law, products liability, insurance defense and premises liability, in addition to working within the health care and employment practice areas. He began his career as a detective in the University City Police Department,

}

CECELIA CARROLL joined Polsinelli’s St. Louis office, focusing her practice on defending companies involved in complex toxic and mass tort litigation.

ANDREW MARTIN is a principal with the law firm Anderson & Associates in St. Louis.

2008

Moved recently? Changed your email address? Have a new job?

2009

STEPHEN ANGELETTE was named a 2014 Rising Star by Louisiana Super Lawyers in the area of health care law. SHEENA HAMILTON, an attorney in Armstrong Teasdale’s employment and labor practice group, received a St. Louis American 2014 Young

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Go to law.slu.edu/alumni and click on “UPDATE MY INFORMATION.” You can also email your class notes to BRIEF@LAW.SLU.EDU. Submitted photos will be included as space allows.

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CLASS

Leader Award. She was one of 19 professionals who were chosen for the award because they are considered committed, compassionate, generous African Americans, who are making a positive impact in the community. WILLIAM HOFFMAN joined Polsinelli as an associate with the firm’s health care practice, where he assists clients with regulatory matters. He has served as an adjunct professor at Saint Louis University School of Law teaching health care fraud and abuse and as a health policy speechwriter for candidates for elected office. JAMIE RODRIGUEZ joined the staff of Legal Services of Eastern Missouri as a staff attorney for the Public Benefits Project in the health and welfare unit. BENJAMIN WILSON joined HeplerBroom LLC’s St. Louis office as an associate attorney where he focuses his practice on trials involving complex litigation, including asbestos and other toxic torts. Wilson has more than three years of experience in federal court, starting out as an intern and later serving as a judicial law clerk in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois.

2011 ADAM BERRY was hired as an associate in Stange Law Firm, PC’s Edwardsville, Ill., office, focusing his practice on family law. JORDAN CAMPANELLA and his brother, Calen Campanella (’13), teamed up to practice law together in Du Quoin, Ill., at Campanella & Campanella, Brothers at Law. Their practice serves an 11-county area and focuses on adoptions, business and corporate law, civil litigation, contract law, criminal defense, divorce, domestic law, estate planning, family law, personal injury, paternity cases, wills and trusts. JOSEPH GOFF JR. joined the office of the St. Francois County Missouri Prosecutor as the newest assistant prosecuting attorney. He previously was with the Missouri Attorney

General’s Office in Jefferson City in the governmental affairs division and later in private practice with his father Joe Goff Sr. at Reeves & Goff in Farmington, Mo. LISA LUETKEMEYER was hired as an associate in Husch Blackwell’s St. Louis office, joining the firm’s health care, life sciences and pharmaceuticals team.

2012 JOHN ARNOLD, of the Jackson, Tenn., law firm Rainey Kizer Reviere & Bell PLC , wrote the cover story of the March 2014 issue of Tennessee Bar Journal. It was titled “PRIVACY: What Lawyers Must Do to Comply with HIPAA .” RUSSELL BAKER was hired as an associate attorney in the Stange Law Firm PC’s St. Louis office, focusing on family law. GAETANA FRANKLIN joined HeplerBroom LLC’s St. Louis office as an associate attorney with a focus on toxic torts. JULIA K ALTENBACH joined the St. Louis law firm Williams Venker & Sanders, LLC as an associate. Her primary practice area is general liability defense, including products liability, insurance defense, premises liability, health care, and employment law. JOSHUA REZNICK was hired by the law firm Herzog Crebs LLP as an associate. He will practice in the firm’s litigation group and will focus on toxic tort, asbestos litigation and product liability. RORY ROUNDTREE joined the Ogallala, Neb., law firm The Pierce Law Office as an associate. Prior to moving back to Nebraska, Roundtree worked at the Ryals Law Firm, PC in St. Louis, and prior to that, he worked for the president of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen as communications director. ADAM SCHAFFER was hired as an associate attorney in Stange Law Firm, PC’s St. Louis office, focusing on family law. BRYAN SCHREMPF joined HeplerBroom LLC’s Edwardsville, Ill., office as an associate attorney. He focuses his practice on trials involving complex business litigation

NOTES

matters including toxic torts as well as premises and product liability.

2013 CALEN CAMPANELLA and his brother, Jordan Campanella (’11), teamed up to practice law in Du Quoin, Ill., at Campanella & Campanella, Brothers at Law. Their practice serves an 11-county area and focuses on adoptions, business and corporate law, civil litigation, contract law, criminal defense, divorce, domestic law, estate planning, family law, personal injury, paternity cases, wills and trusts. JUSTIN LACY and his wife Emily welcomed their first child, Jackson Andrew Lacy, on Oct. 8, 2013. SARAH MARKENSON was hired by Armstrong Teasdale as an associate in its financial and real estate services practice group. Her practice encompasses working with public sector clients, small manufacturers, non-profit organizations, investment banking firms and banks on projects involving development and financing incentives, redevelopment, tax increments and special purpose districts. ROBERT SAMUELSON was hired by the Stange Law Firm as an associate in their Ellisville, Mo., office, focusing his practice on family law. CARRIE SIMS was named office manager of Wyatt Wright LLC . She is a practicing attorney with the firm, specializing in personal injury law and medical negligence cases. Sims has more than two decades of experience in both fields, including 24 years as a paralegal with several prominent St. Louis law firms. MICHAEL VOGEL joined HeplerBroom LLC’s Edwardsville, Ill., office as an associate attorney, focusing his practice on toxic tort defense litigation. K YLE C. WESTBROOK joined HeplerBroom LLC’s St. Louis office as an associate attorney, focusing his practice on trials involving complex business litigation matters including toxic torts.

VO LU M E 1 5 I SS U E 2

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NOTES

IN

MEMORIAM THE HON. JOSEPH STEWART, 1939

THE HON. CORNELIUS LANE JR., 1963

MR. PAUL CHAVAUX, 1948

MR. JOHN WALSH JR., 1963

MR. GEORGE MEHAN JR., 1948

MR. CHUCK TODT, 1964

MR. ROBERT HENRY, 1950

MR. SAM VANDOVER, 1967

MR. BILL HUMAN, 1950

MR. CRAIG CRENSHAW JR., 1969

THE HON. RICHARD MEHAN SR., 1950

MR. RODNEY PITTS, 1973

MR. VAL TERSCHLUSE, 1951

MR. ANDREW NEILL, 1974

MR. JOHN CALLANAN, 1952

MR. JOHN HARSHMAN, 1975

MR. GERALD KELLER, 1952

MR. JOHN JAMES, 1976

MR. JAMES KOESTER, 1952

MRS. SANDY KOESTER, 1986

MR. PAUL WATSON, 1952

THE HON. LARRY WINES, 1987

MR. EDWARD KNOBBE, 1953

MR. STEVE SCHWENDEMANN, 1989

MR. EDWARD HOURSTON JR., 1954

MS. LORRI MOTT, 1990

MR. MICHAEL SULLIVAN JR., 1955

MRS. WENDY SMITH-HANSEN, 1994

MR. JACK DUNSFORD, 1956

MS. SHARON ROBNETT, 2003

MR. JIMMY JOE SAUTER, 1959

MR. JESSE TRAUTMANN, 2007

MR. ROBERT SCHAAP, 1960

Chad Williams

JUDGE JOSEPH STEWART, a colleague and friend to many in the legal community, passed away on March 27, 2014 at 99 years old. A member of the Class of 1939, Stewart never spent more than $150 a year on tuition and in fact painted hallways, shellacked the floor and performed other odd-jobs with his classmates one summer in exchange for tuition. During his long and prosperous career, he served 12 years on the Missouri Court of Appeals, including a two-year term as chief justice. Prior to his time on the bench, Stewart served in the U.S. Navy as a communications officer aboard the Currituck, a seaplane tender in the Pacific theater. After his time in the service he returned to St. Louis to practice law, serving as a trustee of the Junior College District in the 1960s and then being appointed to the police board in 1972 before taking the bench in 1973. His son, Mark, is a 1981 graduate of SLU LAW and practices in Los Angeles. Joe and Mark Stewart at Reunion Weekend in September 2011.

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K C A B G N I V I G N O FOCUS The Office of Development and Alumni Relations is highlighting why alumni give to the School of Law and the different avenues available to you to support future legal education at Saint Louis University. In this installment, we take a look at one of our inaugural members of the Partners in Excellence Society.

WILLIAM (BILL) BOLSTER ('88) MEMBER, LEWIS, RICE & FINGERSH, L.C.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO YOU TO GIVE BACK TO SLU LAW? SLU LAW gave me the ability to give back to my community in a way I never imagined. As the parent of a child with disabilities, my law degree has allowed me to assist people and families with disabilities in both legal and legislative forums.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO JOIN THE PARTNERS IN EXCELLENCE SOCIETY? The Partners in Excellence Society provides students with additional scholarship resources, directly impacting their legal education and assisting them with the start of their career. Knowing I can directly impact students makes it the appropriate vehicle for me to give back to SLU LAW.

DO YOU ENCOURAGE OTHERS TO JOIN THE PARTNERS IN EXCELLENCE SOCIETY? WHY? Yes, I definitely encourage others to give. SLU LAW’s ability to fulfill its mission of preparing graduates to be men and women for others depends on its potential to attract the finest students and faculty. Giving through the Partner’s in Excellence Society allows me to assist SLU LAW in enrolling academically gifted and civic-minded students, thereby strengthening the School of Law’s reputation and presence both in the region and on a national level.

To learn more about how you can continue the legacy and support the School of Law, please contact the Office of Development and Alumni Relations: SHERIDAN HAYNES 314-977-3303 hayness@slu.edu AMANDA GOLDSMITH ('07) 314-977-4141 goldsmae@slu.edu SCHOOL OF LAW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 100 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 314-977-3300 alumni@law.slu.edu law.slu.edu/alumni/giftform

SA I N T L O U I S U N I V E R S I T Y S C H O O L O F L AW 100 N. TUCKER BLVD. ST. LOUIS, MO 63101-1930

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C ALENDA R O F

EVENTS

JUL

29 & 30

Lunch for Missouri Bar Exam Takers, Jefferson City

AUG

The Barristers Club Kickoff Event at SLU LAW

SEP

Alumni Lunch as part of the Missouri Bar Annual Meeting, Kansas City

21 12

SEP

18

SEP

26

SEP

27

FA L L 201 4

The Barristers Club + SLU LAW Night at the Ballpark SLU LAW Clinical Education: Remembering our Past and Celebrating our Future (CLE + Reception) SLU LAW Alumni Open House, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. (as part of SLU Homecoming)

OCT

17

SLU LAW Reunion 2014

& 18

OCT

Childress Lecture

NOV

SLU LAW Trivia Night

24 7

More information can be found at law.slu.edu


Saint Louis Brief v15i2 Alumni Magazine