Issuu on Google+

collegium

Smoke Signals from Rome A P u b l i c a t i o n o f t h e S t . J o h n F i s h e r C o l l e g e OFFICE OF IN S TITUTION A L A D V A NCE M ENT 路 sp r i n g 2 0 1 3

Each season on the St. John Fisher College campus brings its own beauty. The transition from spring to summer is especially welcome and wonderful. We have a feeling of accomplishment as our students complete the academic year, with their minds filled with all they have learned both in the classrooms, and through the many service activities they undertake. We feel pride in the more than 1,000 individuals that have walked across the stage at the Blue Cross Arena, shook my hand, and collected their St. John Fisher College diploma. We feel excitement for the summer when we will again host the Buffalo Bills Training Camp. And we feel anticipation as we plan for the fall semester.

Features

19 New Hope in Newtown 21 Smoke Signals from Rome

In the past year, we enjoyed many successes. The College was honored yet again for the community service performed by our students, and our hard work was rewarded by generous grants from local and national foundations and corporations, setting an even higher standard for more success in the future. We had the opportunity to recognize our outstanding alumni this spring at events that highlight the strength of our academic programs, the important roles that our alumni play in the community, and the success that can be achieved through dedication and commitment to “goodness, discipline, and knowledge.”

Donald E. Bain, Ph.D.­­

Message from the President

Dear Alumni, Friends, and Colleagues:

COLLEGIUM

As the campus moves into summer, I urge you to strengthen your commitment to St. John Fisher College. Our students can only achieve great heights if they are supported by their parents at home, the alumni who traveled this road before them, and the community members who so respect our institution. I encourage you to become engaged in the life of the College in a way that has meaning for you and your role in the future of our students. With kind regards for a delightful summer,

Departments

3 Campus News 11 Academics 23 Class Notes 33 Athletics

Page 3 Spring 2013. Collegium is a magazine for alumni, parents, and friends of St. John Fisher College and is published by the Office of Institutional Advancement. Letters to the Editor are welcome and may be sent to the address below. Diverse views are represented and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editor or official policies of the College. St. John Fisher College, Collegium Editorial Office: 3690 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618 • Email: alumni@sjfc.edu.

Donald E. Bain, Ph.D. President

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Gerard J. Rooney, Ph.D. MANAGING EDITOR Maherly Schaeffer ’98 LAYOUT Maherly Schaeffer ’98

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Donald E. Bain, Ph.D. Anne Geer Norm Kieffer ’96 Jim Mandelaro ’85 Maherly Schaeffer ’98 Kate Torok

PHOTOGRAPHY John Smillie Photography Maherly Schaeffer ’98 Kate Torok Sally Vaughan Eryn Yates

Each season on the St. John Fisher College campus brings its own beauty. The transition from spring to summer is especially welcome and wonderful. We have a feeling of accomplishment as our students complete the academic year, with their minds filled with all they have learned both in the classrooms, and through the many service activities they undertake. We feel pride in the more than 1,000 individuals that have walked across the stage at the Blue Cross Arena, shook my hand, and collected their St. John Fisher College diploma. We feel excitement for the summer when we will again host the Buffalo Bills Training Camp. And we feel anticipation as we plan for the fall semester.

Features

19 New Hope in Newtown 21 Smoke Signals from Rome

In the past year, we enjoyed many successes. The College was honored yet again for the community service performed by our students, and our hard work was rewarded by generous grants from local and national foundations and corporations, setting an even higher standard for more success in the future. We had the opportunity to recognize our outstanding alumni this spring at events that highlight the strength of our academic programs, the important roles that our alumni play in the community, and the success that can be achieved through dedication and commitment to “goodness, discipline, and knowledge.”

Donald E. Bain, Ph.D.­­

Message from the President

Dear Alumni, Friends, and Colleagues:

COLLEGIUM

As the campus moves into summer, I urge you to strengthen your commitment to St. John Fisher College. Our students can only achieve great heights if they are supported by their parents at home, the alumni who traveled this road before them, and the community members who so respect our institution. I encourage you to become engaged in the life of the College in a way that has meaning for you and your role in the future of our students. With kind regards for a delightful summer,

Departments

3 Campus News 11 Academics 23 Class Notes 33 Athletics

Page 3 Spring 2013. Collegium is a magazine for alumni, parents, and friends of St. John Fisher College and is published by the Office of Institutional Advancement. Letters to the Editor are welcome and may be sent to the address below. Diverse views are represented and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editor or official policies of the College. St. John Fisher College, Collegium Editorial Office: 3690 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618 • Email: alumni@sjfc.edu.

Donald E. Bain, Ph.D. President

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Gerard J. Rooney, Ph.D. MANAGING EDITOR Maherly Schaeffer ’98 LAYOUT Maherly Schaeffer ’98

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Donald E. Bain, Ph.D. Anne Geer Norm Kieffer ’96 Jim Mandelaro ’85 Maherly Schaeffer ’98 Kate Torok

PHOTOGRAPHY John Smillie Photography Maherly Schaeffer ’98 Kate Torok Sally Vaughan Eryn Yates

H

onoring Alumni

The College held its annual Accounting Awards Banquet on March 21, honoring Cheryl Lynn Yawman ’86 as the 2013 Outstanding Accounting Alumna of the Year. Yawman is the Practice Director of Accounting and Finance at Cochran, Cochran and Yale in Rochester. She was honored for her career achievement, service to the community, and contributions to Fisher. The College also awarded the Rising Star Award to five alumni. The winners included: Michelle Bellonte ’06, Nicholas Bennett ’05, Erin Hiller ’05, Aimee Jozic ’05, and Jennifer Roberts ’05. On Thursday, April 11, the St. John Fisher College School of Business hosted the Ferdinand and Elaine Smith Excellence in Management Award dinner to honor four alumni. This year’s recipient of the Excellence in Management Award was Russ Brandon ’89, President and CEO, Buffalo Bills. He was honored for outstanding leadership and managerial accomplishment, his record of community involvement, high moral character, and commitment to continued involvement with the College. Michael O’Conor ’78 was given the 2013 Dean’s Medal for Outstanding Service. O’Conor, a Senior Consultant and Director at Jordan & Jordan in New York City, was honored for his exemplary and sustained contributions in service of the School of Business. Rich Anderson ’01, and Dina Natale ’00, ’06 (MBA) were also honored with the Victor E. Salerno Award for American Enterprise, which recognizes the success and dedication of recent graduates. The evening also included recognition of Patricia Leva, President and CEO of Junior Achievement of Rochester, as Fisher’s Beta Gamma Sigma Chapter Honoree. Three alumni were honored at the Jack Palvino Excellence in Communications Awards Gala on April 18. Ray Martino ’71, Partner at

Martino Flynn, LLC, received the Media Gold Award in Public Relations and Advertising; Jim Redmond ’79, Regional Vice President of Communications and Community Investments at Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, received the Media Gold Award in Corporate Public Relations; and Shannon Lappin ’08, Public Relations Specialist at Manning and Napier, received the Rising Star Award. President Bain and Jack Palvino ’55 were on hand to recognize the alumni honorees as well as community recipients Evan Dawson, recipient of the Media Gold Award in Journalism; Todd Clausen, recipient of the Media Gold Award in New and Social Media; and Rich Funke, recipient of the night’s highest honor, the Jack Palvino Lifetime Achievement Award.

Cheryl Yawman ’86 and family

Rich Anderson ’01,Vic Salerno, and David Martin

Bellonte ’06, Roberts ’05, Jozic ’05, Hiller ’05, and Bennett ’05

e

Jack Palvino ’55 and Shannon Lappin ’08

The Distinguished Alumnus in Teaching Award was given to Maria Katsetos ’09, ’11 (MS), a Special Education Teacher at Victor Senior High School.

The Colleg e celebrate d alumni excellence at a series of awards presentatio ns in the s pring semester. The Accou n t ing Awards Ba nquet kick e d awards sea off the son follow e d Ferdinand and Elaine by the Sm Excellence in Manage ith ment Award Ban quet, the J ack Palvin Excellence o in Commu nications Awards Ga la, and the annual Education Celebratio n.

The Distinguished Alumnus in Educational Leadership Award was given to Dr. Mathis Calvin III ’04, Superintendent of the New York State School for the Blind. Calvin is a graduate of the M.S. in Educational Leadership program. The recipient of the Arthur L. Walton, Jr. Award for Executive Leadership was Dr. Matthew Augustine ’10. This award honors an alumnus of the Doctor of Education in Executive Leadership program. Augustine is President and CEO of Biodrill Technical Solutions.

Dianne Cooney Miner, Dina Natale ’00, ’06 (MBA), Lori Hollenbeck, and David Martin

Cardinal Prid

On May 3, the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education held its second annual Education Celebration to recognize and celebrate the College’s support for education, educators, and community leadership. Graduating seniors, graduate candidates, and alumni were honored at the event. Three distinguished awards were given to alumni who exemplify the School of Education’s highest values of diversity, achievement, compassion, knowledge, and service.

Michael ’78 and Pam O’Conor, President Bain

Mike Goonan ’75, Russ Brandon ’89, and President Bain

Jack Palvino ’55 and Ray Martino ’71

Dr. Jeannine Dingus-Easton and Dr. Matthew Augustine ’10

Jack Palvino ’55 and Jim Redmond ’79

Dr. Mathis Calvin III ’04 and Dr. Bill Stroud

For more photos from alumni events, visit us at www.flickr.com/fisheralums.

3 Maria Katsetos ’09, ’11(MS) and Dr. Susan Schultz

4 President Bain, Jack Palvino ’55, and Rich Funke

H

onoring Alumni

The College held its annual Accounting Awards Banquet on March 21, honoring Cheryl Lynn Yawman ’86 as the 2013 Outstanding Accounting Alumna of the Year. Yawman is the Practice Director of Accounting and Finance at Cochran, Cochran and Yale in Rochester. She was honored for her career achievement, service to the community, and contributions to Fisher. The College also awarded the Rising Star Award to five alumni. The winners included: Michelle Bellonte ’06, Nicholas Bennett ’05, Erin Hiller ’05, Aimee Jozic ’05, and Jennifer Roberts ’05. On Thursday, April 11, the St. John Fisher College School of Business hosted the Ferdinand and Elaine Smith Excellence in Management Award dinner to honor four alumni. This year’s recipient of the Excellence in Management Award was Russ Brandon ’89, President and CEO, Buffalo Bills. He was honored for outstanding leadership and managerial accomplishment, his record of community involvement, high moral character, and commitment to continued involvement with the College. Michael O’Conor ’78 was given the 2013 Dean’s Medal for Outstanding Service. O’Conor, a Senior Consultant and Director at Jordan & Jordan in New York City, was honored for his exemplary and sustained contributions in service of the School of Business. Rich Anderson ’01, and Dina Natale ’00, ’06 (MBA) were also honored with the Victor E. Salerno Award for American Enterprise, which recognizes the success and dedication of recent graduates. The evening also included recognition of Patricia Leva, President and CEO of Junior Achievement of Rochester, as Fisher’s Beta Gamma Sigma Chapter Honoree. Three alumni were honored at the Jack Palvino Excellence in Communications Awards Gala on April 18. Ray Martino ’71, Partner at

Martino Flynn, LLC, received the Media Gold Award in Public Relations and Advertising; Jim Redmond ’79, Regional Vice President of Communications and Community Investments at Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, received the Media Gold Award in Corporate Public Relations; and Shannon Lappin ’08, Public Relations Specialist at Manning and Napier, received the Rising Star Award. President Bain and Jack Palvino ’55 were on hand to recognize the alumni honorees as well as community recipients Evan Dawson, recipient of the Media Gold Award in Journalism; Todd Clausen, recipient of the Media Gold Award in New and Social Media; and Rich Funke, recipient of the night’s highest honor, the Jack Palvino Lifetime Achievement Award.

Cheryl Yawman ’86 and family

Rich Anderson ’01,Vic Salerno, and David Martin

Bellonte ’06, Roberts ’05, Jozic ’05, Hiller ’05, and Bennett ’05

e

Jack Palvino ’55 and Shannon Lappin ’08

The Distinguished Alumnus in Teaching Award was given to Maria Katsetos ’09, ’11 (MS), a Special Education Teacher at Victor Senior High School.

The Colleg e celebrate d alumni excellence at a series of awards presentatio ns in the s pring semester. The Accou n t ing Awards Ba nquet kick e d awards sea off the son follow e d Ferdinand and Elaine by the Sm Excellence in Manage ith ment Award Ban quet, the J ack Palvin Excellence o in Commu nications Awards Ga la, and the annual Education Celebratio n.

The Distinguished Alumnus in Educational Leadership Award was given to Dr. Mathis Calvin III ’04, Superintendent of the New York State School for the Blind. Calvin is a graduate of the M.S. in Educational Leadership program. The recipient of the Arthur L. Walton, Jr. Award for Executive Leadership was Dr. Matthew Augustine ’10. This award honors an alumnus of the Doctor of Education in Executive Leadership program. Augustine is President and CEO of Biodrill Technical Solutions.

Dianne Cooney Miner, Dina Natale ’00, ’06 (MBA), Lori Hollenbeck, and David Martin

Cardinal Prid

On May 3, the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education held its second annual Education Celebration to recognize and celebrate the College’s support for education, educators, and community leadership. Graduating seniors, graduate candidates, and alumni were honored at the event. Three distinguished awards were given to alumni who exemplify the School of Education’s highest values of diversity, achievement, compassion, knowledge, and service.

Michael ’78 and Pam O’Conor, President Bain

Mike Goonan ’75, Russ Brandon ’89, and President Bain

Jack Palvino ’55 and Ray Martino ’71

Dr. Jeannine Dingus-Easton and Dr. Matthew Augustine ’10

Jack Palvino ’55 and Jim Redmond ’79

Dr. Mathis Calvin III ’04 and Dr. Bill Stroud

For more photos from alumni events, visit us at www.flickr.com/fisheralums.

3 Maria Katsetos ’09, ’11(MS) and Dr. Susan Schultz

4 President Bain, Jack Palvino ’55, and Rich Funke

CAMPUSNEWS

CAMPUSNEWS

Summer Online

St. John Fisher College has announced “Summer Online @ Fisher,” a new selection of undergraduate courses that will be offered online this summer at a reduced tuition rate.

Overnighters for a cause

Two events, 36 hours, and countless tired feet. That’s what it took for Fisher students to raise more than $80,000 in support of Camp Good Days and Special Times and the American Cancer Society (ACS). On Friday, February 8, as a winter storm raged through Rochester and across New England, St. John Fisher College students filled the Student Life Center for the 31st annual Teddi Dance for Love. Winds whipped, snow piled up, and students, alumni, faculty, staff, and campers from Camp Good Days and Special Times danced the night away.

Clockwise from top left:Teddi dancers having fun. One of the Fisher Relay for Life teams. President Bain, Steve Hausmann (honorary chair), and Gary Mervis at Teddi. A luminary at Relay for Life.

5

Most of the courses fall into the humanities, sciences, and liberal arts categories, fulfilling several elective requirements for many current students. The selection of online courses is also designed to offer non-Fisher students an opportunity to complete transferrable core and elective requirements during the summer in a less costly and more flexible online format. Courses include: Business Communication, Introduction to Philosophy, Culture through This year’s dance was dedicated to Kristina Feane, a former Camp Good Days camper and Fisher student, who lost her battle with cancer in May 2012, at the age of 19. Dancers raised a total of $50,931.56 in support of Camp Good Days, an organization that supports children battling terminal illness. The Teddi Dance is the longest-standing student tradition at the College, with the first dance being held in 1982. Later in the semester, on Friday, April 5, over 375 students, faculty, staff, and community members took part in the 12th Annual Relay for Life in support of the ACS. Relay for Life is a 12-hour event where team members take turns continually walking a track. Throughout the 12 hours, participants celebrate cancer survivors, remember those who have lost their battle with cancer, and pledge to take action against cancer. This is an international event, with more than 5,000 relays happening in 20 countries. Fisher’s student organization, Colleges Against Cancer (CAC), along with Nazareth College and the ACS, hosted the inspirational event in the Student Life Center, and raised an astounding $30,305 – beating last year’s total by nearly $10,000. All proceeds benefit the ACS.

Community Service Honor Roll

Earlier this semester, the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) announced the colleges and universities included in this year’s President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, which honors the nation’s leading colleges and universities, students, faculty members, and staff for their commitment to bettering their communities through community service and servicelearning. For the seventh year in a row, St. John Fisher College was among the 113 institutions that earned the recognition of Honor Roll with Distinction for its service work both locally and globally. “We congratulate the awardees and the students for their dedication to service,” said Wendy Spencer, CEO of CNCS. “These institutions have inspired students and faculty alike to roll up their sleeves and work alongside members of the community to solve problems and improve their neighbors’ lives.” Service has always been central to the mission of St. John Fisher College, encouraging the formation of student-run clubs and organizations, including Students With A Vision (SWAV),

Film, Introduction to Islam, Statistics, and Introduction to Creative Nonfiction, to name a few. The cost per credit hour will be $380.00, a 50 percent savings from the regular full-time undergraduate tuition. Each course is three credit hours and can accommodate 20-35 students, depending on the course. The first session of summer online classes began on Monday, May 13. There is still time for interested students to register for the second summer session, which begins on July 8. For more information about this new selection of online courses, contact the Office of Transfer Admissions at (585) 385-8172 or transfer@sjfc.edu.

Colleges Against Cancer, Teddi Dance for Love, and more. Last May, a group of students, faculty, and staff traveled to Kingston, Jamaica, to volunteer at the Jamaican Advantage Thru Sports for Youth (JASY) Day Camp. And, over spring break, Fisher partnered with Alternative Spring Breaks (ASB) and sent a group of 11 students, faculty, and staff to the Appalachian region of Kentucky where they participated in a variety of service projects. “It is an honor for the College to receive this recognition for seven years running,” said President Bain. “We are dedicated to our mission of helping our students build lives, create careers, and serve the community, and we take great pride in both our current students and our alumni, for their extraordinary commitment to service.” According to the CNCS, in 2012, 3.1 million college students dedicated more than 118 million hours of service across the country — a contribution valued at $2.5 billion.

6

CAMPUSNEWS

CAMPUSNEWS

Summer Online

St. John Fisher College has announced “Summer Online @ Fisher,” a new selection of undergraduate courses that will be offered online this summer at a reduced tuition rate.

Overnighters for a cause

Two events, 36 hours, and countless tired feet. That’s what it took for Fisher students to raise more than $80,000 in support of Camp Good Days and Special Times and the American Cancer Society (ACS). On Friday, February 8, as a winter storm raged through Rochester and across New England, St. John Fisher College students filled the Student Life Center for the 31st annual Teddi Dance for Love. Winds whipped, snow piled up, and students, alumni, faculty, staff, and campers from Camp Good Days and Special Times danced the night away.

Clockwise from top left:Teddi dancers having fun. One of the Fisher Relay for Life teams. President Bain, Steve Hausmann (honorary chair), and Gary Mervis at Teddi. A luminary at Relay for Life.

5

Most of the courses fall into the humanities, sciences, and liberal arts categories, fulfilling several elective requirements for many current students. The selection of online courses is also designed to offer non-Fisher students an opportunity to complete transferrable core and elective requirements during the summer in a less costly and more flexible online format. Courses include: Business Communication, Introduction to Philosophy, Culture through This year’s dance was dedicated to Kristina Feane, a former Camp Good Days camper and Fisher student, who lost her battle with cancer in May 2012, at the age of 19. Dancers raised a total of $50,931.56 in support of Camp Good Days, an organization that supports children battling terminal illness. The Teddi Dance is the longest-standing student tradition at the College, with the first dance being held in 1982. Later in the semester, on Friday, April 5, over 375 students, faculty, staff, and community members took part in the 12th Annual Relay for Life in support of the ACS. Relay for Life is a 12-hour event where team members take turns continually walking a track. Throughout the 12 hours, participants celebrate cancer survivors, remember those who have lost their battle with cancer, and pledge to take action against cancer. This is an international event, with more than 5,000 relays happening in 20 countries. Fisher’s student organization, Colleges Against Cancer (CAC), along with Nazareth College and the ACS, hosted the inspirational event in the Student Life Center, and raised an astounding $30,305 – beating last year’s total by nearly $10,000. All proceeds benefit the ACS.

Community Service Honor Roll

Earlier this semester, the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) announced the colleges and universities included in this year’s President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, which honors the nation’s leading colleges and universities, students, faculty members, and staff for their commitment to bettering their communities through community service and servicelearning. For the seventh year in a row, St. John Fisher College was among the 113 institutions that earned the recognition of Honor Roll with Distinction for its service work both locally and globally. “We congratulate the awardees and the students for their dedication to service,” said Wendy Spencer, CEO of CNCS. “These institutions have inspired students and faculty alike to roll up their sleeves and work alongside members of the community to solve problems and improve their neighbors’ lives.” Service has always been central to the mission of St. John Fisher College, encouraging the formation of student-run clubs and organizations, including Students With A Vision (SWAV),

Film, Introduction to Islam, Statistics, and Introduction to Creative Nonfiction, to name a few. The cost per credit hour will be $380.00, a 50 percent savings from the regular full-time undergraduate tuition. Each course is three credit hours and can accommodate 20-35 students, depending on the course. The first session of summer online classes began on Monday, May 13. There is still time for interested students to register for the second summer session, which begins on July 8. For more information about this new selection of online courses, contact the Office of Transfer Admissions at (585) 385-8172 or transfer@sjfc.edu.

Colleges Against Cancer, Teddi Dance for Love, and more. Last May, a group of students, faculty, and staff traveled to Kingston, Jamaica, to volunteer at the Jamaican Advantage Thru Sports for Youth (JASY) Day Camp. And, over spring break, Fisher partnered with Alternative Spring Breaks (ASB) and sent a group of 11 students, faculty, and staff to the Appalachian region of Kentucky where they participated in a variety of service projects. “It is an honor for the College to receive this recognition for seven years running,” said President Bain. “We are dedicated to our mission of helping our students build lives, create careers, and serve the community, and we take great pride in both our current students and our alumni, for their extraordinary commitment to service.” According to the CNCS, in 2012, 3.1 million college students dedicated more than 118 million hours of service across the country — a contribution valued at $2.5 billion.

6

CAMPUSNEWS

Board of Trustees welcomes new members

Jill Knittel ’94, ’03 (MBA), Chief Operating Officer and Partner, Employee Relations Associates, Inc., and Michael O’Conor ’78, Senior Consultant and Director, Jordan & Jordan, were recently elected to the St. John Fisher College Board of Trustees. Knittel joined Employee Relations Associates, Inc., in 2009, and she also serves as the President of ER Select, Inc., a company that focuses exclusively on customized recruitment process outsourcing engagements for companies located throughout the country. She was previously a partner at Worldleaders in Rochester, and held several positions with Advantage Professionals, LLC. Knittel is active in the community, serving the Bivona Child Advocacy Center and the St. John Fisher College Accounting Alumni Society. In 2012, the College awarded her with the Dean’s Medal for Outstanding Service to the School of

Fisher partnerships continue to grow

O’Conor has been with Jordan & Jordan since 2006. He previously served at Chapdelaine Institutional Equities on Long Island, Merrill Lynch and Co., Citibank, Chemical Bank, and Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company. He has served on the Board of Directors of the NASDAQ Exchange and as the Inaugural Chair of the Global Steering Committee of FIX Protocol Ltd. After completing his B.S. at Fisher, he earned his MBA from Adelphi University. In 2004, he completed the Executive Program in Strategic Leadership at Harvard Business School. O’Conor is a member of the Board of Directors of the Kennedy Child Study Center in New York City, and a Trustee at St. Anne’s Parish. He resides in Garden City, N.Y.

In early April, the College announced a 2+2 partnership agreement with Corning Community College (CCC), bringing the list of formal partnerships to five.

for an associate’s degree. These students are guaranteed acceptance to Fisher as along as academic requirements are fulfilled at the community college level.

“Academic alliances designed to benefit transfer students are very important to us as an institution,” said President Bain. “We hope to provide qualified transfer students with a seamless transition in their educational journey, as well as a rich academic and personal experience once they arrive on our campus.”

Fisher is also working to further expand community college partnerships in the Utica and Buffalo regions in the near future.

With a 2+2 program, students are required to complete two years of prescribed coursework

7

Business. She resides in Rochester.

In addition to the CCC agreement, the College currently partners with Onondaga Community College in Syracuse, Finger Lakes Community College in Canandaigua, Genesee Community College in Batavia, and Monroe Community College in Rochester.

Spring break in Appalachia

A total of 11 Fisher students, faculty, and staff traded in their beach towels for Spring Break 2013 to partner with Alternative Spring Breaks, an organization that coordinates service-learning immersion trips for college students. The Fisher group spent their week in Harlan, Kentucky, in the Appalachian Mountain region. Students Tricia Blanchard, Sarah Hryzak, Karlee Platts, Mark Prunella-Miller, Dan Przybylski, Aaron Spacher, Tierney Sullivan, and Chloe Warner were joined by Sally Vaughan, Director of Community Service, and faculty members Scott Bryson and Dr. Greg Cunningham for the trip. Harlan, Kentucky, sits on the southeast ridge of the Appalachian Mountains, not too far from the Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia borders. The residents’ chief source of income is coal mining and most locals either work in the mines or have a family member who works in the mines. In the Appalachian region, there are two types of mining that are prevalent: the traditional method of digging a tunnel deep into the side of the mountain, and mountaintop removal. This second, more controversial method, uses high amounts of explosives to remove layers of rock and soil on top of the mountain to remove the coal beneath. “Through the mountaintop removal method, the picturesque mountain landscape of the Appalachians is being leveled off and transformed into barren land where nothing grows,” said Przybylski.

The group learned that another problem with this mining method is that deposits of coal slurry (the by-product of mining) are polluting the drinking water and filling the air with dust, making some regions of the mountains uninhabitable. While in Harlan, the group met residents who opposed mining and were suffering from its byproducts, and those who supported and worked in the mines. And while Kentucky may feel far away, Przybylski and the other students came home with a better sense of how the work done in the Appalachian region affects us all – even right here at Fisher. “The coal that is being mined creates light and heat energy for us; coal mining is also contaminating some of our water sources, which is a staggering fact,” said Przybylski. While they were there, the group worked with the Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative to replant 2,700 trees on a mine site. They also visited coal mines to learn about the many aspects of the industry, and they helped weatherize local low-income homes, and painted a community center. But they left feeling compelled to do more. “We need to make simple changes to conserve our natural resources,” said Przybylski. “Shut off lights that are not being used, lower the thermostat when no one is home, and don’t waste water. Some areas of West Virginia are without clean drinking water. West Virginia borders Pennsylvania, which borders New York – it all hits close to home,” added Przybylski.

8

CAMPUSNEWS

Board of Trustees welcomes new members

Jill Knittel ’94, ’03 (MBA), Chief Operating Officer and Partner, Employee Relations Associates, Inc., and Michael O’Conor ’78, Senior Consultant and Director, Jordan & Jordan, were recently elected to the St. John Fisher College Board of Trustees. Knittel joined Employee Relations Associates, Inc., in 2009, and she also serves as the President of ER Select, Inc., a company that focuses exclusively on customized recruitment process outsourcing engagements for companies located throughout the country. She was previously a partner at Worldleaders in Rochester, and held several positions with Advantage Professionals, LLC. Knittel is active in the community, serving the Bivona Child Advocacy Center and the St. John Fisher College Accounting Alumni Society. In 2012, the College awarded her with the Dean’s Medal for Outstanding Service to the School of

Fisher partnerships continue to grow

O’Conor has been with Jordan & Jordan since 2006. He previously served at Chapdelaine Institutional Equities on Long Island, Merrill Lynch and Co., Citibank, Chemical Bank, and Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company. He has served on the Board of Directors of the NASDAQ Exchange and as the Inaugural Chair of the Global Steering Committee of FIX Protocol Ltd. After completing his B.S. at Fisher, he earned his MBA from Adelphi University. In 2004, he completed the Executive Program in Strategic Leadership at Harvard Business School. O’Conor is a member of the Board of Directors of the Kennedy Child Study Center in New York City, and a Trustee at St. Anne’s Parish. He resides in Garden City, N.Y.

In early April, the College announced a 2+2 partnership agreement with Corning Community College (CCC), bringing the list of formal partnerships to five.

for an associate’s degree. These students are guaranteed acceptance to Fisher as along as academic requirements are fulfilled at the community college level.

“Academic alliances designed to benefit transfer students are very important to us as an institution,” said President Bain. “We hope to provide qualified transfer students with a seamless transition in their educational journey, as well as a rich academic and personal experience once they arrive on our campus.”

Fisher is also working to further expand community college partnerships in the Utica and Buffalo regions in the near future.

With a 2+2 program, students are required to complete two years of prescribed coursework

7

Business. She resides in Rochester.

In addition to the CCC agreement, the College currently partners with Onondaga Community College in Syracuse, Finger Lakes Community College in Canandaigua, Genesee Community College in Batavia, and Monroe Community College in Rochester.

Spring break in Appalachia

A total of 11 Fisher students, faculty, and staff traded in their beach towels for Spring Break 2013 to partner with Alternative Spring Breaks, an organization that coordinates service-learning immersion trips for college students. The Fisher group spent their week in Harlan, Kentucky, in the Appalachian Mountain region. Students Tricia Blanchard, Sarah Hryzak, Karlee Platts, Mark Prunella-Miller, Dan Przybylski, Aaron Spacher, Tierney Sullivan, and Chloe Warner were joined by Sally Vaughan, Director of Community Service, and faculty members Scott Bryson and Dr. Greg Cunningham for the trip. Harlan, Kentucky, sits on the southeast ridge of the Appalachian Mountains, not too far from the Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia borders. The residents’ chief source of income is coal mining and most locals either work in the mines or have a family member who works in the mines. In the Appalachian region, there are two types of mining that are prevalent: the traditional method of digging a tunnel deep into the side of the mountain, and mountaintop removal. This second, more controversial method, uses high amounts of explosives to remove layers of rock and soil on top of the mountain to remove the coal beneath. “Through the mountaintop removal method, the picturesque mountain landscape of the Appalachians is being leveled off and transformed into barren land where nothing grows,” said Przybylski.

The group learned that another problem with this mining method is that deposits of coal slurry (the by-product of mining) are polluting the drinking water and filling the air with dust, making some regions of the mountains uninhabitable. While in Harlan, the group met residents who opposed mining and were suffering from its byproducts, and those who supported and worked in the mines. And while Kentucky may feel far away, Przybylski and the other students came home with a better sense of how the work done in the Appalachian region affects us all – even right here at Fisher. “The coal that is being mined creates light and heat energy for us; coal mining is also contaminating some of our water sources, which is a staggering fact,” said Przybylski. While they were there, the group worked with the Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative to replant 2,700 trees on a mine site. They also visited coal mines to learn about the many aspects of the industry, and they helped weatherize local low-income homes, and painted a community center. But they left feeling compelled to do more. “We need to make simple changes to conserve our natural resources,” said Przybylski. “Shut off lights that are not being used, lower the thermostat when no one is home, and don’t waste water. Some areas of West Virginia are without clean drinking water. West Virginia borders Pennsylvania, which borders New York – it all hits close to home,” added Przybylski.

8

CAMPUSNEWS

Fisher names new Provost

St. John Fisher College has appointed Dr. Randall Krieg as the new Provost and Dean of the College. In his role as Provost, Krieg will be the Chief Academic Officer with responsibility for academic leadership and administration in the areas of planning, developing, implementing, and assessing all academic programs and services. He will provide leadership and supervision for the College’s School of Arts and Sciences; School of Business; Wegmans School of Nursing; Wegmans School of Pharmacy; Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education; Office of the Registrar; Career Services; Lavery Library; and Academic Opportunity Programs. In addition, he will be a member of the President’s Cabinet and the Senior Staff. “We’re delighted to have an individual of Randall Krieg’s caliber join the ranks of Fisher’s executive administration,” said President Bain. “Dr. Krieg’s experience and talents are an excellent match for the academic leadership needs of the College.”

CAMPUSNEWS

the College since 2007. From 2003 until 2007, he held several positions of increasing importance at St. Joseph’s College New York, culminating in his role as Academic Dean of Arts and Sciences. Prior to St. Joseph’s College New York, he was with the University of Mary in Bismarck, North Dakota, where he was a Professor in the Business Division, Director of Graduate Programs, and Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs – positions he held simultaneously from 20002003. During his thirteen-year tenure at the University of Northern Iowa, from 1987 until 2000, he rose through the academic ranks, from assistant professor to full professor in the Department of Economics. Throughout his academic career, Krieg has had direct experience in online education, servicelearning, diversity and multicultural affairs, and experiential education. He also has prior experience in strategic planning, assessment, and accreditation self-studies.

Krieg comes to Fisher from Saint Joseph’s College of Maine, where he served as Dean of

College earns competitive grant

St. John Fisher College has received a $100,000 grant from the George I. Alden Trust as part of the Excellence in Career-Related Undergraduate Award program. The grant will support the College’s institutional scholarship endowment. The award is intended to publicly recognize institutions that have excelled in retention, education, graduation, and career placement. Other factors that are taken into account for the award include academic, demographic, and other relevant characteristics of the student population.

Mount Holyoke College, and Saint Peter’s University. The College of the Holy Cross received the competition’s first place Excellence Award. Fisher’s Science Scholars Program, Service Scholars Program, and First Generation Scholarship were of significance in the decision to award the grant. Additionally, the College’s emphasis on a student’s first-year experience and the Community-Based Service-Learning Program helped achieve the recognition.

Buffalo Bills return for 14th Training Camp In 2000, St. John Fisher College was known to residents of Rochester and the surrounding counties, but travel outside of that arc, and many hadn’t heard of it. Saying, “I attend St. John Fisher College in Pittsford,” was often met with “St. John’s University?” or “Pittsburgh?” It’s a different story today. For more than a decade, the end of July and August brings crowds of people to campus, and newscasters report daily from their posts at Fisher. Much of the College’s name recognition is due to the Buffalo Bills football team holding their annual pre-season training camp on the Fisher campus. For nearly a month, professional football players live in the residence halls and work on the field and in Fisher classrooms. Once the Bills started their annual pilgrimage to East Avenue, Fisher became well-known to a wider audience, and the number of applications increased dramatically. At the same time, Fisher began an expansion of academic programs and a well-planned campus update. Since the Bills began their summer workouts on campus, enrollment at the College has almost doubled, doctoral programs were added to the academic roster, and two residence halls and three new athletic fields were added. In addition to name recognition and the growth that has come with that, Fisher has received other benefits from its relationship with the Bills. Ralph C. Wilson, Jr., owner of the Bills organization, created a student scholarship fund

and made a generous gift to name the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education. In recognition of his continuing commitment to the College, the Student Life Center will be renamed the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Athletic Center. This past year, Fisher renewed its contract with the Buffalo Bills to extend training camp. Now entering its 14th year, camp remains as popular as ever. Sports Illustrated placed the training camp third in the “Top Ten Training Camp Sites” list in 2012. “Over the past thirteen years, we have had a wonderful partnership with the Buffalo Bills. Each year we are excited to see the team return,” said President Bain. “The Bills training camp is a respected model throughout the NFL, particularly in terms of the fan experience,” said Russ Brandon ’89, President and CEO of the Buffalo Bills. “It is not only a time for our players to get into their playbooks and execute on the practice field, but also an opportunity for our fans to come out and get a look at our team. Much of our success with training camp is because of the efforts of Dr. Bain, the Board of Trustees, and the faculty and staff at Fisher. Everyone on campus has been so welcoming and accommodating. It is a tremendous place to get ready for the season and we are always excited to come back.” For the 2013 Training Camp Schedule, go to the Buffalo Bills website at www.buffalobills.com.

Fisher received special recognition in the competition alongside several schools, including Vassar College, Franklin & Marshall College,

9

10

CAMPUSNEWS

Fisher names new Provost

St. John Fisher College has appointed Dr. Randall Krieg as the new Provost and Dean of the College. In his role as Provost, Krieg will be the Chief Academic Officer with responsibility for academic leadership and administration in the areas of planning, developing, implementing, and assessing all academic programs and services. He will provide leadership and supervision for the College’s School of Arts and Sciences; School of Business; Wegmans School of Nursing; Wegmans School of Pharmacy; Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education; Office of the Registrar; Career Services; Lavery Library; and Academic Opportunity Programs. In addition, he will be a member of the President’s Cabinet and the Senior Staff. “We’re delighted to have an individual of Randall Krieg’s caliber join the ranks of Fisher’s executive administration,” said President Bain. “Dr. Krieg’s experience and talents are an excellent match for the academic leadership needs of the College.”

CAMPUSNEWS

the College since 2007. From 2003 until 2007, he held several positions of increasing importance at St. Joseph’s College New York, culminating in his role as Academic Dean of Arts and Sciences. Prior to St. Joseph’s College New York, he was with the University of Mary in Bismarck, North Dakota, where he was a Professor in the Business Division, Director of Graduate Programs, and Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs – positions he held simultaneously from 20002003. During his thirteen-year tenure at the University of Northern Iowa, from 1987 until 2000, he rose through the academic ranks, from assistant professor to full professor in the Department of Economics. Throughout his academic career, Krieg has had direct experience in online education, servicelearning, diversity and multicultural affairs, and experiential education. He also has prior experience in strategic planning, assessment, and accreditation self-studies.

Krieg comes to Fisher from Saint Joseph’s College of Maine, where he served as Dean of

College earns competitive grant

St. John Fisher College has received a $100,000 grant from the George I. Alden Trust as part of the Excellence in Career-Related Undergraduate Award program. The grant will support the College’s institutional scholarship endowment. The award is intended to publicly recognize institutions that have excelled in retention, education, graduation, and career placement. Other factors that are taken into account for the award include academic, demographic, and other relevant characteristics of the student population.

Mount Holyoke College, and Saint Peter’s University. The College of the Holy Cross received the competition’s first place Excellence Award. Fisher’s Science Scholars Program, Service Scholars Program, and First Generation Scholarship were of significance in the decision to award the grant. Additionally, the College’s emphasis on a student’s first-year experience and the Community-Based Service-Learning Program helped achieve the recognition.

Buffalo Bills return for 14th Training Camp In 2000, St. John Fisher College was known to residents of Rochester and the surrounding counties, but travel outside of that arc, and many hadn’t heard of it. Saying, “I attend St. John Fisher College in Pittsford,” was often met with “St. John’s University?” or “Pittsburgh?” It’s a different story today. For more than a decade, the end of July and August brings crowds of people to campus, and newscasters report daily from their posts at Fisher. Much of the College’s name recognition is due to the Buffalo Bills football team holding their annual pre-season training camp on the Fisher campus. For nearly a month, professional football players live in the residence halls and work on the field and in Fisher classrooms. Once the Bills started their annual pilgrimage to East Avenue, Fisher became well-known to a wider audience, and the number of applications increased dramatically. At the same time, Fisher began an expansion of academic programs and a well-planned campus update. Since the Bills began their summer workouts on campus, enrollment at the College has almost doubled, doctoral programs were added to the academic roster, and two residence halls and three new athletic fields were added. In addition to name recognition and the growth that has come with that, Fisher has received other benefits from its relationship with the Bills. Ralph C. Wilson, Jr., owner of the Bills organization, created a student scholarship fund

and made a generous gift to name the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education. In recognition of his continuing commitment to the College, the Student Life Center will be renamed the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Athletic Center. This past year, Fisher renewed its contract with the Buffalo Bills to extend training camp. Now entering its 14th year, camp remains as popular as ever. Sports Illustrated placed the training camp third in the “Top Ten Training Camp Sites” list in 2012. “Over the past thirteen years, we have had a wonderful partnership with the Buffalo Bills. Each year we are excited to see the team return,” said President Bain. “The Bills training camp is a respected model throughout the NFL, particularly in terms of the fan experience,” said Russ Brandon ’89, President and CEO of the Buffalo Bills. “It is not only a time for our players to get into their playbooks and execute on the practice field, but also an opportunity for our fans to come out and get a look at our team. Much of our success with training camp is because of the efforts of Dr. Bain, the Board of Trustees, and the faculty and staff at Fisher. Everyone on campus has been so welcoming and accommodating. It is a tremendous place to get ready for the season and we are always excited to come back.” For the 2013 Training Camp Schedule, go to the Buffalo Bills website at www.buffalobills.com.

Fisher received special recognition in the competition alongside several schools, including Vassar College, Franklin & Marshall College,

9

10

ACADEMICS

ACADEMICS

Wegmans School of Nursing

Joining Forces Conference a Success

The Wegmans School of Nursing held its inaugural Joining Forces Conference on May 1314, 2013. The conference was created to promote the health of veterans, military personnel, and their families.

Wegmans School of Nursing

Building a state-of-the-art simulation center

Keynote speaker Lieutenant Colonel David M. Wallace, MD, MPH, Chief, Primary Care Clinic in Fort Drum, discussed “What’s Walking Through the Door: Relating to Members of the Military, Veterans, and Their Families.”

The 10,400 square-foot annex to the existing Wegmans School of Nursing building will include the state-of-the-art Glover-Crask Simulation Center. A recent grant from the Fred L. Emerson Foundation will outfit the new Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and Obstetrics (OB) simulation rooms. The simulation experience complements the nursing students’ clinical rotations, thus reinforcing the experiential learning component of the nursing curriculum.

Wallace, a native of Rochester, spent three years in Germany during his first military tour. In 1999 he spent five months in Kosovo and has deployed twice in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom with the 10th Combat Support Hospital, and again in 2008-2009 with the 10th Mountain Division (LI) Headquarters as part of Multi-National Division South. He currently serves as the Chief of the Primary Care Clinic, Guthrie Army Health Clinic.

Lt. Col. David Wallace, Dr. Dianne Cooney Miner, President Bain, Dr. Douglas Bufano

During the two-day event, health care professionals consulted with clinicians, educators, researchers, and persons who have experienced physical and/or emotional conditions associated with military service.

The conference also featured Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP ’65, Professor Emeritus & Senior Research Scientist, University of Connecticut, Center for Health, Intervention & Prevention; Professor, University of Kentucky, College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry. He presented “Veterans Healthcare: Twenty-first Century Issues & Directions.”

“This generous gift from the Emerson Foundation will allow us to expand opportunities for clinical simulation in our new nursing addition. These expanded opportunities are an integral part of nursing education today, assisting students to build confidence and competence, and

challenging them to think in complex and complicated ways. The grant will help place our students at the forefront of nursing education and entry-level clinical competence, and position them as new leaders in professional practice,” said Dr. Dianne Cooney Miner, Dean, Wegmans School of Nursing Both the Emerson Foundation and the GloverCrask Charitable Trust are longtime supporters of St. John Fisher College. The annex to the existing 42,000 square-foot Wegmans School of Nursing building will also include classrooms, laboratories, and faculty offices to accommodate the growth in the College’s nursing program.

Bringing down the house

This was a regional initiative supporting the national “Joining Forces” effort led by First Lady Michele Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, which calls attention to critical health care issues facing members of our armed forces, our veterans, and their families.

O

“Faculty members in the Wegmans School of Nursing recently made a commitment to address the issue of military cultural competence and to pay more attention to meeting the unique health and wellness needs of veterans and their families in course work and in the acquisition and dissemination of veteran-specific learning materials. The conference is one of the many initiatives already underway to support that commitment,” said Dr. Dianne Cooney Miner, Dean, Wegmans School of Nursing. Thomas Miller ’65 speaking to guests at the Joining Forces conference.

11

ver 40 years ago, St. John Fisher College erected a facilities building on campus. It was intended to be a temporary building to house equipment and offices as the campus expanded under then president Fr. Lavery. Finally, at the beginning of this year, the building was demolished to make room for the School of Nursing addition. With the opening of the new Facilities Building in the northeast corner of campus, demolition of the former facilities building is complete. President Bain was glad to lend a hand in the demolition process.

12

ACADEMICS

ACADEMICS

Wegmans School of Nursing

Joining Forces Conference a Success

The Wegmans School of Nursing held its inaugural Joining Forces Conference on May 1314, 2013. The conference was created to promote the health of veterans, military personnel, and their families.

Wegmans School of Nursing

Building a state-of-the-art simulation center

Keynote speaker Lieutenant Colonel David M. Wallace, MD, MPH, Chief, Primary Care Clinic in Fort Drum, discussed “What’s Walking Through the Door: Relating to Members of the Military, Veterans, and Their Families.”

The 10,400 square-foot annex to the existing Wegmans School of Nursing building will include the state-of-the-art Glover-Crask Simulation Center. A recent grant from the Fred L. Emerson Foundation will outfit the new Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and Obstetrics (OB) simulation rooms. The simulation experience complements the nursing students’ clinical rotations, thus reinforcing the experiential learning component of the nursing curriculum.

Wallace, a native of Rochester, spent three years in Germany during his first military tour. In 1999 he spent five months in Kosovo and has deployed twice in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom with the 10th Combat Support Hospital, and again in 2008-2009 with the 10th Mountain Division (LI) Headquarters as part of Multi-National Division South. He currently serves as the Chief of the Primary Care Clinic, Guthrie Army Health Clinic.

Lt. Col. David Wallace, Dr. Dianne Cooney Miner, President Bain, Dr. Douglas Bufano

During the two-day event, health care professionals consulted with clinicians, educators, researchers, and persons who have experienced physical and/or emotional conditions associated with military service.

The conference also featured Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP ’65, Professor Emeritus & Senior Research Scientist, University of Connecticut, Center for Health, Intervention & Prevention; Professor, University of Kentucky, College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry. He presented “Veterans Healthcare: Twenty-first Century Issues & Directions.”

“This generous gift from the Emerson Foundation will allow us to expand opportunities for clinical simulation in our new nursing addition. These expanded opportunities are an integral part of nursing education today, assisting students to build confidence and competence, and

challenging them to think in complex and complicated ways. The grant will help place our students at the forefront of nursing education and entry-level clinical competence, and position them as new leaders in professional practice,” said Dr. Dianne Cooney Miner, Dean, Wegmans School of Nursing Both the Emerson Foundation and the GloverCrask Charitable Trust are longtime supporters of St. John Fisher College. The annex to the existing 42,000 square-foot Wegmans School of Nursing building will also include classrooms, laboratories, and faculty offices to accommodate the growth in the College’s nursing program.

Bringing down the house

This was a regional initiative supporting the national “Joining Forces” effort led by First Lady Michele Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, which calls attention to critical health care issues facing members of our armed forces, our veterans, and their families.

O

“Faculty members in the Wegmans School of Nursing recently made a commitment to address the issue of military cultural competence and to pay more attention to meeting the unique health and wellness needs of veterans and their families in course work and in the acquisition and dissemination of veteran-specific learning materials. The conference is one of the many initiatives already underway to support that commitment,” said Dr. Dianne Cooney Miner, Dean, Wegmans School of Nursing. Thomas Miller ’65 speaking to guests at the Joining Forces conference.

11

ver 40 years ago, St. John Fisher College erected a facilities building on campus. It was intended to be a temporary building to house equipment and offices as the campus expanded under then president Fr. Lavery. Finally, at the beginning of this year, the building was demolished to make room for the School of Nursing addition. With the opening of the new Facilities Building in the northeast corner of campus, demolition of the former facilities building is complete. President Bain was glad to lend a hand in the demolition process.

12

ACADEMICS

ACADEMICS

Wegmans School of Pharmacy

Birnie receives Fulbright

Dr. Christine Birnie, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, in the Wegmans School of Pharmacy, has been named a Fulbright Scholar. Birnie’s grant will allow her to teach and support program development within the newly established Pharm.D. program at SRM University in Chennai, India, during the fall 2013 semester. “I am honored and humbled to receive this award and look forward to the opportunities it will present to me personally and to the College,” said Birnie. “Part of my plan is to establish collaborations between their University and Fisher. I am excited about this potential collaboration as it is a focused initiative within our school’s strategic plan.” Birnie received her B.S. in Pharmacy from the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and continued her studies at the same institution, completing a Ph.D. in the area of Pharmaceutics.

Scattering for service

The Wegmans School of Pharmacy held its annual service day on Tuesday, April 16, scattering nearly 200 students, faculty, and staff around the community on service missions. The group dispersed to 20 different sites, including Gilda’s Club, Seneca Park Zoo, the Al Sigl Center, Alternatives for Battered Women, Catholic Family Center, Sanctuary House,and Ronald McDonald House. They performed a number of tasks from painting to cleaning to stocking shelves.

Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education

After a few years working in the pharmaceutical industry, she joined the ranks of academia, joining the faculty of Palm Beach Atlantic University in West Palm Beach, FL, helping to develop the compounding laboratories and pharmaceutical science curriculum in the newly founded school. In 2006, Birnie joined the Wegmans School of Pharmacy as a founding faculty and was promoted to Department Chair, Pharmaceutical Sciences, in 2010. Established in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the program’s purpose is to build mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries. Recipients of the Fulbright Scholar awards are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement and because they have demonstrated extraordinary leadership potential in their fields. The Fulbright Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

College names School of Education Dean

The College has appointed Dr. Michael Wischnowski as the new Dean of the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education.

and the mission of the College,” said President Bain.

Wischnowski served as the Interim Dean during this past academic year and previously was Program Director of the College’s Ed.D. Program in Executive Leadership.

Wischnowski joined Fisher in 2004 as an associate professor. He has previously worked at SUNY Geneseo and the University of Rochester.

“Dr. Wischnowski’s professional and academic experiences—through his teaching, scholarship, leadership, and service—underscore his devotion to the philosophy of the School of Education

Grants to help mentoring programs

The School of Education has received a $27,000 grant from First Niagara Bank and a $7,500 grant from Bank of America to support mentoring programs in the Rochester City School District. The First Niagara Bank grant will fund a new mentoring program with seventh and eighth graders at the World of Inquiry School No. 58. Dr. Mike Wischnowski, Dean of the School of Education, notes that the program will benefit Fisher students and the teachers and students at World of Inquiry. “Our teacher candidates can have an authentic teaching experience using best practices for literacy education while, at the same time, students at the World of Inquiry School can receive supplemental instruction and resources in reading and writing. We appreciate First Niagara’s devotion to this cause.”

The grant from Bank of America will help implement the Partnership for Success Program, a college readiness initiative serving low-income, at-risk teens from Rochester Early College International High School (RECIHS). The program is designed to increase high school graduation rates of academically at-risk students while making college a reality for these young adults.

Doctoral program adds a new satellite location The College will offer its Doctor of Education in Executive Leadership (Ed.D.) at Onondaga Community College’s Regional Higher Education Center, beginning in September. This is the second extension site for Fisher’s Ed.D. Program; The College of New Rochelle was the program’s first extension site, opening in 2009. This unique program was developed to provide an attractive and viable alternative to traditional doctoral programs in educational leadership. To date, the program has graduated 147 students.

13

This summer, World of Inquiry students will attend the School of Education’s summer literacy clinic, focusing on all aspects of literacy. Graduate students from Fisher’s Literacy Program will serve as tutors.

The cohort-paced model is designed around a multidisciplinary program of study in executive leadership. Classes meet year-round in an alternate weekend format and are aligned with New York State, national, and institutional standards. “We are excited to collaborate with St. John Fisher College and provide students from our area with a new pathway to support their personal and professional goals,” said Margaret M. “Meg” O’Connell, Onondaga’s Interim President.

14

ACADEMICS

ACADEMICS

Wegmans School of Pharmacy

Birnie receives Fulbright

Dr. Christine Birnie, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, in the Wegmans School of Pharmacy, has been named a Fulbright Scholar. Birnie’s grant will allow her to teach and support program development within the newly established Pharm.D. program at SRM University in Chennai, India, during the fall 2013 semester. “I am honored and humbled to receive this award and look forward to the opportunities it will present to me personally and to the College,” said Birnie. “Part of my plan is to establish collaborations between their University and Fisher. I am excited about this potential collaboration as it is a focused initiative within our school’s strategic plan.” Birnie received her B.S. in Pharmacy from the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and continued her studies at the same institution, completing a Ph.D. in the area of Pharmaceutics.

Scattering for service

The Wegmans School of Pharmacy held its annual service day on Tuesday, April 16, scattering nearly 200 students, faculty, and staff around the community on service missions. The group dispersed to 20 different sites, including Gilda’s Club, Seneca Park Zoo, the Al Sigl Center, Alternatives for Battered Women, Catholic Family Center, Sanctuary House,and Ronald McDonald House. They performed a number of tasks from painting to cleaning to stocking shelves.

Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education

After a few years working in the pharmaceutical industry, she joined the ranks of academia, joining the faculty of Palm Beach Atlantic University in West Palm Beach, FL, helping to develop the compounding laboratories and pharmaceutical science curriculum in the newly founded school. In 2006, Birnie joined the Wegmans School of Pharmacy as a founding faculty and was promoted to Department Chair, Pharmaceutical Sciences, in 2010. Established in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the program’s purpose is to build mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries. Recipients of the Fulbright Scholar awards are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement and because they have demonstrated extraordinary leadership potential in their fields. The Fulbright Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

College names School of Education Dean

The College has appointed Dr. Michael Wischnowski as the new Dean of the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education.

and the mission of the College,” said President Bain.

Wischnowski served as the Interim Dean during this past academic year and previously was Program Director of the College’s Ed.D. Program in Executive Leadership.

Wischnowski joined Fisher in 2004 as an associate professor. He has previously worked at SUNY Geneseo and the University of Rochester.

“Dr. Wischnowski’s professional and academic experiences—through his teaching, scholarship, leadership, and service—underscore his devotion to the philosophy of the School of Education

Grants to help mentoring programs

The School of Education has received a $27,000 grant from First Niagara Bank and a $7,500 grant from Bank of America to support mentoring programs in the Rochester City School District. The First Niagara Bank grant will fund a new mentoring program with seventh and eighth graders at the World of Inquiry School No. 58. Dr. Mike Wischnowski, Dean of the School of Education, notes that the program will benefit Fisher students and the teachers and students at World of Inquiry. “Our teacher candidates can have an authentic teaching experience using best practices for literacy education while, at the same time, students at the World of Inquiry School can receive supplemental instruction and resources in reading and writing. We appreciate First Niagara’s devotion to this cause.”

The grant from Bank of America will help implement the Partnership for Success Program, a college readiness initiative serving low-income, at-risk teens from Rochester Early College International High School (RECIHS). The program is designed to increase high school graduation rates of academically at-risk students while making college a reality for these young adults.

Doctoral program adds a new satellite location The College will offer its Doctor of Education in Executive Leadership (Ed.D.) at Onondaga Community College’s Regional Higher Education Center, beginning in September. This is the second extension site for Fisher’s Ed.D. Program; The College of New Rochelle was the program’s first extension site, opening in 2009. This unique program was developed to provide an attractive and viable alternative to traditional doctoral programs in educational leadership. To date, the program has graduated 147 students.

13

This summer, World of Inquiry students will attend the School of Education’s summer literacy clinic, focusing on all aspects of literacy. Graduate students from Fisher’s Literacy Program will serve as tutors.

The cohort-paced model is designed around a multidisciplinary program of study in executive leadership. Classes meet year-round in an alternate weekend format and are aligned with New York State, national, and institutional standards. “We are excited to collaborate with St. John Fisher College and provide students from our area with a new pathway to support their personal and professional goals,” said Margaret M. “Meg” O’Connell, Onondaga’s Interim President.

14

ACADEMICS

ACADEMICS

School of Business

School of Business

Lakehal-Ayat earns Fulbright

Dr. Merouane Lakehal-Ayat, an accounting/ finance professor in the School of Business, has been named a Fulbright Senior Specialist.

Lynn Mucenski-Keck ’01(right) and the St. John Fisher College team accepting their prize.

Fisher students win big at national tax competition

In the fall of 2012, a team of St. John Fisher College accounting students came in first place in the regional Deloitte FanTAXtic Competition in Boston. Then, in early January, the group traveled to Dallas to the Deloitte Training Facility for the national – and final – round, where they finished in 2nd place, landing a total of $10,000 in prizes. Greg Church ’13, Katie Frandrich ’13, Dan Agan ’13, Brendan Hughes ’15, Jadon O’Donnell ’15, and Professor Lynn Mucenski-Keck ’01 made the trip to compete against schools including Fordham University, College of William & Mary, University of Utah, University of Southern Florida, University of Southern California, and the University of Missouri. The University of Texas placed first, with Michigan State University coming in third place behind Fisher. The annual competition encourages student teams to utilize their growing knowledge and skills to solve real-world, issues-based business

tax scenarios. “This was a great accomplishment not only for the students but also the St. John Fisher College Accounting program and School of Business,” said Mucenski-Keck. “We appreciate all the hard work and sacrifices that the students made to win the regional competition and go on to place nationally.”

The Fulbright Specialist Program is a complement to the traditional Fulbright Scholar Program. In this program, U.S. faculty and professionals serve as consultants on curriculum, faculty development, institutional planning, and related subjects at overseas academic institutions for two to six weeks. Lakehal-Ayat’s award was granted by the Fulbright Scholarship Board, the United States

Department of State, and the Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES). He hopes to travel to Asia, Europe, and Africa over the next five years to teach and conduct research. It is his fourth Fulbright Award since 2001. Lakehal-Ayat has been a faculty member at Fisher since 1986. During his tenure, he has received numerous awards, and has stayed active in research through publishing and attending conferences centered on a variety of finance issues.

Salerno Center Progress

Despite a cold and challenging winter season, construction on the Victor E. Salerno Center for American Enterprise is progressing on schedule. The Salerno Center’s target completion date is August 1.

Deloitte will provide a $5,000 scholarship to the College’s Accounting program, and each student will receive a $1,000 cash prize. “It is always fantastic to see our students putting their knowledge to the test, but to see them do it on a national stage alongside these prestigious schools makes us even more proud,” said Dr. David Martin, Dean. “Professor Mucenski-Keck deserves much applause for her hard work and dedication, along with all of the faculty. Their collaborative efforts have led to the success of our students, which is our top priority.”

Fisher takes third place in the Adirondack Cup The St. John Fisher College Student Investment Club took third place in the 2013 Adirondack Cup, a six-month stock competition among colleges throughout New York and New England.

Each portfolio had to include a hypothetical $1 million invested in five small cap stocks from different industries, holding at least five percent but no more than 50 percent of the portfolio. Teams were allowed to make changes to their

15

portfolio only twice during the contest period. The goals of the competition, which is in its second year, are to teach students the difference between trading stocks and thinking through their investment decisions for the long-term and to help them make appropriate connections in the financial services sector as they prepare to enter the job market. The winning team was Siena College of Loudonville, N.Y.

16

ACADEMICS

ACADEMICS

School of Business

School of Business

Lakehal-Ayat earns Fulbright

Dr. Merouane Lakehal-Ayat, an accounting/ finance professor in the School of Business, has been named a Fulbright Senior Specialist.

Lynn Mucenski-Keck ’01(right) and the St. John Fisher College team accepting their prize.

Fisher students win big at national tax competition

In the fall of 2012, a team of St. John Fisher College accounting students came in first place in the regional Deloitte FanTAXtic Competition in Boston. Then, in early January, the group traveled to Dallas to the Deloitte Training Facility for the national – and final – round, where they finished in 2nd place, landing a total of $10,000 in prizes. Greg Church ’13, Katie Frandrich ’13, Dan Agan ’13, Brendan Hughes ’15, Jadon O’Donnell ’15, and Professor Lynn Mucenski-Keck ’01 made the trip to compete against schools including Fordham University, College of William & Mary, University of Utah, University of Southern Florida, University of Southern California, and the University of Missouri. The University of Texas placed first, with Michigan State University coming in third place behind Fisher. The annual competition encourages student teams to utilize their growing knowledge and skills to solve real-world, issues-based business

tax scenarios. “This was a great accomplishment not only for the students but also the St. John Fisher College Accounting program and School of Business,” said Mucenski-Keck. “We appreciate all the hard work and sacrifices that the students made to win the regional competition and go on to place nationally.”

The Fulbright Specialist Program is a complement to the traditional Fulbright Scholar Program. In this program, U.S. faculty and professionals serve as consultants on curriculum, faculty development, institutional planning, and related subjects at overseas academic institutions for two to six weeks. Lakehal-Ayat’s award was granted by the Fulbright Scholarship Board, the United States

Department of State, and the Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES). He hopes to travel to Asia, Europe, and Africa over the next five years to teach and conduct research. It is his fourth Fulbright Award since 2001. Lakehal-Ayat has been a faculty member at Fisher since 1986. During his tenure, he has received numerous awards, and has stayed active in research through publishing and attending conferences centered on a variety of finance issues.

Salerno Center Progress

Despite a cold and challenging winter season, construction on the Victor E. Salerno Center for American Enterprise is progressing on schedule. The Salerno Center’s target completion date is August 1.

Deloitte will provide a $5,000 scholarship to the College’s Accounting program, and each student will receive a $1,000 cash prize. “It is always fantastic to see our students putting their knowledge to the test, but to see them do it on a national stage alongside these prestigious schools makes us even more proud,” said Dr. David Martin, Dean. “Professor Mucenski-Keck deserves much applause for her hard work and dedication, along with all of the faculty. Their collaborative efforts have led to the success of our students, which is our top priority.”

Fisher takes third place in the Adirondack Cup The St. John Fisher College Student Investment Club took third place in the 2013 Adirondack Cup, a six-month stock competition among colleges throughout New York and New England.

Each portfolio had to include a hypothetical $1 million invested in five small cap stocks from different industries, holding at least five percent but no more than 50 percent of the portfolio. Teams were allowed to make changes to their

15

portfolio only twice during the contest period. The goals of the competition, which is in its second year, are to teach students the difference between trading stocks and thinking through their investment decisions for the long-term and to help them make appropriate connections in the financial services sector as they prepare to enter the job market. The winning team was Siena College of Loudonville, N.Y.

16

ACADEMICS School of Arts & Sciences

Researching Summer F

or many students and faculty, summer is a time to take a break from academic study. But for students like Dan Caruso and faculty like Dr. Brad Kraft, summer has been a time of intense study and research.

Summer 2013 will mark the third year of the Summer Science Fellows Program at the College, bringing students and faculty into the research lab to collaborate on scholarly research initiatives.

to submit a proposal, including a detailed description, proposed timeline, budget, and what they hope their research will do for them, as well as the greater scientific community. Accepted students spend 80 hours through the summer working on research and collaborating one-on-one with faculty. Once completed, student researchers present their findings at academic symposiums, both locally and nationally.

“...I learned a completely new subject as well as a very specialized subset of skills. It was an invaluable experience that has set me up for future success.”

Dr. Kristina LantzkyEaton, assistant professor and chair of the Chemistry Department, said that the program has offered great opportunities for undergraduate students. “Not many small schools have an opportunity to focus on student research,” said Lantzky-Eaton. The program is competitive, requiring students

Dan Caruso, a Fairport native, earned his biology degree this May and was a Summer Science Fellow for two summers. “The summer program allowed me to do graduate-level research as an undergraduate,” said Caruso. “I was able to work with Dr. Kraft one-on-one for 10 weeks, during which I learned a completely new subject as well as a very specialized subset of skills. It was an invaluable experience that has set me up for future success.” “During the summer research program, we watch these students mature as scientists and as people,” said Lantzky-Eaton. “They learn that, in research, things will fail. A lot. And when you fail, you have to get over it and move on.”

Faiza Filfil presents her research at PITTCON. Her work focused on the synthesis of peptide-based chiral ionic liquids, a topic that has seen very little research and documentation.

17

Chris Manzella, a 2013 chemistry graduate, agrees. “In the lab, things don’t always turn out the way you anticipate they will. The type of thinking that I acquired during the two summers allows me to ask the right questions and propose methods to answer these questions. It’s the critical thinking involved in such troubleshooting that I became addicted to.”

Dan Caruso (left) and Dr. Brad Kraft work in the drybox in the Skalny Science Center. Their research focuses on the chemical behavior of silicon-containing compounds.

Junior Faiza Filfil was able to use her experience as a Summer Science Fellow in 2012 to earn one of 10 spots in an REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) sponsored by the National Science Foundation in Golden, Colorado. “The Summer Science Fellows Program gave me a lot more confidence working independently in the lab. It’s a completely different experience,” she said. Lantzky-Eaton also feels that the Summer Science Fellows Program has helped the faculty grow. “At Fisher, faculty are focused on instructing in the classroom and the lab, not on our own research interests. Through this program, faculty—especially our younger faculty—learn a lot as well. And guiding students through extensive research gives us great fulfillment and is very energizing.” To date, the program has yielded great results. Of the participants that have graduated, all are enrolled at the graduate level. Caruso is heading off to dental school at the University at Buffalo and Manzella will be joining the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. This is a M.D./Ph.D. dual-degree program for future physician scientists. “We, as faculty, might not be performing research that is going to find a cure for cancer, but our students will be the ones to find the cure,” says LantzkyEaton.

I know what you did last summer. A few of the topics that have been researched by Summer Science Fellows: • Synthesis of Tri (2-anthryl) Phosphite for Fragility Study • Analysis of Mercury Concentration in New York Game Fish Tissue • Determination of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in Ground Water in Monroe County • Development of a Series of New Peptide-Based Chiral Ionic Liquids (CILs) • Analysis of Concentrations of the Clopyralid in Compost Piles in Pittsford and Perinton • Determination of Acetaminophen in Pharmaceutical Compounding Products

18

ACADEMICS School of Arts & Sciences

Researching Summer F

or many students and faculty, summer is a time to take a break from academic study. But for students like Dan Caruso and faculty like Dr. Brad Kraft, summer has been a time of intense study and research.

Summer 2013 will mark the third year of the Summer Science Fellows Program at the College, bringing students and faculty into the research lab to collaborate on scholarly research initiatives.

to submit a proposal, including a detailed description, proposed timeline, budget, and what they hope their research will do for them, as well as the greater scientific community. Accepted students spend 80 hours through the summer working on research and collaborating one-on-one with faculty. Once completed, student researchers present their findings at academic symposiums, both locally and nationally.

“...I learned a completely new subject as well as a very specialized subset of skills. It was an invaluable experience that has set me up for future success.”

Dr. Kristina LantzkyEaton, assistant professor and chair of the Chemistry Department, said that the program has offered great opportunities for undergraduate students. “Not many small schools have an opportunity to focus on student research,” said Lantzky-Eaton. The program is competitive, requiring students

Dan Caruso, a Fairport native, earned his biology degree this May and was a Summer Science Fellow for two summers. “The summer program allowed me to do graduate-level research as an undergraduate,” said Caruso. “I was able to work with Dr. Kraft one-on-one for 10 weeks, during which I learned a completely new subject as well as a very specialized subset of skills. It was an invaluable experience that has set me up for future success.” “During the summer research program, we watch these students mature as scientists and as people,” said Lantzky-Eaton. “They learn that, in research, things will fail. A lot. And when you fail, you have to get over it and move on.”

Faiza Filfil presents her research at PITTCON. Her work focused on the synthesis of peptide-based chiral ionic liquids, a topic that has seen very little research and documentation.

17

Chris Manzella, a 2013 chemistry graduate, agrees. “In the lab, things don’t always turn out the way you anticipate they will. The type of thinking that I acquired during the two summers allows me to ask the right questions and propose methods to answer these questions. It’s the critical thinking involved in such troubleshooting that I became addicted to.”

Dan Caruso (left) and Dr. Brad Kraft work in the drybox in the Skalny Science Center. Their research focuses on the chemical behavior of silicon-containing compounds.

Junior Faiza Filfil was able to use her experience as a Summer Science Fellow in 2012 to earn one of 10 spots in an REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) sponsored by the National Science Foundation in Golden, Colorado. “The Summer Science Fellows Program gave me a lot more confidence working independently in the lab. It’s a completely different experience,” she said. Lantzky-Eaton also feels that the Summer Science Fellows Program has helped the faculty grow. “At Fisher, faculty are focused on instructing in the classroom and the lab, not on our own research interests. Through this program, faculty—especially our younger faculty—learn a lot as well. And guiding students through extensive research gives us great fulfillment and is very energizing.” To date, the program has yielded great results. Of the participants that have graduated, all are enrolled at the graduate level. Caruso is heading off to dental school at the University at Buffalo and Manzella will be joining the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. This is a M.D./Ph.D. dual-degree program for future physician scientists. “We, as faculty, might not be performing research that is going to find a cure for cancer, but our students will be the ones to find the cure,” says LantzkyEaton.

I know what you did last summer. A few of the topics that have been researched by Summer Science Fellows: • Synthesis of Tri (2-anthryl) Phosphite for Fragility Study • Analysis of Mercury Concentration in New York Game Fish Tissue • Determination of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in Ground Water in Monroe County • Development of a Series of New Peptide-Based Chiral Ionic Liquids (CILs) • Analysis of Concentrations of the Clopyralid in Compost Piles in Pittsford and Perinton • Determination of Acetaminophen in Pharmaceutical Compounding Products

18

New Hope in Newtown D

By Kate Torok ecember 14, 2012, started just like any other day at St. Rose Parish in Newtown, Connecticut. And Msgr. Robert Weiss ’68, Pastor, St. Rose of Lima Church, was in the middle of his morning routine in the rectory when the phone rang. The voice on the other end of the line delivered the horrifying news that would soon spread to the rest of the country – there was a random shooting at one of the schools, and all schools were to be put on lockdown. For Msgr. Weiss, that was the beginning of the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy, where 26 young students, teachers, and administrators were killed by a lone gunman. Weiss immediately went to the church, where the St. Rose schoolchildren were attending their regular 9:00 a.m. mass. He discontinued the service, put the school on lockdown, and the school officials started to notify parents. It was then that the second phone call came in. This time, it was a St. Rose parishioner who said five simple words to Weiss, “You’d better get down here.” Weiss and his two associates rushed to the scene. According to Weiss, about half of Newtown belongs to his parish, so he knew they were about to be directly impacted. When they got to the firehouse, which was set up as a command post and gathering place, they realized that it was more than a random shooting, and immediately felt the magnitude of the devastation. Weiss’ two associates stayed by the firehouse, where the Sandy Hook students and teachers were gathered, frantically taking attendance. Parents and families were slowly starting to gather as well. Weiss went down towards the school, and was approached by one of the first responders, whom he knew, and was asked to go in and bless the children. From the look on the face staring back at him, and the scene unfolding around him, Weiss quickly realized there was very little he could do if he did go inside, and opted not to.

19

several hundred people outside who were starting their own service, with makeshift shrines adorned with rosaries and candles. They even started singing Christmas carols. “I encountered love that night. I saw the love these parents had for their children, and the love the community had for each other, in spite of this horrible tragedy. The good emerged quickly,” Weiss recalled. “This wasn’t just happening at St. Rose, it was happening at every religious house in Newtown that night.”

St. Rose of Lima Church. Photo courtesy of the Diocese of Bridgeport.

When Weiss went back to the firehouse, he was readily recognized by a number of the children, who all started to huddle around him. He sprung into teacher mode, and started working with them to get children back in their lines so the teachers could check off their names. Parents started to arrive, bursting into tears at the first sight of their child, then quickly shuffling them home. Weiss stayed there until the last child was called. He looked up and saw the group of parents whose children’s names were not called. Within moments, they were escorted into the back room, and Weiss trailed closely behind. That moment marked one of the longest days in Weiss’ life, and in the lives of all those in Newtown. Weiss said some of the relatives stayed behind and wouldn’t leave until verification was given that their loved one was in fact inside the school. He himself was overwhelmed by the cars when he tried to leave, and swarmed by media while trying to find his own vehicle. “That was when the magnitude of the tragedy really hit me. It was very overwhelming,” he said. Weiss knew that he and the parish had to do something that evening. He knew people would be looking for a place to go, to find comfort. Newtown is already a very faith-based town and has many active churches. But with almost half of the residents being St. Rose parishioners, Weiss moved into planning mode. By 5:00 p.m. that evening, the church was overflowing with people – some parishioners, some not. There was an organized 7:30 p.m. service. All the pews inside the church were filled and there was standing room only. Weiss said the police estimated

They left the church open for many days following the tragedy, never closing or locking the doors. Floral tributes rapidly filled the sanctuary, and lit candles filled any open niche inside. Weiss said their mantra became, “Light overcomes darkness.” Over the next several days, Weiss presided over eight funerals. Some days, he had two funerals. They started Msgr. Bob Weiss preaching to the St. Rose of Lima congregation following the Newtown shootings. Photo that Tuesday, and the courtesy of the Diocese of Bridgeport. last one took place on Saturday. In the weeks that followed, he said people were doing their best to comfort each other, but the community was still struggling. “People were very supportive, affectionate, and full of prayer. They were doing their best to lift each other’s spirits. We had to get into the Christmas celebration quickly after this happened, but obviously, people were still hurting,” he said. One thing he didn’t hear from the people of Newtown, however, was, “Why did God do this?” “They realized this was evil, and that God’s hand was not in it,” said Weiss. But today, five months later, the anger and questioning is starting to happen, and the recent gun legislation efforts caused a lot of stress to the community. Despite all of that, he said the town is still holding strong. “Every day is different, grief is taking different forms,” said Weiss. “But just yesterday, I was out in the parking lot and people I didn’t know came up to me and said ’thanks.’ I go to the grocery store, and I still get hugs. If I stop in Starbucks, I still get treated

to a coffee. At the core of this town, we are still trying to hang together and stay strong.” Weiss said he has protected himself from doing too much one-on-one counseling with people because it is still just too overwhelming for him. But he has certainly spent time with a number of people in the community, especially the first responders. A number of counseling services have been made available to the church through Catholic Charities, and will be offered through the end of June. The biggest question Weiss and his colleagues have had to ask themselves is, “How will we preach around this?” They were advised by colleagues from around the country to bring in guest priests, particularly for the Christmas and Easter masses, which they did. And Weiss said, sure enough, even they preached about that fateful day in Newtown. “It touched people everywhere, and now it is woven into our fabric. It’s hard to get away from it,” he said. St. Rose has received hundreds, if not thousands, of cards and gifts from people around the world extending their prayers and sympathies. They have sent teddy bears, CDs, books, prayer shawls, rosaries, flowers, candles, wreaths, and “miles of construction paper prayer chains” from elementary schools. Weiss admits that he and his colleagues have become more serious in their preaching. He said the breaking point for them was this past Palm Sunday, when the church was full and the weather was beautiful. “Christ rose from the dead, but he still had his scars. And we are the same way. We’ve all gotten more realistic about what pain and suffering is, and how much a part of life it is,” he said. Weiss will celebrate his 40th anniversary in the priesthood in May, and said he is very grateful for his Catholic education, one that provided him with the foundation to help lead people through this tragedy. “I’ve been put into a privileged and trusted position as pastor to be able to help and lead this community. I am very grateful for the faith of these people, especially for these families. They are incredible,” he said.

20

New Hope in Newtown D

By Kate Torok ecember 14, 2012, started just like any other day at St. Rose Parish in Newtown, Connecticut. And Msgr. Robert Weiss ’68, Pastor, St. Rose of Lima Church, was in the middle of his morning routine in the rectory when the phone rang. The voice on the other end of the line delivered the horrifying news that would soon spread to the rest of the country – there was a random shooting at one of the schools, and all schools were to be put on lockdown. For Msgr. Weiss, that was the beginning of the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy, where 26 young students, teachers, and administrators were killed by a lone gunman. Weiss immediately went to the church, where the St. Rose schoolchildren were attending their regular 9:00 a.m. mass. He discontinued the service, put the school on lockdown, and the school officials started to notify parents. It was then that the second phone call came in. This time, it was a St. Rose parishioner who said five simple words to Weiss, “You’d better get down here.” Weiss and his two associates rushed to the scene. According to Weiss, about half of Newtown belongs to his parish, so he knew they were about to be directly impacted. When they got to the firehouse, which was set up as a command post and gathering place, they realized that it was more than a random shooting, and immediately felt the magnitude of the devastation. Weiss’ two associates stayed by the firehouse, where the Sandy Hook students and teachers were gathered, frantically taking attendance. Parents and families were slowly starting to gather as well. Weiss went down towards the school, and was approached by one of the first responders, whom he knew, and was asked to go in and bless the children. From the look on the face staring back at him, and the scene unfolding around him, Weiss quickly realized there was very little he could do if he did go inside, and opted not to.

19

several hundred people outside who were starting their own service, with makeshift shrines adorned with rosaries and candles. They even started singing Christmas carols. “I encountered love that night. I saw the love these parents had for their children, and the love the community had for each other, in spite of this horrible tragedy. The good emerged quickly,” Weiss recalled. “This wasn’t just happening at St. Rose, it was happening at every religious house in Newtown that night.”

St. Rose of Lima Church. Photo courtesy of the Diocese of Bridgeport.

When Weiss went back to the firehouse, he was readily recognized by a number of the children, who all started to huddle around him. He sprung into teacher mode, and started working with them to get children back in their lines so the teachers could check off their names. Parents started to arrive, bursting into tears at the first sight of their child, then quickly shuffling them home. Weiss stayed there until the last child was called. He looked up and saw the group of parents whose children’s names were not called. Within moments, they were escorted into the back room, and Weiss trailed closely behind. That moment marked one of the longest days in Weiss’ life, and in the lives of all those in Newtown. Weiss said some of the relatives stayed behind and wouldn’t leave until verification was given that their loved one was in fact inside the school. He himself was overwhelmed by the cars when he tried to leave, and swarmed by media while trying to find his own vehicle. “That was when the magnitude of the tragedy really hit me. It was very overwhelming,” he said. Weiss knew that he and the parish had to do something that evening. He knew people would be looking for a place to go, to find comfort. Newtown is already a very faith-based town and has many active churches. But with almost half of the residents being St. Rose parishioners, Weiss moved into planning mode. By 5:00 p.m. that evening, the church was overflowing with people – some parishioners, some not. There was an organized 7:30 p.m. service. All the pews inside the church were filled and there was standing room only. Weiss said the police estimated

They left the church open for many days following the tragedy, never closing or locking the doors. Floral tributes rapidly filled the sanctuary, and lit candles filled any open niche inside. Weiss said their mantra became, “Light overcomes darkness.” Over the next several days, Weiss presided over eight funerals. Some days, he had two funerals. They started Msgr. Bob Weiss preaching to the St. Rose of Lima congregation following the Newtown shootings. Photo that Tuesday, and the courtesy of the Diocese of Bridgeport. last one took place on Saturday. In the weeks that followed, he said people were doing their best to comfort each other, but the community was still struggling. “People were very supportive, affectionate, and full of prayer. They were doing their best to lift each other’s spirits. We had to get into the Christmas celebration quickly after this happened, but obviously, people were still hurting,” he said. One thing he didn’t hear from the people of Newtown, however, was, “Why did God do this?” “They realized this was evil, and that God’s hand was not in it,” said Weiss. But today, five months later, the anger and questioning is starting to happen, and the recent gun legislation efforts caused a lot of stress to the community. Despite all of that, he said the town is still holding strong. “Every day is different, grief is taking different forms,” said Weiss. “But just yesterday, I was out in the parking lot and people I didn’t know came up to me and said ’thanks.’ I go to the grocery store, and I still get hugs. If I stop in Starbucks, I still get treated

to a coffee. At the core of this town, we are still trying to hang together and stay strong.” Weiss said he has protected himself from doing too much one-on-one counseling with people because it is still just too overwhelming for him. But he has certainly spent time with a number of people in the community, especially the first responders. A number of counseling services have been made available to the church through Catholic Charities, and will be offered through the end of June. The biggest question Weiss and his colleagues have had to ask themselves is, “How will we preach around this?” They were advised by colleagues from around the country to bring in guest priests, particularly for the Christmas and Easter masses, which they did. And Weiss said, sure enough, even they preached about that fateful day in Newtown. “It touched people everywhere, and now it is woven into our fabric. It’s hard to get away from it,” he said. St. Rose has received hundreds, if not thousands, of cards and gifts from people around the world extending their prayers and sympathies. They have sent teddy bears, CDs, books, prayer shawls, rosaries, flowers, candles, wreaths, and “miles of construction paper prayer chains” from elementary schools. Weiss admits that he and his colleagues have become more serious in their preaching. He said the breaking point for them was this past Palm Sunday, when the church was full and the weather was beautiful. “Christ rose from the dead, but he still had his scars. And we are the same way. We’ve all gotten more realistic about what pain and suffering is, and how much a part of life it is,” he said. Weiss will celebrate his 40th anniversary in the priesthood in May, and said he is very grateful for his Catholic education, one that provided him with the foundation to help lead people through this tragedy. “I’ve been put into a privileged and trusted position as pastor to be able to help and lead this community. I am very grateful for the faith of these people, especially for these families. They are incredible,” he said.

20

An Inside Look at the Papal Transition

His daily routine consisted of a 7:00 a.m. mass in the Vatican crypt or at the Jesuit Headquarters where he resided, then they went right to work taking media calls and scheduling interviews up until 9:30 p.m. Rosica recalled doing 28 interviews during one of the days. He dealt with the leading anchors and media personalities from the entire English-speaking world. Many saw him on CNN, CBS, NBC, ABC, CBC, and many national and international networks. He also dealt with print media on a daily basis. He said one of his biggest tasks was taking part in the news conferences the Vatican Press Office and the Vatican Audience Hall held every day, which drew between 600700 people – most of them media. They lasted 1½-2 hours each time, and Rosica recalls deep questions along with funny moments. In all, they coordinated and conducted interviews for a total of 6,000 journalists from around the world. Rosica himself handled about 165 interviews, and also served as a translator for Lombardi during press conferences and briefings. Rosica, who was a French and Italian major at Fisher, did interviews in English, French, Italian, Spanish, and German. He joked, saying it was a long way from his Fisher days and language labs in St. Basil Hall!

F

ather Thomas Rosica, C.S.B., ’80 calls February 11 the Monday that changed his life.

By Kate Torok While the rest of the world was waking up to hear the news of Pope Benedict XVI’s resignation, Fr. Thomas Rosica, CEO of the Salt and Light TV Network in Canada, and a member of St. John Fisher College’s Board of Trustees, was answering a 5:30 a.m. phone call from the Canadian media asking him to confirm the news. While Rosica is used to being called upon by the media, nothing could have prepared him for what was coming next. That day, he did about 25 different interviews with media outlets from around the world. Two days later, Father Federico Lombardi, Director of the Vatican Press Office, called and asked Rosica when he would be coming to Rome. Rosica told Lombardi he would be there sometime in March, and Lombardi asked him to come immediately. And so began the papal transition…and four weeks of adrenaline and

21

excitement for Rosica and Sebastian Gomes, a young producer from Salt and Light who accompanied Fr. Rosica and worked closely with the Holy See Press Office. “From the moment we landed in Rome, it was an extraordinary experience,” said Rosica. He was asked to serve as the English language spokesperson for the duration of the papal transition. From day one, he and a team from the Vatican worked quickly to develop a media strategy. He joked that Lombardi said there would be a deluge of media, and Rosica would later correct him and talk about the media tsunami they faced. They worked hard and fast to forge relationships with media outlets from around the world, outlets that never had this kind of access to the Vatican. “The sheer volume of media attention surprised everyone. But then, it was history in the making. It was the first time a Pope had resigned in 600 years, so there wasn’t a funeral that colored things over,” he said.

His office was right in St. Peter’s Square, so he was able to see the first few moments of excitement and chaos. He called it “an incredible experience,” with thousands of people running and pushing and screaming – all to see their new Pope. That first night of Francis’ papacy, Fr. Rosica did interviews with major networks into the wee hours of the following morning. He helped to tell the world an amazing story of how a humble, Jesuit Archbishop from Buenos Aires came from the ends of the earth to be shepherd of the universal Church. Fr. Rosica had known Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio since 2001. In fact, in the days leading up to the conclave, the two met several times on the streets of Rome and shared conversations. When asked if he thought the Conclave made the right decision, Rosica didn’t hesitate in answering. “Pope Francis was more than the right choice. It was an inspired decision, and this is only the beginning. We have witnessed his incredible gestures, his clear, simple language and expressions, his youthfulness, kindness, warmth and fatherly care. What we are witnessing are

“I viewed it all as an opportunity to evangelize and teach. Fisher was very much in my mind the whole time. I kept thinking about my professors, especially my Basilian confrère, Fr. William Marceau, C.S.B., who are no longer with us and thought they would be happy with how things unfolded,” he said. If Rosica had been asked to predict who the new Pope would be, he said the only strong feeling he had was that it should be somebody outside of Italy and Europe. “There had to be a new direction – there was a longing for something new,” he said.

Left: Fr. Rosica at the Vatican. Above: Rosica leaving the Sistine Chapel before the first voting session of the Conclave began (March 12). He was the last to leave before the doors were shut. Photos courtesy of Vatican Photographic Service,Vatican City.

And, while the media kept reporting that the process would most likely take a while, Rosica kept saying it would be two days at the most. “The big work of the Conclave takes place the week before. They deal with any issues at those meetings, and develop a profile for the new Pope,” he said. When the white smoke finally appeared on that cold, rainy night of March 13, the moment the world had been waiting for is a moment that Rosica says he will never forget.

not media moments or photo opportunities; it’s a timereleased capsule of what is to come. Those who know him from Argentina say, ’This is who he is, this is ’Padre Jorge’, ’el Cardenal’, ’nuestro obispo’” he said. “The only thing that changed was the color of his robes. He is no longer Bishop of Buenos Aires, but now the Bishop of Rome.”

22

An Inside Look at the Papal Transition

His daily routine consisted of a 7:00 a.m. mass in the Vatican crypt or at the Jesuit Headquarters where he resided, then they went right to work taking media calls and scheduling interviews up until 9:30 p.m. Rosica recalled doing 28 interviews during one of the days. He dealt with the leading anchors and media personalities from the entire English-speaking world. Many saw him on CNN, CBS, NBC, ABC, CBC, and many national and international networks. He also dealt with print media on a daily basis. He said one of his biggest tasks was taking part in the news conferences the Vatican Press Office and the Vatican Audience Hall held every day, which drew between 600700 people – most of them media. They lasted 1½-2 hours each time, and Rosica recalls deep questions along with funny moments. In all, they coordinated and conducted interviews for a total of 6,000 journalists from around the world. Rosica himself handled about 165 interviews, and also served as a translator for Lombardi during press conferences and briefings. Rosica, who was a French and Italian major at Fisher, did interviews in English, French, Italian, Spanish, and German. He joked, saying it was a long way from his Fisher days and language labs in St. Basil Hall!

F

ather Thomas Rosica, C.S.B., ’80 calls February 11 the Monday that changed his life.

By Kate Torok While the rest of the world was waking up to hear the news of Pope Benedict XVI’s resignation, Fr. Thomas Rosica, CEO of the Salt and Light TV Network in Canada, and a member of St. John Fisher College’s Board of Trustees, was answering a 5:30 a.m. phone call from the Canadian media asking him to confirm the news. While Rosica is used to being called upon by the media, nothing could have prepared him for what was coming next. That day, he did about 25 different interviews with media outlets from around the world. Two days later, Father Federico Lombardi, Director of the Vatican Press Office, called and asked Rosica when he would be coming to Rome. Rosica told Lombardi he would be there sometime in March, and Lombardi asked him to come immediately. And so began the papal transition…and four weeks of adrenaline and

21

excitement for Rosica and Sebastian Gomes, a young producer from Salt and Light who accompanied Fr. Rosica and worked closely with the Holy See Press Office. “From the moment we landed in Rome, it was an extraordinary experience,” said Rosica. He was asked to serve as the English language spokesperson for the duration of the papal transition. From day one, he and a team from the Vatican worked quickly to develop a media strategy. He joked that Lombardi said there would be a deluge of media, and Rosica would later correct him and talk about the media tsunami they faced. They worked hard and fast to forge relationships with media outlets from around the world, outlets that never had this kind of access to the Vatican. “The sheer volume of media attention surprised everyone. But then, it was history in the making. It was the first time a Pope had resigned in 600 years, so there wasn’t a funeral that colored things over,” he said.

His office was right in St. Peter’s Square, so he was able to see the first few moments of excitement and chaos. He called it “an incredible experience,” with thousands of people running and pushing and screaming – all to see their new Pope. That first night of Francis’ papacy, Fr. Rosica did interviews with major networks into the wee hours of the following morning. He helped to tell the world an amazing story of how a humble, Jesuit Archbishop from Buenos Aires came from the ends of the earth to be shepherd of the universal Church. Fr. Rosica had known Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio since 2001. In fact, in the days leading up to the conclave, the two met several times on the streets of Rome and shared conversations. When asked if he thought the Conclave made the right decision, Rosica didn’t hesitate in answering. “Pope Francis was more than the right choice. It was an inspired decision, and this is only the beginning. We have witnessed his incredible gestures, his clear, simple language and expressions, his youthfulness, kindness, warmth and fatherly care. What we are witnessing are

“I viewed it all as an opportunity to evangelize and teach. Fisher was very much in my mind the whole time. I kept thinking about my professors, especially my Basilian confrère, Fr. William Marceau, C.S.B., who are no longer with us and thought they would be happy with how things unfolded,” he said. If Rosica had been asked to predict who the new Pope would be, he said the only strong feeling he had was that it should be somebody outside of Italy and Europe. “There had to be a new direction – there was a longing for something new,” he said.

Left: Fr. Rosica at the Vatican. Above: Rosica leaving the Sistine Chapel before the first voting session of the Conclave began (March 12). He was the last to leave before the doors were shut. Photos courtesy of Vatican Photographic Service,Vatican City.

And, while the media kept reporting that the process would most likely take a while, Rosica kept saying it would be two days at the most. “The big work of the Conclave takes place the week before. They deal with any issues at those meetings, and develop a profile for the new Pope,” he said. When the white smoke finally appeared on that cold, rainy night of March 13, the moment the world had been waiting for is a moment that Rosica says he will never forget.

not media moments or photo opportunities; it’s a timereleased capsule of what is to come. Those who know him from Argentina say, ’This is who he is, this is ’Padre Jorge’, ’el Cardenal’, ’nuestro obispo’” he said. “The only thing that changed was the color of his robes. He is no longer Bishop of Buenos Aires, but now the Bishop of Rome.”

22

TA K E Y O U R C A R E E R TO THE NEXT LEVEL.

The Class of 2013

On May 11, students, families, faculty, and staff gathered at Blue Cross Arena in downtown Rochester to celebrate the College’s 59th Commencement. More than 700 undergraduates became Fisher alumni at the morning ceremony, and 400 earned master’s and doctoral degrees during the afternoon ceremony. Pulitzer-prize-winning author, David McCullough, gave the Commencement address for the undergraduate ceremony and was given an honorary Doctor of Laws degree. He has won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award twice, and has also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award. McCullough’s most recent book, “The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris,” is the number one New York Times best seller. His previous works include “1776,” “The Johnstown Flood,” “The Path Between the Seas,” and “Truman.” His work has been translated and published in 15 countries and more than 10,000,000 copies are in print. A gifted speaker, McCullough has lectured in all parts of the country and abroad, as well as at the White House. He is one of the few private citizens to speak before a joint session of Congress. McCullough graduated from Yale with honors in English literature. The keynote speaker for the afternoon ceremony was Dr. Michael Wischnowski, Dean of the College’s Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education. During commencement, President Bain presented the President’s Medals to Sister Christine Wagner, SSJ, Executive Director of the St. Joseph’s Neighborhood Center, and Mr. Walter Parkes, Chairman of the Board, O’Connell Electric. Michael Goonan ’75, outgoing Board of Trustees’ chairman, received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree.

The Graduate Programs at St. John Fisher College   

Top: A new grad proudly shows her diploma; McCullough urges the Class of 2013 to continue learning and cultivate curiosity; a grad celebrates after the ceremony. Large photo: President Bain and McCullough in the academic procession to start commencement.

MBA                 MS in Advanced Practice Nursing        MS in Adolescence Education/Special Education  MS in Childhood Education/Special Education  MS in Educational Leadership        MS in International Studies          MS in Literacy Education          MS in Math/Science/Technology Education    MS in Mental Health Counseling       

For more information about Fisher’s graduate  programs,  visit  www.sjfc.edu/graduate,  call  (585) 385‐8161, or email grad@sjfc.edu.  23

MS in Special Education  Doctor of Education in Executive      Leadership (Offered at Fisher and       our two extension sites: The College      of New Rochelle and Onondaga      Community College’s Regional       Higher Education Center)  Doctor of Nursing Practice  Doctor of Pharmacy

TA K E Y O U R C A R E E R TO THE NEXT LEVEL.

The Class of 2013

On May 11, students, families, faculty, and staff gathered at Blue Cross Arena in downtown Rochester to celebrate the College’s 59th Commencement. More than 700 undergraduates became Fisher alumni at the morning ceremony, and 400 earned master’s and doctoral degrees during the afternoon ceremony. Pulitzer-prize-winning author, David McCullough, gave the Commencement address for the undergraduate ceremony and was given an honorary Doctor of Laws degree. He has won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award twice, and has also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award. McCullough’s most recent book, “The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris,” is the number one New York Times best seller. His previous works include “1776,” “The Johnstown Flood,” “The Path Between the Seas,” and “Truman.” His work has been translated and published in 15 countries and more than 10,000,000 copies are in print. A gifted speaker, McCullough has lectured in all parts of the country and abroad, as well as at the White House. He is one of the few private citizens to speak before a joint session of Congress. McCullough graduated from Yale with honors in English literature. The keynote speaker for the afternoon ceremony was Dr. Michael Wischnowski, Dean of the College’s Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education. During commencement, President Bain presented the President’s Medals to Sister Christine Wagner, SSJ, Executive Director of the St. Joseph’s Neighborhood Center, and Mr. Walter Parkes, Chairman of the Board, O’Connell Electric. Michael Goonan ’75, outgoing Board of Trustees’ chairman, received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree.

The Graduate Programs at St. John Fisher College   

Top: A new grad proudly shows her diploma; McCullough urges the Class of 2013 to continue learning and cultivate curiosity; a grad celebrates after the ceremony. Large photo: President Bain and McCullough in the academic procession to start commencement.

MBA                 MS in Advanced Practice Nursing        MS in Adolescence Education/Special Education  MS in Childhood Education/Special Education  MS in Educational Leadership        MS in International Studies          MS in Literacy Education          MS in Math/Science/Technology Education    MS in Mental Health Counseling       

For more information about Fisher’s graduate  programs,  visit  www.sjfc.edu/graduate,  call  (585) 385‐8161, or email grad@sjfc.edu.  23

MS in Special Education  Doctor of Education in Executive      Leadership (Offered at Fisher and       our two extension sites: The College      of New Rochelle and Onondaga      Community College’s Regional       Higher Education Center)  Doctor of Nursing Practice  Doctor of Pharmacy

CLASSNOTES

1961

Dr. Frank Salamone, a professor at Iona College, recently published The Italians of Rochester, New York, Post-World War II: Immigration, Prosperity, and Change. This book is a cogent and multi-generational recounting of the lives of major personalities and institutions that shaped the Italian-American experience in Rochester, with attention to World War II, entertainment, sports, music, educational institutions, politics, crime, marriage, and religion. The work focuses on how ethnic groups successfully adapt to changing ecological circumstances.

1969

Louis Giansante self-published Tov in China: Missionary Letters 1947-1952, a book about Fr. James “Tov” Buttino of Cortland, New York. Political, cultural,

CLASSNOTES

and family history come together in the weekly letters home and accompanying commentary.

1974

Gerald Archibald, CPA, received the Community Partner Award from the Council of Agency Executives. Donald Jeffries was appointed president and CEO of VisitRochester, Monroe County’s regional tourism agency.

1976

Michael Colliflower was named chair-elect of the Insurance Regulation Committee (IRC) of the Torts & Insurance Practice Section of the American Bar Association. He works from his Florida home with the Nashville office of Aetna’s Senior Supplemental Insurance business.

1978

Dr. Jesse Brown, Jr. was appointed to the Black Church Studies Advisory Board of Directors at Colgate Rochester Divinity – Crozer Theological Seminary, Rochester, New York.

1980

Rev. Thomas Rosica, C.S.B. was appointed by the Vatican as assistant to Fr. Federico Lombardi, SJ, Papal Spokesperson and Head of the Holy See Press Office and Vatican Radio. Fr. Rosica began his work at the Vatican and served until the inauguration of Petrine Ministry of the new pope in March 2013. See “Smoke Signals from Rome” on page 21.

1981

David McCullough was named Vice President of Latin America Strategic Outsourcing Services Excellence at IBM in January 2012.

Participation is still a part of our grade. At the beginning of the semester, your professors were sure to remind you, “Participation is a part of your grade.” Your participation still matters in helping Fisher make the grade in rankings such as U.S. News & World Report, and in earning competitive grants to help support the College. Your gift matters and helps boost alumni giving participation rates. Help build the reputation and prestige of your alma mater by donating to the Fisher Fund.

www.sjfc.edu/makeagift

Fisher Family Legacy Three generations of Fisher alumni were present to celebrate the College’s 59th commencement. Left to right are Vince Alfieri ’55; his granddaughter,Victoria Alfieri ’13; and his daughter-in-law, Shelley Alfieri ’92.

25

26

CLASSNOTES

1961

Dr. Frank Salamone, a professor at Iona College, recently published The Italians of Rochester, New York, Post-World War II: Immigration, Prosperity, and Change. This book is a cogent and multi-generational recounting of the lives of major personalities and institutions that shaped the Italian-American experience in Rochester, with attention to World War II, entertainment, sports, music, educational institutions, politics, crime, marriage, and religion. The work focuses on how ethnic groups successfully adapt to changing ecological circumstances.

1969

Louis Giansante self-published Tov in China: Missionary Letters 1947-1952, a book about Fr. James “Tov” Buttino of Cortland, New York. Political, cultural,

CLASSNOTES

and family history come together in the weekly letters home and accompanying commentary.

1974

Gerald Archibald, CPA, received the Community Partner Award from the Council of Agency Executives. Donald Jeffries was appointed president and CEO of VisitRochester, Monroe County’s regional tourism agency.

1976

Michael Colliflower was named chair-elect of the Insurance Regulation Committee (IRC) of the Torts & Insurance Practice Section of the American Bar Association. He works from his Florida home with the Nashville office of Aetna’s Senior Supplemental Insurance business.

1978

Dr. Jesse Brown, Jr. was appointed to the Black Church Studies Advisory Board of Directors at Colgate Rochester Divinity – Crozer Theological Seminary, Rochester, New York.

1980

Rev. Thomas Rosica, C.S.B. was appointed by the Vatican as assistant to Fr. Federico Lombardi, SJ, Papal Spokesperson and Head of the Holy See Press Office and Vatican Radio. Fr. Rosica began his work at the Vatican and served until the inauguration of Petrine Ministry of the new pope in March 2013. See “Smoke Signals from Rome” on page 21.

1981

David McCullough was named Vice President of Latin America Strategic Outsourcing Services Excellence at IBM in January 2012.

Participation is still a part of our grade. At the beginning of the semester, your professors were sure to remind you, “Participation is a part of your grade.” Your participation still matters in helping Fisher make the grade in rankings such as U.S. News & World Report, and in earning competitive grants to help support the College. Your gift matters and helps boost alumni giving participation rates. Help build the reputation and prestige of your alma mater by donating to the Fisher Fund.

www.sjfc.edu/makeagift

Fisher Family Legacy Three generations of Fisher alumni were present to celebrate the College’s 59th commencement. Left to right are Vince Alfieri ’55; his granddaughter,Victoria Alfieri ’13; and his daughter-in-law, Shelley Alfieri ’92.

25

26

Fisher. Fall. Family. Fun.

CLASSNOTES

Sharon (Ditullio) Napier was named one of the most influential women in her industry by a prominent trade publication. Advertising Age included Sharon on its list of the 100 most influential women in advertising in a category called “The Rainmakers.” The list was developed by the staff at Advertising Age after receiving input from readers. Linda (Paulmeno) Sewell was named Vice President of External Affairs at Energen Corporation. Linda is responsible for government affairs, corporate communications, charitable giving and strategic planning. Her prior experience includes 25 years with Mercedes-Benz. She and her husband, Steve, have two daughters, Ana and Abby, and reside in Birmingham, AL.

1982

Julia Kathleen Cunningham was promoted to Store Manager at Dick’s Sporting Goods.

1984

John Moriello was inducted into the New York State Basketball Hall of Fame at a ceremony in March 2013. He was recognized for his work as a sportswriter at the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper, where he covered state high school championships as well as St. John Fisher College teams in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

1987

David Gilmartin, Jr., Esq. joins Farrell Fritz Law Firm as a partner focusing on land use,

zoning, real estate, commercial matters, and related litigation. He earned his Juris Doctorate from Fordham University School of Law.

their fields of expertise.

1989

Donald Pomeroy is the Chief Financial Officer of Shurtape Technologies LLC and ShurTech Brands LLC in Charlotte, North Carolina. The companies are the original producers of Duck Brand duct tape, and make many kinds of pressure sensitive tapes for the North American and global markets.

1991

Tami Bacon joined Alfred State College as Communications Specialist. Previously, she was Public Relations Manager at Pictometry International Corp. in Rochester. Lisa (Piccinini) Fahy recently opened Studio C, an arts and crafts studio and shop in Claremorris, Co. Mayo, Ireland. She teaches children’s art classes, adult jewelry making classes, and also sells her own line of silver, copper, recycled material, and beaded jewelry.

1992

Lawrence Jay graduated on June 8, 2012, from the FBI National Academy Program at Quantico, V.A. While there, Agent Jay participated in 10 weeks of advanced investigative, management, and physical fitness training provided by FBI instructional staff and special agents, many of whom are recognized internationally in

1993

Steven Simpson is the Director of Marketing for Gannett US Community Publishing’s East Regional Group and the Vice President of Market Development for the Democrat and Chronicle Media Group.

1994

Susan (Arnold) Osborn ’04 (MS) was named Vice President of the Opportunity Center Organization in El Paso, Texas. Opportunity Center is a nonprofit organization that manages multiple facilities for housing homeless individuals, teens, and families. It also provides meals, addiction and mental health counseling, medical services, and job and educational guidance. Lisa Eilertsen and Shawn Shaw were married on May 19, 2012, at St. Louis Church in Pittsford, New York. Sharon (Bassette) Wu ’99 (MS) and Mark Wu welcomed a son, Ethan Alexander, on October 11, 2012. Ethan joins older brother, Brandon, born October 17, 2011.

Homecoming & Reunion Weekend 2013

September 26-29 1995

David Spencer and Stephanie Peterson were married on March 9, 2013, in North Reading, Michigan.

1996

Michele (Baug) Jones and Jeffrey Jones welcomed a son, Thomas Jeffrey, on November 21, 2012.

1997

Joseph Englebert was named Superintendent of the Warsaw Central School District. Richard Hannon was appointed to the Board of Trustees of Monroe Community College by Governor Andrew Cuomo on December 10, 2012. Emory Roethel is the UPK-

27

12 Coordinator of Curriculum, Instruction & Technology for the Wellsville Central School District in Wellsville, New York. Also, Emory and Erica Fleischman were married on August 18, 2011.

1998

Steven Rudnicki is the Associate Director of Marketing at the National Golf Course Owners Association (NGCOA) in Charleston, South Carolina. Steven will oversee the Associations’ marketing and communications efforts to its over 3,400 member courses. Dr. Brian Schmitt ’03 (MS), ’09 (EdD) was named Superintendent of the Genesee Valley School District in Belmont, New York.

1999

Robert Fanelli and Bethany McFetridge were married on July 6, 2012.

2000

P a t r i c k Newton joined HighPoint Advisors, LLC in East Syracuse, New York, on January 2, 2013. Patrick has been part of the financial services industry for 10 years. His specialty is in transition planning.

28

Fisher. Fall. Family. Fun.

CLASSNOTES

Sharon (Ditullio) Napier was named one of the most influential women in her industry by a prominent trade publication. Advertising Age included Sharon on its list of the 100 most influential women in advertising in a category called “The Rainmakers.” The list was developed by the staff at Advertising Age after receiving input from readers. Linda (Paulmeno) Sewell was named Vice President of External Affairs at Energen Corporation. Linda is responsible for government affairs, corporate communications, charitable giving and strategic planning. Her prior experience includes 25 years with Mercedes-Benz. She and her husband, Steve, have two daughters, Ana and Abby, and reside in Birmingham, AL.

1982

Julia Kathleen Cunningham was promoted to Store Manager at Dick’s Sporting Goods.

1984

John Moriello was inducted into the New York State Basketball Hall of Fame at a ceremony in March 2013. He was recognized for his work as a sportswriter at the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper, where he covered state high school championships as well as St. John Fisher College teams in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

1987

David Gilmartin, Jr., Esq. joins Farrell Fritz Law Firm as a partner focusing on land use,

zoning, real estate, commercial matters, and related litigation. He earned his Juris Doctorate from Fordham University School of Law.

their fields of expertise.

1989

Donald Pomeroy is the Chief Financial Officer of Shurtape Technologies LLC and ShurTech Brands LLC in Charlotte, North Carolina. The companies are the original producers of Duck Brand duct tape, and make many kinds of pressure sensitive tapes for the North American and global markets.

1991

Tami Bacon joined Alfred State College as Communications Specialist. Previously, she was Public Relations Manager at Pictometry International Corp. in Rochester. Lisa (Piccinini) Fahy recently opened Studio C, an arts and crafts studio and shop in Claremorris, Co. Mayo, Ireland. She teaches children’s art classes, adult jewelry making classes, and also sells her own line of silver, copper, recycled material, and beaded jewelry.

1992

Lawrence Jay graduated on June 8, 2012, from the FBI National Academy Program at Quantico, V.A. While there, Agent Jay participated in 10 weeks of advanced investigative, management, and physical fitness training provided by FBI instructional staff and special agents, many of whom are recognized internationally in

1993

Steven Simpson is the Director of Marketing for Gannett US Community Publishing’s East Regional Group and the Vice President of Market Development for the Democrat and Chronicle Media Group.

1994

Susan (Arnold) Osborn ’04 (MS) was named Vice President of the Opportunity Center Organization in El Paso, Texas. Opportunity Center is a nonprofit organization that manages multiple facilities for housing homeless individuals, teens, and families. It also provides meals, addiction and mental health counseling, medical services, and job and educational guidance. Lisa Eilertsen and Shawn Shaw were married on May 19, 2012, at St. Louis Church in Pittsford, New York. Sharon (Bassette) Wu ’99 (MS) and Mark Wu welcomed a son, Ethan Alexander, on October 11, 2012. Ethan joins older brother, Brandon, born October 17, 2011.

Homecoming & Reunion Weekend 2013

September 26-29 1995

David Spencer and Stephanie Peterson were married on March 9, 2013, in North Reading, Michigan.

1996

Michele (Baug) Jones and Jeffrey Jones welcomed a son, Thomas Jeffrey, on November 21, 2012.

1997

Joseph Englebert was named Superintendent of the Warsaw Central School District. Richard Hannon was appointed to the Board of Trustees of Monroe Community College by Governor Andrew Cuomo on December 10, 2012. Emory Roethel is the UPK-

27

12 Coordinator of Curriculum, Instruction & Technology for the Wellsville Central School District in Wellsville, New York. Also, Emory and Erica Fleischman were married on August 18, 2011.

1998

Steven Rudnicki is the Associate Director of Marketing at the National Golf Course Owners Association (NGCOA) in Charleston, South Carolina. Steven will oversee the Associations’ marketing and communications efforts to its over 3,400 member courses. Dr. Brian Schmitt ’03 (MS), ’09 (EdD) was named Superintendent of the Genesee Valley School District in Belmont, New York.

1999

Robert Fanelli and Bethany McFetridge were married on July 6, 2012.

2000

P a t r i c k Newton joined HighPoint Advisors, LLC in East Syracuse, New York, on January 2, 2013. Patrick has been part of the financial services industry for 10 years. His specialty is in transition planning.

28

CLASSNOTES

CLASSNOTES

2004

Pop Culture, 1973

Patrick Craig and Mollie (Schneible) Craig ’02, ’05 (MS) welcomed a daughter, Sadie Margaret, on September 22, 2012.

• Secretariat won the Kentucky Derby.

• The Sting won the Oscar for Best Picture.

Jeremiah Ditch was promoted to Manager in the Small Business Administration Team at The Bonadio Group.

• All in the Family was the most popular TV show. • “Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree” was the top song.

Lisa (Hauck) Fenton and Cory Fenton welcomed twin daughters, Lily and Grace, on December 15, 2011.

• Fisher alumni gathered for the first Whackers & Hackers Golf Tournament.

Adam Hartwig was hired as the York District Public Service Coordinator for the Maine CDC.

Be part of a great Fisher alumni tradition and golf in the 2013 Whackers & Hackers Tournament, Friday July 12, at Shadow Pines Golf Club, Penfield, New York. Contact Chris Sullivan ’94 at (585) 385-8001 or csullivan@sjfc.edu to register now.

2001

James Garner and Kelly (Barnes) Garner welcomed a daughter, Sydney Christine, on March 12, 2013. Paul Goverts IV and Claire (Albertson) Goverts ’06 welcomed a daughter, Hana, on January 27, 2012. Samuel Rizzo and Laurel (Munski) Rizzo welcomed twin sons, Evan Samuel and Nathan Theodore, on November 11, 2012.

2002

Mollie (Schneible) Craig ’05 MS and Patrick Craig ’04 welcomed a daughter, Sadie Margaret, on September 22, 2012.

29

Kevin Johnson, Esq. was named Managing Partner of the law office of, Klafehn Heise & Johnson, PLLC, in Brockport, New York. In addition, Kevin resigned from his elected position on the Sweden Town Board upon his appointment as Town Justice for the Town of Sweden. Dr. Matthew Knapp ’12 (PharmD) and Shauna (Driscoll) Knapp ’05 (MS) had a son, Liam Matthew, on March 25, 2012. LaShunda Leslie-Smith was named Executive Director of CASA. CASA is a private nonprofit organization that trains citizen volunteers to advocate for abused and neglected children in foster care and children at risk of entering foster care.

Morgan (Hawley) Niedermier and Derek Niedermier welcomed a daughter, Adalyn Marie, on September 16, 2012. She is the couple’s first child. Kevin Miller and Melissa Miller welcomed a son, Liam Burke, on May 6, 2013.

2003

Joseph Bovet and Holly Bovet welcomed a daughter, Emily Anne, on February 18, 2012. Bouaketh Chanthavisouk, in her third season as an Assistant Volleyball Coach at Gannon University, helped lead the Golden Knights to their first Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC) Championship. Brian Thomas, D.O., has joined Highland Hospital in the anesthesiology department.

Kara (Race) Ricotta and Matthew Ricotta welcomed twins, Michael James and Helena Katherine, on December 6, 2012. Paul Quinlan, Jr. and Melissa Quinlan welcomed a son, Finnegan Paul, on September 27, 2011 in Cortland, New York.

2005

Sheila (Wood) Ballato, Esq. graduated from the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University in May of 2012. Sheila passed the New York State Bar Exam and accepted a position as an Assistant Attorney at Mental Hygiene Legal Service, Appellate Division 2nd Department, in November of 2012.

Maryrose Blank, a Performance Enhancement Specialist with North Carolina’s Fort Bragg Army Installation, has achieved Certified Consultant status with the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP), an international professional organization that promotes the field of sport, exercise, and health psychology. Robert Eisenhart II and Alexis Eisenhart welcomed a daughter, Elise, on April 11, 2012. Elise joins big brother, Jack. Robert was promoted to Packaging Manager for Unilever’s Hammond, Indiana, manufacturing facility. He will oversee all packaging operations.

24, 2012, at Becker Farms in Gasport, New York. In October 2012, Peter was named the Executive Director for the Rochester, New York Chapter of the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA).

2006

Robert Craig was promoted to Director of Group Sales at the Rochester Red Wings. Ashley Moore and Peter Stoller ’05 were married on August 24, 2012, at Becker Farms in Gasport, New York. Michelle Pyzik was promoted to Manager in the Tax Exempt West Division at The Bonadio Group.

Peter Stoller and Ashley Moore ’06 were married on August

THEN&NOW

This photo of Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler brought a flood of comments! Alumni shared their stories of attending the Aerosmith show in the Student Life Center gym during freshman orientation weekend in 1974. Rick Walsh, Student Congress President at the time, remembers, “Cost for transportation, room and board, additional required sound equipment, and the three-hour performance was $7,500,” for the up-and-coming band. After the event contract was signed, Aerosmith’s “Walk this Way” single was released and the band shot to the top of the charts. “We exceeded the expected revenue and ran three more concerts that year on the profit made that night.” Bob Zinck ’75 recalls that Aerosmith left their dressing room (the men’s locker room) in true rock star form. Both Bill Barone and John Palmieri remember the drummer throwing his sticks into the crowd. Palmieri recalls, “My buddy,

John Fisher, got hit smack in the forehead with the drumstick.” Barone said the drummer then “used the back of his hands and his forehead to complete a long solo.” Karen Pettrone-Keber, Mark Ferraro, James Lamica III and many others remember being impressed that a small college was able to get a great music act for orientation. “What a great way to kick off four very memorable years at Fisher,” says Ferraro. Frank Marticelli recalled many other big-name shows during his time at Fisher including BB King, Melanie, Sha Na Na, and Mama Cass of the Mamas and the Papas. Joe Simeone’s favorite Fisher show was Styx during orientation weekend in 1976. 30

CLASSNOTES

CLASSNOTES

2004

Pop Culture, 1973

Patrick Craig and Mollie (Schneible) Craig ’02, ’05 (MS) welcomed a daughter, Sadie Margaret, on September 22, 2012.

• Secretariat won the Kentucky Derby.

• The Sting won the Oscar for Best Picture.

Jeremiah Ditch was promoted to Manager in the Small Business Administration Team at The Bonadio Group.

• All in the Family was the most popular TV show. • “Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree” was the top song.

Lisa (Hauck) Fenton and Cory Fenton welcomed twin daughters, Lily and Grace, on December 15, 2011.

• Fisher alumni gathered for the first Whackers & Hackers Golf Tournament.

Adam Hartwig was hired as the York District Public Service Coordinator for the Maine CDC.

Be part of a great Fisher alumni tradition and golf in the 2013 Whackers & Hackers Tournament, Friday July 12, at Shadow Pines Golf Club, Penfield, New York. Contact Chris Sullivan ’94 at (585) 385-8001 or csullivan@sjfc.edu to register now.

2001

James Garner and Kelly (Barnes) Garner welcomed a daughter, Sydney Christine, on March 12, 2013. Paul Goverts IV and Claire (Albertson) Goverts ’06 welcomed a daughter, Hana, on January 27, 2012. Samuel Rizzo and Laurel (Munski) Rizzo welcomed twin sons, Evan Samuel and Nathan Theodore, on November 11, 2012.

2002

Mollie (Schneible) Craig ’05 MS and Patrick Craig ’04 welcomed a daughter, Sadie Margaret, on September 22, 2012.

29

Kevin Johnson, Esq. was named Managing Partner of the law office of, Klafehn Heise & Johnson, PLLC, in Brockport, New York. In addition, Kevin resigned from his elected position on the Sweden Town Board upon his appointment as Town Justice for the Town of Sweden. Dr. Matthew Knapp ’12 (PharmD) and Shauna (Driscoll) Knapp ’05 (MS) had a son, Liam Matthew, on March 25, 2012. LaShunda Leslie-Smith was named Executive Director of CASA. CASA is a private nonprofit organization that trains citizen volunteers to advocate for abused and neglected children in foster care and children at risk of entering foster care.

Morgan (Hawley) Niedermier and Derek Niedermier welcomed a daughter, Adalyn Marie, on September 16, 2012. She is the couple’s first child. Kevin Miller and Melissa Miller welcomed a son, Liam Burke, on May 6, 2013.

2003

Joseph Bovet and Holly Bovet welcomed a daughter, Emily Anne, on February 18, 2012. Bouaketh Chanthavisouk, in her third season as an Assistant Volleyball Coach at Gannon University, helped lead the Golden Knights to their first Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC) Championship. Brian Thomas, D.O., has joined Highland Hospital in the anesthesiology department.

Kara (Race) Ricotta and Matthew Ricotta welcomed twins, Michael James and Helena Katherine, on December 6, 2012. Paul Quinlan, Jr. and Melissa Quinlan welcomed a son, Finnegan Paul, on September 27, 2011 in Cortland, New York.

2005

Sheila (Wood) Ballato, Esq. graduated from the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University in May of 2012. Sheila passed the New York State Bar Exam and accepted a position as an Assistant Attorney at Mental Hygiene Legal Service, Appellate Division 2nd Department, in November of 2012.

Maryrose Blank, a Performance Enhancement Specialist with North Carolina’s Fort Bragg Army Installation, has achieved Certified Consultant status with the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP), an international professional organization that promotes the field of sport, exercise, and health psychology. Robert Eisenhart II and Alexis Eisenhart welcomed a daughter, Elise, on April 11, 2012. Elise joins big brother, Jack. Robert was promoted to Packaging Manager for Unilever’s Hammond, Indiana, manufacturing facility. He will oversee all packaging operations.

24, 2012, at Becker Farms in Gasport, New York. In October 2012, Peter was named the Executive Director for the Rochester, New York Chapter of the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA).

2006

Robert Craig was promoted to Director of Group Sales at the Rochester Red Wings. Ashley Moore and Peter Stoller ’05 were married on August 24, 2012, at Becker Farms in Gasport, New York. Michelle Pyzik was promoted to Manager in the Tax Exempt West Division at The Bonadio Group.

Peter Stoller and Ashley Moore ’06 were married on August

THEN&NOW

This photo of Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler brought a flood of comments! Alumni shared their stories of attending the Aerosmith show in the Student Life Center gym during freshman orientation weekend in 1974. Rick Walsh, Student Congress President at the time, remembers, “Cost for transportation, room and board, additional required sound equipment, and the three-hour performance was $7,500,” for the up-and-coming band. After the event contract was signed, Aerosmith’s “Walk this Way” single was released and the band shot to the top of the charts. “We exceeded the expected revenue and ran three more concerts that year on the profit made that night.” Bob Zinck ’75 recalls that Aerosmith left their dressing room (the men’s locker room) in true rock star form. Both Bill Barone and John Palmieri remember the drummer throwing his sticks into the crowd. Palmieri recalls, “My buddy,

John Fisher, got hit smack in the forehead with the drumstick.” Barone said the drummer then “used the back of his hands and his forehead to complete a long solo.” Karen Pettrone-Keber, Mark Ferraro, James Lamica III and many others remember being impressed that a small college was able to get a great music act for orientation. “What a great way to kick off four very memorable years at Fisher,” says Ferraro. Frank Marticelli recalled many other big-name shows during his time at Fisher including BB King, Melanie, Sha Na Na, and Mama Cass of the Mamas and the Papas. Joe Simeone’s favorite Fisher show was Styx during orientation weekend in 1976. 30

CLASSNOTES

Free Fisher transcripts An official record of your academic work at St. John Fisher College is retained permanently by the Registrar’s Office. You can now obtain your transcript at no cost. Go to www. sjfc.edu/alumni/benefits for more information on how to request your transcript.

2007

Corinne Bidnick was promoted to Audit Manager at Fust Charles Chambers, LLP, in Syracuse, New York. Bridgette (Jones) Frometa and Matthew Frometa ’09 welcomed a son, Benjamin, on November 8, 2012. David Lester graduated from the UC Berkeley School of Information with a Masters in Information Management and Systems in May 2013. David recently accepted a position at Twitter in San Francisco as an Open Source Advocate. Kathryn Rudd welcomed a son, Isaac George, on November 20, 2012. Kenneth Tyler, Jr., Esq., joins the firm, Mackenzie Huges, LLP, as an associate with a practice area that concentrates on commercial disputes, personal injury, and appellate litigation. Admitted to the New York State Bar in 2011, Tyler earned a Juris Doctorate from Albany Law School.

31

CLASSNOTES

2008

Katherine Dayton was hired as a Senior Human Resource Specialist for the Enterprise Team within The Bonadio Group. William Kuchman was promoted to Design Director at POLITICO in August 2012. William joined POLITICO in 2011 after spending three years at the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. Matthew Palmieri, Esq., joins Jaeckle Fleischmann & Mugel, LLP, as an associate in the firm’s real estate practice group. While pursuing his law degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo, Matthew served as a Judicial Law Clerk for New York State Supreme Court Judge Joseph D. Valentino. Chelsey Wyant was promoted to Senior In-Charge Accountant at the Tax Exempt Central Division at The Bonadio Group.

2009

Rocco Arcuri II and Julie (Baker) Arcuri ’10 welcomed a daughter, Carmella Marie, on September 8, 2012. John Astles was promoted to Senior In-Charge Accountant in the Tax Exempt Central Division at The Bonadio Group. Robert Bird, Jr. has written two books, The Observer, and its sequel, The Overwatch. Both

are available at Amazon.com. Robert began this project in 2010 after returning from activeduty service in Iraq. They are not autobiographical, but are informed by his experiences and observations in both Iraq and the United States. Joseph Dillon was promoted to Senior In-Charge Accountant in the Government Compliance Labor Division at The Bonadio Group. Matthew Frometa and Bridgette (Jones) Frometa ’07 welcomed a son, Benjamin, on November 8, 2012. Susan Pedrotti and Arthur (A.J.) Connors were married on August 18, 2012, at St. Mary’s Church in Rochester, New York. Amanda Ruscitto ’11 (MS) was promoted to Experience Assistant in the Tax Exempt West Division at The Bonadio Group.

2010

Julie (Baker) Arcuri and Rocco Arcuri ’09 welcomed a daughter, Carmella Marie, on September 8, 2012.

Mark Stack ’12 (MBA) was hired by Lumsden & McCormick, LLP as a Tax Staff Accountant in their tax department in March 2013. Mark is responsible for tax compliance services to businesses and individuals. N a t a l i e Thorpe was p r o m o t e d to Senior Accountant in the audit department at Lumsden & McCormick, LLP. She joined the firm full-time after completing an internship in 2010. In her new position, Natalie will continue to serve governmental entities and nonprofit organizations.

2012

Lauren Heary has accepted a position at the University of Rochester as the conference and special events assistant. Lauren will play an important administrative and organizational role during commencement and different conferences throughout the year. Bradley Sullivan has joined AXA Advisors in Syracuse, NY. He has acquired his life, accident and health, series 6, and series 63 licenses.

In Memoriam

Alfred Damia ’58, August 16, 2012 Vincent Vater ’62, October 3, 2012 Alexander Lupinetti August 19, 2012

’67,

Dominic Fasso ’69 Dennis Cronin ’76, August 24, 2012, after battling ALS Michael Thornton ’76, January 24, 2013 Brett von Wiegen ’01, December 15, 2012

2013

Brandon Smith was named Coordinator at Butler/Till in Rochester. Butler/Till is a media and communications agency that delivers progressive ideas for engaging audiences across multiple platforms, channels, and media.

Future Fisher Alumni

Curtis Vogelsang was promoted to District Manager of Major Accounts in Upstate New York for Apple Inc.

2011

Lindsey Sampo is currently in her second year of physician assistant school at Clarkson University.

Hailey Elizabeth, daughter of Rob ’01 and Christine (Gabak) ’03 Schoener, was born on May 27, 2011. She is pictured with her older sister, Madison.

Hana, born January 27, 2012, is the daughter of Paul Goverts IV ’01 and Claire Goverts ’06.

Jack and Elise are the son and daughter of Bobby ’05 and Alexis Eisenhart. Jack was born on December 3, 2009 and Elise arrived on April 11, 2012.

Share your child’s arrival with the Alumni Office: email alumni@ sjfc.edu or go to www.sjfc.edu/alumni and click “Submit a Class Note.” We’ll send you a “Future Fisher Alumni” bib.

Sydney Christine, daughter of Kelly (Barnes) Garner and Jim Garner ’01, was born March 12, weighing in at 7 lbs., 12 oz., 21.5 inches.

Ryan William is the son of Leslie (Patterson) ’03, ’06 (MS) and Kevin Bruyns ’00. He arrived on November 15, 2011.

Brandon is the son of Sharon (Bassette) ’94, ’99 (MS) and Mark Wu and was born October 17, 2011. Brandon is now big brother to Ethan Alexander, born October 11, 2012.

To submit a picture of your child in the Fisher bib, email alumni@sjfc.edu or mail to: Alumni Relations, St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618.

32

CLASSNOTES

Free Fisher transcripts An official record of your academic work at St. John Fisher College is retained permanently by the Registrar’s Office. You can now obtain your transcript at no cost. Go to www. sjfc.edu/alumni/benefits for more information on how to request your transcript.

2007

Corinne Bidnick was promoted to Audit Manager at Fust Charles Chambers, LLP, in Syracuse, New York. Bridgette (Jones) Frometa and Matthew Frometa ’09 welcomed a son, Benjamin, on November 8, 2012. David Lester graduated from the UC Berkeley School of Information with a Masters in Information Management and Systems in May 2013. David recently accepted a position at Twitter in San Francisco as an Open Source Advocate. Kathryn Rudd welcomed a son, Isaac George, on November 20, 2012. Kenneth Tyler, Jr., Esq., joins the firm, Mackenzie Huges, LLP, as an associate with a practice area that concentrates on commercial disputes, personal injury, and appellate litigation. Admitted to the New York State Bar in 2011, Tyler earned a Juris Doctorate from Albany Law School.

31

CLASSNOTES

2008

Katherine Dayton was hired as a Senior Human Resource Specialist for the Enterprise Team within The Bonadio Group. William Kuchman was promoted to Design Director at POLITICO in August 2012. William joined POLITICO in 2011 after spending three years at the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. Matthew Palmieri, Esq., joins Jaeckle Fleischmann & Mugel, LLP, as an associate in the firm’s real estate practice group. While pursuing his law degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo, Matthew served as a Judicial Law Clerk for New York State Supreme Court Judge Joseph D. Valentino. Chelsey Wyant was promoted to Senior In-Charge Accountant at the Tax Exempt Central Division at The Bonadio Group.

2009

Rocco Arcuri II and Julie (Baker) Arcuri ’10 welcomed a daughter, Carmella Marie, on September 8, 2012. John Astles was promoted to Senior In-Charge Accountant in the Tax Exempt Central Division at The Bonadio Group. Robert Bird, Jr. has written two books, The Observer, and its sequel, The Overwatch. Both

are available at Amazon.com. Robert began this project in 2010 after returning from activeduty service in Iraq. They are not autobiographical, but are informed by his experiences and observations in both Iraq and the United States. Joseph Dillon was promoted to Senior In-Charge Accountant in the Government Compliance Labor Division at The Bonadio Group. Matthew Frometa and Bridgette (Jones) Frometa ’07 welcomed a son, Benjamin, on November 8, 2012. Susan Pedrotti and Arthur (A.J.) Connors were married on August 18, 2012, at St. Mary’s Church in Rochester, New York. Amanda Ruscitto ’11 (MS) was promoted to Experience Assistant in the Tax Exempt West Division at The Bonadio Group.

2010

Julie (Baker) Arcuri and Rocco Arcuri ’09 welcomed a daughter, Carmella Marie, on September 8, 2012.

Mark Stack ’12 (MBA) was hired by Lumsden & McCormick, LLP as a Tax Staff Accountant in their tax department in March 2013. Mark is responsible for tax compliance services to businesses and individuals. N a t a l i e Thorpe was p r o m o t e d to Senior Accountant in the audit department at Lumsden & McCormick, LLP. She joined the firm full-time after completing an internship in 2010. In her new position, Natalie will continue to serve governmental entities and nonprofit organizations.

2012

Lauren Heary has accepted a position at the University of Rochester as the conference and special events assistant. Lauren will play an important administrative and organizational role during commencement and different conferences throughout the year. Bradley Sullivan has joined AXA Advisors in Syracuse, NY. He has acquired his life, accident and health, series 6, and series 63 licenses.

In Memoriam

Alfred Damia ’58, August 16, 2012 Vincent Vater ’62, October 3, 2012 Alexander Lupinetti August 19, 2012

’67,

Dominic Fasso ’69 Dennis Cronin ’76, August 24, 2012, after battling ALS Michael Thornton ’76, January 24, 2013 Brett von Wiegen ’01, December 15, 2012

2013

Brandon Smith was named Coordinator at Butler/Till in Rochester. Butler/Till is a media and communications agency that delivers progressive ideas for engaging audiences across multiple platforms, channels, and media.

Future Fisher Alumni

Curtis Vogelsang was promoted to District Manager of Major Accounts in Upstate New York for Apple Inc.

2011

Lindsey Sampo is currently in her second year of physician assistant school at Clarkson University.

Hailey Elizabeth, daughter of Rob ’01 and Christine (Gabak) ’03 Schoener, was born on May 27, 2011. She is pictured with her older sister, Madison.

Hana, born January 27, 2012, is the daughter of Paul Goverts IV ’01 and Claire Goverts ’06.

Jack and Elise are the son and daughter of Bobby ’05 and Alexis Eisenhart. Jack was born on December 3, 2009 and Elise arrived on April 11, 2012.

Share your child’s arrival with the Alumni Office: email alumni@ sjfc.edu or go to www.sjfc.edu/alumni and click “Submit a Class Note.” We’ll send you a “Future Fisher Alumni” bib.

Sydney Christine, daughter of Kelly (Barnes) Garner and Jim Garner ’01, was born March 12, weighing in at 7 lbs., 12 oz., 21.5 inches.

Ryan William is the son of Leslie (Patterson) ’03, ’06 (MS) and Kevin Bruyns ’00. He arrived on November 15, 2011.

Brandon is the son of Sharon (Bassette) ’94, ’99 (MS) and Mark Wu and was born October 17, 2011. Brandon is now big brother to Ethan Alexander, born October 11, 2012.

To submit a picture of your child in the Fisher bib, email alumni@sjfc.edu or mail to: Alumni Relations, St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618.

32

ATHLETICS “Just meeting everyone that day lit a fire,” he says. “I knew I wanted to do something with football.” At 6, he didn’t yet realize he could never play the game. “He used to ask me, ’Can you make me walk? I want to play football,’” his dad recalls. Reality soon set in, but Bobby’s passion for football didn’t diminish. “If I couldn’t play, I wanted to coach,” he says.

A playbook for beating the odds By Jim Mandelaro ’85 Bobby Greco’s father was approached last fall by a friend who had seen some photos of Bobby on Facebook. There he was coaching at Jim Kelly’s football camp in Buffalo. And there he was meeting Yankees legend Joe Torre at CitiField in New York. “He’s so lucky,” the friend told Bobby’s dad. “I’d love to be your son.” The story made Bobby laugh. “I told my dad, ‘Gladly.’ I would accept the trade. If he wants to come and take the pain, I’ll let him take it.” Bobby lives with pain every day. He’s confined to a wheelchair and can’t move his limbs. He is averaging one surgery for every year of his life. But the boy whom doctors said would never have any semblance of a life is an assistant offensive line coach for the nationally ranked St. John Fisher College football team, and just earned his bachelor’s degree. “When the doctors delivered him, we knew there was a problem,” his dad, Bob Sr., says. “They started examining him and broke his femur.” Bobby eventually was diagnosed

33 29

with arthrogryposis, a rare congenital disorder characterized by multiple joint contractures. The condition affects the proper formation of ligaments and muscles. He can only move his hands enough to drive his electric wheelchair and must be fed, dressed, and showered daily. “He’s in pain 24/7, but he doesn’t let people know. He doesn’t want them to think of him in that way.” At birth, all of Bobby’s joints were locked and most were out of place. He underwent 21 surgeries in his first 14 years - many in his first three years. Most were orthopedic surgeries to turn the joints the correct way. Both hips, his legs, his right arm. There wasn’t enough muscle in his left arm to allow for surgery. Doctors told Bob and JoAnn Greco that their son would never show emotion, never talk, never have any quality of life. Some recommended that he be institutionalized. “It wasn’t an option,” his dad says. “We told them, ‘He’s our son. We’re taking him home.’” Bobby fooled everyone. By three, he was on a parapodium, which

allows standing without the aid of crutches, and using a computer with the aid of a head pointer. And he showed remarkable intelligence for his age. “We went from learning how to deal with a handicapped child to how to deal with a gifted one,” his dad says proudly. Through the pain and the endless hospital stays, Bobby found comfort in watching football with his semifamous dad. Bob Greco was the lead singer for the popular party band Nik and the Nice Guys for 18 years, and they played at Buffalo Bills Super Bowl appearances, tailgate and Christmas parties, and quarterback Jim Kelly’s parties. Bobby became a huge Bills fan, watching games with his dad. In 1995, when he was six, he got a chance to meet his heroes. Kelly brought his StarGaze charity softball tournament—a mix of rock stars and athletes—to Rochester’s Silver Stadium. Bobby met Kelly, Dan Marino and Bills stars Bruce Smith, Thurman Thomas, James Lofton, and Pete Metzelaars. Bobby was in football heaven.

Bobby’s coaching career began in eighth grade. His cousin, Joe Davis, was a former high school football star and also Bobby’s aide. Davis was an assistant coach on the Geneva modified team and asked if Bobby wanted to help out. “I loved everything about it,” Bobby says. “The planning, the camaraderie. I tried to learn everything I could.”

freshman year but a wicked battle with vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels) forced him to miss much of his sophomore year. “That was a really bad year,” he says. Bobby now lives with his parents in Geneva while taking Fisher courses online. Although he has never played the game and is barely older than the players he coaches, Bobby commands their respect. Zach Bassett, a junior offensive tackle from Midlakes, first met Bobby at a summer Finger Lakes football

Bobby knew Fisher had a strong sports management program and, after visiting campus, he realized it was where he wanted to go to college. Bobby paid head football coach Paul Vosburgh a visit and offered to help out with the linemen. Vosburgh gave the OK. “The only thing we worried about was if he was on the sideline, can he get out of the way if someone (on the field) runs into him,” Vosburgh says. “But it’s never happened. He keeps back with the linemen.” Bobby

lived

on

campus

his

If this sounds like the script for a Hollywood movie, there’s a reason: A screenplay is in the works, and Bobby’s manager—Buffalobased Therese Forton-Barnes—is shopping the movie rights around. “He’s a fascinating and inspiring story,” she says. Bobby would love to stay in coaching and his eye remains on that most special of prizes: head coach in the NFL (but he’ll take an assistant’s job too, thank you very much). “Why not?” he asks.

He spent one year on modified, one on junior varsity, and three on the varsity staff. Many nights after practice, his legs would bleed from sitting in a wheelchair for 12 hours. But he wouldn’t stop. In 2006, his senior year, he was named homecoming king, but his biggest satisfaction came later that fall, when unbeaten Geneva won the Class B state championship.

that his meeting with Bobby 17 years ago inspired the young boy to follow this unlikely path. “You never go into something to have accolades thrown your way,” he says. “But it makes you feel good that you were able to help.”

camp in Geneva. “I came here and Bobby remembered who I was,” Bassett says. “As a freshman, you don’t know the steps, but he guides us through, even though he’s never done the steps himself. He’s very soft-spoken, but what he has to say is very encouraging and very informational.” Vosburgh says Bobby knows his football. “He has a good working knowledge of the game,” Vosburgh says, “and I don’t know if anyone loves football as much as Bobby.” Bobby stayed in touch with Jim Kelly. The past two years, the Pro Football Hall of Famer has invited Bobby to be a coach at his annual summer camp and a dinner guest at his home. Kelly is humbled

There are plenty of days when Bob Sr., now the lead singer of The Bob Greco Band, and JoAnn, a registered nurse, stare at their only child and marvel at what has transpired. The boy who was not supposed to show emotion has a wicked sense of humor and a dream that won’t die. “We used to watch him on the field at Geneva, then at Fisher, and at the Ralph coaching with Jim Kelly,” Bob Sr. says. “He wants a job that only 32 people have. Who am I to tell him it can’t happen? He’s beaten the odds over and over. He’s doing it in front of our eyes.” Jim Mandelaro is a 1985 Fisher graduate and a sportswriter for Rochester’s daily newspaper, the Democrat and Chronicle. This article originally appeared in the Democrat and Chronicle on Oct. 14, 2012.

34

ATHLETICS “Just meeting everyone that day lit a fire,” he says. “I knew I wanted to do something with football.” At 6, he didn’t yet realize he could never play the game. “He used to ask me, ’Can you make me walk? I want to play football,’” his dad recalls. Reality soon set in, but Bobby’s passion for football didn’t diminish. “If I couldn’t play, I wanted to coach,” he says.

A playbook for beating the odds By Jim Mandelaro ’85 Bobby Greco’s father was approached last fall by a friend who had seen some photos of Bobby on Facebook. There he was coaching at Jim Kelly’s football camp in Buffalo. And there he was meeting Yankees legend Joe Torre at CitiField in New York. “He’s so lucky,” the friend told Bobby’s dad. “I’d love to be your son.” The story made Bobby laugh. “I told my dad, ‘Gladly.’ I would accept the trade. If he wants to come and take the pain, I’ll let him take it.” Bobby lives with pain every day. He’s confined to a wheelchair and can’t move his limbs. He is averaging one surgery for every year of his life. But the boy whom doctors said would never have any semblance of a life is an assistant offensive line coach for the nationally ranked St. John Fisher College football team, and just earned his bachelor’s degree. “When the doctors delivered him, we knew there was a problem,” his dad, Bob Sr., says. “They started examining him and broke his femur.” Bobby eventually was diagnosed

33 29

with arthrogryposis, a rare congenital disorder characterized by multiple joint contractures. The condition affects the proper formation of ligaments and muscles. He can only move his hands enough to drive his electric wheelchair and must be fed, dressed, and showered daily. “He’s in pain 24/7, but he doesn’t let people know. He doesn’t want them to think of him in that way.” At birth, all of Bobby’s joints were locked and most were out of place. He underwent 21 surgeries in his first 14 years - many in his first three years. Most were orthopedic surgeries to turn the joints the correct way. Both hips, his legs, his right arm. There wasn’t enough muscle in his left arm to allow for surgery. Doctors told Bob and JoAnn Greco that their son would never show emotion, never talk, never have any quality of life. Some recommended that he be institutionalized. “It wasn’t an option,” his dad says. “We told them, ‘He’s our son. We’re taking him home.’” Bobby fooled everyone. By three, he was on a parapodium, which

allows standing without the aid of crutches, and using a computer with the aid of a head pointer. And he showed remarkable intelligence for his age. “We went from learning how to deal with a handicapped child to how to deal with a gifted one,” his dad says proudly. Through the pain and the endless hospital stays, Bobby found comfort in watching football with his semifamous dad. Bob Greco was the lead singer for the popular party band Nik and the Nice Guys for 18 years, and they played at Buffalo Bills Super Bowl appearances, tailgate and Christmas parties, and quarterback Jim Kelly’s parties. Bobby became a huge Bills fan, watching games with his dad. In 1995, when he was six, he got a chance to meet his heroes. Kelly brought his StarGaze charity softball tournament—a mix of rock stars and athletes—to Rochester’s Silver Stadium. Bobby met Kelly, Dan Marino and Bills stars Bruce Smith, Thurman Thomas, James Lofton, and Pete Metzelaars. Bobby was in football heaven.

Bobby’s coaching career began in eighth grade. His cousin, Joe Davis, was a former high school football star and also Bobby’s aide. Davis was an assistant coach on the Geneva modified team and asked if Bobby wanted to help out. “I loved everything about it,” Bobby says. “The planning, the camaraderie. I tried to learn everything I could.”

freshman year but a wicked battle with vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels) forced him to miss much of his sophomore year. “That was a really bad year,” he says. Bobby now lives with his parents in Geneva while taking Fisher courses online. Although he has never played the game and is barely older than the players he coaches, Bobby commands their respect. Zach Bassett, a junior offensive tackle from Midlakes, first met Bobby at a summer Finger Lakes football

Bobby knew Fisher had a strong sports management program and, after visiting campus, he realized it was where he wanted to go to college. Bobby paid head football coach Paul Vosburgh a visit and offered to help out with the linemen. Vosburgh gave the OK. “The only thing we worried about was if he was on the sideline, can he get out of the way if someone (on the field) runs into him,” Vosburgh says. “But it’s never happened. He keeps back with the linemen.” Bobby

lived

on

campus

his

If this sounds like the script for a Hollywood movie, there’s a reason: A screenplay is in the works, and Bobby’s manager—Buffalobased Therese Forton-Barnes—is shopping the movie rights around. “He’s a fascinating and inspiring story,” she says. Bobby would love to stay in coaching and his eye remains on that most special of prizes: head coach in the NFL (but he’ll take an assistant’s job too, thank you very much). “Why not?” he asks.

He spent one year on modified, one on junior varsity, and three on the varsity staff. Many nights after practice, his legs would bleed from sitting in a wheelchair for 12 hours. But he wouldn’t stop. In 2006, his senior year, he was named homecoming king, but his biggest satisfaction came later that fall, when unbeaten Geneva won the Class B state championship.

that his meeting with Bobby 17 years ago inspired the young boy to follow this unlikely path. “You never go into something to have accolades thrown your way,” he says. “But it makes you feel good that you were able to help.”

camp in Geneva. “I came here and Bobby remembered who I was,” Bassett says. “As a freshman, you don’t know the steps, but he guides us through, even though he’s never done the steps himself. He’s very soft-spoken, but what he has to say is very encouraging and very informational.” Vosburgh says Bobby knows his football. “He has a good working knowledge of the game,” Vosburgh says, “and I don’t know if anyone loves football as much as Bobby.” Bobby stayed in touch with Jim Kelly. The past two years, the Pro Football Hall of Famer has invited Bobby to be a coach at his annual summer camp and a dinner guest at his home. Kelly is humbled

There are plenty of days when Bob Sr., now the lead singer of The Bob Greco Band, and JoAnn, a registered nurse, stare at their only child and marvel at what has transpired. The boy who was not supposed to show emotion has a wicked sense of humor and a dream that won’t die. “We used to watch him on the field at Geneva, then at Fisher, and at the Ralph coaching with Jim Kelly,” Bob Sr. says. “He wants a job that only 32 people have. Who am I to tell him it can’t happen? He’s beaten the odds over and over. He’s doing it in front of our eyes.” Jim Mandelaro is a 1985 Fisher graduate and a sportswriter for Rochester’s daily newspaper, the Democrat and Chronicle. This article originally appeared in the Democrat and Chronicle on Oct. 14, 2012.

34

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Rochester, N.Y. Permit No. 1317 3690 East Avenue Rochester, NY 14618

FISHER THEN

The photo above is from the 1968 edition of the Jo Roffs yearbook. The American flag in front of Kearney Hall is at half staff in honor of Tom Way, a Class of 1966 alumnus who was killed in action in Vietnam. It is believed that Way is the only Fisher alum to have died in the war. If you knew Tom, or know of any other alumni that have died in service to our country, we invite you to share your story with the Alumni Office at alumni@sjfc.edu or (585) 385-8001.


Spring 2013 Collegium