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SIGNAL

Self-portrait, oil on canvas by Tiffany Aguila-Hicks

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Honoring local artist Tiffany Aguila-Hicks

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April 9, 1982–Dec. 26, 2013

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Vol. 35 No. 33

LB Mayor Bob Foster paints happy picture of city’s future in his final ‘State of the City’ Your Weekly Community Newspaper

CJ Dablo Staff Writer

Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster is counting down his final months and days before he leaves the center of the Council dais. At his Jan. 14 “State of the City” address, the last one he will make as the mayor, hundreds gathered at the Pacific Ballroom at the Long Beach Arena to hear Foster, as he delivered a speech marked by nostalgia, wit and an unapologetic tone as he recalled the last seven and a half years in office. His last day in office is scheduled for July 14 before a new mayor is elected to preside over the City Council. Foster defended many of the decisions he had made over his two terms in office and highlighted how the city had changed under his leadership. In his address, the mayor said he usually kept in mind a 10year-old child when facing an issue. He explained how it forced him to think of how the City’s actions could affect the life of that child. “I have always seen it as my obligation to improve the future: to leave this City better than I found it and enhance the opportunities for that 10-year-old child. I think I have done this in my seven and a half years as your mayor.”

Long Beach primary election in April to be packed with candidates for mayor, city council and other offices Sean Belk Staff Writer

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

Counting down the final months of his tenure as Long Beach mayor, Bob Foster appears at the Long Beach Arena on Jan. 14 to deliver his last “State of the City” address. Foster’s final day in office will be July 14.

Long Beach Council approves housing document, agrees to look into rent escrow account program see CITY page 11

January 17, 2014

Sean Belk Staff Writer

A planning document for how housing will be shaped in Long Beach for the next seven years was signed off by the City Council at its Jan. 7 meeting, preparing the lengthy proposal for final State certification. After a nearly two-hour public hearing, the update to the City’s Draft Housing Element, which

With less than three months left before the April 8 primary nominating election in Long Beach, a total of 34 candidates have qualified to run for various elected city offices in one of the most jam-packed elections in years. City Clerk Larry Herrera released a list of candidates who will be on the ballot, as of Wednesday, Jan. 15, which is the deadline for all candidates, including council incumbents, to file nomination papers. Also announced were qualified candidates for three available spots on both the Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) Board of Education and the Long Beach Community College District (LBCCD) Board of Trustees. Of the 12 candidates running for the public-education boards, three are incumbents. The race for mayor has the most hopefuls, with 10 candidates looking to take the reins from Mayor Bob Foster, who announced last year he is stepping down and doesn’t plan to seek re-election to a third term in a writein campaign. Among the qualified mayoral candidates are two current city councilmembers, termed-out 5th District Long Beach Councilmember Gerrie Schipske, who announced her bid last March, and Vice Mayor/1st District Councilmember Robert Garcia, who declared he will run for mayor instead of a second council term last July. Another mayoral candidate with experience as a Long Beach public official is attorney and current LBCCD Trustee Doug Otto, who first filed paperwork in April. see CANDIDATES page 11

covers a period from 2013 to 2021, was unanimously approved by the Council as presented by city staff. The California Department of Housing and Community Development Department is expected to provide an official finding of compliance to the City by May, according to city officials. The Council’s approval culminates several months of discussion between city staff, state offisee HOUSING page 12

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

As seen from atop the hill in Willow Springs Park in Long Beach, a vast plume of smoke covers a large portion of Los Angeles County as the Colby fire near Glendora, north of Los Angeles on the edge of the Angeles National Forest, continued to burn late Thursday morning.

Smoke advisory issued as fire near Glendora burns

Courtesy Housing Long Beach

Affordable-housing advocates demonstrate in front of Long Beach City Hall on Jan. 7 before the City Council approves an update to the City’s Housing Element, a planning document that sets guidelines for housing for the next seven years. January 21, 2014 Weekly Weather Forecast Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday

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As the Colby fire near Glendora sent smoke and ash throughout the region Thursday, Jan. 16, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) issued a smoke advisory for portions of Los Angeles County, where air quality could reach the “unhealthy” range or higher. According to the advisory, all individuals are urged to exercise caution and avoid unnecessary outdoor activities in any area directly impacted by smoke, including those areas where residents can see or smell smoke. At press time, the Colby Fire, burning in the Angeles National Forest above Glendora, had been producing a large amount of smoke. Depending on fire and weather conditions, smoke impacts and “unhealthy” air quality are most likely to occur in portions of the east and south see SMOKE page 12

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NEWS

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JANUARY 17, 2014

Councilmember’s advisory measure on overturning fireworks ban in Long Beach may come back Sean Belk Staff Writer

A debate sparked by 8th District Councilmember Al Austin on whether to overturn Long Beach’s 90-year ban on fireworks may not be extinguished just yet. The councilmember had proposed putting an advisory measure on the April 8 ballot to ask voters whether the Council should consider an ordinance to allow the sale and discharge of State-approved “safe and saneâ€? fireworks in Long Beach. However, not one councilmember backed the idea, primarily since the agenda item was brought up on Jan. 7, the last day the Council could put a measure on the ballot for the primary nominating election. Mayor Bob Foster said lifting the City’s fireworks ban would be “ridiculousâ€? and “insane,â€? suggesting Austin bring forward an ordinance before the Council instead of forcing taxpayers to pay for an advisory ballot measure, which according to the city clerk, would cost about $67,500. Still, some councilmembers said they are open to looking into the matter Courtesy YouTube/Cal Fire further and have asked city staff to return with a full report by early next The California State Fireworks Law currently permits the sale, possession and use of what are called “safe and saneâ€? firemonth. The Council would have to decide by March 7 to put an advisory works, an industry term generally referring to fireworks that don’t fly or explode, such as sparklers, fountains, snakes or measure on the ballot for the June 3 statewide primary election. smoke bombs. In Long Beach, all consumer fireworks have been prohibited since 1924, according to Austin’s office, but the State Fireworks Law, however, currently permits the sale, possession and use of what are called “safe and saneâ€? fireworks, an industry term generally referring to fireworks that don’t fly or explode, such as sparklers, fountains, snakes or smoke bombs. Purchase of $20 or more! These fireworks, which sometimes come in assortment packages, are typically sold at outdoor sales stands and Not valid with other offers. are given a seal of approval by the California State Fire Marshal. Under state law, “safe and saneâ€? fireworks may only be sold from June 28 to July 6 for the week of the 4th of July holiday. Several cities throughout the state have permitted fireworks by passing ordinances while others, such as Long Beach, Seal Beach, Cerritos and Signal Hill, have banned the fireworks altogether. In Long Beach, professional fireworks displays, such as the one above the Queen Mary in downtown, are allowed. In response to Austin’s proposal, Long Beach Fire Chief Mike DuRee called “safe and saneâ€? fireworks “merely a marketing ployâ€? used by the fireworks industry to give a “false sense of security.â€? He said, “No fireworks or any other incendiary device are safe or sane,â€? noting that a sparkler burns at 1,600 to 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit, nearly three times hotter than a lit match, which burns at 600 degrees Fahrenheit. During the council meeting, DuRee then rattled off a list of national statistics on injuries, emergency-room visits, property fires and deaths related to fireworks. He said fireworks pose a greater risk for fires than a lit cigarette and LONG BEACH LOCATIONS added that the National Fire Protection Association has cited “safe and saneâ€? fireworks as being used to create incen250 W. Ocean Blvd. | (562) 432-2211 401 W. Willow St. | (562) 595-6138 :.HMML`:[:HU7LKYV‹ diary devices in terrorist attacks, such as the Boston Marathon bombings. For coupons and to order online: www.buonospizza.com DuRee said reversing Long Beach’s ban on fireworks would put an increased strain on public-safety resources as well as “nearly every other city department.â€? He brought up that the Huntington Beach City Council recently reinstated its fireworks ban after lifting it for a two-year trial period ending last summer. The trial, DuRee said, resulted in a “significant increase in calls for serviceâ€? for both fire and police departments and required the City’s public works staff to clean up fireworks debris on streets citywide. “They were happy to see the ban go back into effect,â€? DuRee said. “The [Huntington Beach fire] chief stated that the city looked like a war zone for over a week and they’re still feeling the effects‌ The current ban will remain in effect for the foreseeable future.â€? Austin, however, said residents have complained that Long Beach’s law is “inadequately enforced,â€? implying that it isn’t a high priority for Long Beach police to cite people for violations. He added that access to fireworks is “pretty much unlimited anywayâ€? since the sale of “safe and

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NEWS

JANUARY 17, 2014

Gov. Brown’s proposed Fiscal Year 2014-15 budget may mean more funding for local schools, colleges

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposed state budget that was released Thursday, Jan. 9 projects a billion-dollar surplus for Fiscal Year 2014-15 and is the second consecutive budget to inject more funding into local schools and colleges, according to Long Beach education officials. The $155-billion budget provides K-12 schools and community colleges across the state with an extra $9.7 billion next fiscal year because of a $6.3billion boost in Prop. 98 funding and $3.4 billion in funding laid over from the past two fiscal years, according to the budget. Even though voters passed tax measure Prop. 30 to provide more funding for schools and higher education in the wake of state deficits, Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) had to make tough budget cuts the last two years, including cutting summer school, eliminating education programs, reducing teacher positions and staff and slashing funding for special education. Preliminary estimates show that LBUSD is now expected to receive 11-percent more state funding, or an increase of about $60 million, in Fiscal Year 2014-15 compared to the prior year, said LBUSD Superintendent Christopher J. Steinhauser in a statement. The additional funding would help LBUSD and other school districts in the state to move toward full implementation of the Local Control Funding Formula, the State’s attempt at replacing California’s prior schoolfunding model with a more “streamlined” formula that removes spending restrictions, said LBUSD spokesperson Chris Eftychiou. The new Stateapproved formula includes stringent accountability measures requiring school districts to document how they plan to educate their students, he said. School spending had previously been tightly controlled through more than 40 categorical aid programs, layered one upon the other, to meet specific needs of specific groups of students, Eftychiou said, adding that some of the programs were “duplicative or contradictory, and all came with rigid spending and reporting requirements, often leading to inefficiency.” Steinhauser stated that the new funding formula will likely take “several more years” to fully implement, but he added that LBUSD officials are “pleased to be discussing the prospect of funding increases rather than the type of severe cuts that public schools suffered as a result of the Great Recession.” Steinhauser added, “The governor’s latest proposal is a significant step toward providing the resources that our students and schools need.” Still, he cautioned that the initial state budget is just the start of a months-long budget process in Sacramento. “We will continue to monitor the state budget situation closely, and ultimately our publicly elected Board of Education will decide how best to spend any additional resources,” Steinhauser said. In addition, Eftychiou said the State has provided LBUSD and other school districts with additional funds for new Common Core Standards,

it will stabilize apportionment funding and will allow colleges to prepare and implement annual budgets with a greater sense of certainty,” Ortiz said. Furthermore, Ortiz said he is particularly pleased that the Governor is proposing increased funding for student-success programs and new support for efforts to “close achievement gaps for underrepresented students,” adding that LBCC has “long championed efforts to increase student success and equitable outcomes and looks forward to working with the Governor to improve outcomes for all students.” Ortiz added that the state budget proposal also includes funds for infrastructure upgrades at community colleges and to address increased operational costs after years of deferrals. “Overall, the governor’s budget will clearly advance California by allowing community colleges to educate more students and help to build the competitive workforce required to maintain California's leading place in the global economy,” Ortiz said.

which he said will help with implementation of the State’s new schoolfunding formula. “Of the total $16.4 million in Common Core funding for LBUSD, we’ve allocated about $2 million of these funds to professional development or training,” Eftychiou said. “The school district also is providing an allocation of $8.4 million for instructional materials related to the Common Core Standards and $6 million toward technology to allow schools to administer computer-based assessments or tests.” Eftychiou added that school officials couldn’t speculate whether certain programs or services might be restored from past cuts. However, he said budget discussions would continue to be an ongoing process throughout the school year at various public meetings. LBUSD’s budget must be approved by July 1.

Community colleges The governor’s budget was also celebrated by Eloy Oakley Ortiz, superintendent-president of Long Beach City College (LBCC). The college’s Board of Trustees voted a year ago to eliminate 11 technical/trade programs and most recently opted in to a pilot program to offer highdemand courses at higher tuition rates to allow students to continue their education. Ortiz said in a statement that the Governor’s budget specifically proposes $1 billion in new investments in higher education for next fiscal year and “continues the restoration of funding to community colleges that began this year to reverse the impact of severe state funding cuts that reduced students’ access to courses and services.” He said the State is planning $155 million in additional “enrollment funding” for community-college students. “The Governor’s proposal to erase the wall of debt by restoring nearly $600 million in deferred funds owed to community colleges is welcome news for community colleges because

California State Universities The reaction from California State University (CSU) officials on the governor’s proposed state budget, however, was a bit mixed. Donald J. Para, interim president of California State University, Long Beach (CSULB), said in a statement that the budget has included a modest 5-percent increase, or $142.2 million, in state funding for the CSU system that is consistent with the four-year budget plan the governor set for CSUs last year. Para added that the governor’s budget message “emphasizes the importance of timely degree completion in all of California’s higher-education segments.” He said the budget “signifies the importance of a college education for California residents as well as the impact it has on the state’s economy and workforce,” adding that the added funds should continue to move the CSU forward in a “positive direction” as the system looks to recover from the substantial see LBUSD page 11

562-988-8429 W W W .T H E T I L E Z O N E . C O M

WALK THE WALK What Bixby Strollers Who Hosted by the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Where Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, 4105 Atlantic Ave. When Saturday, Jan. 18– meet at 7:15am for coffee, and the stroll begins at 7:30am More Info The stroll on Jan. 18 will mark the sixth anniversary of the walking group.

JUST KIDDING What Kidical Mass Tweed Neighborhood Bike Ride Who Hosted by the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Where Georgie’s Place, 3850 Atlantic Ave. When Sunday, Jan. 19 at 1pm More Info Children and adults will bike for roughly four and a half miles, beginning and ending at Georgie’s Place. Attendees are encouraged to wear their best clothes to fit the tweed theme. Email krista@bixbyknollsinfo.com, visit bixbyknollsinfo.com/kidicalmass.html or call (562) 595-0081. REMEMBERING DR. KING What Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Interfaith & Intercultural Celebration Who South Coast Interfaith Council Where Gospel Memorial Church of God in Christ, 1480 Atlantic Ave. When Sunday, Jan. 19 from 3pm to 5pm More Info The event will feature a talk by Rev. Dr. Clyde W. Oden, Jr. and will be free and open to the public. Email office@scinterfaith.org .

DIG UP THE PARK What Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service Tree Planting Who Hosted by 8th District Councilmember Al Austin Where Scherer Park, 4600 Long Beach Blvd. When Monday, Jan. 20 from 9am to noon More Info Volunteers will plant up to 40 new trees in the park. The trees being planted will diversify the park’s ecosystem and add colored leaves in the fall. Call (562) 570-6685 or by email district8@longbeach.gov . WHAT'S GOING ON DOWNTOWN? What Creative-visioning dialogue Who Downtown Long Beach Associates Where Rock Bottom Brewery, 1 Pine Ave. When Wednesday, Jan. 22 from 6pm to 8:30pm More Info The event will be an informal gathering to discuss the future of the Long Beach Civic Center. The gathering will serve as the kick-off to a series of engagement opportunities sponsored by the DLBA and designed to solicit input from the community on the future of the Civic Center. Visit downtownlongbeach.org .

CH-CH-CHANGES Catch all theWhat Uptown Renaissance Festival Who Hosted by 8th District Councilmember Al Austin NFL?games Where Atlantic Theater Parking Lot, 5870 Atlantic Ave.

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THE MAYORAL RACE What Mayoral debate Who The Los Angeles League of Conservative Voters Where The Grand Event Center, 4101 E Willow St. When Thursday, Jan. 23 from 7pm to 8pm LONA ’S ALBONDIGAS More Info The event will provide the community with the opportuauthentic mexican meatball Breakfast served 6am tonity to hear mayoral candidates express their positions on environsoup 5.95 mental issues. Beer, wine and appetizers will be served. high noon

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When Saturday, Jan. 25 from 10am to 3pm More Info The event will feature the demolition ceremony of the Atlantic Theater, which will be followed by live entertainment. There will be informational booths from local stakeholders and food available. The Atlantic Theater will be demolished to make way for the new North Library, which will be the largest branch library in the city once completed.

THE RACE CONTINUES What Mayoral forum Who The North Long Beach Community Action Group Where Houghton Park Community Center, 6301 Myrtle Ave. When Tuesday, Jan. 28 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm More Info The event will provide the community with the opportunity to hear mayoral candidates express their positions on issues concerning the city. Call (562) 900-5725 or email DPressburg@gmail.com .

BOOKWORMS UNITE What Monthly community book club Who The Bixby Knolls Literary Society Where Elise’s Tea Room, 3924 Atlantic Ave. When Wednesday, Feb. 12 at 7pm More Info The club will delve into Sons and Lovers by D.H. Lawrence. Parking is available along Atlantic Avenue. Refreshments will be provided. Call (562) 595-0081 or email info@bixbyknollsinfo.com .

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4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OPINION

Thoughts

JANUARY 17, 2014

from the

Publisher

by Neena Strichart

We are all part of a family. Some of us belong to many families. Whether it is our family of origin, our extended family, family by marriage, stepfamily, foster family, adopted family or those we inherited when we became godparents, it is all, in many ways, what makes up who we are. Through those relationships, genetic or otherwise, it creates within us our vision and perception of self that has been created by the combination of nature and nurture. I am part of many different families. Like every one else, my blood relatives have included aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents, etc. My extended family is another quite complicated story. My father was married twice (divorced the first time) which gave me half-brothers, half-sisters-in-law, nieces and a nephew, as well as their kids. Through my mother’s four marriages (she has been widowed four times) I ended up with stepcousins, stepbrothers, sisters-in-law, nieces, nephews and on and on. Through my three marriages (I divorced twice), I inherited nieces, nephews, and their children, as well as a brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, stepchildren, stepgrandchildren, and even stepgreat-grandchildren. Let me tell you, the branches in my family tree look as if they were drawn by a 2-year-old child using his or her left foot to Photo by Carol Krieger hold the crayon. Liz, Grandma Neena and Kathryn keeping it all in the family! For lots of folks, divorces and the passing of spouses may mean the end of contact with stepfamilies. In my world, that has not been the case. My mom was married to Jay Grommé for nearly two decades. When he died in 1999, we hoped that the relationship with again, and I have found myself thinking of them often. With the ability to reach out through the the family would stay close and cordial. I am happy to report that our families are just as inter- Internet, I have recently reconnected with my two former granddaughters, Kathryn and Liz. They twined as when Pop was still with us. It’s true– we all miss Papa Jay, nevertheless, we didn’t let both live out of state, but when they were here this week on business, Mom and I met them for his passing sever the loving relationships that we had established during his marriage to my dinner. Kathryn’s husband, Alan, and the girls’ mom, Carol, joined us, too. What a wonderful visit we had. We did a bit of catching up on each other’s lives and spent mother. Further making my case is the re-establishment recently made with my late second husband’s some time reminiscing about Cliff. Even though I hadn’t seen the girls, now young ladies, in over family. I married into the Krieger Family when I was 23 years old. My husband Cliff was 63 at 15 years, the bond was still there. I am so excited to still be their grandma! The lesson learned is, no matter the circumstances, a family can stay forever united. All it the time. Yes, there was a 40-year difference in our ages. We were married for 10 years before we divorced back in 1988. Over the years, I have touched base with the Krieger Family now and takes is open minds and open hearts.

Finding the right school for your child COMMENTARY

by Andrew Campanella President, National School Choice Week

If you’d like to send your child to a different school next year, now’s the time to start the process of researching your options. As California prepares to commemorate National School Choice Week later this month at 440 events across the state, many parents will begin evaluating the educational opportunities that are available for their children. Believe it or not, seats in schools are already beginning to fill up for the 2014-2015 school year. Interest in school choice– the process of actively choosing a public, charter, magnet, private, or online school– is high. That means that waiting until the spring or the summer to begin researching schools for your children could restrict your options. No handbook or tipsheet can truly guide parents through the entire process of selecting a school, because choosing schools is an individual experience that will be unique to every family. However, parents can start by making a list of the attributes that they hope to find in an ideal school. Ask yourself: what’s most important to you and to the academic, social, and emotional wellbeing of your child? Is it the academic performance of a school, school safety, the instructional methods, the qualifications of teachers, the school’s educational theme, a school’s shared values or other factors? Once you’ve identified what matters most, start looking into the options available to you. In addition to the local public school, you may be eligible to send your child to a school outside of your ZIP code or in a different school district. Look into nearby charter schools and magnet schools. Don’t leave private and faith-based schools off your list! You might be able to find scholarships to cover the costs of tuition. And for some families, online learning and homeschooling work best. To find the options available to you, look at information from the California department of education, as well as information on state-based education reform or school-choice organization websites. For states with charter and magnet schools, there are often state-based associations that provide directories of these types of schools, along with application information. Private schools and scholarship programs can be researched through state chapters of the Council on American Private Education or the National Association of Independent Schools or through local places of worship (for faithbased schools). For a directory of most schools in your area, along with parent rankings and some performance metrics, parents can visit this website– greatschools.org . With your list of requirements and your list of schools in hand, start making appointments to visit the schools. Ask to sit in on classes, and make sure to ask as many questions as possible of teachers, the administration and support staff. You’ll want to find out what motivates the adults in the building, while also seeing how the students in the classes respond to their teachers. Ask yourself: is this a place where I’d want to send my child for most of his or her weekday waking hours? Finally, make sure to talk with other parents– and to your own children. Ask parents how the schools’ administrators treat parents, and whether they welcome, or discourage, parental involvement. And most importantly, ask your children about their perceptions of the schools that you’ve visited. Find out what excites and motivates your child at school, but also ask about their worries, concerns and apprehensions. Making the decision to change schools certainly isn’t easy. And switching schools isn’t a piece of cake, either. But if you start now, and plan out the journey, you’ll find that the destination– a great school for your child– is well worth the diligence and effort.

SIGNAL

Andrew R. Campanella is the president of National School Choice Week, which runs from Jan. 26 to Feb. 1, 2014, and is America’s largest-ever celebration of educational opportunity.

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Stephen M. Strichart

STAFF WRITERS

CJ Dablo Sean Belk CULTURE WRITERS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

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Jennifer E. Beaver

DESIGN EDITOR/PRODUCTION MANAGER

MANAGING EDITOR

Leighanna Nierle

Cory Bilicko

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Barbie Ellisen Ashley Goodsell COLUMNISTS

Kenneth McKenzie Shoshanah Siegel

Carol Berg Sloan, RD

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. Letters should be 400 words or less. The Signal Tribune will publish no more than one “pro” letter and one “con” letter on a particular topic in a single issue. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

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NEWS

JANUARY 17, 2014

LB voters this April to determine fate of ballot measure to tax medical-marijuana businesses

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

Despite a ban on pot dispensaries throughout Long Beach, this particular operation remains open on Redondo Avenue. This April, a ballot measure will ask voters to approve a plan to tax dispensaries and cultivation sites, but the City still has not yet established a new ordinance to allow dispensaries to legally operate in the first place. CJ Dablo Staff Writer

Even though the Long Beach City Council is not close to developing a new ordinance that will regulate pot dispensaries, it has at least planned for the possibility of significant tax revenues on medical marijuana. Whether or not there will be a tax on medical cannabis depends on whether Long Beach residents will like the idea of taxing pot dispensaries and cultivation sites at the rates proposed by the Council. The tax rates will be based on a couple of factors, and it’s especially crucial to determine if the business is considered to be either for-profit or nonprofit. The tax rates will also be based on whether a business runs a retail operation, cultivation site or both. The Council voted on Jan. 7 to approve a resolution that included the language of the tax measure which will be ready in time for the April 8 election. The measure will essentially ask voters to approve a range of six- to 10percent sales tax on gross receipts of marijuana businesses that are considered “for profit.” It initially sets the sales tax at six percent with an annual consumer price index adjustment. The Long Beach tax rate will be in addition to the state tax rate, which is set at about nine percent. City Attorney Charles Parkin said at last week’s meeting that the voters would be authorizing the Council to set the rate as high as 10 percent. He added that even though the initial rate would be set at six percent, the Council may move the rate up or down, but that rate could never exceed 10 percent. It’s a different story for collectives that have been designated with a particular nonprofit status. Religious or charitable organizations might fall into this category. These nonprofit marijuana collectives would be charged $10 per square foot for their retail operations, Deputy City Attorney Amy Webber confirmed in a phone interview on Jan. 16. A staff report from the city attorney’s office explains the reasons behind the separate tax structure. “State law prohibits cities from charging certain types of nonprofit organizations a business tax or fee based on gross receipts or income,” Parkin wrote, explaining that not all marijuana businesses are necessarily considered nonprofit as defined by entities like the Internal Revenue Service and even by the California constitution. “Therefore,” he concluded, “a tax rate per square foot for those religious and charitable nonprofits has been

developed. A minimum $1,000 charge will be applied to all marijuana businesses. If gross receipts or square footage charges exceed $1,000, then the higher amount will be due.” At last’s week’s Council meeting, Webber explained why the staff recommended a tax that is based on a square footage. “It’s a way to create a tax that would apply to all businesses operating in the City of Long Beach, and it’s consistent with the taxing structure that the Business License Division uses currently for other kinds of religious and charitable nonprofits,” the deputy city attorney told the Council. There would also be a different tax structure proposed for the cultivation sites. The ballot measure will indicate that a tax on cultivation sites will be set at $15 to $50 per square foot on an annual basis. The tax on the square footage of the sites has been proposed to have an initial rate at $15 per square foot, and nonprofit organizations with a cultivation site would also have their square footage area taxed at the $15-to-$50 range, Webber confirmed in an interview on Thursday. She said at last week’s meeting that the taxing structure is consistent with the Business License Division’s policy for other kinds of operations like manufacturing, in which companies have both retail and cultivation/storage. Parkin confirmed at the Council meeting that a dispensary wouldn’t be charged both the square-footage tax and the gross-receipts tax. However, 3rd District Councilmember Gary DeLong asked what would happen in a scenario in which a collective runs both a retail and a cultivation operation at the same location. Webber confirmed that, in that example, gross sales receipts would be taxed and only the cultivation area would be taxed on its square footage. These tax issues would be moot if marijuana dispensaries and collectives can’t legally operate in the city in the first place. Pot dispensaries are still banned in Long Beach. Currently, no ordinance is in place that regulates dispensaries and cultivation sites. The Council has struggled for a few years to come up with an ordinance that would effectively regulate medical cannabis businesses and survive any legal challenges. As the Signal Tribune reported last month, the Council a few years ago approved an ordinance that allowed and regulated a limited number of cultivation sites and dispensaries in Long Beach. The ordinance was updated in 2011. The Council later enacted a ban

on dispensaries after a court ruled that parts of the previous ordinance conflicted with federal law. Despite the ban on pot dispensaries throughout Long Beach, at least one operation remains open on Redondo Avenue in Long Beach. The Long Beach Police Department said in a statement this week that the department “continues to work with other city departments regarding operation and business-license issues and will continue to do so until criminal activity is abated.” The Council, in the meantime, is still pushing to get a new ordinance in place for marijuana businesses. Last December, the Council forwarded the ordinance issue to the Planning Commission. The Commission is expected to discuss it in February and give careful consideration to specific directions from the Council as they develop recommendations for this ordinance. There were some individuals at the Jan. 7 Council meeting who were deeply troubled about the proposed ballot measure to tax the dispensaries and cultivation sites. “There are some people who do abuse the system and who do recreational use,” said Long Beach resident Diana Lejins just before the Council voted on the tax rate structure. “I’m not going to say that’s not true, but there are…legitimate people that are sick out there. Please don’t bleed them dry.” (Lejins is an occasional contributing photographer to the Signal Tribune.) Jina Nam, a representative of the Long Beach Collective Association, presented more specific concerns with the proposal. She said that the Association doesn’t have any issues with the proposed tax amount on gross receipts, however, it does have an issue with how the proposed measure would define “gross receipts.” She said that some individuals come to a collective to barter their services. They may offer to clean the facility or help in the cultivation site in exchange for marijuana, and there would be no way to track that kind of transaction. She said that the State Board of Equalization wouldn’t tax that exchange, but Long Beach would tax it. Nam also disputed how the tax on square footage would be calculated by the City. She asked whether or not the collectives would be taxed on their parking areas. It took some time for the Council to fully agree on the tax ranges, however, they passed the resolution with a vote of 8–1. Fifth District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske voted against the resolution. ß

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

5

Harbor Avenue closures set in west Long Beach

Roadwork projects will detour through traffic on Harbor Avenue in West Long Beach south of West Anaheim Street through 6am on Monday, Jan. 20, according to the Port of Long Beach. A repaving project set for Harbor Avenue between 12th and Anaheim streets Jan. 15–17 will also close part of 12th Street just east of Harbor to allow for parking for local businesses. Then the south half of the intersection of Harbor and West Anaheim will close from the evening of Friday, Jan. 17 through early morning of Jan. 20. The intersection work is part of an ongoing project to improve West Anaheim Street from the 710 Freeway to 9th Street at the western city limit. Additional detours will be required during upcoming weekends. At 8pm on Friday, Jan. 24 through 5am on Monday, Jan. 27, connections

­ ives­ L Lived Dena Rae Bradley 49 Isidore Schreiberg 90 Brenda Carrington 60 William Wolfe 65 Brigitte ompson 70 Raymond Price 51 Manuela Rodriguez 93 Susana Tanola 55 Wayne Abel 74 Darrin Koltow 47 Martha Moy 81 Michael Narz 62 Robert Smallwood 94 Robert Murawski 61 Barbara Jones 85 Mary Pope 31 Marlene Brockowski 63

between eastbound Anaheim and the 710 will be closed, including two onramps and two off-ramps. From 6pm on Friday, Jan. 31 through 6am on Monday, Feb. 3, the south half of the intersection of 9th Street and Anaheim will be closed. The street is undergoing a 14month improvement project that started in September of 2013. The City of Long Beach Harbor Department is overseeing the work to improve the street, which is the northern boundary of the harbor district. In addition to roadway resurfacing, the project includes new sidewalks, bus stops, a median, access for the disabled and landscaping. For more information, visit polb.com/anaheimstreet, email anaheimstreet@polb.com or call (562) 283-7715. Source: Port of LB

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6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Event to focus on helping victims of human-trafficking

Mental-health facility The Guidance Center will host a free community-awareness event for the Long Beach Human-Trafficking Task Force, a collaboration of law-enforcement agencies and local organizations, on Wednesday, Jan. 22. The event, intended to raise awareness about the issue of human-trafficking and resources available to help victims, will take place from 5:30pm to 7:30pm at the facility, which is located at 1301 Pine Ave. Long Beach Chief of Police Jim McDonnell, Long Beach Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell, LA Superior Court Commissioner Catherine Pratt and survivors of human trafficking are scheduled to speak at the event. Source: 4eMedia Group

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NEWS

Ara Maloyan appointed director of Public Works

Ara Maloyan, who has been serving as the acting director of Long Beach Public Works Department and city engineer, has been appointed director of Public Works, effective Monday, Jan. 13. City Manager Patrick West announced Jan. 10 the appointment of Maloyan, who has 30 years of professional experience in the field of civil engineering, according to a press release issued by the City of Long Beach. “Ara Maloyan will bring a depth of experience to this position,” West said. “He has demonstrated the ability to manage a complex set of responsibilities and provide excellent service to the community in a variety of critical areas, including transportation, infrastructure and sustainability.” Maloyan was hired by the City on July 23, 2012 as deputy director of Public Works/city engineer and was appointed acting director of Public Works on March 2, 2013. Previously he was city engineer for the City of Beverly Hills, where he had also held a variety of engineering positions for 23 years. Maloyan earlier worked for five years for the City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works. Ara Maloyan Under Maloyan’s leadership as acting director, the Public Works Department has paved 2.9 million square feet of local streets, slurry-sealed 4.3 million square feet of local streets and replaced 13.7 miles of sidewalk, according to the City of Long Beach. In addition, Public Works has completed 13 additional major and secondary street projects and begun six additional major projects, including the Chittick Field project. Maloyan has a bachelor’s degree in civil/structural engineering from California State University, Los Angeles, and recently earned his construction management certificate from UCLA. He is a registered professional engineer with the State of California and a member of the American Public Works Association, the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Concrete Reinforced Steel Institute. “I am honored at the opportunity to serve in this position,” Maloyan said. “I will continue to devote all my professional energy and skill on behalf of the entire Long Beach community.” Maloyan is replacing former director Mike Conway, who now serves as the City’s Business and Property Development director. Maloyan is a resident of Long Beach.

The Campaign Trail

Source: City of LB

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The North Long Beach Community Action Group, The Deforest, Houghton, Grant, Wrigley, North Long Beach Neighborhood Associations, and The Central Project Area Council, Inc, South Street Community Watch and Post 560 of the American Legion will host a Long Beach mayoral candidate forum on Tuesday, Jan. 28 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm at the Houghton Park Community Center, 6301 Myrtle Ave. • Three local Republican candidates will host a grand opening of their campaign headquarters at 5470 East 2nd St. on Thursday, Feb. 6 from 6pm to 8pm. The candidates are: John Goya, who is running for California’s 70th Assembly District seat; Andy Whallon, candidate for the 47th Congressional District; and Stephen Bello, who is seeking the 3rd District seat on the Long Beach City Council. • Mamy’s Restaurant, 1234 Long Beach Blvd., will host a campaign reception for John Goya, candidate for California’s 70th Assembly seat, on Friday, Jan. 17 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm. • Long Beach Police Chief Jim McDonnell has officially announced that he has entered the race to become sheriff of Los Angeles County. • Sierra Madre Mayor Nancy Walsh, Rosemead Mayor Polly Low, Temple City Mayor Cynthia Sternquist and Mendocino County Sheriff Tom Allman have endorsed former Undersheriff Paul Tanaka for sheriff of Los Angeles County, according to Tanaka’s campaign. • Gerald R. “Jerry” Miller, former city manager for Long Beach, and Hank Teran, former deputy fire chief for the Long Beach Fire Department, have endorsed Damon Dunn as the city’s next mayor, according to Dunn. • Long Beach Vice Mayor Robert Garcia has announced that he received the endorsement for mayor from the Southwest Regional Council of Carpenters. • Doug Otto, candidate for mayor of Long Beach, will celebrate the grand opening of his campaign headquarters at 4100 East Ocean Blvd. on Saturday, Jan. 18 from From the family that 1pm to 3pm. RSVP to sandra@dougottoforlongbeach.com or (909) 239-2157. brought you Mexico City • Restaurant in Long Beach– Seventh District Long Beach Councilmember James Johnson has announced that Azteca Mexican Restaurant he has received endorsements from the Los Angeles County Democratic Party, has been offering authentic California State Controller John Chiang, Signal Hill Mayor Mike Noll and Signal Mexican cooking for over Hill Councilmember Larry Forester, as well as 25 other area elected officials, in 50 years! his campaign for Long Beach city attorney. • Home of Aunt Connie’s Rex Richardson, candidate for Long Beach’s 9th Council District, has been endorsed by AFSCME Local 3634, according to Richardson, who will also host a famous garlic sauce campaign kick-off and community canvass on Sunday, Jan. 19 at 1pm at his camand the original paign headquarters at 6183 Atlantic Ave. Call (626) 260-8672. GARLIC TACO! • District 3 Long Beach City College Board of Trustees candidate Stella Ursua has received endorsements from: former Long Beach 7th District Councilmember Tonia Reyes Uranga; LBCCD Board Trustee Roberto Uranga; and two local business owners– Clay Sandidge of Muni-Fed Energy and Alex Galasso of The Battery Recycler, according to an email from Ursua. • Megan Kerr, candidate for the Long Beach Unified School District’s school board, “Where the King lives” District 1, has received the endorsement of the International Brotherhood of ElecOpen Tuesday through Sunday trical Workers (IBEW) Local 11, according to Kerr. 11am-10pm for food • Crooner’s Lounge open until 2am! Uduak Ntuk, candidate for the Long Beach Unified School District’s school board, District 1, has announced that he has reeived endorsements from: International 12911 Main Street Historical Downtown Garden Grove Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUPAT), District Council 36; United Asso(714) 638-3790 ciation, Plumbers– Local 78; Sheet Metal, Air, Rail, & Transportation Workers aztecaoc.org (SMART)– Local 105; and Iron Workers– Locals 416 and 433.

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NEWS

JANUARY 17, 2014

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

CSULB, Berkeley researchers launch kelp study to ascertain extent of contamination from Fukushima tsunami disaster

Researchers from California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have launched “Kelp Watch 2014,” a scientific campaign designed to determine the extent of radioactive contamination of the state’s kelp forest from Japan’s damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant following the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Initiated by CSULB Biology Professor Steven L. Manley and the Berkeley Lab’s Head of Applied Nuclear Physics Kai Vetter, the project will rely on samples of Giant Kelp and Bull Kelp from along the California coast. “The California kelp forest is a highly productive and complex ecosystem and a valuable state resource,” said Manley, an expert in marine algae and kelp. “It is imperative that we monitor this coastal forest for any radioactive contaminants that will be arriving this year in the ocean currents from Fukushima disaster. I receive calls and emails weekly from concerned visitors and Californians about the effect of the Fukushima disaster on our California marine life. I tell them that the anticipated concentrations that will arrive are most likely very low but we have no data regarding its impact on our coastal ecosystem. Kelp Watch 2014 will provide an initial monitoring system at least in the shortterm.” The project includes the participation of 19 academic and government institutions and three other organizations/businesses. These participants will sample kelp from the entire California

coastline as far north as Del Norte County and as far south as Baja California. The sampling will begin in mid-February and will end in late winter. “What I have attempted to do is to organize marine scientists and educators from up and down the coastline to collect a large amount of kelp several times a year so that we can ascertain the amount of radioactive material entering our kelp forests,” Manley said. “The response has been overwhelming. Recently I was contacted by a scientist in Washington state who wants to send samples. I said, ‘Sure.’” Sampling will take place several times in 2014, and processed kelp samples will be sent to the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab’s Low Background Facility for detailed radionuclide analysis. As data becomes available it will be posted for public access. “Working with Dr. Vetter and his group is a perfect collaboration because of their vast experience in measuring radioactivity in a variety of biological samples, including seaweeds,” Manley said. “His enthusiasm and support of Kelp Watch 2014 has been most gratifying. If the kelp takes up the radioactive material, we should detect it.” Vetter, who is also a professor of nuclear engineering at UC Berkeley, pointed out: “UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab’s analysis within the new Kelp Watch initiative is part of a larger, ongoing effort to measure Fukushimarelated radionuclides in a large variety of objects. We have two main objectives: to learn more

Photo by Thomas Farrugia

A Cal State Long Beach graduate student’s view of a kelp forest on the back side of Catalina Island near Ribbon Rock from underwater

about the distribution and transport of these materials in our world, and to make the results and explanations available to the public. Making our results available is a critical aspect of our work as it allows us to address concerns about Fukushima radiation levels and to explain the meaning and potential impact of these levels, particularly in the context of the natural radiation background we are exposed to in our daily lives.” Several institutions– Moss Landing Marine Laboratory (California State University), Marine Science Institute (UC Santa Barbara), Coastal and Marine Institute (San Diego State University) and CSULB– have volunteered to serve as regional processing centers where needed. Also participating are marine scientists from the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California in Baja Norte Mexico. “At the present time this entire initiative is unfunded by any state or federal agency, with time and costs being ‘donated’ by the participants,” Manley said. “I hope that this changes. USC-SeaGrant funded an earlier related study of

7

Photo by Steven L. Manly

Cal State Long Beach Biology Professor Steven Manley collects kelp sap at Eagle Rock off Catalina Island. Manley has teamed up with Kai Vetter, the head of Applied Nuclear Physics at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to launch “Kelp Watch 2014,” a project designed to determine the extend of radioactive contamination of the state’s kelp forest from Japan’s damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant.

mine, and I hope it or some other funding agency will help fund this more extensive project. Still, more participants are signing up weekly. We encourage scientists, educational institutions and other interested organizations to participate in the collecting and/or

processing.” Those interested in taking part in the project may contact Manley at Steven.Manley@csulb.edu and should put “Kelp Watch 2014” in the subject line. Source: CSULB

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COMMUNITY

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JANUARY 17, 2014

Announcing the 2014 colors of the year In Living Color

Shoshanah Siegel Columnist

Every year, a color is designated as the “in” selection or the color trend. Where do these colors come from? Color trends are a reflection of events and ideas from around the world. Influences can include the entertainment industry, upcoming films, artists, travel destinations and lifestyles. Color trends are born out of global, political and economic influences, among others. What’s happening in the world atlarge translates into what will happen in our homes and environments. Why determine trends? Sonu Mathew, Benjamin Moore’s senior

interior designer, summed it up when she said, “The end goal in providing an annual color forecast is to help inspire and fuel the imagination of individuals as they take on homedecorating and painting projects.” Who determines these trends? There are many “color experts” from around the world. For the sake of this article I am going to focus only on four. As you will learn, there’s not just one group of experts and no clear consensus. Even though all of their forecasts were positive, they came up with varying and surprising conclusions. Captivating, magical and enchanting This is a description of a 2014 color of the year. According to the

Four of the “colors of the year” as forecasted by various trendsetters in the field of hues

Pantone Color Institute, one of the trend forecasters and a worldrenowned authority on color, recently announced their color of the year selection, Radiant Orchid (183224). “An invitation to innovation, Radiant Orchid encourages expanded creativity and originality, which is increasingly valued in today’s society,” stated Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute®. “Imbued with a harmony of fuchsia, purple and pink undertones, Radiant Orchid inspires confidence, and its rosy undertones emanate great joy, love and health. ” If you are not up to painting an entire room this color, this eye-catching hue works well for accent pieces and accessories. Radiant Orchid can liven up gray, beige, and taupe without overpowering a room. In order to keep the hue vibrant and youthful, mix it up with yellow-green, turquoise, teal and yellow-orange. Sophisticated Sherwin-Williams’s color of the year for 2014 is Exclusive Plum (SW 6263). It is a hue that is a balance of cool blue and feisty red with a splash of gray. It is very muted and provides a great background for other accent colors. Jackie Jordan, SherwinWilliams’s director of color marketing states, “This dusky, filtered violet is refined without being stuffy, elegant yet easy, and layered with romantic potential.” Their press release has some dec-

3

orating ideas for their color of the year, and they are as follows. For a cozy, masculine den, they recommend pairing their color with accents of copper and leather. For a softer feel, Exclusive Plum can also be layered with cold, gray, and white. For a modern and energetic space, include splashes of magenta or chartreuse. A breath of fresh air Benjamin Moore’s selection of the year is a calming blue shade– Breath of Fresh Air (806). Newly appointed Benjamin Moore Creative Director Ellen O’Neill states, “We chose Breath of Fresh Air because we were seeing it across several different environments. It is a direct result of the fresh color cues and pastel trends we’ve seen throughout the home-furnishing, fashion and even pop-culture landscape.” Their literature also describes the ethereal blue as the “new neutral” that is livable and functional. Benjamin Moore also lists 23 additional hues that would be great to pair with this blue. They include a variety of neutrals, soft pastels and pops of more rich, saturated color. Included are: Distant Gray, White Dove, Peach Parfait, Fruit Shake, Coral Essence, Clay Beige, Sparrow, Castleton, Elemental, Van Alen Green, Palladian Blue, Caribbean Teal, Wickham Gray, Normandy, Van Deusen Blue, Mt. Rainier Gray, Flint, Lavender Mist, Iced Mauve, Super Nova, Nightingale and Black Satin.

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Soft and energetic The PPG Pittsburgh Paints® brand named Turning Oakleaf, a soft, but energetic, buttercream yellow, as its 2014 Color of the Year. “Homeowners have moved away from the muted hues influenced by economic factors in recent years. Turning Oakleaf, which is soft enough to be a neutral, but bright enough to generate a sunshine-like energy, represents a trend toward warmth in harmonious living, a deep appreciation for the surrounding natural elements and a thorough understanding of enlightened philosophies,” said Dee Schlotter, brand manager, The Voice of Color program. I think that this color would be a great complement to purple. It is a very optimistic color. For a calming feel, you could pair it with natural greens, warm grays or sandy brown. For a more intense statement, mix it with accents of bright blue, red-orange, or even black and white. For fun, notice where these colors are prevalent and prominent in your decorating and design selections. Explore! Experiment! Ultimately, the colors you choose should make you feel comfortable and happy. Have a colorful new year!

Shoshanah Siegel provides color consulting as well as space planning, remodeling, upgrading and staging through her firm Your Color Diva. She can be contacted at (562) 427-0440 or at shoshanah.siegel@gmail.com . Samples of her work can be found at houzz.com/pro/shoshanahsiegel/yourcolor-diva .

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CULTURE Arts Council for Long Beach announces artist fellows, exhibition of their work

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JANUARY 17, 2014

The Arts Council for Long Beach (ACLB) has selected five local artists to receive a 2013-14 Long Beach Professional Artist Fellowship. The five artists were chosen following the ACLB’s independent review of annual grant applications for an artist fellowship. Each artist will receive a cash stipend and an opportunity to share his or her work with the community at a public exhibition at The Collaborative, a public art project of the Arts Council for Long Beach and the Museum of Latin American Art (MoLAA). The artist fellowship honors a selection of Long Beach’s living artists for their recent work. Eligible artists must reside in Long Beach and demonstrate an active exhibition and/or production record of at least three years. Awards are granted based on artistic merit and professional achievement, according to ACLB. The exhibition at The Collaborative entitled Shine will present the work of this year’s artist fellows: Margie Darrow, Jeff Foye, Kondrath, Annie Jessica Stromquist and Kurt Simonson. Together their work spans a broad variety of media, including video, photography, painting, mixed media, dance and wood cutting. Margie Darrow Nature, history and counterculture inspire Darrow’s artwork. In the breadth and scope of her art remains a common thread– the underlying desire to tell a factual story of the Earth’s inhabitants and their transitory etching upon it. Jeff Foye For the past six years, Foye has been making video and perform-

ance work in collaboration with Gordon Winiemko under the name Jeff&Gordon. Foye’s artwork engages with the social customs and cultural idioms that underlie both how we distinguish ourselves as individuals and how we relate to each other in the social sphere.

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Jessica Kondrath Kondrath’s choreography is primarily derived from the musical score. Her works craft a visual representation of the music so that the work may be experienced both visually and aurally. She creates movement that is at once beautiful and awkward, utilizing counterpoint to illuminate the visual presence of elasticity within the body. Kondrath's work also investigates and seeks to bring awareness to the relationship between audience and performer.

Annie Stromquist Stromquist’s mixed media on paper explores the human condition through a poetic lens. Her images are abstract and minimalist with empty space used as an active presence. The scale, typically small, reflects a desire to create images with an evocative power that unfolds within an intimate viewing context.

Kurt Simonson Simonson’s photography is a lyrical and strange family album, a collection of photographs that speak to his search for home, a journey to find a sense of belonging, a sense of place and ultimately a deep desire to find a connection to family and community. His body of work revolves around the tensions and questions that surround this search.

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE’S FOCUS ON BUSINESS Name of business: It's a Grind Coffeehouse (Bixby Knolls) Address: 4245 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach (between San Antonio Drive and Carson Street) Phone: (562) 981-0028 Hours: M-Fri 6am to 9pm, Sat.-Sun. 630am to 9pm What type of business: Coffeehouse How long in business: Over 19 years Unique features of your business: It's a Grind Coffeehouse is a specialty coffeehouse in operation since 1995, proving high-quality gourmet coffee, espresso beverages, healthy cold drinks and a range of home-baked foods in a comfortable, community-focused neighborhood environment. Our coffee houses are independent, well-connected and free-spirited. Announcements: It's a Grind Coffeehouse is launching a NEW gourmet menu; the ribbon-cutting ceremony is January 18 at 2pm. Features of the gourmet menu include breakfast sandwiches, waffles, artisan sandwiches, salads, soups and specialty desserts. All customers are welcome to join and come enjoy free samples of the new menu and enter to win the "The Golden Cup" and enjoy FREE coffee for a year! Website: itsagrind.com Email: customerservice@itsagrind.com Social Networks: facebook.com/itsagrind, @ITSAGRINDCoffee, youtube.com/iagcoffeehouse

ST3533 - January 17_Layout 1 1/17/14 3:15 PM Page 10

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Imitating Life

CULTURE

JANUARY 17, 2014

Remembering Long Beach artist Tiffany Aguila-Hicks Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

Since beginning this column more than two years ago, profiling a different local artist each week, I’ve relied on a variety of resources to find the subjects for these profiles: art walks, open-studio tours, gallery openings, friends of friends, artists who attend my own art shows and press releases we receive. As 2013 came to an end, I found myself with a deficiency of new artists to feature. Recalling that I’m included in the artist registry hosted by the Arts Council for Long Beach, I figured that that database would be an ideal source for discovering more talent in our immediate area. I logged on to the registry, which randomizes the names of the artists so that we’re all circulated as people visit the site, and I contacted the first five or so who popped up. The very first artist to appear was Tiffany Aguila-Hicks. I retrieved her contact information and sent her an email, asking if she’d like to be profiled in this column. Shortly thereafter, I received a response– not from her, but from Jerry Hicks. “I am Tiffany’s husband,” he wrote. “Unfortunately, Tiffany passed away December 26. I would love if there was a way we could still do something as a tribute to her. She was such an incredible artist. Please let me know your thoughts.” Naturally, I responded immediately with words of condolence and an enthusiastic answer of “I would be more than happy to still do an artist profile on her.” Since I’ve only had the pleasure of viewing her work and emailing her spouse, rather than being able to speak with the artist directly, I’ve decided to let Jerry’s words tell her story, along with his wife’s works:

Tiffany Aguila-Hicks

Tiffany was a Long Beach native. She loved her community and devoted all her time to help others in Long Beach. Tiffany became a member of various clubs and volunteered her time to Self-portrait, oil on canvas numerous nonprofit organizations. Although she was a gifted, talented artist in so many different fields, her true love was passing her passion of art to children. She knew the importance of being able to express yourself through art and felt every child should have the knowledge and courage to do so. Most recently Tiffany was the art director for the Long Beach Boys and Girls Clubs. Although Tiffany has a degree in fashion, her plans were to start teaching after graduating from CSULB this spring. Tiffany worked in all aspects: oil painting, water-based painting, chalk drawing, web design, jewelry-making, clothing design, clothing-making, video-editing, screenprinting, working with metal, ceramics and pottery. Not much she could not do and do well. Tiffany’s art was not just a job or a school project– it was her life and passion. She had an art studio at the house that she spent almost all of her time in. Her recent projects were all metal-related. She was making rings, necklaces and charms. She had built an etching system in her studio Untitled, oil on canvas so she could etch her own metals. Tiffany was an incredible mother and wife. Her passing is not only a great loss to us but to all of Long Beach and what she would have contributed.

Searching for answers?

To view more of Aguila-Hicks’s work, visit atomicbath.com .

Aguila-Hicks’s 9-year-old daughter Nicole alongside the portrait her mother painted of her

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ST3533 - January 17_Layout 1 1/17/14 3:15 PM Page 11

NEWS

JANUARY 17, 2014

LBUSD

continued from page 3

30-percent decrease in state funding experienced during the state’s economic downturn. However, Para added that the state budget still “falls short” of the $237 million requested by the Board of Trustees (BOT) and “what California needs to do to address the demand for high quality instruction from the high school graduates and community college transfers of this state.” In the next few weeks, the CSU Chancellor’s Office will likely seek to “reconcile the amount the system requested with the amount proposed by the governor” in order to provide the campuses a preliminary estimate of the funding expected if the proposed budget is enacted. Para added that it’s not clear whether the Chancellor’s Office will include allocations to campuses for compensation increases, given that the CSU request was “not fully funded.” He said CSULB officials would begin meeting in February to plan the university’s budget for next year. Para said CSULB’s budget committee would likely have to plan for anticipated increases in employee health care, retirement and other mandatory costs. Still, CSULB was able to enroll less than 8,000 new students out of 83,000 applicants who applied for the fall 2014 semester, with approximately 4,000 freshmen and 3,500 transfer students. CSULB led the CSU system in the number of applications received from first-time freshmen and transfer students for the fall semester this year. Para said it should take several years “consistent state reinvestment” for each of the 23 CSU campuses to fully recover from prior budget cuts, however, he said, with the second straight increase in CSU’s budget, “we have reason to be hopeful.” The State Legislature should approve the governor’s proposed budget for fiscal year 2014-15 by June 15. ß

Candidates

continued from page 1

Carrying local and statewide political credentials is termed-out 70th District Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal, a former Long Beach city councilmember who announced her mayoral candidacy last September. The rest of the qualified mayoral candidates have no political experience. They include entrepreneur and former NFL player Damon Dunn, nonprofit executive and past Long Beach mayoral candidate Jana K. Shields, mortgage-loan officer Richard Camp, businessman Steven Mozena, State Department of Healthcare Services auditor Mineo L. Gonzalez and Erick “Donald” Rock. E.B. Gendel (also known as “Sonny” Pencer), a college professor and founder of Occupy Long Beach, had acquired paperwork during the filing period with the intention of running for mayor, but he died Jan. 4 in a car crash on the Vincent Thomas Bridge on Terminal Island. Aside from voting in a new mayor, Long Beach voters will also elect five new councilmembers this year. So far, no incumbents have filed paperwork to be re-elected to Council Districts 1,3,5,7 and 9. The filing period for write-in candidates, if any, is from Feb. 10 to March 25. In the 1st District, Ricardo Linarez, Pilar Pinel, Lena Gonzalez and Misi Tagaloa have filed paperwork to succeed incumbent and now mayoral candidate Garcia. The 3rd District, currently filled by termed-out Gary DeLong, is the most contested, with five qualified candidates– Martha F. Gibson, Jack A. Rosenberg, James K. Lewis, Stephen C. Bello and Susan Price. Candidates running for the 5th District seat, left open by incumbent and now mayoral candidate Schipske, include Joseph D. Luyben, Stacy Mungo, Carl Kemp and Thomas J. Sutfin. Three candidates– Roberto Uranga, Joan V. Greenwood and Teer L. Strickland– have qualified to run for the 7th District since incumbent James Johnson swapped a secondterm re-election bid for a chance to run for city attorney.

Lastly, two candidates– Rex Richardson and Benjimin C. Daugherty– are running for the 9th District spot after incumbent Steven Neal decided to forego a second term and instead run for the 64th State Assembly District. Three candidates are running for city attorney. They include Charles Parkin, who was appointed acting city attorney last year after Robert Shannon retired, Johnson and Matthew S. Pappas. Incumbent City Auditor Laura Doud will be re-elected to a four-year term since she is running unopposed. For city prosecutor, candidate Rosemary Chavez is challenging incumbent Doug Haubert. For the three open spots on the LBUSD board, two are being contested. Candidates Megan M. Kerr and Uduak-Joe “Joey” Ntuk are running for District No. 1 to succeed longtime boardmember Mary Stanton, who is retiring. For District No. 3, Juan Benitez is challenging incumbent and current LBUSD Board President John McGinnis. LBUSD District No. 5 Boardmember Diana F. Craighead will be re-elected to another term since she is running unopposed. As for the LBCCD Board of Trustees, all three open seats are being contested. For LBCCD Trustee Area No. 1, candidate Marshall E. Blesofsky is running against incumbent Jeffrey A. Kellogg. Three candidates– Mary Anne Silvestri, Stella M. Urshua and Sunny Zia– are running for LBCCD Trustee Area No. 3 after incumbent Mark Bowen bowed out of the race. Also not running for re-election is LBCCD Trustee Area No. 5 incumbent Thomas J. Clark, who will be replaced by either Virginia L. Baxter or Gregory “Greg” Slaughter. If no candidates for elected city offices and the LBUSD board seats receive 50 percent of the vote plus one vote, then a run-off election will be held on June 3. There is no run-off for the LBCCD board, according to the office of the city clerk. ß

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

City

11

continued from page 1

He highlighted key changes for the city that have improved the quality of life for residents. “We are stronger today by almost any measurement– from our fiscal balance sheet to our community fabric,” Foster said. “We chose to make tough political decisions that were in the long-term interests of the city’s health but did not leave anyone behind. And that is an important lesson to carry forward into a new era of surplus and growth.” Foster particularly highlighted Long Beach’s progress in its finances, declaring that the City has managed to live within its means while resisting calls to raise taxes and declining to use one-time revenue for ongoing expenses. He said that the fiscal year has begun with a $3.5 million surplus and that he anticipates a balanced budget for the next three years. He also noted how the City had taken on the problem of unfunded and under-funded liabilities, especially pension liabilities. He said that the unfunded-pension liabilities dropped from $1.1 billion to under $700 million in one year due to investment growth and reform. Foster highlighted the success of the City’s fiscal policy. “Indeed,” Foster concluded, “over the past seven years we have collectively reduced the general- fund budget by more than $130 million. Because of our discipline, we have been able to spend nearly $140 million in one-time revenue for infrastructure and other needs.” Foster didn’t shy away from acknowledging instances in which battle lines were clearly drawn with opponents. The mayor didn’t offer many details behind a few recent skirmishes his administration had faced over the last few years, however, Foster dug a little at his critics, particularly those who disagreed with him on issues surrounding the port. He noted that the Clean Air Action Plan had already been adopted before he began his first term as mayor. He praised the efforts to address the environmental issues, adding that diesel pollution at the port has been down almost 81 percent over the past six years. He credited the vessel-speed-reduction program, distillate fuel use and especially the clean-trucks program for improved environmental conditions at the port. He particularly highlighted one moment at a ceremony that celebrated the clean trucks program. At the event, 68 drivers were given keys to their trucks, and Foster said that more than 100 drivers are now proud small-business owners. “Seeing the joy in the eyes of these drivers and the elation of their families made the struggle for this program worthwhile,” Foster said. “It was particularly gratifying to me personally, since I fought so hard for this program to remain focused on delivering cleaner air, not getting distracted by the agenda of one particular labor union.” The mayor even touched on the controversy surrounding the changes to the Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners for the Port of Long Beach. Last November, at the mayor’s recommendation, the City Council voted to remove Thomas Fields from his position as the president of the Harbor Commission. Foster didn’t name Fields specifically during the Tuesday-night speech, but he did describe the circumstances and reasons behind his request to oust Fields from office. Those reasons were discussed at length at the November city council meeting in which Fields defended his actions and unsuccessfully argued to remain on the Board. “A cultural antipathy toward the city is unhealthy, and the lack of effective oversight can, and has, led to complacent financial management,” Foster said in his Tuesday address. “At times, commissioners seemed more concerned with their next international trip than cost overruns. Whenever you attempt to change culture, you will get turmoil and controversy. The status quo hates change. Defenders will claim things are working just fine. In truth, no one benefits by denying or avoiding problems.” Foster also attacked the proposal to build a rail yard near west Long Beach, noting the Harbor Department’s opposition to the rail yard as well as a number of entities who have filed a lawsuit to stop the development. “This community and the stakeholders at the Port have

Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

worked too hard over the past seven years at improving the air we breathe to see a project in Los Angeles take that back,” Foster concluded. “Long Beach deserves meaningful environmental progress, and quite simply, deserves better from the City of Los Angeles and BNSF [Railway].” The mayor highlighted improvements to public safety. He said that the city’s overall crime rate is down, noting that violent crime has been reduced by 13.5 percent and property crime has also decreased by 8.5 percent. He also said that last year, Long Beach Fire responded to 70,000 calls for service. He reminded the audience that 40 new police officers have graduated from the police academy and 28 firefighters have graduated from the fire academy. “We have improved our finances, reformed our long-term obligations, cleaned the environment, created a safer city, expanded opportunity, and repaired much of our infrastructure,” Foster concluded. “Those who were 10 years old in 2006 have more opportunity and a smaller burden today, and they should have every reason to be optimistic about their future.” Foster was surrounded by a number of young people at Tuesday night’s ceremony. He was introduced by Oscar Garcia, a lifelong Long Beach resident and graduate of the Architecture Construction Engineering Academy of Long Beach (ACE Academy). He was still a child when Foster took office, but now, at 20 years old, Garcia is applying to attend Long Beach City College and plans to return to ACE Academy as a college aide, according to a media release. Inspirational Glee, a choir from Long Beach Polytechnic High School, provided the evening’s entertainment. Foster emphasized the importance of education and praised the Long Beach Unified School District’s success in developing ACE. He particularly stressed the advantage of offering opportunities to young people who won’t attend college and who could learn trade skills. The mayor recalled his own background as he worked his way through school as a carpet installer. “Perhaps nothing prepared me for a job in politics more than spending eight hours a day on my knees,” Foster joked. While he acknowledged his no-nonsense reputation as well as his fights with critics, Foster asserted that he did give his best to the job. “At times I may have appeared hard, forceful, direct, and determined to achieve,” Foster said, “but I believe I have done the job you elected me to do. I have fulfilled the responsibility you gave me and honored the trust you placed in me. I believe our City, our children, our families, and our future are better because of the job we did.” ß

EYE ON CRIME

Crimes reported by SHPD Citywide

Thursday, Jan. 9 Vehicle tampering 10:25am– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Theft from elder/dependent adult 11:30am– 2400 block Skyline Dr.

Battery 3:45pm– 1500 block E. Spring St. Grand-theft auto 9pm– 3500 block E. PCH

Saturday, Jan. 11 Stolen vehicle 9:22am– 2500 block E. Willow St.

Vandalism of $400 worth of property or more 10am– 3100 block E. PCH Sunday, Jan. 12 DUI 2100 block W. Spring St.

Residential burglary 3:30pm– 3300 block Lewis Ave. Attempt residential burglary 8:54pm– 1900 block Molino Ave.

Monday, Jan. 13 Recovered stolen vehicle 3:28am– 700 block E. Spring St.

False impersonation 10:41am– 2700 block Cherry Ave.

Identity theft 12:10pm– 1300 block E 28th St.

Burglary 12:13pm– 1900 block Temple Ave.

Forgery 3:48pm– 2500 block Cherry Ave.

Tuesday, Jan. 14 Recovered stolen vehicle 11:19pm– Obispo Ave./E. 19th St.

Wednesday, Jan. 15 Non-injury hit-and-run 2:20am– 2000 block Temple Ave.

Forgery of access card 6:54am– 2700 block E. PCH

Vandalism, defacing property 3:28pm– Temple Ave./E. 20th St.

Injury hit-and-run 4:40pm– California Ave./E. Spring St.

Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Thursday, Jan. 9 Grand-theft auto 8:30pm– 3000 block Long Beach Blvd. Friday, Jan. 10 Grand-theft auto 9am– 3400 block Pacific Pl.

Grand-theft auto 10am– 2200 block Martin Luther King Ave.

Robbery of person 3:10pm– E. Hill St./Linden Ave.

Saturday, Jan. 11 Grand-theft auto 8pm– 3200 block Park Ln.

Tuesday, Jan. 14 Grand-theft auto 12:10pm– 100 Cameron Pl.

Recovered stolen vehicle 10:47pm– 2400 block Linden Ave.

Thursday, Jan. 15 Grand-theft auto 12am– 1000 block E. Hill St.

ST3533 - January 17_Layout 1 1/17/14 3:15 PM Page 12

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Housing

continued from page 1

cials and community stakeholders. Under state mandates, the City is required to institute policies and planning in order to ensure there would be enough housing available for residents of all income levels in the years to come. The Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA), which is allocated through the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and determined by the State, requires that the City accommodate a total of 7,048 housing units from last year through 2021 to align with projected regional housing needs. Amy Bodek, director of the Long Beach Community Development Services Department, assured the Council that city staff has expanded several existing housing programs and is adding new ones to meet the State’s requirements and goals. She said the State already issued a letter on Dec. 27, stating that the City’s Housing Element as drafted is in compliance with state law. “We believe we have been very responsive and have pushed the envelope quite a bit from where we were as a city from the old housing element to the new housing element,” Bodek said. New programs that were added to the Housing Element include a “right of first refusal” program for displaced lowincome residents, expanding the zoning code to include areas the City would allow emergency shelters by right and planning transit-oriented development, particularly along the Blue Line corridor on Long Beach Boulevard. City staff has also proposed studying the possibility of a rent escrow account program (REAP), which is implemented in Los Angeles and allows residents living in “substandard units” to pay their rent to the City where it’s held in an account until code violations are fixed by the landlord. The REAP proposal was brought forward during community discussion by affordable-housing advocates Housing Long Beach and the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles. However, Bodek said it’s not clear if the program is needed in Long Beach, noting that only 24 rental units out of the 10,000 units the City deals with annually in code-enforcement issues have been deemed “substandard.” At the request of 9th District Councilmember Steven Neal, the Council approved a friendly amendment to have city staff come back with a full analysis of a REAP in addition to other programs

throughout the state that deal with habitability issues for rental units by December. A rental-habitability program would be up for Council approval no later than the end of 2015, Bodek said. One request from affordable-housing advocates that was not approved by the Council was for the City to allocate 20 percent of new property tax funding– that the City now receives after the State demolished redevelopment agencies (RDAs)– toward affordable housing. Prior to the dissolution of redevelopment, cities were able to set aside property-tax increment funding to provide developers with incentives to build affordable-housing projects. However, City Manager Pat West clarified that, because RDA no longer exists, propertytax revenue can no longer go toward affordable housing because it is now a part of the City’s revenue source for the General Fund, which pays for critical city services. Setting aside such money for affordable housing would create a budget deficit, he said. “There are no funds that are boomeranging back to the city,” West said. “Redevelopment is dead. It’s gone.” Councilmember Neal proposed setting aside 10 percent of property-tax funds for affordable housing, however he later rescinded his proposal after receiving clarification from city staff. Bodek noted that the City currently has $16.8 million in its housing fund for affordable housing in addition to $16 million that the Council, acting as the RDA successor agency, committed when approving a repayment schedule last year. She said the City also has a repayment of debt of more than $24 million owed to the housing fund. Additionally, the City is expected to receive $85 million for affordable housing on an annual basis through federal programs, such as Section 8 vouchers for homeless families and community development block grant funds. Councilmembers agreed to further discuss the city’s affordable-housing funds during the budget process. The Council didn’t approve an inclusionary housing or zoning ordinance, which would have required that a percentage of all development in the city be set aside for affordable housing. The ordinance, which has been heavily pushed by affordablehousing groups, was opposed by various business entities, including the Long Beach Area Chamber of Commerce and Downtown Long Beach Associates. ß

NEWS

JANUARY 17, 2014

Smoke

continued from page 1

San Gabriel Valley areas and the Pomona/Walnut Valley area. Smoke may also impact downwind areas including southeast and south-central Los Angeles County and the south and southwest coastal areas of Los Angeles County, but air quality is expected to remain “unhealthy” in these areas.

In any area impacted by smoke: • Individuals should avoid any vigorous outdoor or indoor exertion. • People with respiratory or heart disease, the elderly, and children should remain indoors. • Keep windows and doors closed or seek alternate shelter. Run an air conditioner, if available. Do not use a swamp cooler or whole-house fan, to prevent bringing additional smoke inside. • To avoid worsening the health effects of wildfire smoke, don’t use indoor or outdoor wood-burning appliances, including fireplaces. • For anyone not able to avoid a smoky area, a special N95 or P100 respirator mask worn properly may help protect against the fine particles in smoke. Paper or surgical masks do not protect the wearer from smoke. To learn more on how to properly wear a special respirator mask and help protect from wildfire smoke, visit arb.ca.gov/videos/impacts_of_smoke.htm . To subscribe to air-quality alerts, advisories and forecasts by email, visit AirAlerts.org .

Source: AQMD

Fireworks

continued from page 2

sane” fireworks is permitted in several surrounding cities, including Carson, Compton, Bellflower, Paramount, Lakewood and Hawaiian Gardens. Austin also pointed out that firework sales in cities that allow them are a big revenue generator during 4th of July for local nonprofits, charities, churches and youth-sports organizations. “The question isn’t whether fireworks are dangerous or risky, I think that’s pretty much known, I think that’s the case, but the question is whether or not the City of Long Beach should recognize ‘safe and sane’ fireworks as other cities that surround us do,” Austin said. Police Chief Jim McDonnell admitted to “frustration on the part of the officers having to run from call to call for fireworks calls,” however he added that allowing “safe and sane” fireworks would still create “much

FOLBA

Pet of the Week:

Trina

Three-year-old Trina was found wandering the streets of Long Beach, bearing a microchip to nowhere. Apparently, her owners could not have cared less about renewing the information on the chip, which is highly important as insurance for lost pets. Do you want to fill in the blanks? Meet Trina on the shelter side of Companion Animal Village at 7700 East Spring St., (562) 570-PETS and see to it that she never roams again. Ask for ID#ID512001.

more of a workload issue” for annoyance and disturbance calls. Sixth District Councilmember Dee Andrews said allowing fireworks in Long Beach would “send our kids in the wrong direction,” adding “I know we can raise money in a much better way for these nonprofit organizations than to open up fireworks in our city.” Mayor Foster said most municipalities that allow fireworks are contract cities while large cities, such as Los Angeles, that have their own public-safety agencies continue to ban fireworks. He said permitting fireworks flies in the face of Long Beach’s recent efforts to promote safe and healthy choices in communities. “You can’t even play dodge ball in school anymore because of the effect on children,” Foster said. John Kelly, vice president of national fireworks retailer TNT Fireworks, however, said in the past five years some cities have been bringing back fireworks. In Orange County, for instance, voters overturned bans in Westminster in 2010 and in Fullerton in 2012. “We know there are challenges in education, administration and public safety when it comes to a fireworks discussion,” Kelly said. “There are existing ordinances in Southern California that can and do address those concerns.” Long Beach City Attorney Charles Parkin pointed out that an advisory ballot measure is “non-binding,” meaning the Council still has a right to vote down any proposed ordinance or scrap the proposal even if

voters pass the measure. Even so, 9th District Councilmember Steven Neal said he appreciates the dialogue and that the advisory question would be a good way to get a sense of whether residents would even want the Council to consider repealing the City’s fireworks ban. Third District Councilmember Gary DeLong said he is not entirely against Austin’s proposal but would like to see a full analysis of how much fireworks sellers would be taxed by the City in order to recoup costs for any increase in city services. Fifth District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske said she would like to see more discussion about the issue, but she warned that the fireworks industry is “big business,” adding that a previous councilmember went to jail for accepting bribes. “Long Beach has had some bad history with fireworks,” she said. In Signal Hill, fireworks have been prohibited for nearly 29 years, according to Signal Hill Deputy City Manager Charlie Honeycutt in a phone interview with the Signal Tribune. He said it was most likely a “prudent” action by the City Council to ban fireworks given the risk for fires because of the city’s barren, dry landscape at the time. Honeycutt said that, even though Signal Hill has grown in development and population, the Council is not considering lifting the City’s ban. Still, he said, if Long Beach were to legalize fireworks, Signal Hill would most likely be impacted. ß

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ST3533 - January 17_Layout 1 1/17/14 3:15 PM Page 13

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JANUARY 17, 2014

13

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ST3533 - January 17_Layout 1 1/17/14 3:15 PM Page 14

14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4527 Trustee Sale No. : 20130134000609 Title Order No.: 1514234 FHA/VA/PMI No.: 197-566310 2 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 11/18/2011. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 11/30/2011 as Instrument No. 20111617445 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: BARBARA J. DUFFY, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by California Civil Code 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 01/23/2014 TIME OF SALE: 9:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: DOUBLETREE HOTEL LOS ANGELES-NORWALK, 13111 SYCAMORE DRIVE, NORWALK, CA 90650. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2510 EAST WILLOW #108, SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA 90755 APN#: 7214-009146 Exhibit A Legal Description The Land Referred To Herein Below Is Situated In The County Of Los Angeles, State Of California, And Is Described As Follows: A Condominium Comprised Of: Parcel No. 1: That Portion Of Lot 2, Of Tract No. 34974, In The City Of Signal Hill, County Of Los Angeles, State Of California, As Shown On A Map Recorded In Book 941 Pages 20 To 21 Of Maps, In The Office Of The County Recorder Of Said County, Shown And Defined As Unit No. 8, On That Certain Condominium Plan (The ''Condominium Plan'' Herein) Recorded On December 21, 1983 As Instrument No. 83-1510618, Of Official Records Of Said County And As Said Condominium Plan Was Amended By An Agreement Recorded November 3, 1986 As Instrument No. 86-1496625, Of Official Records, And Referred To And Incorporated By Reference In That Certain Notice Of Annexation Of Addition Territory And Supplemental Declaration Of Covenants, Conditions And Restrictions And Easements For Willow Ridge-Phase Ii, Recorded On December 21, 1983 As Instrument No. 831510617, Of Official Records Of Said County (Such Instrument As From Time To Time Amended In Accordance With Its Terms Being Referred To Herein As The ''Supplemental Declaration'') Which Supplemental Declaration Refers To And Incorporates By Reference The Provisions Of That Certain

PUBLIC NOTICES

Master Declaration Of Covenants, Conditions, Restrictions And Easements For Willow RidgePhase I, Recorded On December 9, 1980 As Instrument No. 80-1231815, Of Official Records Of Said County (Such Instrument As From Time To Time Amended In Accordance With Its Terms Being Referred To Herein As The ''Master Declaration''), The Provisions Of The Master Declaration And The Supplemental Declaration Are By This Reference Incorporated Herein And Made A Part Hereof. Parcel No. 2: An Undivided 1/104th Interest In And To That Portion Of Lot 2 Of Tract No. 34974, Shown And Defined As ''Common Areas'' (''Common Areas'' Herein) On The Condominium Plan And In The Supplemental Declaration, Which Definition Excludes Units 1 To 104 Inclusive, From The Common Areas. Except Therefrom Those Portions Of Said Lot 2, Included Within The Lines Of The West One-Half Of Farm Lot 81 Of The American Colony Tract, As Per Map Recorded In Book 19 Page 89 Et Seq., Of Miscellaneous Records, All Petroleum Oil, Gas And Other Hydrocarbon Substances As Conveyed And Reserved In Various Deeds Of Record, Among Them Being A Deed Recorded As Instrument No. 1086 On June 3, 1927 In Book 6731 Page 36, Of Official Records. Also Except Therefrom Those Portions Of Lot 2 Included Within The Lines Of The West One-Half Of The East OneHalf Of Said Lot 81 Of The American Colony Tract, Any And All Oil, Gas And Other Hydrocarbon Substances In, Under Or Which May Be Produced From Said Real Property Without Any Right Whatsoever To The Use Of The Surface Of Said Land To A Depth Of 500 Feet, An Undivided One-Half Interest Thereof Being Excepted By John B. Haas, Jr., In The Deed Recorded August 1, 1955 In Book 48511 Page 328, Of Official Records, And An Undivided One-Half Interest Thereof Being Excepted By Cliff Le Vern Downer, Et Al., In The Deed Recorded August 1, 1955 In Book 48511 Page 354, Of Official Records. Also Except Therefrom Together With The Right To Grant And Transfer All Or A Portion Of The Same, Subject To Any Rights Of Others Under Prior Reservations Or Exceptions Of Record, As Follows: Any And All Oil, Oil Rights, Minerals, Mineral Rights, Natural Gas Rights And Other Hydrocarbons By Whatsoever Name Known, Geothermal Steam, And All Products Derived From Any Of The Foregoing, That May Be Within Or Under The Said Property, Together With The Perpetual Right Of Drilling, Mining, Exploring And Operating Therefore And Storing In And Removing The Same From The Property Or Any Other Property, Including The Right To Whipstock Or Directionally Drill And Mine From Properties Other Than Those Conveyed Hereby, Oil Or Gas Wells, Tunnels And Shafts Into, Through Or Across The Subsurface Of The Prop-

TST4546 NoTICE INVITING BIDS A-1 Sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, California, until 10:00 a.m. on February 4, 2014, and on the same day shortly thereafter, they will be publicly opened and read for the “Willow Street/Dawson Avenue Intersection Improvements Project, No. 670”, in accordance with the Specifications therefore. Bids must be made on the forms provided for this purpose, addressed to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, marked "Bid for “, followed by the title of the project and the date and hour for submitting bids. Bids are required for the entire work as described in the Bid Schedule and the Specifications. The work to be accomplished under this contract is reconstruction of the south driveway approach at the “T” intersection of Willow Street and Dawson Avenue, including, but not limited to, street paving, PCC drive approach, driveway, sidewalk, curb and gutter and ADA ramps, and traffic loops. A-2 All work must be completed within twelve (12) working days after receipt by the Contractor of the Notice to Proceed from the City. The contractor shall begin construction on a Monday and shall be allowed to close the driveway for the first ten (10) calendar days after the Notice to Proceed. Project site must be open to the public on the following weekend. The contract documents, which include the Specifications, may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Department of Finance, for $20 or $25, if requested by mail. The documents are entitled “Willow Street/Dawson Avenue Intersection Improvements Project, No. 670”. A-3 Bids will not be received unless they are made on a proposal form furnished in the Contract Documents by the City of Signal Hill. Each bid must be accompanied by cash, certified check, cashier's check or bidder's bond, made payable to the City of Signal Hill for an amount equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the amount bid; such guarantee to be forfeited should the bidder to whom the contract is awarded fail to enter into the Contract. A-4 All bids are to be compared on the basis of the lump sum or itemized bid items shown in the Bid Schedule(s). Bids will not be accepted from the Contractors who are not licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, Division III of the Business and Professions Code of the State of California. The Contractor shall be required to possess a Class A or Class C8 license at the time the contract is awarded. A-5 Attention is directed to the provision in Section 1777.5, 1777.6, and 1777.7 of the California Labor Code and Title 8, California Administrative Code, Section 200 et seq. concerning the employment of apprentices by the Contractor of any subcontractor under the Contractor. A-6 Before a Contract is entered into with the successful bidder, the bidder shall present evidence in writing to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, that he has a current combined single limit liability policy with aggregate limits for Bodily Injury and Property Damage in the amount of two million dollars ($2,000,000). A-7 The Contractor’s duty to pay State prevailing wages can be found under Labor Code Section 1770 et seq. and Labor Code Sections 1777.5 and 1777.7 outline the penalties for failure to pay prevailing wages and employ apprentices including forfeitures and debarment. A-8 Attention is directed to Government Code Sections 4590 and 14402.5 permitting the substitution of specified and approved securities for contract retention of funds. All such securities shall be subject to the review and approval of the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-9 The successful bidder will be required to furnish a payment bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price and a faithful performance bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price, and said bonds shall be secured from a surety company satisfactory to the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-10 The City of Signal Hill reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or delete portions of any and all bids or waive any informality or irregularity in the bid or the bid procedures and shall be the sole judge of the bids received. A-11 Conflict of Interest: In the procurement of supplies, equipment, construction, and services by sub-recipients, the conflict of interest provisions in 24 CFR 85.36, OMB Circular A-110, and 24 CFR 570.611, respectively, shall apply. No employee, officer or agent of the sub-recipient shall participate in selection, or in the award or administration of a contract supported by Federal funds if a conflict of interest, real or apparent, would be involved. By order of the City of Signal Hill.

Posted at Signal Hill City Hall on: January 17, 2014

Published in the Signal Tribune on: January 17 and 24, 2014

erty, And To Bottom Such Whipstocked Or Directionally Drilled Wells, Tunnels And Shafts Under And Beneath Or Beyond The Exterior Limits Thereof And To Redrill, Retunnel, Equip, Maintain, Repair, Deepen And Operate Any Such Wells Or Mines, Without, However, The Right To Enter, Drill, Mine, Store, Explore And Operate On Or Through The Surface Or The Upper 500 Feet Of The Subsurface Of Said Property. Parcel No. 3: An Easement For The Exclusive Right To Use, Possess And Occupy Those Portions Of The Common Areas Of Lot 2 Of Tract No. 34974, Shown, Defined And/Or Designated On The Condominium Plan And/Or The Supplemental Declaration As Being Parking Spaces (Ps) Appurtenant To Parcel 1 Above And Constituting Restricted Common Areas. Parcel No. 4: An Easement For The Exclusive Right To, The Extent Provided For In The Condominium Plan And In The Supplemental Declaration, To Use, Possess And Occupy Those Portions, If Any Of The Common Areas Of Lot 2 Of Tract No. 34974, Shown, Defined And/Or Designated On The Condominium Plan And/Or In The Supplemental Declaration As Being Interior Building Courtyards, Stairways, Landings, Corridors, Hallways And Walkways Appurtenant To Parcel I Above And Constituting Restricted Common Areas.. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $348,190.60. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 800-280-2832 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.auction.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20130134000609. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AUCTION.COM, LLC 2 ONE MAUCHLY IRVINE, CA 92618 800-280-2832 www.auction.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED

FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 12/20/2013 NPP0225012 To: SIGNAL TRIBUNE 01/03/2014, 01/10/2014, 01/17/2014.

TST4543 T.S. No. 2013-2357 Order No. 01180-70670 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 4/26/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: JOHN MAJOR MCLEOD Duly Appointed Trustee: S.B.S. TRUST DEED NETWORK, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION Deed of Trust recorded 05/03/2007 as Instrument No. 20071072437 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 2/11/2014 at 09:00 AM Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other reasonable estimated charges: $122,252.72 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 2150 OHIO AVE #C , Signal Hill, CA 90755 A.P.N. 7215027-045 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the trustee within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call FOR SALES INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL (714) 5731965 or LOG ONTO or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 2013-2357. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

TST4544 NoTICE oF PUBlIC HEARING AND SPECIAl MEETING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN on Wednesday, January 29, 2014, the Planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a Special Meeting at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California to consider the following:

GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT DRAFT HOUSING ELEMENT UPDATE All California cities are required to prepare and maintain a General Plan. The Housing Element is one of the seven required elements of the General Plan and regular updates to the Housing Element are legally required. The Housing Element Update being considered will have an eight year cycle before the next required update if adopted by February, 2014.

The Housing Element must include six major components: 1. An assessment of the Signal Hill housing needs including existing and projected needs. 2. An inventory of sites to accommodate the City’s Regional Housing Need Allocation (RHNA) of 169 housing units. 3. An analysis of housing market and governmental constraints that impede public and private sector efforts to meet the need. 4. A progress report describing actions taken to implement the 2006-2014 Housing Element. 5. A statement of the City’s goals, quantified objectives and policies relative to the construction, rehabilitation, conservation and preservation of housing for the period 2013-2021. 6.An implementation program which sets forth a schedule of actions which the City is undertaking or intends to undertake to implement the policies and achieve the stated goals and objectives of the Housing Element.

Applicant: City of Signal Hill Recommendation: Staff is recommending approval.

THE DRAFT HOUSING ELEMENT UPDATE is available for review by visiting the website at www.cityofsignalhill.org, then select Departments, Community Development. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend the hearings to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. IF YOU WISH TO LEGALLY challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearings A NEGATIVE DECLARATION was prepared in conjunction with the subject project based on an initial study that found no significant environmental impacts associated with the proposal. The Negative Declaration and material relevant to the proposed project may be inspected between the hours of 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursdays, and 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Fridays, in the Community Development Department at City Hall. FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Colleen Doan, Associate Planner, at cdoan@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7344.

Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper per Gov’t Code §65091(a)(4): January 17, 2014 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010: January 17, 2014

FoR RENT

JANUARY 17, 2014

verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 1/8/2014 S.B.S. Lien Services, 31194 La Baya Drive, Suite 106 Westlake Village, CA 91362 (818) 991-4600 FRANCIS FRANCO, TRUSTEE SALE OFFICER WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1078277 1/17, 1/24, 01/31/2014

TST45533 / Case No. VS025337 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 12720 Norwalk Blvd., Norwalk, CA 90650-3188. PETITION OF Ilana Victoria Fine, A Minor Child. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner ILANA VICTORIA FINE, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: ILANA VICTORIA FINE to Proposed Name: RYAN VICTOR FINE. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: February 26, 2014; Time: 1:30 P.M.; Dept. C, Room 312. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: January 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014. ___//ss//___ Yvonne T. Sanchez, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: December 30, 2013 TST4531/ Case No. VS025328 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 12720 Norwalk Blvd., Norwalk, CA 90650-3188. PETITION OF Otto Rene Segura, For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner OTTO RENE SEGURA, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: OTTO RENE SEGURA to Proposed Name: OTTO RENE FIGUEROA. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: February 19, 2014; Time: 1:30 P.M.; Dept. C, Room 312. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: January 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014. ___//ss//___ Yvonne T. Sanchez, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: December 24, 2013 TST4532 / Case No. NS026989 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 275 Magnolia Ave., Long Beach, CA 90802.. PETITION OF Denise Christian Vazquez, For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner DENISE CHARISTIAN VAZQUEZ, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: DENISE CHARISTIAN VAZQUEZ to Proposed Name: DENISE REGINA SORIANO. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: February 7, 2014; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. S27. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: January 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014. ___//ss//___ Ross M. Klein, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: January 10, 2014 TST4534 / 2014 000357 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: THE LAVENDER CREATIVE GROUP, 2121 Maine Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. Registrants: 1. WILLIAM FRANKLIN PROCTOR, II, 2121 Maine Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806, 2. ALEX HARRY KITAY, 6055 McKnight Dr., Lakewood, CA 90713. This business is conducted by: Copartners. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: William Franklin Proctor, II. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on December 16, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 2, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014. TST4525 / 2013 258402 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: VIVA VERDE WORDS, 220 Termino Ave., Long Beach, CA 90803. Registrant: HAROLD HERNANDEZ, 220 Termino Ave., Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Harold Hernandez. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement

Banquet Room available for parties or events at Bellflower-Long Beach Elks Lodge, 16426 Bellflower Blvd. Call Steve at (562) 925-5750 for details.

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JANUARY 17, 2014

was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 18, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 3, 2014 & January 3, 10, 17, 2014.

TST4535 / 2013 259946 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. HIGH STYLE WINE, 2. HIGHSTYLEWINE.COM, 3401 Claremore Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. Registrants: 1. TAMMARA S. HAGAN, 2.JEFFREY C. HAGAN, 3401 Claremore, Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Tammara S. Hagan. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 20, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013.

PUBLIC NOTICES

ested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: February 21, 2014; Time: 8:30 am.; Dept. S27, Room 5400. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: January 10, 17, 24, 31, 2014. ___//ss//___ Ross M. Klein, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: January 3, 2014

TST4541 / 2013 265127 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: THE REAL ESTATE RECYCLER, 4067 Hardwick St. #233, Lakewood, CA 90713. Registrants: I AM JES, INC., 5214 Knoxville Ave., Lakewood, CA 90713. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: John Scandalios, CEO. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 30, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name state-

ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 17, 24, 31, & February 7, 2014.

TST4542 / 2014 005867 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: AMPHIBIOUS MEDICAL, 2633 E. 28th St. Unit 622, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrants: AM INDUSTRIAL MEDICALSERVICES, INC., 2633 E. 28th St. Unit 622, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Ryan La Bounty, Secretary. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 9, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation

of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 17, 24, 31, & February 7, 2014. TST4545 / 2014 009352 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: BROTHER'S GRILL, 3605 Tweedy Blvd., South Gate, CA 90280. Registrants: 1. VICENTE CAPARELLI, 1353 Gaviota Ave., Long Beach, CA 90813, 2. LIVIO FABIO CAPARELLI, 11303 Lasselle St., Moreno Valley, CA 92557. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Livio Fabio Caparelli. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 13, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 17, 24, 31, & February 7, 2014.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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TST4547 / 2014 013055 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: KRYSTAL PHOTO SERVICES, 3553 Atlantic Ave., Suite, 1130, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrants: DAVID ROSEN, 3556 Lime Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: David Rosen. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on February 1, 2014. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 16, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 17, 24, 31, & February 7, 2014.

TST4537 / 2014 003898 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: A1 AUTO RECONDITION, 2578 E. Adams St., Carson CA 90810. Registrants: ANDY JAUREGUI, 2578 E. Adams St., Carson, CA 90810. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Andy Jauregui. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 7, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 10, 17, 24, 31, 2014.

TST4536 / Case No. NS026909 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 275 Magnolia Ave., Long Beach, CA 90802. PETITION OF Breana Seymore, for minor Anthony Ross Jr. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner BREANA SEYMORE, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: ANTHONY DEVON ROSS JR. to Proposed Name: ALIJAH JOSAI SEYMORE. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons inter-

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JANUARY 17, 2014

16

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St3533 january 17 layout 1