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2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

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NOVEMBER 15, 2013

COMMUNITY

LB residents join search for bone-marrow match to help save 3-year-old girl’s life and many others

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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GOT E-WASTE? DOCUMENTS TO SHRED? What Document shredding and recycling event Who Sixth District Councilmember Dee Andrews Where Martin Luther King, Jr. Park, 1950 Lemon Ave. When Saturday, Nov. 16 from 9am to 12pm More Info The first five boxes of shredding documents per car are free, and anything more will cost $5 per box. Recyclable items include televisions, computer monitors, computers (CPUs), laptops, keyboards, printers, computer mice, hard drives, fax machines, microwave ovens, DVD players, VCRs, cables and cords, telephones, cell phones, radios, shredders, stereo components, tape and zip drives, power supplies and electronic devices. X-rays, CDs, large appliances, toner cartridges, fluorescent bulbs or batteries of any kind will not be accepted. Call (562) 570-6816.

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Meagan Meylor, a Cal State Long Beach student and Long Beach resident, takes a sample of her own DNA through swabbing the inside of her cheek during a bone-marrow drive on Saturday, Nov. 9 in east Long Beach to help find a bone-marrow donor for 3-year-old Pasadena resident Sofia Flores, who has been diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia. Sean Belk Staff Writer

LBFD extricates man buried waist-deep in mud see DONORS page 13

The Long Beach Fire Department (LBFD) responded to the 1400 block of Walnut Avenue at 4:55pm on Saturday, Nov. 9 after reports of a person trapped in a confined space, according to Matthew Dobberpuhl, LBFD public information officer. On arrival, firefighters found a worker buried to his waist in mud. The LBFD Urban Search and Rescue Team was requested and assisted in successfully extricating the man. He was treated on the scene and transported to Saint Mary's Medical Center in minor distress. No further information is available at this time.

Source: LBFD

Metro Briefs

GATEWAY CITIES

Go Metro for the Holidays Add more merriment to your holidays with Metro. Show your valid TAP card at participating businesses for exclusive deals on seasonal performances and activities, holiday shopping, festive dining and more. See this season’s Destination Discounts at metro.net/discounts.

AUTHORS UNITE What Author talk Who Hosted by Friends of the Signal Hill Library Where Signal Hill Library, 1770 Hill St. When Monday, Nov. 18 at 6:30pm More Info Darrell James, author of Nazareth Child and Sonora Crossing, and Tammy Kaehler, author of Dead Man's Switch and Braking Points, will be discussing and signing their books.

Gate Latching Begins on Blue and Green Lines Turnstiles at >ve Metro Blue Line stations will latch next month, followed by 14 Metro Green Line stations. Gate latching has been completed on 16 Metro Red and Purple Line stations and >ve Metro Gold Line stations. Be sure your TAP card is loaded with the appropriate fare to pass through turnstiles at rail stations. Details at metro.net/latching.

TRUE CRIME What North Long Beach Leaders Meeting Who Long Beach Police Department Where Carmelitos Community Center, 851 E. Via Carmelitos When Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 6pm More Info Residents are invited to join Long Beach North Commander Robert Luman for a community meeting. The meeting will focus on crime trends in different neighborhoods. Robert Cerince of the City of Long Beach Homeless Services Program will be the guest speaker. Call (562) 570-9827 or email lbpdnorth@longbeach.gov .

Metro ExpressLanes Maintenance Fee Still Free Keep using your Fastrak® transponder on Metro ExpressLanes without the $3 monthly account maintenance fee. The Metro Board of Directors voted to continue waiving the fee for LA County residents until February 2014. For more information, or to get your Fastrak® transponder, visit metroexpresslanes.net.

New Buses to Begin Service in 2014 Metro has received the >rst of its $297 million order of 550 new 40-foot clean air buses. After testing, the new buses will go into service across the county early next year. The new buses will replace those in the ?eet expected to reach retirement age, which is 12 years of service and 500,000 miles, in the next three years.

PUBLIC SAFETY 101 What Monthly meeting Who Deforest Park Neighborhood Association Where Deforest Park Clubhouse, 6255 Deforest Ave. When Thursday, Nov. 21 from 7pm to 8:30pm More Info Long Beach City Prosecutor Doug Haubert will be the speaker. Call (562) 428-7710.

Get Metro Service Alerts on Twitter Metro service information is available instantaneously on Twitter at @metroLAalerts. Get up-to-the-minute detour alerts, maintenance notices or holiday schedule reminders. Be the >rst to know by following twitter.com/metrolaalerts.

metro.net @metrolosangeles facebook.com/losangelesmetro

JUST KIDDING What Kidical Mass Neighborhood Bike Ride Who Hosted by the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association (BKBIA) Where Georgie’s Place, 3850 Atlantic Ave. When Sunday, Nov. 17 from 1pm to 3pm More Info Children and adults will bike for roughly four and a half miles, beginning and ending at Georgie’s Place. Orozco’s Auto Service will partner with the BKBIA to collect canned food that will be donated to the Long Beach Rescue Mission. Email krista@bixbyknollsinfo.com, visit bixbyknollsinfo.com/kidicalmass.html or call (562) 595-0081.

WALK THE HALLS What Open house Who St. Anthony High School Where 620 Olive Ave. When Sunday, Nov. 17 at 2pm More Info St. Anthony High School will host an open house for students interested in attending the school. Tours will be led by students, and visitors will have the opportunity to speak directly with faculty and staff. Application packets will be available. Call (562) 435-4456 or visit LongBeachSaints.org .

14-0793ps_gat-ne-14-005 ©2013 lacmta

The best gift that 3-year-old Sofia Flores from Pasadena could get this Christmas is a chance to stay alive. In July, she fell ill and was brought to the emergency room, but later her family found out that it wasn’t just the flu. Flores was diagnosed with a rare form of blood cancer known as acute myeloid leukemia, which affects only 1 percent of children. Though five treatments of chemotherapy have kept the cancer in remission, her only chance for a cure is finding a bone-marrow donor with the right DNA match. Family members say she only has two to three months to find a match. The problem is that, for Flores, matches are limited by her unique ethnic and racial makeup– half Caucasian and half Mexican. Local and international bonemarrow registries have so far turned up nothing, and none of her family members had compatible DNA matches either. Still, the hope is that a donor may eventually be found amongst Los Angeles County’s diverse population.

COATS FOR KIDS What Coat drive Who Sixth District Councilmember Dee Andrews and Inner Beauty Gems Where Martin Luther King, Jr. Park, 1950 Lemon Ave. When Saturday, Nov. 16 from 9am to 2pm More Info Councilmember Dee Andrews and Inner Beauty Gems, a small mentoring club that hosts various community events throughout the 6th District, will provide children with coats for the winter season. Call (562) 570-6816.

FOR THOSE IN NEED What Renewable Hope Thanksgiving Food Project 2013 Who The Rock Christian Fellowship Where The Central Facility Center at Martin Luther King Jr. Park, 1133 Rhea St. When Saturday, Nov. 23 from 8am to noon More Info The Rock will provide 500 boxes of food to families in need. Each box will have enough food to supplement the needs of a family with four to six people. Call (562) 597-7481 or visit therocktoday.com .

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4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OPINION

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

houghts Tfrom the Publisher by Neena Strichart

As many of our readers are aware, next Friday will mark the 50th anniversary of the day President John Fitzgerald Kennedy (JFK) was assassinated while riding in a motorcade in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. President Kennedy was the youngest president (age 43 years, 236 days) ever elected to our country’s highest office. At the time of this tragedy, I was just 8 years old and attending the 3rd grade at Signal Hill Elementary School. Some of the day’s events are still quite vivid in my memory. I remember our teacher, Mrs. Wright, asking us to pick up one of our textbooks and to read quietly because she needed to leave the room for a few minutes. She arrived back to us with a somber look on her face, and she immediately told the class, through tears and sobs that our dear President Kennedy had been killed. Not offering many details (frankly, not much information was available at that point), she did her best to calm us and answer our naïve questions. “What do we do now?” and “Why did someone shoot him?” were just two of the questions. A few classmates attempted to hide under their desks, acting as though a bomb was about to be dropped. It was a very scary time for us youngsters– and an even scarier time for parents who showed up to the school in attempts to comfort their very frightened and confused children. Coincidentally, that was the very day that parents had been invited to have lunch with their kids in the cafeteria. The parent/child luncheon had been planned for weeks and ironically had never been an option before. Although my mother worked clear over on Long Cover of Life Magazine dated Nov. 29, 1963. My father placed one of these issues Beach Boulevard at the Department of Public Social Services (the welfare office) and used in our family’s cedar chest the week it was published. The magazine is still there, a bicycle for transportation to and from work, she still participated in that day’s luncheon. tucked between our heirloom linens. I was never so happy to see her in my life! I don’t recall much about our lunch that day other than standing in the long cafeteria line waiting patiently with my beautiful mother at my side. Her soothing touches and tender eyes seemed to melt all my fears. I remember feeling sad for my classmates whose moms or dads couldn’t be there. I know that many of us who were old enough to realize what was happening at that time have memories of that day and the days that immediately followed. If you’d like to share them with our readers, please do so by U.S. mail, fax or email. All of our contact information is available at the bottom of this page. We will reprint your thoughts next week on the 50th anniversary of the day our country lost JFK. May he rest in peace.

LETTERS AND EMAIL

Addressing distractions

This has been a banner year for the Latino Caucus. We set out to make a difference and were able to make major strides in improving the lives of all Californians by facilitating driver’s licenses for the undocumented community, expanding healthcare access to the uninsured and expanding educational opportunities for millions of students. Unfortunately, recent allegations against one of our Caucus members, Senator Ron Calderon (D-Montebello), threaten to overshadow our accomplishments and undermine the integrity of the Caucus as a whole. We take these grave allegations seriously. While we make no judgment as to the veracity, we have a duty to protect the integrity of a distinguished Caucus. In fact, since my election as chair last year, I have worked hard to make the Caucus, its policies and finances as transparent and open as possible. It should go without saying, but I do not take lightly the public trust that comes with elective office, and I do not condone nor would [I] ever engage in any activity that puts that trust in question. In order to address all distractions that may impede our progress, the California Latino Legislative Caucus has removed Senator Calderon as a member of our executive board. In his place, I have appointed Sen. Norma Torres (D-Pomona) who today [Nov. 12], was also selected to sit on the Senate Committee on Legislative Ethics. As a Caucus, we stand proud of our legislative accomplishments this year. Our focus remains on working together to build upon these policy successes with another ambitious policy agenda in 2014.

Boosting the Boosters

Thank you, Signal Tribune, for running our Millikan Rams Baseball car wash press release in October. Many readers took an interest and visited the car wash and made donations. It was a great day for Millikan Rams Baseball Boosters.

Calif. Sen. Ricardo Lara Chairman California Latino Legislative Caucus

[Ed. note: Although not charged with any crimes, Calderon is the subject of an FBI investigation into whether he accepted $60,000 in bribes from an undercover FBI agent assuming the identity of a film-studio executive in exchange for pursuing an expansion of tax credits for the movie industry. The news of the alleged bribery was first reported by the Al Jazeera America cable network. PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

www.signaltribune.com DESIGN EDITOR/PRODUCTION MANAGER

Leighanna Nierle

Cory Bilicko

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STAFF WRITERS

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Something on your mind? Visit our website and leave a comment! MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

CJ Dablo Sean Belk

Shelly Hamagishi Rams Baseball Boosters Millikan High School

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

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Barbie Ellisen Ashley Goodsell COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Kenneth McKenzie Shoshanah Siegel

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The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

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NEWS

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

After recovering stolen property, LBPD seeking rightful owners

Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) burglary detectives served search warrants on Nov. 6 at several Long Beach residences and recovered stolen property taken in at least one residential burglary, and detectives believe some of property belongs to victims who have yet to be identified. According to LBPD, the investigation stemmed from a routine traffic stop on Oct. 21 in the area of Pacific Coast Highway and Cherry Avenue. When the officer learned the driver was unlicensed, he began preparing to impound the vehicle. Conducting an inventory search of the vehicle, the officer located several computers in the vehicle that were ultimately determined to have been stolen from a Long Beach residence earlier in the day. At that time, the driver, identified as 19-year-old Trayon Gaston of Long Beach, was arrested for receiving stolen property. Three other occupants in the vehicle were released at the scene. Burglary detectives continued with the investigation, which ultimately led to the serving of search warrants on Nov. 6 at four Long Beach residences located in: the 1700 block of Orizaba Avenue, the 1500 block of E. 5th Street, the 2600 block of Magnolia Avenue and the 1900 block of Pine Avenue. As a result of the search warrants, the LBPD took five individuals into custody and recovered an assortment of property that included nine firearms, cash, marijuana, electronics and jewelry, including several high-end watches. Four of the recovered guns have all been identified as loss from one Long Beach burglary; however, the owner(s) of other property have yet to be identified. The five suspects were booked on various charges that ranged from residential burglary to possession of an illegal assault weapon, and are as follows: Gaston, for residential burglary and possession of marijuana for sale; 19-year-old Cartier Anderson of Long Beach, for residential burglary and possession of marijuana for sale; 36year-old Jay Holms of Long Beach, for receiving stolen property, possession of illegal assault weapon and possession of gun with altered serial number; a 16-year-old Long Beach resident, for residential burglary; and a 17-year-old Long Beach resident, for residential burglary. Detectives believe these individuals may have also committed burglaries outside of Long Beach. Those who believe their property may have been recovered during this operation should contact the Long Beach Police Burglary Detail at (562) 570-7353. Anonymous tips may be submitted by calling 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), texting TIPLA plus the tip to CRIMES (274637), or visiting lacrimestoppers.org . Source: LBPD

Suspected gang member killed in shootout with Long Beach police

A suspected gang member is dead after a shootout with Long Beach police on West Anaheim Street on Sunday, Nov. 10, according to the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD). Officers received a call from citizens reporting a man firing a gun at a gas station in the 500 block of W. Anaheim Street at approximately 6pm last Sunday, according to LBPD. As the first officers arrived, they saw a person matching the reported suspect’s description walking along the north sidewalk of Anaheim Street near Chestnut Avenue. Officers made contact with the suspect, leading to an exchange of gunfire. Medical aid was provided until the Long Beach Fire Department transported the suspect to a local hospital, where he was pronounced deceased as a result of his injuries. Detectives have identified the suspect as a Long Beach gang member with an extensive arrest record. However, identification is being withheld until released by the coroner’s office. Detectives learned that, while at the gas station, the suspect fired multiple rounds at the

driver of a dark-colored vehicle. The driver fled, then the suspect left the scene on foot. Officers later located the attempted-murder victim and vehicle. The driver could not provide a motive for the attack and said he did not know the suspect. He was not injured, however his vehicle was struck multiple times by the suspect’s gunfire. A handgun was recovered from the scene. The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office will conduct an independent investigation of the shooting, as they do with all officerinvolved shootings that result in injury or death in Los Angeles County. Those with information regarding this incident are asked to contact LBPD Homicide Detectives Todd Johnson and Roger Zottneck at (562) 5707244. Anonymous tips may be submitted by calling 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), texting TIPLA plus the tip to CRIMES (274637), or visiting lacrimestoppers.org . Source: LBPD

Thursday, Nov. 7 Terrorist threat 12:12am– Cherry Ave./Willow St. Auto burglary 9pm– 1900 block Cherry Ave.

Friday, Nov. 8 Auto burglary 7:30am– 1500 block E. Spring St. Commercial burglary 9:06am– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Auto burglary 9:24am– 2199 block E. 21st St.

Auto burglary 10:30pm– 1900 block Dawson Ave.

Commercial burglary 11:05pm– 2600 block Signal Parkway Saturday, Nov. 9 Assault 2:14am– 2800 block Walnut Ave.

Auto burglary 3:43am– 2000 block E. 19th St.

Grand theft, auto/livestock 10:52am– 2600 block Cherry Ave.

Battery 10:50pm– 2800 block Walnut Ave.

Sunday, Nov. 10 Receiving known stolen property 4:19am– 1800 block Raymond Ave.

Auto burglary 8am– 2500 block Cherry Ave.

Disorderly conduct, under the influence 6:16pm- Redondo Ave./E. 20th St.

Monday, Nov. 11 Non-injury hit-and-run 5:34pm– 2600 block Lime Ave.

Tuesday, Nov. 12 Attempted commercial burglary 12:01am– 2200 block E. Willow St.

Threatening crime with intent to terrorize 11:40am– 1900 block Temple Ave. Wednesday, Nov. 13 Identity theft 1:53pm– 2700 block E. PCH

Auto burglary 5pm– 2600 block E. 19th St.

Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Thursday, Nov. 7 Recovered stolen vehicle 9:28am– 3400 block Brayton Ave.

Friday, Nov. 8 Grand theft auto 10pm– 2300 block Maine Ave.

Saturday, Nov. 9 Grand theft auto 11:30am– 3600 block Maine Ave.

Grand theft auto 5pm– 3300 block Magnolia Ave.

Sunday, Nov. 10 Robbery of person 11:44am– 1100 block San Antonio Dr.

Residential burglary 3:50pm– 3300 block Maine Ave.

Grand theft auto 7pm– W. 21st St./Magnolia Ave.

5

Burglary-prevention tips from the LBPD

In light of recent residential-burglary arrests, the Long Beach Police Department has shared the following tips: • Keep doors and windows locked at all times • Meet your neighbors, as this makes it easier to recognize a person who doesn’t belong, and neighbors that communicate are more likely to look out for one another • Report loiterers– loitering is often a precursor activity for burglars, enabling them to case the area • Immediately report suspicious activity by calling 9-1-1, and be sure to get a good description of any subjects or vehicles • Keep shrubbery trimmed down around your home to prevent hiding places • Keep any gates to back yards locked at all times • Request a free “vacation check” by contacting the Senior Police Partner volunteers at (562) 570-7212 • Be sure your house number is visible from the street so police or emergency personnel can locate your residence quickly • Keep porch lights on at night– this makes any suspicious persons visible, as well as your house number •When away for extended periods, make sure your home has the “lived in” look– have lights on timers, ask a neighbor to park in your driveway and make arrangements for newspapers, mail, and fliers that may accumulate • Install motion-sensor lighting around your property, including on garages that may face alleyways • Keep garage doors locked and closed at all times; open doors allow potential suspects to take inventory of the contents of your garage

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6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE COMMUNITY Long Beach volunteer group hopes to warm veterans’ hearts with quilts Sean Belk Staff Writer

When a military veteran was recently awarded a handmade quilt, the former service member seemed bewildered as he took the delicately sewn blanket with his name printed on the back of it. “You’d do this for me?” the veteran asked. “But you don’t know me.” Barbara Winkler, coordinator and founder of So Cal Quilts of Valor, however, simply replied, “It doesn’t matter. You didn’t know me when you served, and I’m benefiting from that, so it’s a win-win.” Winkler leads a team of volunteer quilters and other helpers who meet just about every Thursday in Long Beach to craft the honorary gifts made of decorated fabric, using unique patterns and color schemes. The group is one of hundreds across the country that are part of the nationwide nonprofit the

Quilts of Valor Foundation. Last Friday, Nov. 8, the local operation presented 16 personalized quilts to veterans during the 7th annual Veterans Day Tribute that included a flag ceremony and lunch at the Cypress Senior Citizens Center in Orange County. Seven of the veterans who attended the event had served during World War II. Assemblymember Sharon QuirkSilva (D-Fullerton), who gave each veteran a certificate of recognition to honor his or her service, expressed the importance of providing soldiers assimilating back to civilian life with “open doors” and “warm hearts.” Quirk-Silva said the California State Assembly has recently focused efforts on finding funds to ensure veterans have housing, education and medical benefits when they return from war. She said more than 2 million veterans in America are homeless.

Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva (far left) presents Ralph Tilbrook, a World War II veteran who served in the Unites States Marine Corps from 1943 to 1945, with a Quilt of Valor in honor of his service to the country.

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

“We can connect them not only to education and veterans housing but to other services they may need, such as mental-health services, working with their disability,” Quirk-Silva said. “It’s so imperative that, when they come home, they receive good health [benefits] because of the dedication they Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune have shown to us.” Stephen Conner (second from left), a World War II veteran who served in the United States Army from Quilts of Valor 1942 to 1945, receives a Quilt of Valor during the Veterans Day Tribute at the Cypress Senior Citizens first emerged in Center last Friday, Nov. 8. Presenting the honorary gift were (from left): Teena Tomlinson, recreation 2003, when Cather- specialist for the Cypress Senior Citizens Center; Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva; and So Cal ine Roberts from Quilts of Valor Coordinator Barbara Winkler. Seaford, Delaware, became inspired during her son sized quilts is obtained through dona- give them something that they can cudNathanael’s yearlong deployment in tions and raffles throughout the year, dle with and watch TV with and enjoy Iraq. Her idea came out of a desire to Winkler said. The fabric costs about feeling the love and the hugs that we see to it that soldiers returning from $10 to $15 per yard, and each quilt put into those quilts.” So Cal Quilts of Valor meets every combat were “welcomed home with requires about 10 yards, she said. Each the love and gratitude they deserved,” of the quilts starts with a pattern that is Thursday from 1pm to 5pm, except according to the organization’s website. cut, sewn and stitched together. The during holidays, for a sewing day at Today, with the help of quilters and quilts are then washed and ready to use. Sew Vac, 1752 Clark Ave. in Long volunteers across the country, Quilts of Winkler said sometimes the same pat- Beach. The group will also host a Valor has grown into a national grass- tern is used but different fabrics make sewing day on Feb. 2 at Lakewood High School. roots community-service effort with each piece unique. The goal of the effort, she said, is to “Anybody is welcome at any time,” more than 65,000 quilts awarded to both service members and veterans in provide a personalized award to veter- Winkler said. “Even if you don’t sew, states across America. The campaign ans that can be cherished and used you can make a donation, trim threads has even caught on in Canada, Britain every day instead of hung on the wall or help iron. There’s always something like a medal. that needs doing. More hands make and Australia. “It’s our way of saying thanks– it’s light work.” One of the primary goals of the organization is to provide comfort to a small token,” Winkler said. “Some of MORE INFORMATION soldiers wounded in combat. Accord- them have not been thanked, and some socalqov.com ing to the organization’s website, the of them have not been welcomed qovf.org quilts are “stitched with love, prayers home, and it’s a shame, but this will and healing thoughts” and provide a token of appreciation to wounded soldiers for their “service, sacrifice and valor.” Winkler started So Cal Quilts of Valor in 2006, and the local group now works with about 10 volunteer quilters and has made more than 2,000 quilts since its inception, she said. So far this year, the group has made about 350 quilts and worked with local high-school students from the Long Beach Unified School District who volunteered their time to fulfill community-service requirements for graduation. George Hallak (far right) who served in the United States Marine Corps from 1951 to 1954, receives The money for the a Quilt of Valor from members of the So Cal Quilts of Valor organization and Assemblymember fabric to make the lapSharon Quirk-Silva (far left) during the Veterans Day Tribute in Cypress last Friday, Nov. 8.

Ken Shill (left), a World War II veteran who served in the United States Army from 1944 to 1946, receives a certificate of recognition from Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva in honor of his service to America.

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NEWS

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

Wrigley BBQ ‘pop up’ looking for permanent spot to serve down-home cuisine and get-togethers

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Appie van der Fluit is serious about bar-

becue, and he’s also serious about his community. He said his hope is to bring the two together at a permanent location at the gateway of the Wrigley Village business district. For now, the Kansas native, who works as a teacher at South Gate High School, has organized regular “pop-ups” around town, sometimes on a landscaped median at 19th Street and Daisy Avenue, not far from his home in the historic Wrigley District neighborhood on the west side of Long Beach. Most people driving by can find the temporary restaurant by spotting the large, bright-red “Wrigley BBQ” sign. As his children play in the distance, van der Fluit and his wife Jennifer serve up an array of barbeCourtesy Wrigley BBQ cue plates with portions of pulled-pork sandHusband and wife Appie and Jennifer van der Fluit serve barbecue wiches, grilled veggies and quartered dishes during one of their pop-ups in the Wrigley District of the west chicken. side of Long Beach. Appie, who works as a high-school teacher, wants On the table are van der Fluit’s specialty to turn the temporary restaurant into a permanent business to help grow sauces, which he named after famous slogans the Wrigley community. from his favorite wrestlers, such as “Ooh Yeah!” for Macho Man Randy Savage. Since van der Fluit hasn’t obtained a business license yet, he legally can’t make a profit, and currently he’s offering the food for free, though he does accept suggested donations, such as $15 for the “Holy Trinity” of beef, pork and ribs. The most recent pop-up was Saturday, Nov. 9 just after the annual Long Beach Veterans Day Parade. The Wrigley resident said he started the pop-ups, which he usually hosts during the summertime and for his birthday, after his neighbor Colleen McDonald, parliamentarian for the Wrigley Association, asked him how to put the neighborhood on the Long Beach map. Being from Kansas, where, he said, barbecue is “huge,” and also being a self-taught chef since childhood, van der Fluit suggested hosting a community barbecue. Now his operation has generated a local fan base and a growing interest on social-media sites. He’s already been asked to cater parties and provide food for the annual Wrigley River Run’s Pizza Pig-Out event. With a clientele that has already sampled his food, van der Fluit hopes that by next year he will move into a brick-and-mortar location in the Wrigley Village corridor with the help of Gavin McKiernan, who has years of experience in the restaurant industry and organizes the Wrigley River Run, hoping to make the operation a real business. One possible location that the yet-to-be entrepreneurs have been eyeing is the vacant lot at the corner of Pacific Avenue and Pacific Coast Highway, which is considered Courtesy Wrigley BBQ by the community the “gateway” to the The Wrigley BBQ pop-up offers specialty sauces that yet-to-be entrepresee BBQ page 8 neur Appie van der Fluit named after his favorite wrestlers’ slogans.

Fourth District Long Beach Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell has garnered the endorsement of the Long Beach Police Officers Association in his bid for the 70th Assembly District, according to O’Donnell’s campaign manager Brian Mineghino. • Congressmember Linda Sanchez, who represents California’s 38th District, has endorsed Long Beach Vice Mayor Robert Garcia for mayor, according to a Nov. 13 emailed statement from Garcia. • Long Beach City College Board of Trustees member Doug Otto on Nov. 8 released the names of 18 new endorsements for his campaign for mayor, including: Umberto Autore, owner, Umberto’s International Clothiers; J. Paul Robinson, AIA Architect and Kathryn Robinson; Matt Peterson, coowner, Legends Sports Bar; Barbara Butler, retired CSULB professor and former Millikan High School teacher; Carl Ann Wylie, past president of Rotary of Long Beach, past president of International Business Association, member of the Board of Trustees of Ronald McDonald House and past board member of Long Beach Day Nursery; Javier Gonzalez, Special Projects, Los Angeles Turf Club, Santa Anita Park; Ed Spatola, founder and CEO, New Found Life; Dr. Nasir Tejani, perinatal and neonatal physician; Steve Chesser, consultant for

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city prosecutor, according to their website lalcv.org . • John Morris, partner and general manager of McKenna’s on the Bay at Alamitos Bay Landing, Long Beach First Lady Nancy Foster and Long Beach CPA Blake Christian will cohost a reception for Long Beach 3rd District Council seat candidate Jim Lewis at McKenna’s, 190 N Marina Dr., on Thursday, Nov. 21 from 6pm to 8pm. Visit JimLewisForCouncil.com . • The Long Beach City College (LBCC) Political Action Coalition, made up of full- and part-time teachers and staff, has endorsed Gregory Slaughter, a veteran, retired police officer and college professor, to represent District 5 on the LBCC Board of Trustees. • United Association Local 709 and Assemblymember Anthony Rendon, who represents the 63rd Assembly District, have endorsed Uduak Ntuk in his campaign for the Long Beach Unified School District Board of Education’s 1st District, according to emailed statements from Ntuk. • The Teachers Association of Long Beach (TALB) have announced their endorsement of Megan Kerr for the 1st District School Board seat in Long Beach, according to an emailed statement by Kerr.

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Leadership TraQ, office manager for Marine Exchange of Southern California, consultant for Improbable Ministries, former senior manager of Community Relations for Boeing programs in Long Beach; Ross Riddle, president and CEO of South Coast Shingle; George Bustamante, vice president of Coldwell Banker Commercial Real Estate; James Ansite, president, Sport Kilt, Inc.; Dr. Bill Smitheran, Long Beach City College professor emeritus and athletic/academic counselor; Bill Garrison, retired vice president of Petroleum Engineering, Tidelands Oil Production Company and former chief petroleum engineer for City of Long Beach; Dennis Elber, attorney at Stolpman, Krissman, Elber and Silver; Dr. Robert Kariger, former vice president of Academic Affairs at Long Beach City College and founder of Adapted Physical Education Program at LBCC; and Susan Hayles-Berbower, English facilitator, teacher and administrator, Huntington Beach Union High School District. • Congressmember Alan Lowenthal has endorsed 7th District Long Beach Councilmember James Johnson for city attorney, according to an emailed statement from Johnson. • The Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters has endorsed Doug Haubert for re-election as Long Beach

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COMMUNITY

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

BBQ

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

continued from page 7

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south Wrigley District. McKiernan said the hope is that the spot may become available since an autotitle loan company called Pennbrooke Financial Services LLC was denied a conditional-use-permit by the Long Beach City Council. If not, however, he said there are plenty of other open spaces in the area. McKiernan said the idea for opening a permanent location came out of the large interest that Wrigley BBQ has received from the community. He added that the Wrigley District also Sean Belk/Signal Tribune lacks a family-style restaurant where people can gather for events, unlike A plate of barbecued chicken, pulled pork, beef tips and signature grilled veggies other areas in Long Beach. Some res- from the menu of the Wrigley BBQ on Saturday, Nov. 9 idents said the interest might some day spark a monthly event in Wrigley like we just haven’t gotten the critical mass We’d love to be a part of that and have the First Fridays event in Bixby Knolls. for it to start really blossoming like a successful business and be one of the “There’s so much potential in this Bixby Knolls or Belmont Shore… It anchors for that.” neighborhood for stuff along Pacific just needs that little nudge until it starts MORE INFORMATION Avenue or Willow Street as well,” blossoming into that place where you thewrigleybbq.com McKiernan said. “There’s some great, start getting a lot of businesses looking (562) 233-1884 successful businesses and restaurants, to want to get in on the ground floor.

Market featuring handmade gifts returns to Bixby Knolls for third year

A vendor from the 2011 Uptown Village Market

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

The Expo Arts Center, 4321 Atlantic Ave., will host the 3rd Uptown Village Market on Friday, Dec. 6 and Saturday, Dec. 7. The event includes numerous booths with hand-crafted creations from almost 100 vendors. Offerings will include high- and low-priced jewelry, adults’ and children’s clothing, paintings, photographs, sculptures, succulent plant arrangements, hats, locally made salsas, Mediterranean desserts, hand-crafted Peruvian clay works and dog accessories. The event will kick off during the First Fridays Art Walk on Friday, Dec. 6 at 5pm with holiday carolers, pictures with Santa and fashion trucks, and the market will remain open until 10pm. On Saturday, the event will feature “Snow in Bixby,” hot chocolate, kids’ holiday book signings, free face painting and candy canes, and the market will be open from 11am to 5pm. This event is free, but there will be a $3 admittance fee for snow. For more information and to see products offered at the market, visit uptownvillagemarket.com . Source: Expo Arts Center

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Fly-in to celebrate 90th anniversary of Long Beach Airport

Southern California skies will fill with pilots heading to Long Beach Airport (LGB) for a 90th-anniversary fly-in on Saturday, Nov. 16, from 11am to 3pm. The public is welcome to attend this free event where local pilots display their planes to the community. “Long Beach has 90 years of rich aviation history, and the fly-in is a great opportunity for the community to see some amazing planes up close and personal,” Mayor Bob Foster said. The fly-in will take place on Taxiway B on the LGB Airfield. Free parking is available at East Wardlow Road and Globemaster Way. The event also will feature the Aquarium of the Pacific’s Aquarium on Wheels mobile tidepool exhibit, a JetBlue Airways flight giveaway and a celebration of 90 years of aviation tradition at LGB. “Today, Long Beach Airport is a thriving, multi-purpose aviation complex serving more than 3 million commercial airline passengers and supporting more than 300,000 aviation operations annually,” said Airport Director, Mario Rodriguez. “We are proud to share the wonder of flight with area residents and business.” Several of Long Beach Airport's tenants are expected to bring their most iconic airplanes for display. Aircraft will include a DC-3, a Gulfstream II, a War Dog and more. Owners will be available to answer questions about the planes. Food trucks and vendors will be selling their items. In 1923, the Long Beach City Council set aside 150 acres near the intersection of Spring Street and Cherry Avenue for use as an airfield. It was named Daugherty Field after Earl S. Daugherty, one of the area's pioneer aviators. Up to that point, during the early 1920s, the only “airport” in Long Beach was the beach, where takeoffs and landings were best made during low tides. Source: City of LB

ST3524 - Nov. 15_Layout 1 11/14/13 4:53 PM Page 9

S T 9 COMMUNITY Long Beach honors local heroes with 17th annual Veterans Day Parade

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

IGNAL

RIBUNE

Neena Strichart Publisher

Parade-goers certainly had their expectations met at the 17th Annual Long Beach Veterans Parade. Taking place last Saturday morning, the parade featured more than 100 participants including representatives from various veterans’ organizations, local politicians and dignitaries, marching bands and equestrian groups. The ongoing theme for the parade, “A Salute To Those Who Served,” was duly illustrated with the participation of Grand Marshal Rear Admiral Mark D. Guadagnini and Honorary Grand Marshal Keith McCart. Guadagnini, one of Long Beach’s own, graduated from Woodrow Wilson High School in 1975. He has over 4,700 hours of flight time in 52 different aircraft. His awards include two Battle “Es,” and he has flown 95 combat missions. McCart, who received an honorary discharge from the Army National Guard in 2005, is a member of the Long Beach Police Department and currently serves with the Robot Technician Detail and the Honor Guard Detail. The parade program commemorative booklet, created by the Signal Tribune, was distributed to participants and parade onlookers. Featured in the booklet is information regarding the grand marshals, the history of every branch of the military, details about the parade and a full-color spread on the Long Beach Veterans Mural located at the corner of Atlantic Avenue and Harding Street. Those wishing to have a booklet may pick up a free copy at the Historical Society of Long Beach (HSLB), 4260 Atlantic Ave., while supplies last. Business hours for the HSLB are Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays 1pm to 5pm; Thursdays 1pm to 7pm; and Saturdays 11am to 5pm.

Photo by Mike Mounce

Photo by Mike Mounce

Neena Strichart/Signal Tribune

Neena Strichart/Signal Tribune

Neena Strichart/Signal Tribune

Photo by Justin Rudd

Photo by Justin Rudd

Photo by Justin Rudd

Photo by Mike Mounce

ST3524 - Nov. 15_Layout 1 11/14/13 4:53 PM Page 10

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Imitating Life

CULTURE

Posing questions to local artist Heather McMillen

Is there a particular kind of art or an artist you whom don’t particularly like? Viewing art is a dynamic, participatory experience. If I spend enough time with an artist’s work, it usually grows on me. Even if I still do not like it, I can at least honor the artist’s vision by engaging with the work and trying to understand it. “Golden Skippers,� oil on canvas With that being said, there is a lot of artwork out there, so I have to start How would you characterize the the viewing process by being selec- role of art in modern society? tive– and whenever possible to see Worrying about this is one of my the art in person. I feel it is a waste pesky artist’s blocks that I have to of creative energy to actively dislike work myself out of! I am not an art another person’s work. There is art critic or art historian. I am not in out there for every palate, and I’m charge of the Story of Art or the direction it is going. I only know who and always looking to expand my own. where I am now. I still don’t know Does anything cause you to have how I fit into the bigger picture, or what the role of my art should be. I’m artist’s block? I have little attacks of artist’s block just doing what feels important to me, every day– in the form of procrasti- and hoping other people will see its nation. I avoid doing things out of value also. Creativity is not the work of fear of the unknown. My creative the gods; it is for everyone to particihabits direct my emotional energies pate in. to the right place at the right time. I play with a strategic kind of spon- Describe what the scene is like when taneity so I can work around those you are creating your art. mental inhibitions that are constantly I live and work in a very small, cluttered space, with my sketches taped up trying to hold me back. all over my studio wall. I have a little side-yard space with a garden of potted plants that I can escape to if I need a mental break.

Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

I made the acquaintance of Heather McMillen last month when she included my studio among those she attended during the Long Beach Open Studio Tour. To me, she embodies the quintessential person for whom this column is designed: a fledgling, aspiring, struggling artist fresh out of an education system in which arts courses are fast dwindling. She’s finding her way– rather shy and reserved, but open and eager too. In her, I sensed a delicacy and vulnerability, but also a fortitude of spirit that reminded me of the birds she paints. Those creatures are on display through Thursday, Dec. 12 in her exhibit entitled Avian Muse at the Unitarian Universalist Church, 5450 E Atherton St. There will be an artist reception on Saturday, Nov. 16 from 2pm to 5pm. [Appointments may also be made by calling (562) 5978445.]

“Baroque Butterflies,� oil on canvas

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

In 50 words or less, what do you do as an artist? I paint with oils on canvas. My preferred subject matter currently includes a variety of bird species. They function as character portraits and mood pieces. I create a unique environment for each bird, using a variety of techniques and experimenting with a continuously evolving color palette.

In one word, describe what your life would be like if, for some reason, you couldn’t create art. “Nevermore�

“The 83 Senses,� mixed media on canvas

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How does your artistic sensibility or skills help you in your daily life? Painting is very therapeutic, but it is also hard work. In a sense, it is just another daily activity. Sometimes it is like grocery shopping; other times it is like practicing yoga. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always been the kind to â&#x20AC;&#x153;stop and smell the roses.â&#x20AC;? This kind of activity is a catalyst for inspiration, but it is only a fraction of what it means to be a practicing artist. My entire lifestyle becomes my art, and painting is just another facet of the whole.

As an artist, have you had any experiences with censorship? (If so, how did you react? If not, how do you think you would react?) It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t my main objective to offend or provoke controversy. I would be interested to know what would have caused that kind of response. I might feel bothered or indignant.

Have you ever found a piece of art offensive? Sure.

What are your ultimate goals as an artist? My goal is to live well and connect with other people in meaningful ways...and to eventually get a bigger studio to work in.

What color excites you? Imagine an avocado that has been freshly cut open, and picture that area of color that transitions from the bright yellow-green near the seed to the cooler, creamy green in the middle. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my favorite color; it is both lively and calming at the same timeâ&#x20AC;Ś and delicious.

To view more of McMillenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work, visit cargocollective.com/canvasblues or facebook.com/canvasblues .

ST3524 - Nov. 15_Layout 1 11/14/13 4:53 PM Page 11

NOVEMBER 15, 2013 Theatre review

Boeing Boeing at Long Beach Playhouse

CULTURE

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

11

Vicki Paris Goodman Culture Writer

It’s amazing how many different ways writers of farce think up to tell the same story. You know the one: A playboy has several different girlfriends, each of whom thinks she is his one and only. He thinks he’s got things organized down to a science such that there is no chance that more than one of the women will be on hand at any given time. Then things go awry, and his best-laid plans backfire when the women show up all at once. Yada yada yada. So imagine my surprise when the Long Beach Playhouse production of Boeing Boeing turned out to be fresh and utterly delightful, in no small part due to mostly fabulous casting. Playwright Marc Camoletti’s creative take on the theme helps out, as well. Upon entering the theater, audience members are wowed by one of the best Playhouse sets ever. Set designer Greg Fritsche’s fabulous 1960s bachelor pad is to die for. In Boeing Boeing, committed bachelor Bernard (Scott T. Finn) has three fiancées, all flight attendants for different airlines. Each of the women calls Bernard’s apartment “home” and believes she is the lady of the house. Of course, Bernard adores each and every one of them and has no intention of ever getting married. He keeps close track of each fiancée’s airline schedule, believing his system is foolproof. In his mind never the twain, nor trio, shall meet. Right…. Several details give the play a distinctive panache. One is the fact that Bernard’s apartment is near Orly Airport in Paris. As such, his hard-working housekeeper Berthe (Chiquita Fuller) is a French maid, From left: Scott T. Finn and Tiffany Toner in Long Beach Playhouse’s production of Boeing Boeing though less formal and far more put upon than the stereotype would dictate. The other stylish aspect is that the three women are an international assortment, one being a New Yorker, another Italian, and one German. Remember those wonderful form-fitting stewardess uniforms of the ‘60s? They were skirted suits with collared scoop necklines and 3/4 sleeves, worn with iconic caps or scarves. Hairdos were neat as a pin, and make-up was just so. Costume designer Donna Fritsche nailed it. Tiffany Toner plays the perky and energetic Gloria, whose crisp New York accent and sensibility comes across as realistic as can be. Eva Dailey’s sensuous Italian Gabriella is also the real deal. But it is Lacy Prince in the role of German fiancée Gretchen who steals the show. Her abrupt commands and responses are priceless. And the chemistry she establishes with Bernard’s old friend and unexpected visitor Robert (Tom Metcalf) sizzles. Metcalf takes quite a few serious pratfalls during the course of a performance, leading to audience hysterics but, we hope, no bruises nor broken bones. In the end, a newer, faster jet and bad weather combine to place all three of the women “at home” at once. The usual frantic excuses pour forth to keep one woman from entering a room occupied by another. All the while, maid Berthe’s predicament is almost as complicated as Bernard’s as she works hard to accommodate the food preferences of all of the women while struggling to keep Bernard’s secret from coming out. James Rice’s direction is spot-on. Finally, Bernard is forced to admit his foolish over-confidence, and love dictates more permanent pairings. As the holidays approach and things get stressful, give yourself a break. Catch a performance of this adorable production of Boeing Boeing. You’ll be glad you did. Boeing Boeing continues on the Long Beach Playhouse Mainstage through Saturday, Dec. 7. General-admission tickets are $24, senior tickets are $21, and student tickets are $14 with valid ID. Performances are Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, with Sunday matinees at 2pm. The Long Beach Playhouse is located at 5021 E. Anaheim St. Call (562) 494-1014, option 1, for reservations and information. Tickets are also available at lbplayhouse.org .

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12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE CULTURE NOVEMBER 15, 2013 Boutique wins Day of the Dead Altar Contest Three artists in gallery show explore Power of Color

Trance on Atlantic’s offering for the First Fridays Art Walk’s Day of the Dead Altar Contest

Trance on Atlantic boutique has won the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association’s First Fridays Art Walk’s Day of the Dead Altar Contest. Trance was one of 15 businesses to create an altar for the Nov. 1 First Fridays event, which celebrated a Dia de los Muertos theme. “The businesses really did a great job with the concept and stepped up even more than last year,” said Tokotah Ashcraft, First Fridays coordinator. “Altar themes ranged from tributes to Julia Child and cinema greats to traditional themes. We had a community altar in front of our office,

Courtesy BKBIA

where people were encouraged to write the names of loved ones who passed in front of it. People got emotional as they participated.” For the Dec. 6 First Fridays, businesses are now being encouraged to create holiday-themed window displays. December 6 will also include the annual tree and menorah lighting ceremony that takes place at Nino’s Italian Restaurant beginning at 6pm. Source: BKBIA

“Orange Treat,” mixed media on canvas by Herlinda Rojas-Giandalia

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577 E. Wardlow Rd. @ Atlantic Avenue • 562-595-6666

& Detail Center

Contemporary-art gallery Les Jolis Trésors, 3226 East Broadway, will host an exhibit entitled The Power of Color from Thursday, Nov. 21 to Wednesday, Jan. 15. The opening will be part of the Third Thursday art walk on Broadway and will take place from 5pm to 9pm. “Choosing colors is a process of elimination to capture a scene,” Clavel said. “Emotion is the most vibrant color on my palette, bringing freedom and inspiration to my work. Joy is at the heart of all my work.” Rojas-Giandalia says color is her language. “I love bold, vibrant, intense colors,” she said. “In my paintings, I like to apply a succession of different layers: colorful or transparent acrylic paint, tissue paper, fabric, light or coarse molding paste and all sorts of collage materials.” Ceramic artist Sandstrom’s recent creations offer an existential theme. “My current work deals with the idea of how the design and form of the pot relate to one’s life,” Sandstrom said. “We are all born the same; it is the bumps and curves along our path that lead us to significant endings.” MORE INFORMATION agtresors.com

GROOMING • FOOD • SUPPLIES • SELF-SERVICE WASH

Pet Wash 2OFF Self-Service

$

Not valid with any other offer. Expires 11/29/13. one per customer. BK store only.

$

4102 Orange Ave.

#113

at Carson St. Open Tues–Sun 562-427-2551

Grooming 5OFF Full-Service

on first visit or $3 off next visit. $25 min. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 11/29/13. one per customer. BK store only.

Approved Watering Sched-

Expert Care • Gentle Grooming • Walk-Ins Welcome*

* AS SPACE PERMITS

Watering is approved on the following days:

Monday, Thursday, and Saturday before 9:00 am and after 4:00 pm

For more information, call the Water Conservation Hotline: 562-989-7350

ST3524 - Nov. 15_Layout 1 11/14/13 4:54 PM Page 13

NEWS

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

13

Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Photographs of 3-year-old Sofia Flores are displayed on a table during a bone-marrow drive. The girl from Pasadena has been diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, and the only cure is a transplant of bone marrow from a compatible donor.

Donors

continued from page 3

After the girl’s family searched in Pasadena, her cousin, Courtney Noel and Noel’s fiancé Juan Rendon opened up the front yard of their east Long Beach home on Saturday, Nov. 9 to host a bonemarrow drive in hopes of finding a match for Flores or the many other children desperately searching for a donor to survive. Noel said the Long Beach community has been supportive of the effort, with strangers, local city officials and business owners all pitching in to promote the drive. “I just wanted to be able to do something to help contribute, so I asked if we could have a match [drive] down here,” she said. “It’s amazing how many people have come out to help. Everyone is reaching out.” The family publicized the

event during a Long Beach City Council meeting, and 4th District Long Beach Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell also helped put the word out to his constituents. Thousands of email messages were sent out, and fliers were posted at nearby businesses. Meagan Meylor, a Cal State Long Beach student and local neighbor, said she decided to participate after hearing about it through a co-worker at a local real-estate firm. “I thought maybe I should just try and donate just in case,” she said. “I think it’s great that all these people in the community are coming together to try and help.” To participate, each person has to be willing to join a global bone-marrow registry known as Be The Match Registry, which,

A3M, a local recruitment center for Be The Match Registry, hosted a bone-marrow drive to save the life of Sofia Flores, who was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia. The event took place at a family member's home at 6351 E. El Jardin St. near Cal State Long Beach.

according to its website, is operated by the National Marrow Donor Program and is considered the “largest and most diverse marrow registry in the world.” People, between 18 and 44, in general good health and willing to help any patient in need, were required to swab four corners of the inside of their cheeks. Their DNA samples were then placed into an envelope to be sent out to a lab. Those who participated will be in the registry until their 61st birthday, said Sara Arroyo, Hispanic outreach and recruitment coordinator for Los Angelesbased Asians for Miracle Marrow Matches (A3M), which organized the drive in Long Beach. If a match is found for Flores or any other of the thousands of patients with life-threatening

blood cancers, there are two methods for bone-marrow transplants. The method most commonly performed is a non-surgical procedure known as peripheral blood stem cell donation (PBSC), which involves extracting circulating peripheral blood from the arm and putting it through a machine to take out stem cells. The other, more invasive, procedure involves an actual bonemarrow donation in which liquid is extracted from a person’s pelvic bone. This method can leave a person sore for a couple of days. Arroyo said, however, that, in the case of both methods, cells come back to the body in about four to six weeks. “It’s something your body can donate– it replenishes,” she said. “This doesn’t cause any permanent damage, and you get to help save someone’s life.” Barbara Welsh, Flores’s grandmother, said the goal of the drive is to collect as many samples as possible given the girl’s mixed race, noting that there are less non-white minorities in the registry. “Ethnic groups are very under-

Alpine Village Antique Clock We make house calls for large clocks! Barbara Welsh (far left), the grandmother of Sofia Flores, who needs a compatible bone-marrow donor to cure her leukemia, greets local residents during the bone-marrow drive at the girl's cousin’s east Long Beach home.

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represented, and that’s why they’re having a harder time finding a match,” she said. “The match could come from anywhere in the world.” Welsh added that she hopes the event will spread awareness about how people can join not only to help Flores but the thousands of other patients searching for a cure as well. “People aren’t aware that this happens, and it’s going on,” she said. “There are people out there every day who need a match… It’s worthwhile, and hopefully this will benefit a lot of people.” MORE INFORMATION a3mhope.org bethematch.org

lives lived Jolene King 73 edith Blakewell 90 John Forrest 67 Jerome Wallace 64 Maria Brewer 89 Albert Zeller 90 rosalie helm 75 Blanche Barnaby-nied 92 tom Steele 46 Aaron Castellon 46 Suzanne george 68 Joseph Fair Sr 58 omar Zarate Avila 30 e families were assisted by McKenzie Mortuary. For more details on service dates and times, contact (562) 961-9301

Environmentally Friendly

saME DaY sErViCE Hours (PCH LoCation) Monday-Friday 7am to 7pm sat. 7am-6pm, sun. 9am-12pm

Shirts Laundered Hand-finished

Dry-cleaned

(2-pc. min.)

We do jeans, too!

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3304 Cherry Ave. 3344 PCH 6620 Cherry Ave. (562) 595-7093 (562) 494-0351 (562) 529-7590

ST3524 - Nov. 15_Layout 1 11/14/13 4:54 PM Page 14

14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

You're invited to the Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce Holiday Party at Delius Restaurant, Monday, December 9, 2013 2951 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill Prizes, Raffle, Live Music, No Host Bar, Hors d'oeuvres, Dinner, Dessert and Beverages $35 per person with prepaid reservations/ $45 at the door. reserve early- space limited to 60 people. reservation deadline is December 2, 2013. Please send reservation card and payment to signal Hill Chamber of Commerce. 2201 East Willow Street, Suite D- PMB 138, Signal Hill, CA 90755-2142

Bixby Knolls Car Wash & Detail Center

Full service wash • Fast exterior wash 6 self-serve wash bays with air dryers (3) Mon.-Sat. 8am-6pm Sunday 8am-5pm

We have the most polite and friendliest employees, & best of all...

camoves.com/terry.rogers

Ph: 562-713-4630

email: trogers@coldwellbanker.com

© 2004 Coldwell Banker Corporation. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT Incorporated. If your property is listed with another broker, this is not intended as solicitation.

Golden Eagle

Restaurant

1 OFF

THE BEST CUSTOMERS IN THE WORLD!

577 E. Wardlow Rd.

Free WiFi!

AnDAZoLA’S

g A L L e r y CuStoM PiCture FrAMing & Fine Art

Happy anksgiving to our loyal customers and families of 37 years! Mats • glass • Mirrors • Mounting • Prints • Posters for Sale • Museums & Conservation Framing • graphics • original oils

Shell & Sheldon Grossman

owners for 35+ years

@ Atlantic • 562-595-6666

1673 e. 28th St. • Signal hill (562) 427-3100 open Mon-Fri 9-5 • Sat 9-2

a n d a z o l a s g a l l e r y. n e t

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner • Combos

$ 00

orders $4.99 or more

Dine In or Take Out

HOURS Mon-Fri 6am-930pm Sat 6am-8:30pm Sun 6:30am-7:30pm

“Thank you for your loyal support”

-Louie & Jim

2101 E. WilloW ST., SiGNAl Hill 562-492-1216 oR 562-492-1336

Chicken • Beef • Vegetarian

2 Long Beach Blvd. locations at Willow St. | at Wardlow Rd.

One-of-a-kind holiday gifts! We can fulfill all of your gift-giving needs!

w w w. d y n a m i c g l a s s . n e t

A Plan For All Seasons.

James Mills-Winkler, CMFC Financial Advisor CA Insurance License # 0E48583

E-Mail jamesmillswinkler@wradvisors.com Phone 310 371-7036 x 121

ST3524 - Nov. 15_Layout 1 11/14/13 4:55 PM Page 15

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

15

Chamber Spotlight

1344 N. Newport Ave., Long Beach (562) 595-8100 Featuring long-time signal Hill chamber members— it could be you! encore Awards marks its 26th year for customizable gis and products it was derived from three different locations more than 30 years apart. encore Awards and Marking, formed from separate establishments, Jensen rubber Stamps (Long Beach, 1929), Al's rubber Stamps (Whittier, 1962), and encore Awards (Pasadena, 1984), became a single operation in 2010, landing itself on the border of Signal hill and Long Beach (1344 n. newport Ave.). upon being founded in 1984, encore Awards acquired the encore trophy sector, which was responsible for large hollywood accounts such as the golden globe Awards, the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Student Academy Awards. to this day, encore still handles accounts for the golden globe and Webby Awards--which helps set them apart from other award and marking shops. "We have the custom-design ability and the quality, and every piece comes from us and our on-site designers," said Mu Zhang, owner of encore awards. "ere are years of history behind our workforce for us to design the best product." Since the beginning, Zhang says encore has had "major accounts with a solid customer base." While encore sees busy weeks all year long, their most hectic time of the year comes in May and october, with the transitions of seasons and school. e awards facet of the company focuses primarily on nonprofit accounts, events (car shows, etc.) and the entertainment industry. e rubber stamp segment, however, deals with many banks, housing sectors and manufacturers--ensuring consistency. Locally, encore has done business with the Signal hill Police Department, the undershirt and Kluger Architects. ough encore ships finished products all over the Southern California region, they also work with uPS daily, to ship items as far as new york. encore specializes in engraving materials, glass etching, personalized corporate gis, trophies, banners, badges, plaques and a plethora of other customizable items and gis. valued with trust and unique designs, encore will cater to the theme of your needs. For more information or to view a complete list of products, visit: encoreawards.com .

Thanksgiving Side Dishes

order to-go (Pick up on Wed. 11/27 after 2:00pm. Please give 48 hours notice.) Whole turkey - uncooked, dressed turkey ready to roast Call for quote (with failsafe instructions) Approximately $2.50 per pound. Stuffed turkey Breast (serves 2-4) $30 Pine nut, Sage Stuffing (serves 2-4) $8/pint Spicy green Bean Salad (serves 2-3) $5/half pound Brussels Sprouts with Bacon $7/pint roasted garlic Mashed Potatoes (serves 2-4) $8/pint Potato Parsnip Puree $8/pint Cream Cheese and nutmeg $8/pint Sweet Mashed Potatoes with Maple Butter (serves 2-4) $8/pint gravy (serves 2-4) $6/pint Cranberry Apple Compote (serves 2-4) $7/half pint Loaf of Shallot Bread (homemade) $8/loaf

soup (serves 2-3)

2951 CHERRY AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL 562.426.0694

deliusrestaurant.com

Signal T

R

I

B

U

N

E

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

25,000 ISSUES PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY! SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY & THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Sweet Potato Champagne $5/pint roasted red Bell Pepper & tomato Bisque $5/pint

Desserts Pumpkin Spice Cake w/ Caramel Sauce $15 each Pumpkin Cheesecake with Pecan Crust $19 each Pecan Pie $14 each Chocolate Marble Brownies $16/dozen Assorted Cookie Platter $9/dozen Cinnamon Coffee Cake $14 each

Sign up for your subscription & receive the Signal Tribune by first-class mail! To purchase an annual subscription, send this form and a check for $50 to:

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755

NAME_________________________________________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS______________________________________________________________________________________________ CITY___________________________________________________________________________________________________ STATE & ZIP CODE______________________________________________________________________________________

www.signaltribune.com

Questions or comments? (562) 595-7900

ST3524 - Nov. 15_Layout 1 11/14/13 4:55 PM Page 16

16 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4490 Trustee Sale No. 12-519249 CEN Title Order No. 7331593 APN 7214-009-212 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE     YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 02/13/04. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.    On 11/21/13 at 9:00 am, Aztec Foreclosure Corporation as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by Jesse M. Bill, a Single Man, as Trustor(s), in favor of VirtualBank. a Division of Lydian Private Bank, a Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, Recorded on 02/24/04 in Instrument No. 04 0418196 of official records in the Office of the county recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Sabadell United Bank, N.A., as the current Beneficiary  , WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state), Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California described as: 2514 EAST WILLOW STREET UNIT#310, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90806 The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $212,841.75 (Estimated)     Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale.   The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is".   DATE: 10-28-13 Elaine Malone Assistant Secretary & Assistant Vice President  Assistant Secretary & Assistant Vice President  Aztec Foreclosure Corporation     6 Venture, Suite 305 Irvine, CA 92618 Phone: (877) 257-0717 or (602) 638-5700  Fax: (602) 6385748    www.aztectrustee.com NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call or visit this Internet Web site, using the file number assigned to this case 12-519249. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Call 714-5731965 http://www.Priorityposting.com Or Aztec Foreclosure Corporation (877) 257-0717 www.aztectrustee.com P1068399 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2013      

TST4498 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 110101283 Doc ID #0001146133212005N Title Order No. 11-0081922 Investor/Insurer No. 0114613321 APN No. 7216-014-044 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 11/23/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by KEVIN B AUSTIN, A SINGLE MAN, dated 11/23/2005 and recorded 12/7/2005, as Instrument No. 05 2991074, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 12/16/2013 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1984 CHERRY AVE, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 907555824. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $602,395.96. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than

PUBLIC NOTICES

the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 11-0101283. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: 03/22/2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 9274399 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4426849 11/15/2013, 11/22/2013, 11/29/2013   

TST4493 APN: 7215-019-107 TS No: CA09004341-12-1 TO No: 5911224 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED June 26, 2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.  On December 9, 2013 at 09:00 AM, Vineyard Ballroom at Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on September 12, 2003 as Instrument No. 03 2686917 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by MARIANNA MADRZYK AND ANDRZEJ MADRZYK, as Trustor(s), BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: SEE EXHIBIT "A" ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF EXHIBIT "A"  A Condominium Composed of: A) An undivided 1/50th interest in and to Lot 2 of Tract 39915, in the City of Signal Hill, as per map recorded in Book 958 Pages 4 to 7 inclusive of maps, in the Office of the County Recorder of said County.  EXCEPT therefrom all oil, gas, minerals, and other hydrocarbon substances, lying beneath a depth of 500 feet from the surface of Lots 1 and 2 in Tract 39915, in the City of Signal Hill, as per Map Recorded in Book 958 Pages 4 to 7 inclusive of Maps, in the Office of the county Recorder of said County, without right of surface entry, by deed recorded February 2, 1981 as Instrument No. 81-117630, of Official Records.  Also except therefrom Units 120 to 136 inclusive, 220 to 236 inclusive and 320 to 335 inclusive as defined and delineated on a Condominium Plan recorded May 5, 1983 as Instrument No. 83-502918 of Official Records.  Reserving therefrom exclusive easements for all uses and purposes of a "Parking Space", together with the right to grant the same to others, over and across those portions of said land defined and delineated as "Common Area" 401P to 508P inclusive on the above referred to Condominium Plan.  B) Unit 226 as defined and delineated on the above referred to Condominium Plan.    Parcel 2:  An exclusive easement appurtenant to Parcel 1 above, for all uses and purposes of a "Parking Space" over and across that portion of Lot 2 of said Tract No. 39915 defined and delineated as "Common Area" 490P (and 491P) on the above referenced Condominium Plan.  The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2001 E 21ST #226, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90806  The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein.  Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust.  The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee's Sale is estimated to be $95,895.18 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary's bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to

cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee's Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable.  If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse.  Notice to Potential Bidders  If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property.  Notice to Property Owner  The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Auction.com at 800.280.2832 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address www.Auction.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA09004341-121. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.    Date: November 1, 2013  TRUSTEE CORPS  TS No. CA09004341-12-1  17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614  949-2528300   Lupe Tabita, Authorized Signatory  SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.Auction.com  FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AUCTION.COM at 800.280.2832    TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE P1069188 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/2013 

TST4487 / 2013 219013 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. PUBLIC SECTOR EXCELLENCE, 2. TRAINING CONCEPTS, 3520 Long Beach Blvd. #209, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: FORREST L. STORY, 3520 Long Beach Blvd. #209, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Forrest L. Story. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 1, 1995. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 21, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4489 / 2013 217713 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: DONATO'S HAIR SALON, 4102 Orange Ave., Ste. 121, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: LEONORA L. FARRIS, 4102 Orange Ave., Ste. 121, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Leonora L. Farris. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on March 6, 1996. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 18, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fic-

titious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013. TST4485 / 2013 215151 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MIND THOUGHT PRODUCTION, 5250 W. Century Blvd. #448, Los Angeles, CA 90045. Registrant: JIMMY CHRIS, 14702 Visalia Ave., Compton, CA 90220. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Jimmy Chris. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 15, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 15, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4486 / 2013 218565 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: THOMAS FIELD SERVICES, 324 Mira Mar Ave., Long Beach, CA 90814. Registrant: GAWIN ARRON THOMAS, 324 Mira Mar Ave., Long Beach, CA 90814. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gawin Arron Thomas. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 21, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4491 / 013 223257 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FORTIS FUTURA FINANCIAL SERVICES, 767 Freeman Ave. #3, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: MAURICIO TORRES, 767 Freeman Ave. #3, Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Mauricio Torres. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 28, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2013.

TST4492 / 2013 223258 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BIG E PIZZA, 3225 E. Pacific Coast Hwy. #C, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: JAMES ELEOPOULOS, 3225 E. Pacific Coast Hwy. #C, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: James Eleopoulos. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

this fictitious business name in 1986. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 28, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2013.

TST4495 / 2013 228184 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: EASTERN BEACON INDUSTRIES, 121 Linden Ave. Suite B-111, Long Beach, 90802. Registrant: RONALD E. WEAVER JR., 4508 Atlantic Ave. Unit 182, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Ronald E. Weaver Jr. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 4, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 8, 15, 22, 29, 2013.

TST4497 / 2013 230310 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: S&A MARKET, 1639 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach, CA 90813. Registrant: BONUS NHEK, 16113 Orange Ave., Paramount, CA 90723. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Bonus Nhek. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 1, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 6, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 8, 15, 22, 29, 2013.

TST4499 / 2013 230578 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. HUMBLEBRAGS EATERY, 2. HUMBLEBRAGS FINE FOOD, 3. HUMBLEBRAGS AMERICAN DINING, 4. HUMBLEBRAGS AMERICAN EATERY, 5/ HUMBLEBRAGS EAT NOW, 3225 Clubhouse Dr., Lakewood, CA 90712. Registrant: MODI'S CATERING LLC, 3225 Clubhouse Dr., Lakewood, CA 90712. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Anthony Frank Modica, CEO. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 6, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 15, 22, 29, & December 6, 2013.

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NEWS

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

Cyclone Racer

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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a fan of the project and is also running for mayor, put the item on the Council’s agenda. The public was invited to get a “behind the scenes” look at the proposition on Wednesday, Nov. 13 at the Long Beach Groundwater Treatment Plant at 2950 Redondo Ave. The event was part of Schipske’s regular Open Up Long Beach series, a program she started to provide a way for residents to become more acquainted with city departments and major happenings in the city. Before a crowd of about twodozen residents, Schipske said she hopes the presentation will put pressure on the city manager to get started on the feasibility study, adding that West has yet to call Osterhoudt about the plans. The councilmember said the project could be a major boost for jobs and tourism in Long Beach. With the recent announcement that Boeing will be shuttering its C-17 manufacturing plant, any project that may bring economic development to the city shouldn’t be overlooked, she said. “This city needs to look right now at all the possibilities of what we can do to bring jobs, to bring tourists, to bring revenue to the city of Long Beach, and I think we need to put everything on the table,” Schipske said. “I don’t think anything should be looked at as not an option until we get the information back that there’s absolutely no way it’s feasible.” She noted that the proposal has come up just as a new roller coaster may be underway at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, pointing out that the original Cyclone Racer was built to compete with the east-coast seaside attraction more than 80 years ago. The first roller coaster built in Long Beach was the Jackrabbit Racer, which extended over the ocean near the foot of Cedar Avenue, adjacent to the area known as Silver Spray Pier, but the Cyclone Racer was built for about $200,000, according to Osterhoudt, to be “over the top.” According to Schipske, who has written numerous books about Long Beach history, the roller coaster was considered “the largest and fastest in the U.S.” The ride was called “racer” because it had two cars on two separate tracks that raced each other. Though the City eventually terminated the lease for the Cyclone Racer to construct a part of Shoreline Drive that has since been demolished, Schipske said more than 30 million people had ridden the rollercoaster before it was destroyed. Osterhoudt, who owns the trademark name and is considered a foremost expert on the Cyclone Racer, gave a detailed overview of how he painstakingly “reverse-engineered” the entire original wooden roller coaster, once called “The World’s Greatest Ride,” down to its original intertwining dual tracks using nothing but photos and footage. He showed snippets of movies, such as Abbott in Costello in Hollywood, in which the attraction appeared. The ride was even featured in an episode of Leave It To Beaver. Osterhoudt’s first attempt at selling the idea of bringing the classic ride back to Long Beach was in 1997, when Disney was planning to build California Adventure, which would include a roller coaster, along Long Beach’s shoreline at the time. Disney rejected his plans, and the project never came to fruition any-

Courtesy Gerrie Schipske

The Cyclone Racer roller coaster, as seen in this historic photograph, was an iconic landmark in Long Beach from 1930 to 1968.

way, but Osterhoudt said he still never gave up. In the years that followed, he spent two years building a model replica of the Cyclone Racer, which has 2,800 wood elements on the track alone, in order to prove his concept could be built, at least on a small scale. The model, which won first place in the Los Angeles County Fair, grabbed the attention of the head of Pennsylvania-based Structural Technologies, Inc., which restores roller coasters across the country. Osterhoudt said the builder is still interested in re-creating the ride in Long Beach, adding that “investors are ready,” and there are orders in place for lumber. He said the construction of the roller coaster would be paid for by a corporation of investors, including himself, through forming an LLC that would own the ride and then rent the land from the City. The designer has proposed placing the roller coaster, expected to be the size of two football fields, on the water near Shoreline Park or on the park near the Aquarium of the Pacific or near the Queen Mary. “With the public backing, for the return of the racer, we will get it rebuilt,” he said, adding that the construction should take about two years to complete. The major hurdle for the project, however, is getting approval from the California Coastal Commission, especially since state-tidelands law restricts development in the waterfront area. Still, Osterhoudt said the City and the state agency could work together to make exceptions if there’s enough public support, such as with moving the Space Shuttle Endeavour. “If they want something bad enough, they will find a way to do it,” Osterhoudt said. After the presentation, Osterhoudt fielded questions from the audience. One resident questioned whether the ride would sell enough since it may be perceived as “mild” compared to today’s standards. Osterhoudt, however, said what made the original roller coaster unique was its four five-car trains that ran side by side, making for a one-of-a-kind ride. He assured that the coaster would be exciting enough to draw big crowds. “It’s going to give you thrills,” Osterhoudt said. “The secret to the ride is in the trains. It allows them to do tricks with the amount of movement you’re going to get on the ride. That puts the thrill factor over the

FoR RENT

top… The record on this one is going to be on the ticket sales. It’s going to literally smoke anything out there.” He added that the structure would be able to withstand storms and earthquakes as the original did throughout its 38 years in existence. Rebuilding the Cyclone Racer would also give Long Beach the economic drive that it needs by providing a unique attraction unlike any other, Osterhoudt said. “Every city needs a ‘wow factor’ type of attraction to pull tourists in there, and Long Beach took theirs out unfortunately,” he said. “I sincerely feel that, if this thing’s put back in there, this thing is not going to be the talk of Long Beach, it’s going to be the talk of the whole Los Angeles area and the country. You’re going to be getting people coming from all around the world wanting to ride this thing.” Todd Muilenburg, a lifelong Long Beach resident, said he remembers ditching school in the late 1950s to spend the entire day riding the original Cyclone Racer for just 25 cents a ride. He added, though, that he’s still on the fence about the project. “Those were good memories,” Muilenburg said. “I don’t know where this is going to go … I hope they do well, but I haven’t really made a decision.” Other residents, however, lauded the proposal, stating that the ride would attract tourists to the city and breathe life into the Pike area in downtown that currently only has a “fake” roller coaster structure. “I think it would be a great benefit for Long Beach,” said Scott Evanskey, a Long Beach resident. “You can go almost anywhere in Long Beach and feel like, ‘hey, this is my town; this is a part of me,’ and that’s why we need to have something like this back, just for the thrill of riding the thing too.” ß

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CAMS students have the option to take aerospace-engineering classes at the California Academy of Mathematics and Science (CAMS).

‘gel’ together as a unique group,” Williams said. He described their distinct advantage of being on a college campus. “They see college kids there who want to be there,” Williams said. “They see college kids doing homework…that environment becomes very rich in terms of what transpires [there].” Several people appeared who before the Board’s October meeting expressed concerns and opposition to the District proposal to eventually close down Hill Middle School. teacher Aerospace-engineering students concentrate on their work Hill Heather Valdespino in a classroom at the California Academy of Mathematics particularly and Science (CAMS). opposed the plan, “Closing a school is never a arguing that a cap last year on the enrollment number of 6th-graders good thing,” Torres said in a was responsible for the declining Wednesday phone interview. “But we’ve had some changes in some of numbers at Hill. “As a former CAMS student…I the Long Beach schools over the do love the model of CAMS,” she last several years. One thing that is said at the Board of Education meet- solid and in writing is the contracts, ing, “And I was very proud to be a which is good for our members.” Torres added that credentials, as student there, and I believe that’s why I’m here today. But CAMS well as seniority in the district, will never had to shut down schools in be considered. The proposal for a new CAMSorder for it to exist.” The District has closed a few like school includes facelift schools in the last several years, and changes recommended to transform the union representing the teachers the campus on Iroquois Avenue. already has contracts in place that The gym will come down, and two deal with displacement. Virginia Tor- new classrooms will be added, res, who serves as the president of according to Steinhauser. There the Teachers Association of Long will also be new parking spaces. Beach, says that the union is pre- Measure K funds will pay for the pared to assist teachers through the project, which is estimated to cost about $6.5 million. ß process.

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dle-school students to finish the 6th, 7th and 8th grades at Hill. Christopher Steinhauser, who serves as the superintendent of Schools, said in a report to the Board that Hill Classical Middle School had declining enrollment. Steinhauser described how CAMS has hundreds of prospective school applicants who must be turned away because the school can only accept

schools, described how the new specialized high school in Long Beach will emulate the CAMS model which partners with CSUDH. “The idea is that their curriculums and offerings will be close to the same as possible,” Davis said in a telephone interview last week. The new campus should not affect any of the operations of the original CAMS program. Brown said that he hoped that the new school will also be “progressive.” “One of the things with thematic high schools that I see is that you’ve got to be constantly looking at, ‘What are we preparing our students for?’” Brown said. “I think STEM is a good one for us because a lot of the future careers are going to be in science, technology, engineering and math. To just replicate CAMS because it’s worked, I think, would be a mistake.” He explained that it would be better to replicate the parts of CAMS that do work and also look to prepare kids for what may come 10 years from now. While the curriculums may be very similar, the new high school in east Long Beach may eventually offer one distinct advantage over the original CAMS, which is located in the city of Carson. Davis said that while it is an LBUSD school, CAMS has students representing 10 school districts. He explained that this new school will also be an LBUSD school, but the majority of the students will be Long Beach residents. There will, however, still be some spots available in this new school for students who don’t live in the LBUSD. The District’s Board of Education unanimously approved the proposal. Board Member Felton Williams, seemed enthusiastic about the change. He is a former administrator of CAMS, and he had fond memories of his days at the academy, where he saw students flourish on its campus. “We now see that these kids that come from all over the city really

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about 175 students every year. “We have literally hundreds of students who would love to go to that school that can’t because there’s no space,” Steinhauser told the Board. The new high school that will eventually take over the site located at 1100 Iroquois Ave. is in a key location in Long Beach. It’s very close to California State University, Long Beach. Peter Davis, who serves as the assistant superintendent of secondary

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562-498-8788 • 3225 E. Pacific Coast Highway • LB

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does all flow here.” Recent efforts to add bike trails, restore wetlands and “activate” the riverfront have attracted interest from residents, preservationists and business leaders, according to the staff report. “The LA River still carries snowmelt from the Santa [Susana] Mountains, just as it did 200 years ago, but it has been neglected throughout the region,” according to Long Beach city staff. “Residents wishing to engage in recreational activities along its banks or in its currents will find many obstacles, including trash and other pollution, overgrowth, potentially unsafe individuals loitering or living along the river and a variety of bureaucratic and legal barriers.” A movement to clean up the river has recently taken hold, throughout the region, particularly in the city of Los Angeles, as residents, environmental advocates and elected officials have started to show interest in restoring the river’s natural habitat as much as possible. This effort may involve: “maintaining a water level more appropriate for recreation; cleaning the trash and pollution in the river; adding additional publicsafety resources to the river’s publically accessible areas; maintaining the landscape more consistently; and allowing recreational use on a regular basis,” according to the staff report. In Long Beach, Mayor Bob Foster has already led a charge to install catch basins and other technology to capture trash and prevent it from reaching the city’s beaches. Long Beach also has a

10-year-old River Link plan that serves as a blueprint for future restoration and development along the river. The plan, according to city staff, “is in need of an update” to include “new restoration efforts, wetlands projects, changes to the I710 Freeway Project and the adaptive reuse of the Shoemaker Bridge.” The City of Los Angeles, in collaboration with Friends of the Los Angeles River (FoLAR) and other community groups have also started efforts to “reclaim” the northern stretches of the LA River and its surrounding lands for use by kayakers, hikers, birdwatchers, educa-

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tional groups, cyclists and others. Garcia is hosting a “Restore the River in Long Beach Forum” on Saturday, Nov. 16 at 11am at the Jenny Oropeza Community Center at Cesar Chavez Park located at 401 Golden Ave. The forum is expected to serve as a kick-off event to encourage residents to clean up the Los Angeles River and better utilize it for recreation and education. The forum is open to the public and will explore the river’s current conditions, potential reclamation methods, projects and the benefits to the public. ß

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Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

One of the goals of a recently proposed effort to “reclaim” the Los Angeles River is to help bring natural habitats and wetlands back to the waterway.

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