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Manhattan Beach mural 2007, by Art Mortimer

See page 12

VoL. 35 No. 3

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Today is the first day of summer

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Signal Hill City Council passes balanced budget for Fiscal Year 2013-2014, approves one-time expenditures

Sean Belk Staff Writer

includes $35.8 million in operating expenses. No comments were made during the public-comment portion of the Council item, which Mayor Michael Noll said was “a first.” City Manager Ken Farfsing said the budget reflects a “continuing slow improvement of the local, statewide and national economy,” adding that the budget has been “slowly returning to pre-Great Recession lev-

The Signal Hill City Council passed a balanced budget for Fiscal Year 2013-2014 during its June 18 meeting, approving capital-improvement projects and a long list of “decision packages,” or one-time expenditures, for various city departments. But city management remains cautious about revenue forecasts going forward and see COUNCIL page 14 added that labor costs and expenses for new State-mandated environmental programs are expected to rise in coming years. The City estimates a General Fund budget surplus of $20,179 when fund transfers and one-time revenues are added to the budget. The City anticipates total General Fund revenues of more than $18 million and expenditures of more than $17.9 million. When combinSean Belk/Signal Tribune ing all funds, the Ron Sylvester (left), chair of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender City’s entire budget (LGBT) Center in Long Beach, shakes the hand of Signal Hill Mayor for next fiscal year Michael Noll after receiving a proclamation from the City and Senator that starts July 1 Ricardo Lara’s office during the June 18 City Council meeting.

June 21, 2013

Long Beach Free School aims to encourage ‘life-long learning’ in an unconventional format

Courtesy LB Free School

The Long Beach Free School will offer a variety of classes, including graphic design and a “youth-empowerment workshop,” in its first term, which will run from July 7 through Aug. 17.

Leonardo Poareo

from the traditional approach, such as the massive open online courses (MOOC) and other, more community-oriented, free schools. One of these latter options in the Long Beach area is this school. With a de-emphasis on conventional education methods such as grades and tests, the Long Beach Free School, whose first term runs from

Editorial intern

So many people are eager to learn, but with the much-publicized woes of the public education system in the U.S., it’s getting more and more difficult for people to satisfy their craving for knowledge. Fortunately for them, there are now more free educational options popping up that diverge

July 7 to Aug. 17, aims to strengthen the community and encourage learning for its own sake. “We’re trying to take a really open approach, and I like to look at it more as skill-sharing and the teachers more as facilitators, so that everyone’s involved in the learning process,” said Rachael Rifkin,

City leaders concentrate on push to regulate north Long Beach liquor stores CJ Dablo Staff Writer

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

This August, the Long Beach City Council will consider an ordinance that will ultimately require the owners of specific types of liquor stores to make key upgrades to their buildings and signage. If the ordinance is approved, city staff will begin implementation in north Long Beach, and owners of shops like this one on Atlantic Avenue will be notified of the new requirements.

The liquor stores are all over Long Beach. Their neighborhoods may have changed, but the ubiquitous shops that claimed their own spots on the city landscape decades ago weren’t required to change much. Unlike other new businesses that moved into the city later, many of these stores weren’t required to apply for a conditional-use permit that allows them to sell beer, wine and other distilled spirits. A proposed ordinance that targets the small liquor stores that carry what’s called the “Type 21” licenses is scheduled to be reviewed by the City Council in August. Supported by a number of residents and neighborhood advocates who are deeply critical of the number of liquor stores throughout the city and especially on the north end of town, city councilmembers from north Long Beach raised the concern that these shops are attracting the wrong kind of attention. Com-

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June 21 through June 25, 2013 Tuesday

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Please RSVP to 494-5300

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plaints of loitering, public fighting, drunkenness and a host of other problems that occupy police resources are often associated with the liquor stores, according to staff reports. Two Long Beach city councilmembers hope to address the problem of crime by requiring that store owners make significant improvements to their buildings and commit to keeping their property clean and safe. Ninth District Councilmember Steven Neal, who cosponsored the proposed ordinance with 8th District Councilmember Al Austin, says that the overall concentration of liquor stores in Long Beach does not create an atmosphere that is conducive to economic development, and economic development is badly needed in his region. “If we’re ever going to improve infrastructure and the real quality of life for our residents,” Neal said in a telephone interview last week, “[we] have to be able to draw busisee LIQUOR STORES page 15


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2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JUNE 21, 2013

Escape from Planet Earth 7/29 - Seaside 7/31 - McArthur 8/2 - Heartwell

Hotel Transylvania 7/8 - Scherer 7/10 - Vets 7/12 - Wardlow

Thunderstruck 8/12 - King 8/14 - Ramona 8/16 - Silverado

Madagascar 3 6/24 - Signal Hill Park 6/26 - AK 6/28 - Bixby

Rise of the Guardians 7/1 - Somerset 7/3 Recreation 7/5 - Chavez

Wreck-it Ralph 7/22 - Pan Am 7/24 - College Estates 7/26 - Houghton

Paranorman 8/5 - Deforest 8/7 - Drake 8/9 - Whaley

The Lorax 7/15 - Coolidge 7/17 - Stearns 7/19 - Signal Hill Park Let it Shine 8/19 - Orizaba 8/21 - Grace 8/23 - McBride

The Odd Life of Timothy Green 8/26 - Cherry 8/28 - El Dorado


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NEWS

JUNE 21, 2013

Suspect convicted of trespassing after police find stolen property at Bixby Knolls bike shop

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Luis Alberto Cortez, 22, of Signal Hill, was convicted of criminal trespassing in connection with stolen property found by police at The Workshop, a Bixby Knolls bike shop at 4250 Atlantic Ave., last month, according to court records obtained by the Signal Tribune. Cortez, who was originally charged under the last name Orozco, was arrested along with Jesus Emmanuel Rojas, 28, of Long Beach on May 5 after police recovered more than $20,000 worth of stolen property.

Cortez was served an arrest warrant and originally charged with one count of receiving stolen property and another count of trespassing and refusing to leave, according to court records. Police officials confirmed that Rojas was charged with burglary, adding that detectives were investigating whether the incident was related to other commercial burglaries reported in the area. Court records for Rojas could not be immediately obtained. In a May 8 court hearing, Cortez pleaded not guilty to receiving stolen property, and the charge was eventually dismissed.

Cortez, however, pleaded guilty to criminal trespassing, which is a misdemeanor, of which he was convicted. He was ordered to serve 24 days in county jail and three years probation. The court also ordered Cortez to stay away from the bike shop. Long Beach police spokesperson Cynthia Arrona said via email that one of the two suspects in the case is a friend of the owner of the business. Shawn Moore, who owns the bike shop and Long Beach Clothing Company, did not return phone calls by the Signal Tribune seeking comment.

The Campaign Trail

The Wine Crush, 3201 Marna Ave., will host a wine-tasting/fundraising reception for Long Beach mayoral candidate Gerrie Schipske on Sunday, June 3 from 3pm to 5pm. Contributions for the event are $25 per person and $40 per couple.

Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Long Beach) released a statement last Saturday following the passage of the State budget. “Today is a historic day for California. For the second year in a row, we have a budget that is on time, and for the first time in recent history, our budget is once again reinvesting in the services, programs and jobs our state needs to fully recover,” he said. “This budget makes meaningful progress in improving programs that help families striving for the middle class by making good-paying jobs accessible through the welfare-to-work program. This budget expands Medi-Cal to cover some 1.4 million Californians starting next year. Additionally, this budget prioritizes the education of our future workforce through the creation and funding of the ‘Middle Class Scholarship’ program for California college students. Undoubtedly, today is a success for working families, students and the future of our state.” The budget bill is balanced, establishes a $1.1 billion reserve, aggressively pays down state debt and makes critical, targeted restorations of some of the worst cuts made during the recent recession. The State budget and its trailer bills now head to Gov. Jerry Brown to await his signature. For more information, visit senate.ca.gov/lara .

metro.net metro.n etro.net

Turnstiles will be latched latched Turnstiles mid-June. starting mid-J

CANINE FUN What Dog show Who Great Western Terrier Association Where Queen Mary Events Park, 1126 Queens Hwy. When Friday, June 21 and Saturday, June 22 from 8am to 5pm More Info Event will be free. Parking cost will be $15 per vehicle. Call (323) 727-0136.

SELL YOUR STUFF What Big community yard sale Who The Office of 6th District Councilmember Dee Andrews Where Martin Luther King, Jr. Park, 1950 Lemon Ave. When Saturday, June 22 from 8am to 2pm More Info Residents may sell furniture, desks, tools, music instruments, electronics, baby items, household items, clothing, kitchen items, books, bikes, holiday decorations and lawn equipment. The cost is $20 per space to sell items. Call (562) 570-6816.

BOOKING AROUND What Book signing Who Author Raul Delgado Where Phil Traini's, 3490 Long Beach Blvd. When Sunday, June 23 from noon to 4pm More Info Raul Delgado will present his book Ghosts of 1968. The book is an account of his experiences during and after the Vietnam War.

MEET AND EAT What Supper club Who Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association When Monday, July 1 at 6:30pm Where Aura Thai, 4085 Atlantic Ave. More Info Bixby Knolls Supper Club is the simple concept of supporting local restaurants on a Monday night, which is typically a slow night. Residents are invited to meet, eat and support the local economy. RSVP required. Email supperclub@bixbyknollsinfo.com .

Starting latching Sta ti JJune 19, 2013, Metro M tro will begin latchin the turnstiles at Metro tro Rail stations. When latched, turnstiles will open only with a valid TAP card. Whatever type of fare you’re using – single ride, pass or transfer from another system – it must be loaded on a TAP card to ride any Metro Rail line.

LAW ENFORCEMENT 4-1-1 What Citizens Police Academy Who Signal Hill Police Department Where Signal Hill Police Station, 2745 Walnut Ave. When Tuesday, July 9 from 7pm to 9pm More Info The Citizens Police Academy is a 10-week program in which attendees will learn about patrol operations, criminal law, the court system, narcotics enforcement, investigative techniques, crime prevention, emergency dispatch procedures, and many other areas of law enforcement. Participation is available to anyone over the age of 21. Additional qualifications include no pending criminal case or felony convictions. Email Sergeant Cravens at rcravens@signalhillpd.org or call (562) 989-7222, ext 5046.

For complete details aand a schedule showing when hen each station will be latched, latch visit metro.net.

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CLEAN SWEEP What Neighborhood cleanup Who The Friendship Neighborhood Where Cesar Chavez Park, 401 Golden Ave. When Saturday, July 13 at 11am More Info The Friendship Neighborhood hosts neighborhood cleanups on the second Saturday of every month. Cleanups begin at Cesar Chavez Park and end at Drake Park. Email friendshipneighborhood@gmail.com or call (562) 270-5463.

COME HEAR THE MUSIC What Peninsula Summer Concerts in the Park. Who City of Long Beach Where 7201 E. Ocean Blvd. When Sunday, July 14 from 5pm to 7:30pm More Info Gregg Young & the 2nd Street Band will perform. Event will be free. Call (562) 433-4858.

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A reminder from the Signal Tribune

COME RUMMAGE AROUND What Rummage sale Who Covenant Presbyterian Church Where 607 E. 3rd St. When Friday, June 21 and Saturday, June 22 from 8am to 4pm More Info All proceeds will benefit Rising TIDE, an after-school drop-in program. Call (562) 437-0958, ext 25.

HAVE FUN FOR A GOOD CAUSE What Variety show and concert fundraiser Who Meals on Wheels and Rock for Vets Where Long Beach Scottish Rite, 855 Elm St. When Saturday, June 29 from 2pm to 5pm More Info Event will include a silent auction, raffles, and more. Gourmet food trucks will be present. Tickets cost $25. Visit mowlb.org .

Source: Lara’s office

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GARNISHING YOUR GARMENTS What General meeting Who The Long Beach Chapter of the Embroiderers Guild of America Where California Heights United Methodist Church, 3759 Orange Ave. When Friday, June 28 beginning at 10:30am More Info The Chapter meets the fourth Friday of every month. Guests are welcome and requested to donate $2.

attention n Metro Rail Riders

r regular egul ar

Lara applauds passage of state budget

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

STEPPING STONES TO EMPLOYMENT What Training class Who Disabled Resources Center, Inc. Where 2750 E. Spring St., Suite #100 When Tuesday, July 16 from 1pm to 2:30pm More Info The classes will focus on interpersonal communication skills and disability etiquette. Call Andrew at (562) 427-1000, Ext. 23.


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OPINION

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JUNE 21, 2013

Thoughts from the Publisher

by Neena Strichart

Recently, I have felt as though I am in a world filled with a whirlwind of fundraisers. There are so many great local charities in need that it is difficult to say no, as long as my budget holds out. A month or so ago I was attending my third charity event of the week. Standing with door-prize tickets clutched in my hand, I puzzled over why the numbers being read as winners were nowhere even near the numbers in my hot little hand. Ah, revelation, the tickets in hand were from the event the night before. In all the hubbub I had merely dropped the losing tickets in my purse instead of tossing them into the trash. Luckily, I quickly retrieved the correct stubs from a pocket in my handbag and found that I was indeed the winner of a rather impressive basket geared for outdoor patio dining. We all know how hard volunteers work to plan festivities in order to add dollars to their coffers. Most of those types of events include some sort of entertainment, food, wine (yippee) silent auctions and/or raffle/drawings/chances/door prizes, or whatever term is appropriate these days to keep it all legal. A couple of weeks ago, the Friends of Long Beach Animals hosted a benefit for the animals at the Long Beach Playhouse. This particular event featured all the expected elements for a successful fundraiser, except one. This charity event included a performance of Little Shop of Horrors (LSOH), a ghoulishly fun musical that takes place in a failing Skid Row florist shop. Besides visiting with attendees, partaking of the refreshments and participating in the various drawings, experiencing this top-notch production during the event made this fundraiser a winner in my eyes. Having seen the movie version of LSOH as well as another theatre’s interpretation several years ago, I was anxious to see what our local Playhouse would do with the storyline and songs. I was not disappointed. Although I wish some of the female playPhoto by Jonathan Lewis ers’ voices had projected a bit more volume, all in all it was an incredibly enjoyable Stephen Lydic as Seymour and Theresa Finamore as Audrey evening. For those of you who didn’t attend the fundraiser and haven’t had the chance to see LSOH at the Long Beach Playhouse, take a look at the press release below. I think nitrous oxide-inhaling dentist is just one of Audrey II’s gustatory delights as she eats you’ll be pleased to know it isn’t too late to experience an entertaining theatre produc- her way through Seymour’s friends and acquaintances. When botanists want to make cuttings to send all over the world, Seymour discovers the truth about Audrey II and tion at reasonable prices, and practically in your own back yard. knows he must stop her before it’s too late. Admission for adults is $24, seniors $21, and students $14. Tickets are available at Due to popular demand the Playhouse will be extending their run of Little Shop of Horrors one extra weekend! Friday, June 28 and Saturday, June 29 at 8pm Audrey II lbplayhouse.org, or by calling (562) 494-1014, option 1. Long Beach Playhouse is located at 5021 E. Anaheim St. Performances are 8pm will be taking another bite out of the Mainstage scenery. Seymour, a down-and-out Skid Row floral assistant becomes an overnight sensation Fridays and Saturdays and 2pm Sundays. The box office is open Wednesday through when he discovers an exotic plant with a mysterious craving for fresh blood. Soon Saturday from 3pm to 8pm, and Sundays from 1pm to 2pm on scheduled matinees Audrey II grows into an ill-tempered, foul-mouthed, R&B-singing carnivore who only. For more information or to purchase tickets visit lbplayhouse.org or call (562) offers him fame and fortune in exchange for feeding her growing appetite. A sadistic, 494-1014.

C O M M E N TA RY

AB 880 will severely harm tourism, manufacturing, construction, restaurants and more By Randy Gordon President/CEO, Long Beach Chamber of Commerce

Today (Tuesday, June 18), a broad group of Long Beach and South Bay business leaders came together to encourage legislators to oppose Assembly Bill 880 (Gomez). AB 880 will harm the region’s economic recovery in addition to nearly every industry in California, including manufacturing, construction, tourism, restaurants and more. Specifically, AB 880 will mandate a new costly government program on top of the federal Affordable Care Act forcing new severe financial penalties on employers who employ part-time workers– including seasonal– who work eight hours a week or more at a time. This legislation will have far-reaching consequences and limit job growth, and further harm local recovering economies. Long Beach and South Bay business leaders participating in the press conference at Long Beach Chamber of Commerce to oppose AB 880 included: Weston LaBar of the

Redondo Beach Chamber of Commerce, Brian Rosario of the Torrance Chamber of Commerce, Tracy Rafter of the Los Angeles County Business Federation, the Latin Business Association and the Greater Los Angeles African American Chamber of Commerce. At a time when our local economies are slowly recovering, we do not need legislation that is a double tax to employers that will send more people to welfare than to work. Assembly Bill 880 would severely cripple our local economy and harm our core businesses. This legislation will provide no additional healthcare coverage to our residents but it will add unnecessary and severe penalties discouraging job growth and investment in this region. “AB 880 will hurt working families, as it will penalize California employers that offer part-time or seasonal jobs to people in need,” said Brian Rosario, Government Affairs ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

Coordinator with the Torrance Chamber of Commerce. “This legislation will discourage employers who hire many individuals who have little job training and experience. And what’s even worse is that AB 880 unfairly punishes employers who offer health care coverage but whose employees still elect to use Medi-Cal.” Even UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education Ken Jacobs said in KQED on The California Report last week, “Cutting to parttime would entail much greater costs than the penalty on employers,” said Jacobs. “They’ve got greater hiring costs, more turnover, more supervision costs, more unemployment insurance costs. It’s not worth it.” (http://blogs.kqed.org/stateofhealth/2013/06/13/will-proposedobamacare-fines-help-or-hurt-californi a-workers) The coalition opposing AB 880 agrees– AB 880 is not worth it. AB 880 will force larger employers

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

ASSISTANT EDITOR/STAFF WRITER

Sean Belk

Barbie Ellisen

COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

Shoshanah Siegel

Organizations opposed to AB 880 represent nearly every industry in the state including: California Farm Bureau, California Attractions and Parks Association, Hispanic 100, Orange County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, California Restaurant Association, California Retailers Association, Western Growers, Nisei Farmers League, Latin Business Association, UniteAg, California Chamber of Commerce, California Trucking Association, California Travel Association, California Grocers Association, California Manufacturers and Technology Association, California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce, California Business Properties Association, California Lodging Industry Association, and many more. MORE INFORMATION 880hurts.com

Leighanna Nierle

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

CULTURE WRITER

STAFF WRITER

CJ Dablo

even if an employee refuses the benefit and opts to use Medi-Cal.

DESIGN EDITOR

Cory Bilicko

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Jane Fallon

to pay an estimated additional penalty between $6,000 and $15,000 to the state for any employee who works eight hours or more a week including seasonal or temporary employees– and chooses to use Medi-Cal. The additional penalty is on top of another penalty that the federal healthcare program already requires. Other key components include: • Penalizes companies, nonprofits, and other organizations that have employee(s) including part-time, temporary, or seasonal employees enrolled in Medi-Cal. The penalty is 110 percent of the average cost of health care including both the employer and employee share of the premium. • No penalty exemptions for the use of temporary or seasonal employees, which is common in industries such as trucking, agriculture, manufacturing and construction and many other vital industries. • Penalizes employers who offer healthcare insurance to employees

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

Vicki Paris Goodman

Tanya Paz

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Ariana Gastelum Leonardo Poareo Brandy Soto

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

ADMINISTRATIVE INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


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NEWS

JUNE 21, 2013

Officials warn seniors to guard financial, personal information from scam artists

Sean Belk

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

5

victims of elder abuse, which has been called “a crime It sounds good enough at first. You of the 21st Century.” receive a check in the mail that you have It is estimated that won a sweepstakes. The only requireone in 10 seniors ment is that you send a payment to cover nationwide will fees and taxes. By the time you figure become victims of out it’s a scam, however, it might be too some form of “physlate. ical, emotional or Identity theft and elder financial financial abuse,” abuse are on the rise, and these days senhowever most of iors need to be cautious about giving them will “suffer in anyone their personal or financial inforsilence” because, mation by phone, mail or email, said “for every case of local officials during the Senior Scamreported elder abuse, Prevention Seminar on Friday, June 14 at at least five more go the El Dorado Park Community Center. unreported,” states a “There are few emergencies in life flier from LowenPhotos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune that require us to give out money or perthal’s office. sonal identification immediately,” said From left: Dawnnesha Smith, community outreach manager for the Los Angeles County Department Whitmore Darlene Whitmore, a Long Beach police of Consumer Affairs; El Cid de Ramos, a specialist assistant from the Los Angeles County Assessor’s described cases in detective. “Before you sign important office; Rosemary Lewallen, coordinator for the Long Beach Elder Abuse Prevention Team; and Darwhich elderly people documents or wire money, take the time lene Whitmore, a Long Beach police detective, participate in a panel discussion during the Senior had their bank to call a friend, a neighbor or use the accounts nearly Scam-Prevention Seminar on Friday, June 14 in Long Beach at the El Dorado Community Center. Internet to Google it or even call the wiped out, and some [police department] to ask our opinhad the deed to their Another emerging scam is related to a payment to cover associated fees and ion… If it sounds too good to be true, it homes taken away from them. Once taxes. Victims are told to wire the pay- the Affordable Care Act, also known as probably is.” money is transferred to an overseas ment to a bank account that is usually Obamacare, the national healthcare Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenaccount, however, the local police are no located outside of the United States. reform law slated to go into full effect on thal, who was unable to attend the event longer able to investigate for criminal Later, however, the victim finds out the Jan. 1, said Dawnnesha Smith, commudue to budget deliberations in Sacraprosecution, she said. check is counterfeit or stolen, Whitmore nity outreach manager for the Los Angemento, sponsored the seminar that Elder financial abuse mainly pertains said. les County Department of Consumer included a panel of local officials, who to larceny, embezzlement, forgery, Capitalizing on natural disasters such Affairs, which investigates complaints described harrowing cases of elder fraud-related crimes and identity as Hurricane Sandy, “disaster scams” are and consumer-fraud cases in the county, theft against a person over 65 also a regular occurrence these days, she working with prosecuting agencies and years of age or a dependent adult, said. The crime involves scammers, who local law-enforcement. Whitmore said. She said theft is fraudulently solicit donations for aid. With enrollment in state healthcare defined as the taking of personal Others may contact seniors by mail, coverage plans opening in October, property from anyone without his email or phone, claiming that their clos- there are already reports of scammers or her consent. est living relative is among those who calling seniors claiming to enroll them One type of scam of which perished in the disaster, and that the vic- in healthcare plans, only to obtain their seniors should be aware, she said, tim is the recipient of an insurance set- personal and financial information over is “sweepstakes swindles” in tlement. the phone, she said. Smith said phone which a senior may have been The victim may make a payment to calls from government agencies are not mailed a check worth large sums cover fees or taxes or provide bank- expected, and the State has a form for of money (from hundreds of thou- account information, so settlement members to fill out online through the sands of dollars to $2 million). money can be electronically transferred Covered California website. The checks may look official into the victim’s account. But the sus“Watch out and be careful,” she said. Anthony Attia, social worker for Adult Protective Services of Los Angeles County, and indicate the recipient is the pect then can access the victim’s account “Be very leery of anyone calling you discusses how to prevent elder abuse during the Senior Scam-Prevention Seminar winner of a cash prize, but they without the victim’s knowledge, Whit- and saying they’re going to enroll you last Friday. Although chairs were set up for 150 people, only a handful showed up also often include instructions for more said. see SCAMS page 18 for the event. Staff Writer

abuse and provided tips and resources on how to prevent such scams. Even though last year’s Elder Abuse Symposium, also sponsored by Lowenthal, drew a crowd of about 225 people, only a handful of people showed up to the symposium last week while 150 chairs were set up. Lowenthal’s representatives said the “lower-than-average attendance” was likely because of conflicting events but added that the Assemblymember’s office nixed sending out mailers this year and only advertised the event through online notifications and fliers provided at senior centers. Whitmore, who handles financial elder abuse for the Long Beach Police Department, said she was “disappointed” with the low turnout because she had intended to alert more seniors to be aware of scams, hoping they would share the information with family and friends. “I actually hoped there would be more people out there I could scare,” she said. “As you heard from these stories, we hope to intend to scare you with a lot of what’s going on so you can be informed not only for yourself but for others as well.” Speaking in a pre-recorded video, Lowenthal said, each year, nearly a quarter of a million Californians become


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6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE COMMUNITY JUNE 21, 2013 Lovelace was Korean War Pro surfers visit patients of Miller Children’s Hospital Long Beach veteran, grandfather of 22

Edward “Papa” Lovelace passed away at his home on June 12, 2013, at the age of 83, after a long battle with cancer. Lovelace was born on Dec. 8, 1929 and grew up in Lompoc, California. He joined the Navy and was a veteran of the Korean War. He married Mary Orr and they proceeded to start their family in Long Beach, ending up with eight chil-

Lives Lived

Councilmember Andrews to host neighborhood tree-planting

Source: Bill Lovelace

George Kaloian 85 Paul Guy Ford Jr 60 Carol Elizabeth Dalrymple 74 Caroline Greer 70 Grace Hagemann 86 Franceasker Reed 45 omas Deener 61 Albert Charles Stone 87 William Saunders 61 Joe Garcia 66 Dirk Simon Haye lll 68 Kerry-Rae Frances Perkins 53 Shirley Wilson 63 e families were assisted by McKenzie Mortuary. For more details on service dates and times, contact (562) 961-9301

dren. He retired after working 34 years at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard. Lovelace loved spending time with his large family. He was also very involved in church activities. His passions included fishing and scroll sawing. He is survived by his sons Jeff (Liz), Mark, Matt (Joan), Rich, Mitch, Bill (Sue), and Terry (Gabby); his daughter Mary Jo; 22 grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. A memorial mass and reception will take place at 11am on Friday, June 21 at St. Cornelius Church, 5500 E. Wardlow Rd. In lieu of flowers, donations should be sent to the American Cancer Society.

Local professional surfers Hans Hagen from Laguna Beach and Brad Ettinger from Huntington Beach spent time getting to know patients in the playroom at Miller Children’s Hospital Long Beach on Wednesday, June 12. The Mauli Ola Foundation brought professional surfers Brad Ettinger, Hans Hagen, Eli Olson and Koa Rothman, as well as mixed-martial arts fighter Brian “T-City” Ortega to Miller Children’s for a special visit and art workshop. With gifts in tow, the group of athletes spent time in several playrooms getting patients excited for summer, while distracting them from hospitalization. Each patient received autographed posters and a hat designed Courtesy Miller Children’s by professional surfer Kalani Robb. The hats were created specifically Brad Ettinger spends time getting to know 7-year-old Kayla during an art workfor hospitalized children to decorate shop in the Miller West playroom at Miller Children’s. in their own style representing their our tour is themed the Aloha Tour,” Children’s are signed up to particiunique personalities. In the Miller says Bobby Serna, surf experience pate in the Foundation’s surf-expeWest playroom, Hagen and Ettinger director of the Mauli Ola Founda- rience day in Santa Monica later this helped patients customize their hats tion. “At the end of the day, we’re summer. during the art workshop. on this Earth to support one another “Hospitalization for a child is Miller Children’s was the first with Aloha.” hard at any time of year, especially stop in Southern California on the The Mauli Ola Foundation during the summer,” says Rita Mauli Ola Foundation’s 2013 began as a group of surfers who Goshert, child life manager at Miller Aloha Tour, which was created to banded together to introduce surfing Children’s. “Special visits like the cheer up patients in children’s hos- as a natural treatment to people with one from the Mauli Ola Foundation pitals across the nation who are too cystic fibrosis and later expanded its lift our patient’s spirits and can sick to make it to the beach. reach with hospital visits and other really make a difference, even if just “The joy we get from sharing activities that touch the lives of kids for that moment, in the lives of our Aloha with the patients at Miller’s with cancer and other health chal- patients and their families.” Children’s and all the children’s hos- lenges. Several patients from the pitals we visit around the nation each Cystic Fibrosis Program at Miller Source: Miller Children’s year is immeasurable, which is why

Sixth District Councilmember Dee Andrews, along with the Office of Sustainable, and Mental Health America, will host a neighborhood tree-planting, from 10am to 2pm on Friday, June 21 at 1871 Locust Ave. As part of the tree-planting program, neighbors of the Midtown area of Long Beach will plant about 30

trees over three street blocks. The trees will be planted from the 1800 block through the 2000 block of Locust Avenue. Volunteers are welcome. Street tree coordinators will gather at 1871 Locust Avenue for a demonstration on how to properly plant a tree. Participants will work in teams of two to

three people and are advised to wear boots and gloves, with no open-toe shoes or bare hands. Coordinators are also encouraging planters to bring tools like shovels, pruning shears, sharp knives, brooms and rakes. “Long Beach is becoming a more environmentally sustainable place to live, work and visit,” Andrews said. “I

encourage all of Long Beach to make an easy investment in our city by learning how to plant, preserve and protect their neighborhood trees.” To volunteer or acquire more information about getting a free tree, call (562) 570-6816.

Signal Hill-based Mitchell Land and Improvement Company announced this week the remodel of Naples Center Building located at 5855 Naples Plaza and the Naples Medical Center located at 5865 Naples Plaza. The Naples Center Building has three stories of office space in the heart of the Belmont Shore/Naples Island business center. Built originally in 1964, this newly renovated property is located at the corner of

2nd Street and Naples Plaza. There are 50 units in the building with offices ranging in size from single room offices to two-, three-, fourand five-room suites. The transformation of the buildings includes a “facelift” that incorporates stone, tile and resin products on the exterior walls. The interior has been updated with indirect and can lighting, tile floors and new restrooms. A previous drive-through breezeway has been converted into a

rear-entry lobby, accessible restrooms and areas for tenant storage. The office building has been made energy-efficient through exterior sunshades, an air-space ventilation system behind the new façade and a new, energy-efficient HVAC system. The landscape, designed by Jon Cicchetti, has been completely transformed by Salco Landscape with drought-tolerant plant materials and a low-volume irrigation system. The

landscape won the Naples Garden Club Beautification Award in March 2013– the first time the award has been given to a commercial building. Environ Architects designed the remodel, and Kelty Co. General Contractors performed the construction. There will be an open house in the 5855 building on Tuesday, June 25, from 11am to 2pm. Lunch and refreshments will be served. Tenants and the public are invited. Available suites will be open for viewing. Contact Fred Stuart or Joyce Quinn at (562) 987-5000 for more information.

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ST3503 - June 21_Layout 1 6/21/13 11:50 AM Page 7

NEWS

JUNE 21, 2013

Signal Hill Police Capt. Ron Mark retiring to take position at CSULB’s criminal-justice department

Sean Belk Staff Writer

After more than 30 years in law enforcement, Signal Hill Police Capt. Ron Mark is retiring to work full-time in higher education. But he won’t be too far away. Mark, who is leaving the department next month, plans to stay involved in public service, only in a more behind-the-scenes role as director of the Center for Criminal Justice Research & Training at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB). Sitting at his desk that now has a window view at the Signal Hill Police Department’s newly built headquarters, Mark told the Signal Tribune on Tuesday that his new position was an opportunity he couldn’t refuse. “I went through the testing process and was fortunate enough to be appointed into the job,” he said. It’s one of those once-in-a-lifetime things. It doesn’t come up very often. The last guy was in there for 10 years, and he left because he was sick. It was an opportunity I couldn’t say no to.” First working for the Gardena Police Department for nearly 25 years, Mark climbed the ranks from cadet when he was 19 to police officer in 1984. He was promoted to sergeant five years later and then lieutenant in 2000. In Gardena, Mark took on a wide range of duties, including working as field-training officer, staff instructor for the sheriff’s academy and SWAT team operator, supervisor and commander, among other positions. In October 2006, Mark joined the Signal Hill Police Department as operations captain when the department had two captains. He later

assumed responsibility for both captain positions after the department reorganized its staff. For the past nearly seven years, the husband and father of two children worked many details and special assignments. He was also instrumental in helping the City to complete a disaster plan and in 2007 spearheaded a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training program. That same year, Mark was heavily involved in reinstituting the police department’s Explorer program, which had been nonexistent for a number of years. He said some Explorers, who are 14 to 21 years old and are required to pass an academytraining program and other reviews, have transitioned to paid cadet positions in hopes of someday becoming a police officer. “I think that’s something that has always been really, really important– to give back to the community,” Mark said. “It helps our youth and it then helps build our employees here. … When they’re young, we can help shape their work ethic. We can help get them to understand what public service is about, and, if they’re well qualified, we bring them on as police officers.” While working as a part-time professor and lecturer at CSULB’s Department of Criminal Justice and at Concordia University for the past eight years, Mark helped to boost the Signal Hill Police Department’s college internship program. In fact, some cadets working at the police department today were once his students, he said. As director of the university’s Center for Criminal Justice Research & Training, Mark said his new position will allow him to stay involved

The Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners has approved a $1.02-billion budget for Fiscal Year 2014 that includes the Port of Long Beach’s largest-ever capital-improvement spending plan. A total of $788 million in capital spending– 6 percent more than last year– leads the planned expenses in the budget that covers the fiscal year set to begin Oct. 1, 2013. The Port’s modernization projects, such as the Middle Harbor terminal and Gerald Desmond Bridge Replacement, pushed the overall budget up by 6.6 percent compared to the current fiscal year. The budget also projects operating revenue of $375 million, the highest ever. The budget was unanimously approved by the Commission on June 17. It will be presented in July to the Long Beach City Council for approval. The spending plan reflects the Port’s commitment to boosting its competitiveness by rebuilding and replacing outdated facilities and infrastructure. The approved budget adds 52 new full-time positions, which include 33 in the Engineering Bureau to oversee the ongoing capital improve-

7

in public service and help with law-enforcement training. center The offers a wide variety of instructional programs through Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) and has trained over 36,000 lawenforcement personnel, including judges, criminalSean Belk/Signal Tribune justice scholars, Signal Hill Police Capt. Ron Mark, seen at his desk at the newly built Signal Hill Police Department headpracticing attor- quarters located on Walnut Avenue, is retiring from his career in law enforcement to become the director neys and law- of the Center for Criminal Justice Research & Training at California State University, Long Beach. enforcement crime trends… Those are really was the last remaining top-ranking practitioners. Mark will be collaborating with a important tools for law enforcement police official involved in original full-time professor at the university to try to predict crime and try to pre- planning of the new, state-of-the-art, to conduct research on such topics as vent crime. Frankly, we don’t have $18-million facility, which was completed in January, replacing a juvenile justice, crime prevention the personnel to do that.” Mark added that he had planned cramped, aging building that was and law-enforcement management, to leave earlier but promised Signal nearly half its size. he said. Mark hailed Signal Hill’s city “This gives me the opportunity to Hill police and city officials to stay start figuring out the back side of it,” on until the City finished building its management and police staff as being among “the best” for which Mark said. “We do the ‘boots on the new police headquarters. After the previous police chief he’s ever worked, adding that Signal ground’ stuff on a daily basis, but what kind of research can we put into and captain left the department, he see MARK page 9 it? How do we reduce the crime rate? How do we keep kids on the right track?” He also hopes to send college grads willing to receive work experience in crime analysis to the Signal Hill Police Department. “We’ve got grad students over at Cal State Long Beach, and they’re itching to apply to train but they have no place to apply to,” Mark said. “That’s why I kind of want to bridge that gap and start bringing some graduate students here to look at crime analysis to try to figure out

Commission approves $1-billion Port budget

Gerald Desmond Bridge replacement rendering

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Courtesy Port of LB

ments and 12 in the Security Division to enhance operational integration with the Long Beach Police Department and other partnering security agencies. In addition, the budget sets aside $73 million for environmental programs to improve air and water quality, as well as to protect wildlife habitat. The budget also estimates a record $18.4 million transfer to the City’s Tidelands Fund for the Board to consider. The transfer would be 5 percent of estimated operating revenue for Fiscal Year 2013. Al Moro, the Port's acting executive director, said the Port’s budget incorporates a combination of prudent fiscal planning and “green growth” that increases cargo flows with environmental sustainability programs. “Our carefully planned 10-year capitalimprovement program represents a significant investment in this Port, and this annual budget is just one part of that,��� Moro said. “We’re working to maintain this Port’s ability to sustain economic activity and jobs in Long Beach and the region.” Source: Port of LB


ST3503 - June 21_Layout 1 6/21/13 11:50 AM Page 8

NEWS

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JUNE 21, 2013

Signal Hill Petroleum gives public tour of oil drill-site facilities, prepares for permit renewal

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Sean McDaniel, vice president of production/operations for Signal Hill Petroleum (far right), leads a tour of the oil-well operator’s seven drill sites in preparation for a conditional-use permit that is up for renewal in September. Those who were in attendance included Signal Hill residents and city officials.

In the middle of the Signal Hill Gateway Center in between Ross and Home Depot off of Spring Street, thousands of barrels of water flow through concrete pipes on a daily basis in an area hidden from public view and enclosed by brick walls. The water is sent to what’s called a central “vacuum cleaner” with large tanks just a few blocks away, where water, oil and gas fluids are separated. The system enables crude oil to

Crimes reported by LBPD • Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

EYE ON CRIME

Thursday, June 13 Residential burglary 2:25am– 1900 block Chestnut Ave.

Robbery, inhabited dwelling, common carrier 4:30pm– 1800 block Cedar Ave. Friday, June 14 Residential burglary 2pm– 1500 block E. Carson St.

Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide

Thursday, June 13 Battery 4pm– E. Pacific Coast Hwy./Temple Ave. Friday, June 14 Trespassing, refusing to leave 12:38am– 2400 block California Ave. Parks, hours of overnight closure 3:50am– 2100 block Cherry Ave.

Non-injury hit-and-run 8:21am– 2300 block E. Spring St.

Saturday, June 15 Trespassing, occupying property without consent 12:44am– 2400 block California Ave. Stolen vehicle 8:17am– 2000 block Freeman Ave.

Petty theft 10:08am– 2400 block Cherry Ave. Auto burglary 3:18pm– 2500 block Cherry Ave.

DUI 11:37pm– 3700 block E. Spring St.

Sunday, June 16 Receiving known stolen property 12:59am– 1800 block Dawson Ave. Petty theft 1:40pm– 2200 block E. Willow St. Wednesday, June 19 Vandalism, damaging property 10:25am– 2600 block Wall St.

be skimmed off the top and then sold. The water is then filtered for contaminants and re-injected into the ground. “The big mistake everybody thinks is that we’re a huge oil company and we just got tanks full of oil,” said Sean McDaniel, vice president of production operations for Signal Hill Petroleum. “In reality, we got tanks full of water and about this much oil on the top.” The process is the opposite of “fracking,” a controversial oilwell drilling technique that involves injecting fluid at high pressures in order to fracture shale rocks, he said. McDaniel said Signal Hill Petroleum produces a total of 3,000 barrels of oil per day from more than 300 active wells in the Long Beach/Signal Hill Oil Field. But in order to do that requires about 90,000 barrels of water to be taken out of the ground each day and then reinjected, he said. “Water injection or secondary enhancement is about putting water back in to pull it out of the reservoir, so that you don’t have subsidence, because if we’re taking 90,000 barrels of water out a day and we’re not putting it back, you could have a drop,” McDaniel said. “It isn’t about fracking. It’s about enhanced recovery. You put it in the oil sands and start pushing that oil over to one of our producing wells, and then our producer brings it up through the production system.” Signal Hill Petroleum, which took over oil-well operations for Texaco, Arco and Shell in the 1970s and is now the biggest oil operator in the city, gave resi-

dents and city officials a tour of its seven oil drill sites on Tuesday, June 18. It was the third public tour of the oil-well operator’s facilities since last year, when the company started the process of renewing its conditional use permit (CUP) for operations on all seven sites. The operator has conducted various meetings with the Signal Hill Planning Commission as well. Colleen Doan, the City’s associate planner who was present during the tour along with City Councilmember Lori Woods, said the Signal Hill Petroleum was granted a oneyear extension for its CUP, which is now coming back for renewal in September. McDaniel said, originally, oilwell facilities were spread out over 800 satellite drill sites, but Signal Hill Petroleum has consolidated its operations in the last 20 years by using more “directional drilling.” However, he added that it’s been “challenging” to consolidate drill sites in a city with so many faults. Oil-well production, however, isn’t Signal Hill Petroleum’s only operation. McDaniel said the company is able to generate 75 percent of its own power by extracting natural gas or vapor through its oil operations, enabling the company to run a large turbine generator that was built and commissioned about nine years ago. The operator’s gas-processing facility, also known as Drill Site No. 2, located off of Gundry Avenue, generates about five megawatts of electricity and hansee OIL SITES page 19

Signal Hill Petroleum Vice President of production/operations Sean McDaniel holds up a jar of “brine water,” which is re-injected into the ground after water is extracted for oil-production purposes. The operator has 300 active oil wells in the Long Beach/Signal Hill oil field and produces 3,000 barrels of oil per day.

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ST3503 - June 21_Layout 1 6/21/13 11:50 AM Page 9

NEWS

JUNE 21, 2013

Port board elects Fields as year-long president

The Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners on Monday, June 17 elected board member Thomas Fields as its president for a one-year term to start July 1. He will succeed Commissioner Susan E. Anderson Wise, who has served two years as president. Fields, a Long Beach advertising executive and former city planning commissioner, was appointed to a six-year term on the Harbor Commission in 2009 by Mayor Bob Foster. The Board president serves as chair of the commission, running board meetings and often representing the Port to the public and shipping industry. “I look forward to serving as Board president. This is an exciting time for the Port as we look for the next executive director while at the same time proceeding with our capital-improvement program to modernize the Port,” Fields said. Fields is the founder and owner of Thomas Fields Associates, a Long Beach marketing and advertising agency. He launched his career as an advertising agency writer-producer in New York and Los Angeles, writing ads and commercials for Nissan, Toyota, Mitsubishi, Chevrolet, Evian, the California State Lottery, the California Angels, Hanes, Burger King and Prudential. Rounding out the selection of board officers, Commissioner Nick Sramek was elected as vice president. Commissioner Doug Drummond was voted secretary. Commissioners Wise and Rich Dines will serve as assistant secretaries. All terms start July 1. The five-member Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners is the governing body of the Port of Long Beach, which is the Harbor Department of the City of Long Beach. For full commissioner biographies, visit polb.com/commission/commissioners.asp . In other action, the Board of Harbor Commissioners formally approved the appointment of Al Moro to the position of acting executive director. Moro joined the Port in 1997 and has served as chief harbor engineer since 2007. The Board also formally approved the appointment of Dr. Noel Hacegaba as acting deputy executive director. Hacegaba has served as the executive officer to the Board of Harbor Commissioners since 2010.

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Mark

continued from page 7

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Signal Hill Police Capt. Ron Mark (standing, far left) chats with friends and coworkers during a farewell party at the city’s police department headquarters on June 20. Mark received a shadow box featuring Signal Hill Police memorabilia.

Hill Police Chief Michael Langston has not only been a “good boss but a good friend.” Langston added, “A good man is hard to find. [Therefore] not what you see, it’s what you don’t see. Ron’s leadership was extremely important.” Even though the police department and the City faced challenges over the last several years and during the economic downturn, they have survived it by maintaining tight budgets and lean staffs, Mark said. Now, Mark’s departure comes as another senior sergeant and possibly others plan to retire soon, likely opening up vacant positions at the police department. Mark said he is comfortable his position will be easily filled. “It’s been a good career,” he said. “It’s been a great experience. I’ve had the opportunity to work with some great individuals. There’s a good team here. This police department really understands communityoriented policing, which is something I really enjoy and one of the reasons why I came here.” On Thursday, June 20, the Signal Hill Police Department hosted a potluck lunch and farewell party for Mark. Co-workers and friends stopped by to congratulate him and give their best regards.

9

During the farewell party, Mark thanked his wife and children, as well as members of the police department. “The beat will go on,” he said. “This is family here.” ß

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10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Funk legend Shuggie Otis to highlight Long Beach Funk Fest Homegrown culture and music series Summer and Music (SAM), co-produced by the Downtown Long Beach Associates (DLBA), is gearing up for the fifth annual Long Beach Funk Fest (LBFF) on Saturday, July 6 by highlighting a few of its notable acts. “We like to showcase a combination of very well-known acts and more underground, or up-and-coming talent,” said Justin Hectus, co-founder of SAM and LBFF. “This lineup offers a nice balance that equally appeals to the casual funk fan and the more devoted aficionado.” Funk legend Shuggie Otis will perform at LBFF, and the event’s organizers say it is extremely rare for him to perform in the Los Angeles area. Otis joins the event after releasing a double album earlier this year. It had been almost two decades since he had released new music. He is considered a master of his craft and has played with legendary musicians Etta James and Frank Zappa. The Bernie Worrell Orchestra will also perform at this year’s festival. Bernie Worrell is a co-founding member of original PFunk as well as master keyboardist, co-writer, and co-producer of many

notable funk songs. He has also played with the Talking Heads and worked with countless other artists spanning multiple genres. Bobby Easton, founder of Long Beach Funk Fest, said he was thrilled to have Worrell in the lineup. “Even if you don't recognize his name, believe me, you will definitely recognize his music,” Easton said. LBFF will also feature The Blackbyrds, a jazz-funk fusion group formed in Washington, D.C. in 1973 whose members were students of the late jazz trumpeter Donald Byrd. They are known for highly sampled hits, including “Rock Creek Park,” “Happy Music,” and “Walking in Rhythm.” Adding variety to the LBFF stage will be local favorite Sea Funk Brass Band, who perform a form of brass-band funk called second line, which is popular in New Orleans. There will be additional performances by Charles Wright and the Watts 103rd St. Rhythm Band, Circle City Band, Jungle Fire, Henry + the Invisibles, and Funk Angels. Rickey Vincent, author of the book Funk: The Music, the People and the

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Rhythm of the One, and LBFF’s emcee, shared his enthusiasm for the acts. “I am so excited for this year’s Funk Fest,” he said. “We are going to feature the sublime groove masters Charles Wright, the Blackbyrds, the legendary guitarist Shuggie Otis, and P-Funk Hall of Fame legend Bernie Worrell and his fresh new band, Bernie Worrell Orchestra. Funk Fest is always full of funky surprises that make it the place to be each summer.” LBFF will take place Saturday, July 6 from noon to 11pm at the Downtown Long Beach Promenade (east of Pine Avenue between 1st and 3rd streets). LBFF will also offer several DJs, dance performances, two beer gardens (presented by Beachwood BBQ & Brewing and Congregation Ale House), and a variety of on-site activities and vendors, including the Kids Zone of Funktivity. Harvelle’s, a blues club located adjacent to the festival at 207 E. Broadway, will host additional funk performers throughout the day and the post-event after party and jam session. $15 presale tickets can be purchased at lbfunkfest.com or in person at Fingerprints Music, 420 E. 4th St. Tickets will also be available at the gate for $20. For more information, call the DLBA at (562) 436-4259 or visit summerandmusic.com .

Signal Hill’s hilltop area to be closed to non-residents on 4th of July

The Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) recently issued a press release stating that the Signal Hill hilltop area will be closed to all non-residential vehicular traffic on the 4th of July holiday, beginning at 6pm. The SHPD suggests that all individuals and families interested in viewing the aerial firework displays enjoy the view from the hilltop but consider attending other local shows in the area, because hilltop space is limited. The press release states that the possession, sale and/or discharge of all types of fireworks, including “safe and sane” fireworks, are prohibited within the city of Signal Hill. Hilltop residents who are planning a party on the 4th of July should contact Sergeant M. Krizo at (562) 989-7222 ext. 5061 or mkrizo@signalhillpd.org or Senior Police Officer K. Brown at (562) 989-7222 ext. 5106 or kbrown@signalhillprd.org for information regarding hilltop access for their guests. Source: SHPD


ST3503 - June 21_Layout 1 6/21/13 11:51 AM Page 11

JUNE 21, 2013

SUM-SUM-SUMMERTIME

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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Local resident-powered group ‘Friendship Neighborhood’ embarks on series of festivals in Drake Park

The Friendship Neighborhood will present their inaugural “Friend Fest” in Drake Park, 951 Maine Ave. in the Willmore City area of Long Beach, on Saturday, June 22 from 11am to 3pm. The free family-friendly event will include live music by local band Romero y Perez, skill-share workshops on seed planting presented by Foodscape Long Beach, DIY non-toxic cleaning products and creative-reuse art, as well as various park games, face painting, a“free market” and more in an effort to bring neighbors together as friends. A grant was awarded to The Friendship Neighborhood Friend Fest by the Building Healthy Communities: Long Beach initiative based on the intention of the group to create a sustainable network of allies that celebrate the gifts and talents of their neighbors as opposed to focusing on deficits of the area. Through the course of the ongoing development of this and future events, the objective is to build healthy relationships amongst residents of all ages in ways both empowering and uplifting for all,

LBFD shares safety tips for beach visits

The Long Beach Fire Department (LBFD) has released the following safety tips for visiting the beach this summer. “Tragedy in the ocean can happen quickly, therefore having knowledge of aquatic safety is critical when coming to the beach,” said Will Nash, firefighter and public-information officer for LBFD. • When swimming in the ocean, always swim near an open lifeguard station • Never swim alone • Supervise children closely, even when lifeguards are present • Don’t rely on floatation devices, such as rafts or inner-tubes. Even US Coast Guard-approved life jackets are not substitutes for swimming ability • Don’t dive into unfamiliar waters. Enter feet-first to protect your head, neck, and spine • Follow regulations and the direction of lifeguards • Never turn your back to waves in the ocean • Never throw sand and always fill holes before you leave the beach • Do not litter • Use sunscreen to protect yourself from the sun • Use caution when crossing bike paths • Dogs are prohibited on school grounds, bike paths, or on beaches, except for designated “dog beaches” In an emergency, call 911. For nonemergencies or beach violations, call the Long Beach Lifeguard Headquarters at (562) 570-1360. Source: LBFD

according to a press release issued by the Friendship Neighborhood. The idea for a series of Friend Fests came after the neighborhood was rocked by gun violence that ended the life of a 23-year-old Willmore City resident named Nelson Suarez. A second incident of gun violence six days later prompted homeowners, property managers and renters to join together at a community meeting featuring the district’s City Council member, the LBPD West Division Commander and their local gang unit. “I left the meeting feeling very unsatisfied with the answers we got. The only solutions perpetuated seemed to be that of increased surveillance via video cameras and operating as a ‘nosy neighbor’ that reports any and everyone that they think ‘doesn’t belong.’ How do I know who doesn’t belong just by looking at them?” said Erin Foley, Willmore City resident and local organizer. “I don’t want us all just peering through our window afraid of everyone. I felt we need to address the root of the problem– not foster fear and suspicion and solely focus on catching people doing wrong. Ultimately, as neighbors talked, it was decided that the best first

step might be to try to get to know our other neighbors. The more you get to know people, the more you care about them…the more we get to know each other, the better we can figure out together what we can do together to foster positive change.” One way the group plans to break the ice among neighbors is to utilize the solidarity and trust-building techniques of Augusto Boal’s “Theater of the Oppressed,” which brings participants together through various games to beget respect of diversity of experiences and thoughts along with the shared humanity of all participants, according to the Friendship Neighborhood. In order to help create awareness of what is available and what people can get involved in, local organizations such as Centro CHA, Foodscape Long Beach, Green Long Beach!, The Long Beach Time Exchange, The Long Beach Depot for Creative Reuse, East Yard Communities for Environmental Justice, Willmore City Heritage Association, Friends of

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Drake Park, Housing LB, and Building Healthy Communities: Long Beach, among others, have been invited to share their various resources, ideas and actionable ways for perpetuating sustainable growth and positive change for the community of Willmore City. Attendees are encouraged to bring a dish of their choice for the potluck and/or gently used clothes and books for the free market, however, no one

7/1 - Somerset Park 7/3 - Recreation Park 7/5 - Chavez Park

Los Altos Altos Neighborhood Neighborhood Assoc. Assoc. South Concert : June 21 - Blue Steel 6p.m. FREE. El Dorado Park West W

Rancho Los Cerritos Cerritos Summer Summe Concert Concert : June 23 - Scarlett & Dr. Dr. Bob Finney (Jazz) FREE. Gates open 4:30 p.m.; Concert, 5:30-7:00p.m. Adobe home open for tours. FREE

Long Beach Beach Municipal Band Concerts 6:30 p.m. FREE. Concerts FREE. July 2, Whaley Park; July 3, Los Cerritos Park; July 4, Marine Stadium; and July 5, El Dorado Park West W

Long Beach Be Sea a Festival Festival Three Three months of fun in the sun! Visit www.lbseafest.com www.lbseafest.com for schedule. sche Movies at Granada Beach: “When Harry Met Sally,” Sally,” 6/22. Starts at Dusk. FREE

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ST3503 - June 21_Layout 1 6/21/13 11:51 AM Page 12

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE CULTURE Painter livens up streets and buildings with historical murals

Brandy Soto Editorial intern

Art Mortimer didn't exactly plan to become an artist; it was something he stumbled into. He was born in Long Beach, and he says he had a particularly normal childhood, with no real artistic influence. “My father was a college math and physics teacher, and my mother was a housewife,” he says. “I think living life, pretty much just the way it presented itself, led me into an exploration of feelings and emotions through representational art. Turns out there were a lot of artistic people in my parents’ families, including my two grandfathers, but I did not really experience that much through them.” Although he always admired artists and their interesting lifestyles, it was not until college that Mortimer realized he could be one. “I became an art major after a failed attempt at physics,” he explains. “In art-history classes, we learned about artists and their lives, and I always wanted to be like them– the guy in the garret in Paris with the smock, beret, goatee and the babes. But I did not think it was

possible. Many years later I had matured enough and learned enough to believe that it was possible.” He graduated from Occidental College in Eagle Rock, California, and has since become a freelance artist and art educator. Mortimer paints scenes of everyday life; many of his acrylics are of beaches, bridges or piers. He is also known for his detailed murals, most of which are historic and representative of a certain city or surrounding areas. He has painted close to 100 murals since 1971, and several of them having been displayed in newspapers, books and films in the United States and across the world. Recently, he completed a project that he calls “A Mural in a Weekend” in Twentynine Palms, California. He has also been working at Dodger Stadium, creating murals that celebrate memorable events in the history of the Los Angeles baseball team. In painting, what is the biggest challenge you have faced? The biggest challenge, of many, is the original concept. Particularly in a mural. Without that, all the other

Manhattan Beach mural from 2007

challenges are unattainable.

Do you think about placement before you begin a project, or do you freestyle in the moment? I plan out where I am going. In a mural, I plan and design very carefully. In a painting, a rough outline and then let it evolve as it goes.

Is there a special technique or theme that has become a staple of your art? In murals: historical themes, and a

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collage approach. In paintings: the intersection between nature and the man-made.

Is there a process in choosing the materials you will use for your paintings/murals? Through experience, I know what works best for a mural in a specific situation to make the work go smoothly and to make the mural last as long as possible. But some mural projects require special or different materials, so that necessitates a research and learning process to find the best solution(s) for that project. For paintings, I like to work on canvas with paints I am familiar with. Which mediums do you prefer to work with?

For murals, artists’ acrylic. For canvases, acrylics and oils.

Do you prefer working alone or in groups? I prefer working alone, but on murals [I] often hire people to assist me to make the work go faster and easier.

How has your artwork developed over the years? Big question. Very complex answer. Every project or painting is a new challenge and requires me to try something I have never done before. So my work has gotten progressively more sophisticated and challenging– not to mention more complex and informed by all that experience.

see ARTIST page 19

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ST3503 - June 21_Layout 1 6/21/13 11:51 AM Page 13

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JUNE 21, 2013

13

SH Chamber Luncheon Date: Thursday, June 27, 2013 Location: Signal Hill Park Community Center, 1780 E. Hill Street, Signal Hill Speaker: Brandon Long, Motivational Speaker & Personal Trainer (Belong 2 Fitness/No Limits Sports & Fitness Academy) Topic: P9 Program— Invest in Your Health Doors open at 11:45am for networking and the program starts at noon. Enjoy a delicious lunch catered by Holiday Inn while mingling with other members of our business community, local officials, and legislative representatives. Cost is $25 per person but will be discounted to $15 for 2012-2013 current members with advance non-refundable reservations made before noon on the day before the luncheon. Non-members are welcome at a cost of $25 per person. Please make your reservations by e-mail to shcc@verizon.net or leave a message at 562-424-6489 and make your payment at the door via cash, check, MasterCard or Visa only.

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ST3503 - June 21_Layout 1 6/21/13 11:55 AM Page 14

14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Council

continued from page 1 els after five years of reduced expenditures and reduced revenues.” He added that it’s the fourth year in a row the City has balanced the budget without relying on the City’s rainy-day fund. Both the General Fund reserve and the Economic Uncertainties Reserve Fund are expected to remain at healthy levels, totaling $11.3 million, which remains above the Council’s threshold for keeping reserves at 50 percent of projected expenditures, Farfsing said. Still, he said economic performance is expected to be “uneven,” adding that the City conservatively estimates total sales-tax revenue at about $11.5 million, which is a nearly 1-percent decrease from the performance during the current fiscal year. Though auto dealers continue to see an improvement in vehicle sales, which is expected to bring a boost in sales-tax revenue for the City, Farfsing said staff remains cautious about a possible “auto sales bubble.” Home Depot and other construction-related retailers have seen more business, but other retailers, such as Best Buy and Target, have reported losses, he said. On the plus side, the new EDCO transfer station is expected to bring in about $130,000 in new revenues to the City, Farfsing said. The City has not budgeted in sales-tax revenue from the new Costco gas station cur-

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rently under construction. At the same time, he said the City’s department heads have been asked to maintain lean budgets going forward, without “significant increases over their existing expenditures,” which he said is “a difficult task” since merit and step increases were granted that automatically increased each department’s budget. The City is also planning for increases in California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) rates that are expected to start in 2015. While the City has already prepared for the CalPERS rate increases by setting aside funds, Farfsing said the new rates are expected to increase labor costs by more than $600,000 annually. The City is also expected to pay for a retrospective deposit for city workers’ compensation costs through the California joint powers insurance authority (JPIA). The deposit is similar to a pension program’s unfunded liability and reflects system losses in the JPIA’s investment portfolio and increases in insurance costs. A portion of the new costs will be picked up by Prop 1A revenues, which the State borrowed several years ago. However, Farfsing said the City has not received the revenues yet, because of an error by the State Controller. Another major expense going forward will be startup costs for complying with new environmental regulatory programs implemented by the Los Angeles County regional water board for storm-water permits. New expenses for next fiscal year also include $75,000 for the June 5, 2014 special election associated with the “Taxpayer’s Right to Know and Vote” initiative and nearly $161,000

NEWS

for shifting full-time personnel from the now defunct Signal Hill Redevelopment Agency to city departments. Farfsing said the City is also budgeting a $5-an-hour increase in attorney fees proposed by City Attorney David Aleshire. The fee increase, which is the first increase in attorney fees in nearly six years, is expected to go into effect in January 2014 and January 2015. However, Farfsing said the overall budget for the city attorney will remain the same since there’s been a decrease in development activity. He said staff completed a survey of similar cities with contract city attorneys and concluded that Signal Hill is paying the lowest attorney rate. The survey also found that many cities are considering similar rate increases. For the fourth year in a row, the City is keeping its water rates flat but anticipates proposing an increase in water rates next fiscal year due to recent increases in water-replenishment assessments and rates for purchasing imported water. Farfsing said $392,200 worth of one-time expenditures is being paid for by Prop 1A revenues and funds received from a legal settlement in which the City and 40 other cities prevailed in a lawsuit against Los Angeles County for illegally charging administrative fees. The one-time monies will pay for upgrading the City’s accounting system, purchasing new electronic-citation devices for the police department, adding additional park-patrol hours and additional restroom cleaning during the summer, unfreezing a parkmaintenance position in public works, and a study to upgrade cable-TV equipment, among other items.

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4395 NoTICE oF A PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, July 2, 2013, the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider the following: ORDINANCE AMENDMENT

AN AMENDMENT TO SIGNAL HILL MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 16.24, ENTITLED “ABANDONMENT OF WELLS AND IDLE WELLS,” ESTABLISHING VENTING AND SETBACK REGULATIONS REGARDING NEW DEVELOPMENT ON PROPERTIES WITH PREVIOUSLY ABANDONED OIL WELLS ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this public hearing to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter.

If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearings. A CEQA DETERMINATION has been made that the project is categorically exempt as a Class 8 exemption pursuant to 14 California Code of Regulation Section 15308.

FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Colleen Doan, Associate Planner, at cdoan@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7344. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper per Gov’t Code §65091(a)(4): June 21, 2013 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010: June 21, 2013

JUNE 21, 2013

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Signal Hill Mayor Michael Noll introduces Melissa Garcia (right) as the new administrative assistant for the City’s community-services department during the City Council meeting on June 18.

Farfsing said it’s the first time in nearly two years the City Council has been able to approve decision-package expenditures, but he added that the Council has to be “realistic,” while maintaining key services and adequately anticipating future budget challenges. “It’s not an easy assignment,” he said. Mayor Noll noted that many of the expenditures will go a long way toward making departments run more cost-effectively. “Most of those are how we can be more efficient and improve our operations to save money down the line,” he said. Finance Director Terri Marsh said purchasing new software and a server to upgrade the City’s antiquated accounting system, which currently operates using DOS from the 1980s, is expected to pay for itself over the next three years. She said maintenance costs would be reduced from about $45,000 to about $9,000 per year. The City is also allotting funds for a $14.9-million capital-improvement project budget mostly being paid for through grants and development fees.

Introductions and presentations During the Council meeting, Mayor Noll introduced Melissa Garcia as the new administrative assistant for the City’s community-services department. He also presented a proclamation to that department in recognition of July being Parks Make Life Better Month and a proclamation to Ron Sylvester, chair of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) Center, in recognition of LGBT Month. Low-impact development The Council approved a new ordinance that imposes rainwater lowimpact development (LID) strategies

on certain projects that require building, grading and encroachment permits. The new LID systems are required as part of new municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) permits adopted by the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board.

Children’s health services The Council authorized the city manager to enter into a contract services agreement between the City and Miller Children’s Hospital and The Children’s Clinic to provide partial funding for uninsured children of low income Signal Hill families who are facing serious illnesses to access health and hospitalization care. Funds, not to exceed $5,000 for each hospital, are to be utilized for hospital and specialty visits. The funds requested for The Children’s Clinic are expected to support up to 100 clinic visits by Signal Hill children throughout the fiscal year. The two programs are funded through the General Fund.

Watershed management The Council authorized the city manager to sign letters of intent to participate in watershed-management programs and monitoring plans for both the Lower Los Angeles River and the Los Cerritos Channel. Signal Hill’s total share of the costs for development of watershed-management programs and coordinated monitoring plans is expected to total $62,300, according to a city staff report. The programs are required as part of the new MS4 adopted by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board.

The next Signal Hill Council meeting will take place Tuesday, July 2 at 7pm in the City’s Council Chamber.

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ST3503 - June 21_Layout 1 6/21/13 11:55 AM Page 15

continued from page 1 nesses to the area because there is no more land. So we have to clean up the land that we have.” Neal stressed the urgency of moving forward with the ordinance. He said that north Long Beach is about to experience a number of positive changes in the next 12 to 36 months. “By not addressing this [the liquor store issue],” Neal said, “it could curtail some of the future development that we anticipate is going to be coming to north Long Beach.” The ordinance will specifically target the smaller shops that sell beer, wine and distilled spirits that have been legally operating for years without the need for a conditional-use permit. They are still subject to state regulations governing the sale of alcohol, but as far as the City was conthe shops enjoyed cerned, “grandfather” status for years. Shops weren’t required to apply for a conditional-use permit because they were established prior to 1988, the year that the City decided to require these permits and enforce performance standards on stores that sell alcohol, according to a staff report. Larger convenience stores, pharmacies and bigger grocery stores are exempt from this proposed ordinance. Restaurants that serve alcohol also won’t be affected by this ordinance. According to a staff report presented at the May Planning Commission meeting, if the staff plan is fully approved by the Council, enforcement will be completed in phases. Because north Long Beach has been shown to have a higher concentration of liquor stores, the efforts to implement the plan will begin in the entire region north of Del Amo Boulevard before

School

continued from page 1

co-coordinator of the Long Beach Free School, at the school’s open house June 15 at the Long Beach Community Action Partnership’s Community Garden. The idea for the school came from Eric Leocadio, founder and executive director of the Catalyst Network of Communities, a nonprofit organization that he said helps “people in groups to connect, collaborate, and share resources.” Catalyst is financially supporting the school, while the school staff and teachers volunteer and locations for classes are donated, Rifkin said. Leocadio said he wanted the school to have some of the aspects of traditional schools, such as teachers and a registration process, but “let it be organic enough to where the subject matter came from the people.” The teachers, called “resident professors,” apply and are interviewed, find class locations on their own (the staff helps them if needed), and attend

RD238272 Engagement City: LA Combo BW News If they still fail to comply after Ad status. to target only those stores that carry a Media:

the ordinance is enforced in the rest of the city. If the ordinance is approved, letters will be sent to more than 30 north Long Beach liquor stores. City staff will notify the owners in an on-site visit to review specific changes that will need to be completed within 90 days of notice. Those changes could involve installation of security cameras on the building exterior that could be accessed by the police department, improvement of the lighting, changing the building signs, and ensuring that nothing is blocking the view through the store’s windows and glass doors. Overall, the proposed ordinance specifically asks that owners maintain a clean and safe environment that doesn’t present any safety or nuisance issues to the surrounding area. The ordinance does not regulate the sale of alcohol. ”Our goal is not to hurt existing businesses,” Neal said, but the councilmember added that the needs of the constituents have to be addressed. Both Neal and Austin have emphasized in previous interviews that this is an attempt to improve the facilities, not to do away with them altogether. However, city staff explained at the May 16 Planning Commission meeting that, if this ordinance is passed, there will be repercussions for business owners who don’t comply with the performance standards. Staff described briefly the possible consequences for those businesses that ultimately refuse to comply with the requirements that go along with the so-called Alcohol Nuisance Abatement Ordinance (ANAO). If the shop owners don’t comply with these new performance standards in accordance with the proposed ANAO, they are still given a few opportunities to meet the requirements. They could even appeal their

they have undergone the enforcement Insertion process, the Date(s): owners do risk losing the ability to continue to sell alcohol and might have to file for a conditional-use permit to sell liquor. That permit would have to be approved by the City Council. City staff told the Planning Commission that they have received mostly positive feedback from the community and the liquor-store owners. However, one owner of a shop in north Long Beach appeared before the May Planning Commission to voice his own concerns. “I put my life savings on this store,” he said, “and I’m afraid somebody [will] use this as a pretext to get rid of the store in that area.” He added that he had no issues with complying with the requirements the staff outlined at the meeting, however, he didn’t like the possibility that the City could revoke his license. He felt that citations would be sufficient. He said that the City was discriminating against liquor stores and suggested that the City should ask the other kinds of shops to adhere to the same standards. One other owner agrees that generally, the performance standards seem to be reasonable. Ed Snow, the original owner of Eddie’s Liquor at 299 Artesia Blvd., said in a telephone interview that his store already meets the requirements. He read over the general list outlined in the staff report, noting the requirements to keep a clean area, to ensure that the windows aren’t blocked and for the installation of cameras that are linked to the police department. “We already do that. It’s part of doing good business,” he said. Snow originally owned the store in 1973, but in the last few years his son has taken over the family business. However, Snow is critical of the City’s decision

meetings for safety and other meetings that aim to help them teach better before the classes start, Leocadio said. But the school gives teachers latitude, as Rifkin said that it doesn’t require teachers to have grades or give out tests. “We do take more of an organic approach…because we’re concerned about learning, we’re not concerned about GPA, and so since our priority is promoting the idea of life-long learning, that means the teachers, in terms of their grading process, should be more about assessing something more personalized or individualized,” Leocadio said. One teacher, who said he probably wouldn’t have a test, is Roger Kroll, who will be teaching a graphic-design class. Kroll, who said he’s seen the cost of his class at the Long Beach School for Adults go from $25 to $300 per session over the years, was attracted to teaching at the Free School by the idea of having “a different audience to teach to” since the

classes are free. He has not yet found a location for his class. Another teacher is only 10 years old. Jonas Corona, whose organization, Love in the Mirror, seeks to help the homeless population, said he will have a two-day “youth-empowerment workshop” that will encourage more children to volunteer. The class will take place at Love in the Mirror’s office, Corona said. It’s with classes like these, and many more, that the Long Beach Free School hopes to achieve what Rifkin calls “open education and community building.” “We’d love to have classes taught in every language that’s spoken here,” Rifkin said. “We want people to interact that aren’t used to interacting and to kind of take back their education and take back what it means to learn and be curious about life and enjoy yourself.” For more information, visit lbfreeschool.com or call (562) 2874661. ß

Type 21 license. “I would think it would be just as effective if they target all alcoholic licenses,” Snow said, wondering aloud why the City didn’t also target the numerous stores that sell only beer and wine. “I don’t know what they are try-

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

15Ad Size: 3.875”

Section: ing to accomplish.” He said that the majority of his store’s sales are from groceries; liquor only makes up about 10 percent of his sales. A public hearing on the matter is scheduled for Aug. 6 during the City Council meeting. ß

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE’S FOCUS ON BUSINESS Name of business: Fitness Chiropractic & Massage Therapy | Name of owner: Jean-Pierre Khreich Address: 3221 Industry Dr., Signal Hill | Phone: (562) 494-5300 | Hours: M-Th 8am to 7pm, Fri & Sat 8am to noon What type of business: Full wellness center | How long in business: 12 years Unique features of your business: Multidisciplinary where East meets West. Medical facility with holistic feel. What do you want your customers to know? Take all insurance plans including attorney liens, Senior and Student discounts. Also, cash payment discounts, special prices. Same day appointments. 20,000 facility to do exercise. Traction and decompression-massage room has spa-like atmosphere. Healthcare Website: fitnesschiropractic.net for the entire Email: Dr.khreich@FitnessChiropractic.net Social Networks: Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, Google family!

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TST4376 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No.: 99852590 TSG Order No.: 94677 A.P.N.: 7216-034033 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED (The above statement is made pursuant to CA Civil Code Section 2923.3(c)(1). The Summary will be provided to Trustor(s) and/or vested owner(s) only, pursuant to CA Civil Code Section 2923.3(c)(2).) YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 05/06/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NBS Default Services, LLC, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded 05/13/2005 as Document No.: 05 1133040, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by: CHRIS COMPTON, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Trustor, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable in full at time of sale by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and state, and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. Sale Date and Time: 07/01/2013 at 11:00 AM Sale Location: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2280 VILLAGE WAY, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made in an "AS IS" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $465,950.17 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call, (714)730-2727 for information regarding the trustee`s sale or visit this Internet Web site, https://www.lpsasap.com/, for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, T.S.# 9985-2590. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. NBS Default Services, LLC 301 E. Ocean Blvd. Suite 1720 Long Beach, CA 90802 800-766-7751 For Trustee Sale Information Log On To: https://www.lpsasap.com/ or Call: (714)730-2727. NBS Default Services, LLC, Natalie Franklin "We are attempting to collect a debt, and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose." A-4390405 06/07/2013, 06/14/2013, 06/21/2013

TST4392 T.S. No.: 11-45564  TSG Order No.: 0211103804 A.P.N.: 7148-010-085 ATTENTION RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY IS APPLICABLE TO THE NOTICE PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR ONLY PURSUANT TO CA CIVIL CODE 2923.3 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED  注:本文件包含一个信息摘要 참고 사항: 본 첨부 문서에 정보 요약서가 있습니 다 NOTA: SE ADJUNTA UN RESUMEN DE LA INFORMACIÓN DE ESTE DOCUMENTO TALA: MAYROONG BUOD NG IMPORMASYON SA DOKUMENTONG ITO NA NAKALAKIP LƯU Ý: KÈM THEO ĐÂY LÀ BẢN TRÌNH BÀY TÓM LƯỢC VỀ THÔNG TIN TRONG TÀI LIỆU NÀY       NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE    YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 4/5/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.  On 7/12/2013 at 9:00 AM, Old Republic Default Management Services, a Division of Old Republic National Title Insurance Company as duly appointed Trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust, Recorded 4/21/2005 as Instrument No. 05 0927042 in book --, page -- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by: LIMTIN THAO A SINGLE MAN AND LANCE SALIN A SINGLE MAN , as Trustor, DOWNEY SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION F.A. as Beneficiary. WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable in full at time of sale by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or fed-

PUBLIC NOTICES

eral credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and state, and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust.    The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1132 & 1134 EAST 32ND ST, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755   The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made in an “AS IS” condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $631,520.20 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due.  NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.    NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 573-1965 or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1145564. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.  The Declaration pursuant to California Civil Code, Section 2923.5(a) was fulfilled when the Notice of Default was recorded on 11/30/2011   Date: 6/13/2013  Old Republic Default Management Services, A Division of Old Republic National Title Insurance Company, as Trustee  500 City Parkway West, Suite 200, Orange, CA 92868-2913  (866) 263-5802  For Sale Information Contact: Priority Posting & Publishing (714) 573-1965  Heather Marsh, Assistant Secretary "We are attempting to collect a debt, and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose."    P1045674 6/21, 6/28, 07/05/2013  

TST4377 APN: 7211-026-137 TS No: CA09000191-13-1 TO No: 5912801 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED March 11, 2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On July 8, 2013 at 09:00 AM, Vineyard Ballroom at Doubletree Hotel Los AngelesNorwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on March 18, 2008 as Instrument No. 20080461082 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by ROBERT STRICKLAND, A SINGLE MAN, as Trustor(s), in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: SEE EXHIBIT "A" ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF EXHIBIT "A" A CONDOMINIUM COMPRISED OF: PARCEL 1: A) AN UNDIVIDED 1/82ND INTEREST IN AND TO LOT 1 OF TRACT NO. 31155, IN THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 1004 PAGES 95 TO 96 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPT THEREFROM ALL OIL, GAS, MINERALS, AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES LYING BELOW THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND, BUT WITH NO RIGHT OF SURFACE ENTRY, AS PROVIDED IN DEEDS OF RECORD. EXCEPT THEREFROM UNITS 1 TO 82, INCLUSIVE, AS DEFINED AND DELINEATED ON A CONDOMINIUM PLAN RECORDED APRIL 22, 1985 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 85-450742, OFFICIAL RECORDS. B) UNIT 60 AS DEFINED AND DELINEATED ON THE ABOVE REFERRED TO CONDOMINIUM PLAN. PARCEL 2: AN EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT, APPURTENANT TO PARCEL 1 ABOVE, FOR ALL USES AND PURPOSES OF A "GARAGE SPACE" OVER AND ACROSS THAT PORTION OF LOT 1 OF SAID TRACT NO. 31155, DEFINED AND DELINEATED AS "RESTRICTED COMMON AREA" G 60A AND 60B ON THE ABOVE REFERENCED CONDOMINIUM PLAN. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2599 WALNUT AVENUE 228, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said

Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $244,276.71 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property.Notice to Property Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Auction.com at 800.280.2832 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address www.Auction.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA09000191-131. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: May 29, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPS TS No. CA09000191-13-1 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Lupe Tabita, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.Auction.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AUCTION.COM at 800.280.2832 TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1042817 6/7, 6/14, 06/21/2013 TST4372 / 2013 103580 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: C AND M FOUNDATION, 4235 Chestnut Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: 1. CLYDE EMERSON, 2. MILA EMERSON, 4235 Chestnut Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Clyde Emerson. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 20, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 31, & June 7, 14, 21, 2013.

TST4373 / 2013 109006 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CHERISHED ROSE, 12643 Belinda Ct., Lynwood, CA 90262. Registrant: CHERI WARD, 12643 Belinda Ct., Lynwood, CA 90262. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Cheri Ward. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 28, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 31, & June 7, 14, 21, 2013.

TST4374 / Case No. VS024592 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 12720 Norwalk Blvd., Norwalk, CA 90650. PETITION OF Karina Hernandez For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner KARINA HERNANDEZ, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: KARINA L. HERNANDEZ PEREZ to Proposed Name: KARINA L. RODRIQUEZ. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of

name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: July 24, 2013; Time: 1:30 P.M.; Dept. C, Room 312. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: May 31, & June 7, 14, 21, 2013. ___//ss//___ Yvonne T. Sanchez, Judge of the Superior Court

TST4375 / Case No. NS027329 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 415 W. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. PETITION OF Kristin Marie Figueroa-Bland and minor Kaleb Michael Figueroa-Bland For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner KRISTIN MARIE FIGUEROABLAND and minor KALEB MICHAEL FIGUEROA-BLAND, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: KRISTIN MARIE FIGUEROA-BLAND to Proposed Name: KRISTIN MARIE FIGUEROA and minor; Present Name: KALEB MICHAEL FIGUEROABLAND to Proposed Name: MAKAYLA MICHELLE FIGUEROA-BLAND. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: July 12, 2013; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. 11, Room 31. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: May 31, & June 7, 14, 21, 2013. ___//ss//___ Ross M. Klein, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: May 30, 2013

TST4379 / Case No. LS024007 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 6230 Sylmar Ave., Van Nuys, CA 91401. PETITION OF Malli Gamliel For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner MALLI GAMIEL, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: MALLI GAMIEL to Proposed Name: EMILY GAMIEL. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: July 11, 2013; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. T, Room 600. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013. ___//ss//___ Richard H. Kirschner, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: May 28, 2013

TST4378 / 2013 094927 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: DAVID'S TIRE SHOP & SERVICE, 906 E. Willow St., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: 1. MARIANO VEGA, 2. EVA GUZMAN, 2485 Pasadena Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Mariano Vega. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 8, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013.

TST4382 / Case No. BP141891 Notice of Petition To Administer Estate of: FRANCES L. KELLER aka FRANCES KELLER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of FRANCES L. KELLER A Petition For Probate has been filed by CAROL STENBERG in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. The Petition For Probate requests that CAROL STENBERG, be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests the decedent’s will codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act with limited authority. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain and very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held on July 1, 2013 at 8:30 AM in Dept. 9 located at 111 N. Hill St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. If You Object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections, with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If Your Are A Creditor or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four

JUNE 21, 2013

months from the hearing date noticed above. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: CAROL STENBERG 3640 Monica LONG BEACH, CA 90808 Attorney for Petitioner: Elizabeth Vozzella, Esq. 3553-A Atlantic Ave. #187 Long Beach, CA 90807 Pub. Signal Tribune, June 7, 14, 21, 2013

TST4383 / Case No. NS027336 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 415 W. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. PETITION OF Tobeshi Ugwumba For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner TOBESHI UGWUMBA, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: TOBESHI UGWUMBA. Proposed Name: TOBECHI UGWUMBA; 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: July 19, 2013; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. 11, Room 31. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: June 14, 21, 28, & July 5, 2013. ___//ss//___ Ross M. Klein, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: June 7, 2013

TST4384 / 2013 119171 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: VELOCITY TRADING GROUP, 2202 S. Figueroa St. #653, Los Angeles, CA 900072049. Registrant: DARRIN ABNER, 2202 S. Figueroa St. #653, Los Angeles, CA 900072049. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Darrin Abner. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on June 10, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 10, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 14, 21, 28, & July 5, 2013.

TST4385 / 2013 119205 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: TECHTURNAL, 2202 S. Figueroa St. #653, Los Angeles, CA 90007-2049. Registrant: DARRIN ABNER, 2202 S. Figueroa St. #653, Los Angeles, CA 90007-2049. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Darrin Abner. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on June 10, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 10, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 14, 21, 28, & July 5, 2013.

TST4386 / 2013 121280 STATEMENT oF ABANDoNMENT oF USE oF FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: SECURITY MINI STORAGE, located at 1328 Newport Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on January 25, 2012, original File No. 2012 2014000, in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant: KAREN POWELL BRISCOE, 395 Main St., Quincy, CA 95971. This business is conducted by: an Individual. Signed: Karen Powell Briscoe. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 12, 2013. Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 14, 21, 28, & July 5, 2013. TST4387 / 2013 121304 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SECURITY MINI STORAGE, 1328 Newport Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: TRISHA MARIE CARTER, 2514 E. Willow St. #309, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Trisha Marie Carter. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 11, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 14, 21, 28, & July 5, 2013.

TST4388 / 2013 121305 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: RED DOOR LIVING, 6512 E. 2nd St., Long Beach, CA 90803. Registrant: DORIAN BOLICK, 615 Avery Place, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Dorian Bolick. The registrant


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TST4399 / 2013 127517 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: HOT n SPICY GOURMET, 412 W. 35th Court, Long Beach, CA 90806. Registrant: MICHAEL SHERMAN JONES, 412 W. 35th Court, Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michael Sherman Jones. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 19, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 21, 28, & July 5, 12, 2013.

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TST4400 / 2013 127518 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BONIFACIA INDIVIDUAL COACHING, 733 Junipero Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: BONNIE R. SHAW, 733 Junipero Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Bonnie R. Shaw. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on June 6, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 19, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 21, 28, & July 5, 12, 2013.

TST4401 / 2013 127519 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: PAICITAS TACOS, 154 W. Market St., Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: JOAQUIN CASTANEDA, 154 W. Market St., Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Joaquin Castaneda. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 19, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 21, 28, & July 5, 12, 2013.

TST4398 / 2013 127159 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: ZENSATIONS, 1777 Bellflower Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90815. Registrant: JANET COLE, 3613 Monogram Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Janet Cole. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 18, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 21, 28, & July 5, 12, 2013.

TST4393 / 2013 117361 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SIGNAL HILL NAILS, 2201 E. Willow St. Ste. A, Signal Hill, CA 90755 . Registrant: THAM NGOC TRAN, 1022 S. Shannon St., Santa Ana, CA 92704. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Tham Ngoc Tran. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 6, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 21, 28, & July 5, 12, 2013.

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TST4389 / 2013 121327 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. MASONRY AND TILE TOOL, 2. AMERICAN SHORT LOAD CONCRETE, 7033 McManus St., Lakewood, CA 90713. Registrant: LARRY ANDRE, 7033 McManus St., Lakewood, CA 90713. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Larry Andre. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in 1978. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 11, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 14, 21, 28, & July 5, 2013.

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has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on November 11, 2009. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 11, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 14, 21, 28, & July 5, 2013.

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ST3503 - June 21_Layout 1 6/21/13 11:55 AM Page 18

18 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Scams

NEWS

Whitmore also described a “relative in distress scam,” which has been common in Long Beach. In one instance, a suspect, who acted as an elderly continued from page 5 woman’s granddaughter, called the victim and claimed to be in jail in Mexico in need of $45,000 for bail. After the victim wired over the money, the over the phone. It will not work that way.” Smith said there are also recent reports of real-estate fraud, in which suspect called a second time requesting $20,000 be sent through a Moneyagents claim to be able to help seniors out of foreclosure or provide assis- Gram transfer. A bank teller was able to notice something suspicious and brought the tance with loan modifications or home refinancing, only to run off with their transfer to the attention of the bank’s manager, who contacted family money money. El Cid de Ramos, a specialist assistant from the Los Angeles County members, and the victim didn’t transfer any further money. “That’s what Assessor’s office, added that any caller or mailer offering to reduce a per- happens when you have a good relationship with your bank,” Whitmore son’s taxes is a scam, since the county assessor’s office provides such serv- said. She said Long Beach is also rampant with “gypsies” or transient crimiices free of charge. ���Most scams these days are regarding the decline in the market, so peo- nals, who often intimidate elderly victims for up-front payments for services ple are sending information saying, ‘give us $45 and we will get your taxes or car repairs, saying, “I can fix that dent for you” but never follow through. Another common scam in Long Beach in the last few years has been reduced,’” he said. “That is a scam. The assessor’s office does it for free.” utility-worker imposters, described as men in their 30s wearing polo shirts, Whitmore said a “pigeon-drop scam” often involves a suspect, who in some cases is in the country illegally, trying to cash a large inheritance, tar- who burglarize homes, Whitmore said. She said real utility workers are idengeting Hispanic seniors who only speak Spanish. Using a second suspect to tifiable by their uniforms, have City-issued identification, carry official act as a contributor with “good-faith money” to develop trust, the suspects forms and always provide contact information, adding that utility workers almost always show up out upon request for service only. later walk away with the cash, never to be seen again. Whitmore encouraged seniors to call the LBPD about any incident that arouses suspicion. She also told seniors to: not keep their social security cards in their wallets; get on the “do not call” and “do not mail” registries; keep checkbooks in a safe place at home; and always shred important documents. TST4394 NoTICE oF A PUBLIC HEARING “Being a victim of any type of scam is never pleasant,” Whitmore said. “Victims often feel angry depressed and/or violated. If NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, July 2, 2013, the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City this sounds familiar, don’t beat yourself up. Con artists are very Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider the following: good at their craft and have fooled many individuals, including doctors, college professors and even cops. The best way to move past ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT 13-01 this is to be informed about the scams and pass the word.” • ADDING CHAPTER 20.23 “TRUCKING YARD PERFORMANCE STANDARDS” TO THE Not all scams are easily discerned, however. SIGNAL HILL MUNICIPAL CODE, AMENDING FOOTNOTE (LL) SECTION 20.20.020, “USE Rosemary Lewallen, coordinator for the Long Beach Elder CLASSIFICATIONS” AND REPLACING THE 2006 LIST OF EXISTING TRUCKING YARDS Abuse Prevention Team, described a case in which an 89-year-old WITH A REVISED LIST. MINIMUM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS OF TRUCKING YARDS INCLUDE: man in Los Alamitos posted an ad on the Internet looking for a care• A current business license giver. He had low vision, and his wife had died. • Best Management Practices under the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System for The man became infatuated with a 40-year-old woman whom urban and storm water runoff he hired, showering her with gifts, buying her a diamond ring and • Yard improvements for dust and dirt track-out reduction • Screened perimeter fencing taking her on trips. But, as soon as the elderly man became fully • Maintenance of perimeter landscaping blind and fell ill, the woman left and hasn’t returned since, taking • A reduced time frame for discontinuance of the use much of his money with her, Lewallen said. Although it’s uncertain • A prohibition for increasing the intensity of the use whether the man’s financial losses were due to gambling or the • Annual inspection report to the City Council woman, Lewallen said his family hesitated to get involved out of ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this public hearing to present writembarrassment. ten information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. Lewallen described another case in which a man in his 60s was If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be overheard at the Long Beach Senior Center talking about drugging limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the pubolder, wealthy women to take advantage of them and later maniplic hearings. ulate them into turning their homes over to him. She said authorities A NEGATIVE DECLARATION has been prepared in conjunction with the subject project are currently investigating the case. based on an initial study finding of no significant environmental impacts associated with the

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

project. The initial study and associated documents were made available to the public during the public review period from May 3, 2013 to May 23, 2013 and no comments were received. FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Colleen Doan, Associate Planner, at cdoan@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 9897344. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper per Gov’t Code §65091(a)(4): June 21, 2013 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010 on or before: June 21, 2013 Mailed to affected property owners and tenants: June 21, 2013

MORE INFORMATION Long Beach Forgery/Fraud Detail: (562) 570-7330 The Internet Crime Complaint Center: ic3.gov Federal Trade Commission: ftccomplaintassistant.gov Elder Abuse Hotline: (800) 722-0432 The Eldercare Locator: (800) 677-1116 or eldercare.gov

JUNE 21, 2013

LBPD warns of rental scams

The Long Beach Police Fraud Detail has experienced an increase in calls from the community regarding home-rental scams and is encouraging prospective tenants to conduct transactions in person and proceed with caution, according to a press release issued by the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD). The most common scams include: • Unrealistic prices Large, single-family homes offered for rent at a fraction of a reasonable amount, such as a 5,300-square-foot home renting for $800 to $1,500 • No personal interaction The complete rental process (application, rental transaction, and other miscellaneous paperwork) being done exclusively over the Internet or telephone, with no personal, face-to-face interaction • No keys sent as promised Prospective tenants are told to wire the security deposit or rental payment to an out-of-state address via Western Union or U.S. mail. They are advised that the rental agreement and/or keys will be mailed to them after the payment has been sent. • Suspects using “for sale” properties to hook and scam prospective tenants Prospective tenants searching the Internet locate a potential rental property, but when they drive by for further consideration, they discover it has a “for sale” sign posted. They seek clarification by phoning the Internet contact person and are told to disregard the sign. The leaser may also direct the prospective tenant to neither disturb the current residents nor call the listed realtor, since the leaser doesn’t want anyone to dispute his story. The unsuspecting applicant proceeds with the application process, in good faith, but later realizes it’s a scam. The LBPD is encouraging community members to share this information with their family and friends, in an effort to reduce their chances of falling prey to these scams. Contact the LBPD Forgery/Fraud Detail at (562) 5707330 for more information. Source: LBPD

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JUNE 21, 2013

Artist

continued from page 12

Is there a piece that you favor more than others? Yes. Always. But it keeps changing, depending on how I feel about my latest projects.

Is there anything you hope people can take away from your pieces? I hope, through my murals, to make people’s daily lives more enjoyable and richer. A historical and beautiful mural becomes part of people’s daily lives. That is a wonderful thing for me. With my paintings, I hope to be able to express feelings and emotions through depicting scenes that people can resonate with and feel a sense of communion with the world they live in and experience.

Oil sites

In what type of setting do you work best? Alone or with one or two others doing their own thing as well. Mostly outdoors, too.

NEWS

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

19

Are there any artists that influenced you? Van Gogh, Monet, Rembrandt, Toulouse-Lautrec, Winslow Homer, Maxfield Parrish, etc.

How has your art shaped who you are today, or who you want to be? Art has been the defining element in my life. I have pursued nothing much else, and it has allowed me to develop and expand the sensitivities to and awareness of the world and life around me that were always there. To experience the world through the eyes of an artist is a very profound experience. MORE INFORMATION artmortimer.com

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continued from page 8

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One of seven oil drill sites owned and operated by Signal Hill Petroleum is located in the hilltop area of the city and includes water-treatment facilities for reinjecting wells with water.

dles about 2 million McF of natural gas per day, he said. Signal Hill Petroleum also provides vapor recovery for all of the 17 independent oil-well operators in the city as well, McDaniel said. The plant is one of two sites that filters water extracted for oil-producing purposes that is then re-injected at a low pressure back into the ground as “brine water,” using corrosive inhibitors, all in a 24-hour cycle, he said. “We re-inject every barrel we take,” McDaniel said. The CUP allows for oil and gas production and handling, electrical generation and distribution, drilling, re-drilling, maintaining wells, gas-production handling and oil and gas testing. Signal Hill Petroleum is also required to follow an Idle Well Management Plan. McDaniel said the State’s Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR) requires that the operator return to service or properly abandon 10 wells per year, however the company continues to “stay ahead of the game.” In terms of opportunities for re-drilling, he said, “the future is bright,” adding that results from an ongoing seismic survey that started about three years ago in portions of Signal Hill and Long Beach are promising. “We’ve been re-drilling for the past few years,” McDaniel said. “We have two drilling rigs, and we believe there’s a lot of potential and a lot of opportunity… It’s an ongoing process with the seismic surveying. The data is coming in that is very exciting to us, and that’s why we feel there’s a lot of opportunity here.” ß

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TST4397 NoTICE oF oRDINANCE ADoPTIoN

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4396 NoTICE oF oRDINANCE INTRoDUCTIoN

Ordinance No. 2013-06-1455 was introduced by the City Council at their meeting of Tuesday, June 18, 2013. A summary of the ordinance is as follows:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING SIGNAL HILL MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 12.16 ENTITLED STORM WATER/URBAN RUNOFF, TO EXPAND THE APPLICABILITY OF THE EXISTING POLLUTANT SOURCE REDUCTION REQUIREMENTS BY IMPOSING RAINWATER LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT (LID) STRATEGIES ON CERTAIN PROJECTS THAT REQUIRE BUILDING, GRADING AND ENCROACHMENT PERMITS

A copy of the full text of the ordinance is available in the City Clerk’s Office and on the City’s website www.cityofsignalhill.org. Second reading and adoption of this Ordinance is scheduled for Tuesday, July 2, 2013. Kathleen L. Pacheco City Clerk

Published in the Signal-Tribune newspaper on June 21, 2013. Posted at City Hall, Library, Discovery Well Park, and Reservoir Park on June 21, 2013.

Ordinance No. 2013-06-1454 was introduced by the City Council at their meeting of Tuesday, June 4, 2013, and adopted by the City Council at their meeting of June 18, 2013. A summary of the ordinance is as follows:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA, APPROVING ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT 13-02, ADOPTING TIME LIMITS FOR COMPLETION OF CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS BASED ON PROJECT SIZE AND PROJECT TYPE, INCLUDING AN EXTENSION APPROVAL PROCESS, AND AUTHORIZING CERTAIN FEES AND PENALTIES AYES: NOES:

ABSENT:

ABSTAIN:

The ordinance was adopted by the following vote:

Mayor Michael J. Noll, Vice Mayor Edward H.J. Wilson, Council Members Larry Forester, Tina L. Hansen, Lori Y. Woods None

None

None

Pursuant to Signal Hill City Charter Section 315, this ordinance shall become effective 30 days from and after the date of its adoption. A certified copy of the full text of the ordinance is available in the City Clerk’s Office. Kathleen L. Pacheco City Clerk

Published in the Signal-Tribune newspaper on June 21, 2013. Posted at City Hall, Library, Discovery Well Park, and Reservoir Park on June 21, 2013.


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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JUNE 21, 2013

20

INSTANT $100.00 MANUFACTURER’S REBATE

FOR ONE WEEK ONLY!

on all Leather and Fabric Comfort Designs Recliners All styles of Comfort Designs Recliners, stock or special orders, will qualify for an instant $100.00 manufacturer’s rebate off of our sale prices.

These quality American-made recliners can be customized to fit into any decor. Choose from hundreds of fabrics and leathers. Come in today to experience these quality hand-crafted recliners.

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