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ST3450 - May 17_Layout 1 5/17/13 11:46 AM Page 1

Close-up view of “Long Beach,” giclee print by Joan Sanders See page 9.

Vol. 34 No. 50

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

WRD board approves 9.9-percent increase in water-pumping assessment rate amid protests

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Despite diagnosis of HIV almost 30 years ago, Signal Hill Councilmember Larry Forester hasn’t slowed down

Sean Belk Staff Writer

The Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) Board of Directors voted unanimously (4-0) to increase its assessment for pumping water from underground aquifers by 9.9 percent, effective July 1, during a nearly three-hour public hearing last Friday, May 10. Boardmember Lillian Kawasaki was absent, and Boardmember Willard H. Murray Jr. was absent during most of the public testimony but present for the vote. The public hearing that drew a crowd of more than 75 people to the WRD’s headquarters in Lakewood was the agency’s first attempt to comply with Proposition 218, a state law that requires governments to notify property owners and give them the right to protest any proposed increases in assessments and taxes before they’re voted on and approved. Under the law, a majority protest of more than 50 percent of the property owners being assessed the fee invalidates any rate increase. According to WRD staff, the notices were sent out to all parcel owners, holders of pump rights and well owners within the WRD’s 420-square-mile service area, which overlies 43 cities and a population of just under 4 million in the Central and West Coast Basins of southeast Los Angeles County. The WRD board approved the rate

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Water Replenishment District of Southern California board members listen to public testimony during a May 10 hearing, during which the board approved a 9.9-percent increase to the assessment for pumping groundwater. Pictured, from left, are: Board President Albert Robles, who represents Division 5; Division 4 Boardmember Sergio Calderon; and Division 2 Boardmember Robert Katherman.

hike, despite several objections brought by the cities of Signal Hill, Downey and Cerritos, which have filed a lawsuit against the agency for not complying with the state law in previous years. Although a Los Angeles Superior Court judge filed rulings in 2011 that favor the cities’ position, the case is still awaiting a final judg-

ment that would determine monetary damages. Since the initial court ruling was issued, the cities and others have withheld replenishment assessment (RA) payments that WRD staff said are expected to total $18.9 million by the end of the year.

Courtesy Larry Forester

Signal Hill Councilmember Larry Forester, pictured here at Long Beach’s annual Lesbian & Gay Pride parade in 2011, will also appear in this year’s parade on Sunday. Although diagnosed with HIV in 1985 and then with AIDS in 1994, Forester has dedicated much of his energy toward his work on the Council and other volunteer projects.

CJ Dablo

Rock For Vets band plays in the key of life

Staff Writer

see WRD page 4

Larry Forester didn’t seem at all to mind a little controversy on a recent Friday afternoon. Clad in a pink shirt with a matching handkerchief that popped out of the pocket of his navy-blue blazer, the Signal Hill Councilmember was on a mission. He faced leaders of the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) that afternoon at their Lakewood office. That day, he didn’t shy away from telling the agency that manages the groundwater for more than 40 cities that he objected to their recommendation to increase water rates. He didn’t shy away from reminding them about a lawsuit that Signal Hill and other cities had pursued against the agency. Later that afternoon, Forester, who eventually shed his blazer, sat down at a local coffee shop for an interview with the Signal Tribune. He sipped at his Hawaiian sea-salted caramel iced coffee as he reflected on how a diagnosis of HIV and

Sean Belk Staff Writer

They once carried guns, heavy artillery and radio equipment. Now, they carry a tune. Coming home from horrific combat situations during wars from Vietnam to Iraq and Afghanistan, many veterans struggle with depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), loneliness, alcohol and drug addictions and unemployment. But, for those in the Rock For Vets band, the minute they get up on stage, all those troubles seem to disappear. “I get up there for a couple hours at practice, and I’m able to just let all that stuff go,” said James Elliott, 48, who joined the United States Army in 1986 as a Ranger in the Airborne Infantry. After serving in the U.S. invasion of Panama during Operation Just Cause up until 1990 and then in Saudi Arabia for Operation Desert Storm, Elliott had battled with PTSD and drug addiction for years. But now, he has discovered a passion as a bassist, guitarist and

May 17, 2013

Courtesy Rock For Vets

Members of the Rock For Vets band, a music-instructional and educational program for rehabilitating veterans and others at risk, performs during a Vietnam Veterans Day concert. Pictured up front, from left, are: Steve “Red” Ovard (guitar); Cristina Calderon (vocals); and Bill Fletcher (harmonica).

backup vocalist for the band that Elliott said has given veterans a new avenue for self-expression and builds camaraderie among its members.

“It’s really helpful to be around other veterans, who understand what PTSD is, so, that way, you don’t have

Weekly Weather Forecast see VETS page 15

Monday

see FORESTER page 13

May 17 through May 21, 2013

Friday

Saturday

Mist in the morning

71°

Low clouds, then sunshine

Low clouds, then sunshine

Low clouds, then sunshine

Low clouds, then sunshine

Lo 58°

Lo 56°

Lo 58°

Lo 58°

Lo 56°

71°

Sunday

eventually AIDS and hepatitis C had changed him over the last three decades. Forester doesn’t shy away from talking about his health, either. He says he would never wish it on anybody, but the diagnosis of HIV, AIDS and hepatitis C made him rethink his life. Forester, now 66, was in his 30s when he was first diagnosed in 1985 with HIV and learned how the virus would compromise his immune system. Nearly a decade later, in 1994, he developed AIDS. Then another blow in 1999– doctors told Forester he also had hepatitis C. Forester says the drugs to treat hepatitis C counteract with the drugs to treat AIDS, and he acknowledges that the combined infections will likely kill him someday. Forester will appear in the Long Beach Gay & Lesbian Pride celebration alongside other leaders this weekend. A councilmember who has served the City of Signal Hill for more than a decade, Forester says he’s participated in the parade since 1998. The organization responsible

Tuesday

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NEWS

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

MAY 17, 2013

LB Water Department proposes increasing water rates to deal with rising costs Sean Belk Staff Writer

As costs for pumping and importing water continue to rise, Long Beach Water Department (LBWD) officials said this week they are proposing to increase water rates for the first time in more than three years. The Long Beach Board of Water Commissioners discussed the proposal during its meeting on Thursday, May 16. The board will further discuss whether to increase water rates and, if so, by how much, in addition to reforming its budget for capital improvement projects, in coming weeks before taking

final action on the LBWD’s budget on June 20. Under the Long Beach city charter, the LBWD’s budget must be signed off by the Long Beach City Council before Oct. 1. In order for the water commission to approve a rate increase, however, the LBWD is required to hold a public hearing and notify property owners of the hearing under Proposition 218. If 50 percent plus one of the property owners being levied the increased charge protest the proposal, the rate increase would be invalidated. The LBWD’s proposal to increase water rates comes just days after the

Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) Board of Directors voted unanimously (4-0) to increase its water-pumping assessment rate by 9.9 percent during a public hearing on May 10. (See story on page 1.) WRD charges nearly 175 pumpingright holders, such as municipal water agencies that are commonly referred to as “pumpers,” for costs incurred for replenishing underground aquifers in the Central and West Coast Basins of southeast Los Angeles County. Matthew Veeh, LBWD’s director of government and public affairs, said the increase in WRD’s replenishment

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assessment (RA) rate that goes into effect July 1 will have an impact of $800,000 on the water department’s overall water-fund budget or about a 1percent increase on LBWD’s revenue requirements. He added, however, that WRD’s increased rate is only “one piece of the puzzle.” Long Beach receives its potable water from two main sources: groundwater and imported water, according to the LBWD website. More than half of the city’s water supply is produced from groundwater wells in Long Beach, since the City owns pumping rights. The other portion mostly comes from treated surface water purchased from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD), which imports water from the Colorado River and northern California to supplement local supplies in parts of Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties. Another small portion (15 percent) comes from reclaimed water supplies. LBWD provides both water and sewer services. However, imported water is two to three times more expensive than groundwater, and Veeh noted that imported-water sources have increased prices as well. Last year, the MWD Board of Directors approved a two-year spending plan, which includes increasing its wholesale water rate by 5 percent at the beginning of the year and another 5 percent on Jan. 1, 2014. Veeh said the last time the LBWD increased its rate was for Fiscal Year 2010 that took effect on Oct. 1, 2009, raising the rate by 16 percent. He said LBWD charges different rates to singlefamily households, multi-family households and commercial-property owners. While each category has a different rate structure, all are charged the same rate increase, he added. Veeh said rate increases from both WRD and MWD were the two “driving forces” behind the need to increase LBWD’s water rates in 2009, besides rising labor costs and other charges. WRD Chief Financial Officer Scott Ota, however, said during the public hearing last week that most single-family households in the West Coast and Central Basins of the agency’s 420-square-mile service area only pay an average of about $10 or less per month for WRD-related costs through their water bills. Therefore, with WRD’s 9.9-percent increase, those households are expected to see their monthly water bills rise by about $1. Veeh said the average single-family household in Long Beach pays a

monthly water bill of about $42.22. According to WRD staff, the average single-family household in Signal Hill pays an average monthly water bill of about $47. Signal Hill, Cerritos and Downey, along with other cities, however, are involved in a legal dispute against WRD over allegations that the agency failed to comply with Proposition 218. Since a Los Angeles Superior Court judge ruled in favor of the cities in 2011, the cities’ attorneys have deemed that paying WRD’s assessment charges would constitute a “gift of public funds,” and the cities have so far withheld payments in liability accounts until a final judgment is entered by the courts. WRD officials said a total of $18.9 million in payments would be owed to the agency by the end of the year. Tesoro oil company was recently ordered to pay WRD back. After sending out nearly 800,000 public notices and concluding that a majority protest had not been established, the WRD board approved the RA rate increase, raising the rate from its current $244 per acre-feet of water pumped to $268 per acre-feet of water. A proposal to increase the rate by 22 percent was scrapped. Steve Myrter, Signal Hill public works director, however, said how much each municipal water utility would be impacted by WRD’s increased rate depends on how much water is imported and how much is pumped from underground aquifers. Each city and pumping-rights holder has its own formula for the percentage of water pumped from underground aquifers versus water purchased from imported-water sources, he said. In Signal Hill, nearly 95 percent of the City’s water is pumped from underground aquifers, which WRD eventually charges for replenishment. The other 5 percent is purchased from imported sources, Myrter said. In addition, he said about 26 percent of the City’s water department budget is associated with WRD-related costs, while the rest is primarily associated with purchasing imported water. If Signal Hill were to pay the WRD assessment, the increase in WRD’s rate would cost the City’s water department an additional $60,000 per year in revenue requirements, increasing Signal Hill’s operational costs to about 30 percent of the budget, Myrter estimates. “Our operating costs go up,” he said. “That’s the bottom line.” Myrter added that, this fiscal year, the City is required to pay a WRD assessment of more than $490,000. But, with the recently approved rate increase, the new annual WRD costs for Signal Hill are expected to jump to more than $540,000, he said. ß

LB City Attorney Robert Shannon announces resignation

Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

Long Beach City Attorney Robert Shannon has announced his resignation from his position, according to a memorandum provided by Karen Hester, executive assistant to the city attorney. Shannon sent the memorandum to the Long Beach City Council on May 14. Shannon has worked in the City Attorney’s office for the last 39 years, and his retirement will take effect July 2, according to the memorandum. “My career in the office has been professionally challenging and thoroughly rewarding, especially so in these last 15 years as

city attorney,” Shannon stated in the document. “During my tenure, I have been blessed with the support of an office of municipal attorneys and staff without equal in California. This fact has played a significant role in my decision as I am absolutely confident that I leave the office in experienced and capable hands.” Vice Mayor Robert Garcia sent the Signal Tribune an emailed statement about Shannon’s departure. “Bob Shannon has served Long Beach well, and he’s been a great friend and advisor,” he said. “We all wish him the very best on his next endeavor.”

To r e a d o r d o w n l o a d f u l l i s s u e s o f t h e S i g n a l Tr i b u n e , v i s i t

w w w. s i g n a l t r i b u n e . c o m

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NEWS

MAY 17, 2013

Signal Hill auto dealers gear up for summer sales with new Fiat, Cadillac dealerships Sean Belk Staff Writer

Two new car dealerships were added to the Signal Hill Auto Center in the last year, and local auto dealers are pumped for this year’s summer sales season, hoping to continue an upward trend brought on by improving market conditions. “Typically, this is a pretty good time of year for us,” said Bob Davis, president of Glenn E. Thomas Dodge Chrysler Jeep, which officially rolled out its new Fiat dealership at 2102 E. Spring St. in late March. Offering new and used models of the compact cars produced by the Italian auto-maker, Glenn E. Thomas Dodge Chrysler Jeep acquired the Fiat franchise several months ago and opened a temporary 2,200-square-foot showroom on the lot early last month. Signs along Spring Street can be seen pointing to the new dealership. After becoming the majority shareholder of Chrysler Group LLC in 2011, Fiat is now hoping to break into California’s electric-vehicle market. Hugo Parades, head of Internet sales and leasing for the Fiat dealer, said he suspects interest from customers will grow as people become more aware of the Fiat brand through advertising and learn of the new dealer in town. He said Fiat plans to roll out its new 2013 500e electric models by June. Fiat, considered the fourth-largest car manufacturer in Europe, is a relatively new “nameplate” in America since the automaker had disappeared from the United States for 20 years,

said Davis, who serves as president of the Signal Hill Auto Center Association. Fiat has returned to the U.S. market in California, looking to capitalize on the Golden State’s mandated shift to energy-efficient, zero-emissions vehicles. Davis said the new franchise dealership won’t compete with other brands on the lot and he hopes the new style of car will thrive, especially since sales of Chrysler Jeep models have declined throughout the years. “We don’t have anything that competes with [Fiat], so it’s a kind of a niche vehicle for us,” he said. “They’ve ramped up the advertising, which is good to bring some awareness to the brand and get people to at

least put Fiat on their shopping list. People love the car… and the styling and the colors. It’s a good California car.” Davis hopes to eventually relocate the Fiat dealership to a vacant threeacre lot located on the 1400 block of E. Spring Street at Walnut Avenue, adjacent to the Honda dealership. The empty lot was left behind from the dissolved redevelopment agency and is zoned for a car dealership. He said Glenn E. Thomas Dodge is working with Signal Hill city officials to acquire the land that is still moving through the redevelopment-dissolution process.

The Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) is again alerting residents about recent reports of persons falsely representing themselves as utility workers as a ruse to commit burglary. In this alleged scam, the phony “employees” work as a team to distract the occupant and burglarize the home. Typically, the suspects set their sights on the senior community. Victims of this type of crime are encouraged to call Long Beach Police Dispatch at 9-1-1 or (562)

435-6711 to file a report. Utility employees are identifiable by their uniform and are required, upon request, to show an official identification card. Customer contact is made either in person by a uniformed employee or through a form that is left in a prominent location on the property. The form provides a contact number to inquire about the work scheduled or to reschedule the work at a more convenient time. If in doubt, residents are encouraged to call the appropriate depart-

ment or company to verify the legitimacy of the employee: • Long Beach Gas and Oil, (562) 570-2140– 24 hours a day, 7 days a week • Long Beach Water Department, (562) 570-2300– 24 hours a day, 7 days a week • Southern California Edison Customer Service, (800) 655-4555 • Corix Utilities (water & gas meter readers)– (562) 424-4223

On Wednesday, May 15, at approximately 11:15am, Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) officers responded to a four-vehicle hit-and-run traffic collision at Carson Street and Clark Avenue that resulted in the death of an adult female and the arrest of an adult male. The preliminary investigation revealed that 21-year-old Mario Palafox of Bellflower was driving a 1992 Lexus westbound on Carson Street and allegedly at a high rate of speed, when he collided with three vehicles that were stopped in the left-turn bay of westbound Carson Street. The suspect vehicle first collided with a 1985 Toyota Supra, forcing that vehicle forward into a 2005 Scion TC, and that vehicle into

a 2007 Ford Mustang. The force of the collision caused major damage to the Toyota, and the female driver was pronounced deceased at the scene from injuries sustained by the impact. She has been identified as 47-year-old Elane Logay of Long Beach. Suspect Palafox fled from the scene on foot after the collision, was located on the Long Beach City College campus and was subsequently arrested for vehicular homicide, felony hit-and-run, and being an unlicensed driver. He was transported to a local hospital for treatment of moderate injuries. The driver of the Scion was transported to a local hospital with nonlifethreating injuries, while the driver of the Mustang was released at the scene. It is

unknown if any of the parties involved are students at Long Beach City College. Those with information regarding this incident are asked to contact Long Beach Police Department Collision Investigations Detective David Lauro at (562) 570-7355.

3

SAY WHAT? What Hearing device exhibit Who The Hearing Loss Association of America Long Beach/Lakewood Chapter Where Weingart Senior Center, 5220 Oliva Ave. in Lakewood When Friday, May 17 from 10am to noon More Info Local residents can get a free hands-on display of devices that help with hearing difficulties and receive information on how the devices work and where they can be purchased. Call (562) 630-6141.

WANT TO EAT OUT? What Food truck night Who California Heights United Methodist Church Where 3759 Orange Ave. When Friday, May 17 from 5:30pm to 8pm More Info Food trucks Rancho a Go Go, Corn Heaven, and Bite Me Foods will be on site. Call (562) 595- 1996.

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Glenn E. Thomas Dodge Chrysler Jeep is hoping to see more interest in sales of its new and used Fiat models, seen here parked at its new dealership, which is the latest addition to the Signal Hill Auto Center.

LBPD warning residents of burglars posing as utility workers

see DEALERSHIPS page 14

Source: LBPD

Woman killed, man arrested in four-vehicle hit-and-run collision

LBPD, DUI task force planning weekend saturation patrols

Officers from the Long Beach Police Department’s DUI Enforcement Team, assisted by police officers from the Avoid the 100 (law-enforcement agencies) DUI Task Force, will deploy this weekend to stop and arrest alcohol- and drugimpaired drivers. DUI saturation patrols will deploy on Saturday, May 18, between 6pm and 2am, in areas with high frequencies of DUI collisions and/or arrests. “California’s roadways are very much safer than they were before 2006,” said Office of Traffic Safety

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Director Christopher J. Murphy. “The Long Beach Police Department will be keeping the pressure on through enforcement and public awareness so that we can continue saving lives and reach the vision we all share– toward zero deaths, every 1 counts.” Funding for the program is from a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Source: LBPD

Source: LBPD

IN THE KNOW What North Long Beach Community Assembly Who Councilmembers Al Austin and Steven Neal Where Glad Tidings Church, 1900 E. South St. When Saturday, May 18 from 10am to noon More Info Guest speaker Doug Haubert will discuss public-safety efforts his office has undertaken in north Long Beach and throughout the city. Austin and Neal will also provide updates on projects in the 8th and 9th Council Districts. There will also be public-safety and neighborhood updates. Call (562) 570-6685 or email district8@longbeach.gov .

BREATHE BETTER What Asthma Resource Fair Who 5th District City Councilmember Gerrie Schipske Where Admiral Kidd Park, 2125 Santa Fe Ave. When Saturday, May 18 from 10am to 2pm More Info The free event will feature information on asthma prevention and control, including free health screenings by doctors, allergists and respiratory therapists, educational materials and connections to vital resources and support services. There will be mobile clinics, drawings, door prizes and healthy snacks for all attendees. The Greener Good Farmers Market will be open during the fair. Call (562) 427- 4249 or visit longbeach.gov/health .

GET MOTIVATED What 1st Annual Women’s Healthy Lifestyle Luncheon Who Writer Shawond Givens of the blog “A Curvy Girl’s Journey” Where Long Beach Marriott, 4700 Airport Plaza Dr. When Saturday, May 18 from 1pm to 5pm More Info The luncheon will feature a variety of experts who will share tips on how to live a better lifestyle, both physically and mentally. Fitness guru Jerry Anderson will be the keynote speaker. Cost is $50. Call Shawond at (866) 634-6586.

GOURMET-FOOD TRUCK NIGHT What Monthly fundraising event Who Meals on Wheels and Belmont Heights United Methodist Church Where 317 Termino Ave. When Saturday, May 18 from 5pm to 9pm More Info Monthly event takes place every third Saturday of the month and features five food trucks and live music. A HELPING HAND What 5th Annual Long Beach Basket Brigade Fundraiser Who The Long Beach Basket Brigade Where The Grand, 4101 E. Willow St. When Saturday, May 18 starting at 5:30pm More Info Money raised will be used to assist families in need. Email Kym at kym@lbbb.org or visit longbeachbasketbrigade.org .

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ST3450 - May 17_Layout 1 5/17/13 11:46 AM Page 4

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

WRD

staff that a majority protest had not been established under all three scenarios: parcel owners, holders of pump rights and well owners. WRD staff stated that within both basins there are 175 holders of pumping rights, 657 wells and 793,800 assessment parcels. WRD staff said only 341 protests were received by mail or hand-delivered before the public hearing was concluded. A total of 324 protests were from parcel owners and 17 were from pumping-right holders. Edward Casey, the lead attorney representing WRD in several lawsuits regarding Proposition 218, argued that WRD has followed the law. “A couple of years ago, those cities sued the District on the claim that the District did not give enough notices under Prop 218,” Casey said. “They then withheld $18 million on the basis of that claim, but now, a couple years later, they say that the District has given too much notice under Prop 218 even though that notice led to a number people coming here for the first time.” Some residents, water-utility representatives and city officials solely objected to WRD’s higher rate but had no objection to its procedures to follow Proposition 218. The approved 9.9-percent increase in the RA rate, raising from its current charge of $244 per acre feet of water pumped to $268 per acre feet of water, allows WRD to purchase 16,000 acre

continued from page 1

Officials and property owners from these cities and others submitted written protests, claiming that the WRD’s recent attempt to comply with the law in which the agency had sent out nearly 800,000 public notices doesn’t follow proper procedures and constitutes a “waste of public funds,” adding that some notices were sent to wrong addresses, while some property owners didn’t receive a notice at all. City officials objected to so many notices being sent out, stating that they should have only gone out to the “pumpers,” which own pumping rights and are responsible for paying the RA fees. “Your current attempt to comply [with Proposition 218] has not been in good faith and fails under any reasonable interpretation of the law,” said Signal Hill City Councilmember Larry Forester during the public hearing. “WRD continues to raise water rates with no reasonable justification. Our agency has been forced to make significant cuts in services to our residents during the recession… WRD has circumvented the rights of the pumpers to properly notice the protest by sending $1 million worth of unnecessary mailers to our residents and businesses who still do not know what your mailing means. Your purpose was to dilute the protest.” Still, it was determined by WRD

Thoughts from the Publisher

by Neena Strichart

We all know that with the way the economy has been behaving, or misbehaving, for so long, many of our local nonprofits and charities are finding quite a dip in monetary donations and even a decline in volunteer hours that had been so generously given in the past. Folks have been struggling to make their own ends meet, and giving to a charity in some cases has been considered a budgeted luxury. Tough times call for creative measures, and it looks as if Long Beach Playhouse has come up with a winner. I recently received a press release telling of an upcoming

NEWS

feet of water from imported sources. WRD staff had previously proposed increasing the rate by 22 percent or to $298 per acre feet of water, however, the agency’s Budget Committee and technical advisory committee, which includes water-utility representatives from Central and West Coast basin associations, ended up recommending the smaller increase. Forester said that he had an issue with the WRD’s keeping over $100 million in reserves, while Signal Hill city officials have stated that the WRD has increased its rate by 96 percent since 2006. “A special-purpose district has no need to maintain unlimited amounts of reserves, especially when it does this type of taxation,” he said. WRD General Manager Robb Whitaker, however, said that, as of March 31, the balance of unrestricted reserves was $6.7 million, beyond the reserves restricted for capital projects and water purchases. Scott Ota, WRD chief financial officer, said that WRD was able to “stabilize” the RA rate last fiscal year by using $21 million in carry-over funds, however, this fiscal year the WRD is budgeting a shortfall in its ability to purchase imported water needed to replenish aquifers. He added that, despite an increase in demands and regulations, the WRD has cut projects, programs and administrative costs in fiscal years 2012-13 and 2013-14 for a total decrease of more than $3.3 million.

MAY 17, 2013

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Signal Hill City Councilmember Larry Forester gives public testimony in protest of a proposal by the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) to increase its replenishment assessment by 9.9 percent. He said the WRD did not follow proper procedures in complying with Proposition 218.

OPINION

WRD Board President Albert Robles, who was the only board member to speak during the public hearing, pointed out that the costs for purchasing imported water is expected to rise by an additional 5 percent starting next year, which comes out to a $75 increase in fees charged to the WRD, nearly three times more than the WRD’s own rate increase. WRD staff stated that the average single-family household pays $10 a month or less in WRD-related costs. With the 9.9-percent increase, most households will see their monthly water bills rise only a dollar, according to WRD staff. Signal Hill city officials, however,

event intended to help procure a financial boost to what is, for some, their favorite local theatrical venue. When I shared the creative fundraising concept with my dear hubby Steve, he quickly replied, “I wouldn’t miss it.” Now, for a guy who usually shies away from social soirees to volunteer to attend, it must be a winner. We’ll be sharing more about the event with you over the next few weeks. However, please read the full press release below, get out your checkbooks and plan to see us there.

Politicians, community leaders and actors will again gather at the offices of Keesal, Young and Logan to talk about Long Beach politics, culture and newsmakers, this time on Wednesday, June 5 at 5:30pm. Tongues firmly in cheek, these local political players promise to reveal the real truth about all that is happening in town. This year’s production, A Return to the Long Beach Home Companion, will be presented in the style of an old-timey radio

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR On the rebound Why can’t Long Beach leave the streets in the beautiful neighborhoods of Los Cerritos and Bixby Knolls

Are we being ‘street’wise?

alone? And I don’t mean not re-paving those roads that need it– Long Beach already does that. Remember the fiasco with diagonal parking along Atlantic Avenue in the Bixby Knolls business district? That street was made so crooked it was harder to follow than the IRS Code. It was actually laughable to anyone who drove it unless he/she thought about the wasted taxpayer money that could have benefitted other neighborhoods which really do need improvements to their streets. (It wasn’t too funny either if it happened to be a foggy night and you couldn’t keep in your lane.) Eventually parallel parking was restored and the traffic lanes straightened out. Big changes made to California Avenue behind the Bixby Knolls Shopping Center were another colossal failure. The apparent intent was to reduce cut-through traffic on the residential streets, but the modifications made getting in and out of the shopping center by way of California Avenue far more difficult. After a very short time, those changes too were reversed. It’s hard to know if these kinds of problems are the result of incompetence by the City Traffic Engineering Department or insistence on the changes by the councilperson for the district. Whichever it is, they are about to happen again. This time it’s because 7th District Councilman James Johnson insists on an unnecessary bicycle lane on Pacific Avenue through Los Cerritos. Pacific Avenue, there, may well be the widest residential street in Long Beach. If not, it’s close. Cyclists currently have no problem at all sharing the road with motor vehicles. If you can’t safely navigate that street without a separate lane painted on the pavement, you don’t belong on a bicycle. The City’s Traffic Engineer says he has recently discovered that Pacific Avenue at Wardlow Road has a 10-year history as a dangerous intersection and absolutely must have a new traffic signal, even though it will cause Wardlow Road to have even worse traffic jams than it already has. It also just happens to be where Councilmember Johnson wants the new bike path to cross Wardlow Road! How fortuitous. Mary Jo Wegner Lakewood Neena R. Strichart

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

ASSISTANT EDITOR/STAFF WRITER

Sean Belk

Barbie Ellisen

COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

STAFF WRITER

CJ Dablo

Shoshanah Siegel

DESIGN EDITOR

Cory Bilicko

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Jane Fallon

show. The show is written by Gazette Executive Editor Harry Saltsgaver and performed by the Long Beach Political Players, which include George Deukmejian, Evan Anderson Braude, Justin Rudd, Blair Cohn, Randy Gordon, Doris Topsy-Elvord, Gigi Fusco Meese, Gerrie Schipske, Mike DuRee, Laura Doud and Mitchell Nunn. Straight Talk host Art Levine will provide sound effects. In addition to the radio show, there will be a buffet and cocktails. There will be raffles for gift cards and services from local businesses. The event is a fundraiser for the Playhouse. Tickets, which are $85 each, are limited. Call the Playhouse box office at (562) 494-1014 ext. 1. All proceeds support the productions and programs of the Long Beach Playhouse, including plays of all types, collaborative productions, comedy nights, guest lecturers, regionally recognized youth- and adult-education programs and the New Works Festival.

Thanks to a rebounding economy, tough decisions made by Democratic legislators and voter approval of a temporary tax increase, our state budget has reached stability. In an effort to maintain these positive gains and strengthen our state, Assembly Democrats have created the “Blueprint for a Responsible Budget,” a set of guidelines for lawmakers as we craft the state budget in time for the June 15 deadline. As California’s budget process moves into high gear with the Legislature working to pass a final, balanced budget by June 15, I, along with other Assembly Democrats will focus on these key aspects of the Blueprint: • Continuing fiscal responsibility, including passing a balanced budget, paying down our debt and creating a rainy-day fund to protect from future economic downturns • Strengthening the middle class by increasing access to education for all students, investing in small businesses and providing a safety net to get people back on their feet and contributing to the economy • Delivering effective, efficient services for Californians by ending red tape and bureaucratic delays for businesses, veterans and all Californians including shortening processing times for business filings If you have any questions about the budget, the Blueprint or legislation, please call my office at (916) 319-2070, or to read the Blueprint [visit http://asmdc.org/issues/budget-blueprint]. Also please make sure to spread the word by texting, tweeting and posting. Time is short, so we need to generate as much support as possible as quickly as possible. With your help we can slash college fees by 40 percent and help more families once again afford higher education in California. Bonnie Lowenthal California State Assembly 70th District

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

have said that WRD costs make up 31 percent of the City’s water-department budget. South Gate City Councilmember Bill De Witt agreed with other cities that the notices should have only gone to the pumpers, but he called on the WRD board to come to an agreement to quell rising litigation costs, which WRD is budgeting at about $2.5 million in fiscal years 2013-14. “Let’s see if we can get a package together,” he said. “Let’s get these cities together and see if we can hammer out some compromises so we’re not cutting at each other’s throats… It’s an expense we all bear.” ß

Leighanna Nierle

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

CULTURE WRITERS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

Tanya Paz

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Ariana Gastelum Leonardo Poareo Brandy Soto

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

ADMINISTRATIVE INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com

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MAY 17, 2013

COMMUNITY

Vice Mayor Garcia to host Armory Park update meeting Long Beach Vice Mayor Robert Garcia will host a final community meeting about the Armory Park project next Monday, May 20 from 6pm to 7:30pm at the Pacific Island Ethnic Art Museum, 695 Alamitos Ave. The new park will remove a dangerous intersection at 7th Street and Alamitos Avenue and create new green space on a full city block adjacent to the Museum of Latin American Art, according to Garcia’s office.

The project is fully funded and construction will begin at the end of the year. “We intend to not only build a great green space but a park unlike any other in the city,” Garcia said. “We are planning on an innovative design that will provide recreation space and make a statement.” The community meeting is open to the public, and items to be discussed include design, parking

impacts and official park naming. The Public Works and Parks and Recreation Departments will be in attendance to hear community feedback. Design elements that will be included in the almost one-acre park include a playground, skate elements and a multipurpose plaza and amphitheater.

Rancho offering children hands-on approach to learning history Source: Garcia’s office

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

HoW To AVoID PRoBATE

5

Probate is a very costly and long process that can last from 9 to 18 months in most cases. Fortunately, there are several alternatives available that remove the asset from one’s probatable estate while that person is still alive. Naming a beneficiary on life insurance policies, IRA’s, 401(k)’s, and annuities before your death assures the asset is transferred straight to the chosen beneficiary. Joint Tenancy is where the owner of the asset names a co-owner of an account or real property. Caution: Joint tenancies have risks as the co-owner has the same rights to the asset as the original owner and a loss of Stepped-up valuation. Pay-on-death Accounts are similar to naming a beneficiary in that the bank account owner completes banking paperwork which names the person(s) who will receive the bank account upon the bank owner’s death. Lifetime Gifts given during your life avoids probate because probate only applies to those assets owned at time of death. A Living Trust is very beneficial when dealing with titled real property and other assets. A complete estate plan included in the Living Trust includes many ancillary documents that protect you financially, physically and allows for peace of mind.

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May 4-June 1

Courtesy Rancho Los Cerritos

Rancho Los Cerritos Historic Site’s “Summer Adventures” are weeklong historically themed camps for children ages 6 to 11– designed to allow today’s urban children to learn about history through hands-on activities.

Rancho Los Cerritos Historic Site, 4600 Virginia Rd., will host “Summer Adventures,” weeklong historically themed camps for children ages 6 to 11, beginning July 15. The camps, which are designed to allow children who live in urban areas to learn about history by “doing” history, will include historic crafts and activities, games, stories, and special guests. The camps will be conducted in three sessions: Vaquero Adventures, from July 15 to July 19; Old-Time Adventures, from July 22 to July 26; and Adobe Adventures, from July 29 to Aug. 2.

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In Vaquero Adventures, children will learn about cattle-ranching and fiestas by designing brands, churning butter, drawing diseño maps, cutting papel picado and making tortillas. They will also get to try roping a (fake) cow, tooling real leather, punching tin and dancing to 19th Century music at an end-of-week fandango. Old Time Adventures will focus on children’s activities in the late 19th Century. Modern children will make their own toys, learn how to découpage, scrub clothes on a washboard and wringer and walk on stilts. They will also play marbles, dip can-

dles and enjoy a formal Victorian tea party. During Adobe Adventures, children will stomp mud, sculpt with clay, plant seedlings and make birdhouses. They will also explore the Rancho’s gardens by going on a scavenger hunt, playing croquet and making mud pies. A storyteller will also share tales of nature. For questions regarding cost, and the limited number of scholarships available, call (562) 570-1755. MORE INFORMATION rancholoscerritos.org

By Sophie Treadwell Helen does what society expects of her, however resistant she may feel. She marries her boss, has a baby with him and is driven to murder him. Inspired by the real life case of executed murderess Ruth Snyder.

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ST3450 - May 17_Layout 1 5/17/13 11:46 AM Page 6

6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE A LINGERIE BOUTIQUE

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Members of the US-China Peoples Friendship Association of Long Beach (USCPFA-LB) and their guests were treated to a seven-course lunch at the Seafood Palace Restaurant in Westminster last Saturday, May 4, after which they were entertained by a trio of students from Professor Sheng-Tai Chang’s Mandarin language class at Long Beach City College. Nhi Sung gave an in-depth talk on “The Tradition of the Beijing Opera,” discussing such elements as story lines, standardized characters, costumes, action moves and the elaborate masks worn by the actors. Examples were Courtesy USCPFA-LB demonstrated by a colorful From left to right, speakers Gerald Kim, Richard Chiritz, Nhi Sung and Professor slideshow. Richard Chiritz and Gerald Kim then provided a nar- Sheng-Tai Chang. ration of each of their sojourns into China without the benefit of the standard tours or tour guides. Chiritz would be hired out to perform computer-linked technology jobs on a short-term basis in between his travels to various cities while Kim spent over two years traveling on his own and learning the language on a one-to-one basis with students he hired. The next USCPFA-LB luncheon is scheduled for June 15, during which time Dr. Sing-yung Wu, radiologist at the Long Beach Veterans Affairs Hospital, will talk about “The Chinese Secret Archives of Gold.” Source: USCPFA-LB

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Signal Hill-based Hofman Hospitality Group (HHG), owners of Lucille's Smokehouse Bar-B-Que and Hof's Hut restaurants, announced Tuesday the opening of their first Spin! Neapolitan Pizza in Orange on May 20. As the chain’s first franchisee, the restaurant represents HHG’s first foray into operating a fastto casual dining experience built around a successful Midwest concept that has won multiple industry and “best of” awards. Spin! was founded in 2005 by restaurant industry veterans Gail and Richard Lozoff and Edwin Brownell. The Lozoffs developed Bagel & Bagel, which later became Einstein Bros. Bagels. The couple had visited pizzerias across Italy and wanted to create a warm and fun modern dining experience built around the earthy flavors of Italy with a fresh and healthy emphasis. They partnered with James Beard Award-winning chef Michael Smith to create a broadly appealing menu that features authentic Neapolitan pizza with a modern culinary twist. The award-winning concept has six locations in Kansas and Missouri. Family-owned HHG owns 17 Lucille’s Smokehouse Bar-B-Que locations in California, Arizona and Nevada, and five Hof’s Hut restaurants in Southern California. In 2012, HHG completed a franchise agreement to open 37 Spin! restaurants throughout Southern California. HHG plans to open a second Spin! in early 2014 in Los Alamitos. Source: HHG

Celebrating over 25 years in business!

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MAY 17, 2013

COMMUNITY

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Indoor soccer facility offers encouraging environment for autistic children leonardo Poareo Editorial Intern

“I’ve got to get ready– he’s too good. He’s like a professional soccer player,” coach Ricardo Caparelli says as a child gets ready to kick the ball in the goal Caparelli’s guarding at Long Beach Futsal’s indoor soccer facility. The child kicks and misses, but it doesn’t matter– what matters on this second Saturday in May is that these autistic children have the opportunity to learn soccer in a positive environment where they can play more freely. This environment is found at Long Beach Futsal in Signal Hill, an indoor soccer facility that hosts a free soccer clinic on the second Saturday of each month for autistic children. “We make it a class, but then we also make it that one hour where the kids can grab the ball and if they want to kick it, if they want to sit on it…it’s almost like their freedom to do as they wish for one hour,” said Emilia Lopez, who, along with Caparelli and her other five siblings, owns Long Beach Futsal. Futsal is a form of soccer played on a smaller field, Lopez says. The process of starting this program began when Lopez contacted Jane Tipton, the founder of the organization Autism in Long Beach about having an event for autistic children, Tipton said. It started as a “pilot” program almost two years ago, and now it’s a monthly event, Lopez says. The clinic features parents, volunteers and members of the Caparelli Family, who do the coaching, Tipton said. She originally wanted the clinic to have a focus on the social aspect of the sport. “We wanted to teach them… to learn the beginnings, just the socialization part of drills, so when they do go into sports they know how to stand in line, they know what a team is,” Tipton says. “And it breaks down the

barriers for the parents too because they’re not stressed out that their kid’s not listening.” Indeed, Janette Sainz, a parent and Spanish-language translator for Autism in Long Beach, says she doesn’t feel stressed at all at Long Beach Futsal. “We, as parents, we feel comfortable here because…our kids can be kids,” Sainz says. “We don’t have to worry about being stared at or judged, because…we go through that.” Lucie Houston, a parent of one of the children participating Saturday, says she likes the fact that the clinic is inclusive, as it also welcomes the siblings of the autistic children. Back on the field, a child drives the ball into the goal and keeps kicking it in. Lopez notices this and takes him aside so he can play with her son, a volunteer, and work on ball control. Later on, Caparelli has everyone take a water break. One of the children is so excited he’s jumping up and down, so Caparelli gives him a hug. “I love seeing my place happy with kids,” Lopez said. “It just makes my day.” After the water break, Lopez has the kids line up to run a few laps. Her brother, Caparelli, runs a few laps with them, after which they high-five each other, and he gives them words of encouragement. For a little while the children have an opportunity for freeplay, but then Lopez asks them, “Who wants to play a game?” “Oh my gosh, good luck with that,” says a smiling Annie Todd, a parent of an autistic child and a member of Autism in Long Beach. But the game moves smoothly, with Lopez and Caparelli providing structure. They go over the rules with the children, ask them about the direction of the ball, and then start the game. Goals are scored, with the requisite soccer celebration of “Gooooooooaaaaaaalllllllllll!”

7

Photos by Leonardo Poareo/Signal Tribune

Coach Ricardo Caparelli leads a drill at a free soccer clinic for autistic children conducted the second Saturday of each month at Long Beach Futsal in Signal Hill.

Afterwards, Lopez guides them toward their original positions, and they start again. Some kids play, while others amble about, but they’re all smiling and they all seem excited about the game. Even the kids who aren’t playing (some are entranced by the clock) feel the energy. “They pick up on that,” Todd says. After the game, everyone claps and Coach Emilia Lopez instructs children before playing a soccer game. This was the first gathers together in a game they played in the free soccer clinic for autistic children offered at Long Beach Futsal huddle. They put in Signal Hill. their hands in the Dine middle of the huddle and yell, Mexican In “Long Beach Futsal!” Restaurant The clinic’s over, but Eric Take Out Coupon Whitley’s son, Marcus, doesn’t Special want to leave. served w/vegetables, “I want to stay,” Marcus says. rice, and a regular drink “I want to stay.”

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ST3450 - May 17_Layout 1 5/17/13 11:46 AM Page 8

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Pride Parade to celebrate 30th year by honoring its founders, 9-year-old community activist and first openly gay state senator of color Ocean Boulevard in Long Beach will have LGBTQers and their allies strut and float along its concrete path this Sunday to celebrate the 30 years that the Long Beach Lesbian and Gay Pride (LBLGP) Parade has existed. That first parade in 1984 had some 5,000 revelers that harnessed the pride they held in their community– even under rain clouds. Today, that same annual celebration gathers more than 80,000 people in the united belief that diversity is to celebrated, equality is to be shared with everyone and that love holds no boundaries within the human spirit. This year’s parade will take place on Sunday, May 19 with the three original founders of LBLGP as the parade’s 2013 Grand Marshals: Marilyn Barlow, Bob Crow, and Judith Doyle. “We still face our battles,” said Crow, who still works for LBLGP. “But we have come a long way. Back then, we had enormous opposition, from city officials to neighbors, but we never gave up, and we never aborted the mission that we still have today– to let love be a part of every single person’s life.” Five other individuals will be recognized and hold special places within the parade route. The Whitey Littlefield Community Bridge-Building Award will be given to local ally Herlinda Chico for her advocacy of LGBT legislation through the Human Rights Campaign and Long Beach Democratic Club– something she attributes to her first visit to the LBLGP parade when she 18. Ever since she witnessed protestors holding signs which she said spewed nothing short of “hate speech,” she has seen the annual celebration as a way to engage her heterosexual friends with the gay community on a level that is simultaneously amusing and mind-opening. A special recognition honor will be given to 9-year-old Jonas Corona, founder and “Chief of Change” of the nonprofit Love in the Mirror that he created when he was 6. Focusing on low-income and homeless families and individuals, Jonas has helped lift the lives of those less fortunate by giving them the essentials that many of us take for granted: socks, shoes, sustenance, and shelter. The Female and Male Community Grand Marshals will be Sarah Rice and Jewels of Long Beach, respectively. Rice is not shy of the camera, as seen during her stint on MTV’s The Real World Brooklyn. For those within the LGBT community, Jewels is a staple– and not just within the nightlife scene, but within their community as a whole. The first openly gay person of color to ever be elected to the California State Senate, Sen. Ricardo Lara will be granted the moniker of the Morris Knight Political Grand Marshal. One of his boldest moves was the successful passage of a California Legislative Joint Resolution calling for a national LGBTQ Bill of Rights. The LBLGP Parade will take place along Ocean Boulevard between Redondo and Alamitos avenues on Sunday, May 19 at 10am. Street closures and detours will be in effect.

Source: LBLGP, Inc.

MAY 17, 2013

PRIDE WEEKEND 2013

City of LB to dedicate new Harvey Milk Park

The City of Long Beach will host a dedication and opening ceremony on Tuesday, May 21 at 11am for Harvey Milk Promenade Park, the first park in America to be named after the slain civil-rights and LGBT leader. It will also be the first park in the city of Long Beach to be named after an openly gay person. Mayor Bob Foster, members of the Harvey Milk Foundation and dozens of leaders and members of the LGBT community will celebrate the park opening one day before what would have been Harvey Milk’s 83rd birthday. The new park site is located at 3rd Street and The Promenade. The historic park will include sitting areas, a memorial to Milk, including a replica of his famous soapbox, and dedicated space to learn about him and his legacy to civil rights.

The park will also include Equality Plaza, an area where local LGBT community members will be honored. The nine members of the local LGBT community who will be inducted and honored at the dedication are: Bob Crow, co-founder and current co-president of Long Beach Pride, Inc.; Ray Lowen, founding member of The Center, activist and artist; Patty Moore, former chair and assistant director of The Center and longtime activist; Michael Noll, the first openly gay Signal Hill Councilmember and a member of The Center’s Board; Frank Rubio, former president of Long Beach Pride, Inc.; and Ellen Ward, an openly gay Signal Hill councilmember for 12 years and former executive director of the Long Beach AIDS Walk. Those who will be posthumously honored are: Pastor

Michael Cole, founder of Christ’s Chapel Long Beach and of the AIDS Food Store; Ellen “Mary” Martinez, a 25-year member of Long Beach Pride, Inc. and a board member at The Center; and Jean Harris, former executive director of the California Alliance for Pride and Equality. “I am so proud that we are honoring the incredible work of civilrights leader Harvey Milk,” said Vice Mayor Robert Garcia, who represents the 1st district, where the park is located. “This park will not only celebrate Harvey’s historic contributions to equality but honor the great work of our local LGBT community. I hope you can join me on this special day for not only Harvey’s legacy, but for Long Beach.” MORE INFORMATION (562) 570-6919

With initial goal to ‘break shackles of oppression,’ Long Beach Pride Fest now draws 80,000

With its beginnings in 1983, the Long Beach Gay and Lesbian Pride Festival now attracts more than 80,000 revelers a year. The mission in that first year, in the words of Pride co-founder Bob Crow, was simple– “To break the shackles of the oppression of homophobia in the community and the general population.” And despite uphill battles, which included a disapproving City Council, a deficiency of funds, and a lack of widespread support, they pushed on. Ultimately all ended well, with Crow, Marilyn Barlow, Judith Doyle, JC Cree, and Fern Williamson– the original creators of the festival– witnessing what would become one of the largest events in Long Beach, thanks to none other than a straight ally. Then-owner of the bar Executive Suite, Fred Kovell, heard of the City’s “stringent fees, harsh deposit requirements, lack of political support,” and he opened his wallet so the event could take place, with Long Beach Pride born on June of 1984 under rainclouds,

according to LBLGP, Inc. It is in this spirit that Long Beach Gay and Lesbian Pride (LBLGP), the organization that oversees the official launch of Pride Weekend throughout Long Beach on May 18 and 19, opted to keep the theme to this year’s celebration simple, to the point, and in honor of that history– “30 Years Proud!” The centerpieces of Pride will be the festival, which spans both days, and the parade, which occurs on Sunday morning along Ocean Boulevard. “We embrace change,” said LBLGP co-president Kimberly Maddox, “but realize that we must also remember the past in order to fight for equal rights and be role models for our future leaders.” MORE INFORMATION longbeachpride.com

Source: LBLGP, Inc.

ST3450 - May 17_Layout 1 5/17/13 11:46 AM Page 9

CULTURE

MAY 17, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Local artist featured in Mid-City Studio Tour lives her appreciation of art

9

Brandy Soto Editorial Intern

Art has always been and continues to be a life lesson for local painter Joan Sanders. She values her own creativity as well as the works of others. Sanders was born in Portland, Oregon. She says she was an attentive child who, despite hardships, was always sure that she would pursue a career in art. “My parents were divorced, and my mother became a housekeeper to make a living,” Sanders said. “We lived in several different households, but I didn’t feel deprived. I was a quiet, shy child and was quite happy doing things by myself. I was always doodling in school and sometimes other students liked my drawings. I always knew that art was my road to life.” She majored in art at the University of Oregon and went on to study at The Art Center College of Design, which was located in Los Angeles at the time. Sanders completed her degree at California State University, Long Beach and her art has since been shown in several exhibits around the world. New York, Florida, New Mexico, California, England, France and Wales are just a few places she has displayed her art, and she recalls one special event, in which her art was profiled on international cable TV. “It featured my Moroccan series of paintings,” she said. “These poetic interpretations of Morocco came about while traveling there and falling in love with the country. I have been fortunate enough to have one of the paintings featured in a book curated by the Smithsonian called Object Lessons.” Her paintings include a variety of mediums and mixed media, and more recently, are influenced by her love of vibrant pastels. One series was inspired by various aspects of Moroccon culture, and another, entitled Fresh Paint, had a broader theme. “Fresh Paint constitutes a wide range of subject matter, no holds barred,” she said. Sanders enjoys creating art alongside other artists, but is most creative when she is alone. “I work well with groups of artists, drawing or painting from models,” she said. “When I am creating a piece strictly from my own imagination or inspiration, then I

Courtesy of the artist

Joan Sanders majored in art at the University of Oregon, went on to study at The Art Center College of Design and then completed her degree at California State University, Long Beach. She has since shown in several exhibits around the world.

have to work alone. I have a small studio, but it opens onto a outdoor space which is where I do most of my solo painting. I also paint with two other artist friends in their studio, but this is after the initial concept has occurred.” Her art is influenced by a variety of artists, whether or not they are well known. She appreciates the art but also takes into account the effort and commitment it takes to be an artist. She hopes that her own art can influence others in a similar way. “I am influenced by many artists,” she commented. “I love the line work of Edgar Degas, for instance. But every day, I see the work of artists that I know personally or that I see in art magazines, and I am full of admiration for them. Today, in our culture, artists work under the radar with very little notice. I have to admire how artists continue to pursue art anyway, despite the lack of monetary awards or public acclaim. My penchant for drawing portraits has pushed me into learning more and more about the subject and studying the work of so many fine artists. I hope others like my work, and I really hope that some of my paintings make people happy when they look at them, such as in my Fresh Paint series, which is very colorful.” She will always be grateful to art and the lessons it taught her about herself and life in general. “Art has always been there for me, especially at those times in my life when things have not gone well. Now that I am no longer

“Belmont Shore,” acrylic

young, art is still a faithful companion and always there waiting for me, no matter what. It has taught me to be much more observant to the textures, colors and images in the visual world around me, and I am so very grateful for that. Yes, art has served me well in my life, including the friendships of other artists. It has also pushed me into learning new technology. Today, you have to become familiar with Photoshop, jpegs, tiffs, picas, etc., if you are going to keep your work in the public eye. And in the end, art is, ideally, a

Close-up view of “Long Beach”

communication between the artist and the observer.” Sanders will be featuring her painting, “Anthurium,” in Art Auction 15 at the Long Beach Museum of Art on May 19. In addition, she will be featured in the Mid-City Studio Tour on Saturday, June 1 and Sunday, June 2. MORE INFORMATION midcitystudiotour.com/joanskogsberg-sanders

GROOMING • FOOD • SUPPLIES • SELF-SERVICE WASH

2OFF Pet Wash

$

Self-Service

$

Grooming 5OFF Full-Service

Not valid with any other offer. Expires 5/31/13. one per customer. BK store only.

4102 Orange Ave.

#113

at Carson St. Open Tues–Sun 562-427-2551

Pet of the Week:

Lola

Her name is Lola, she is a tortie, who’s at the tender age of 2, whose eyes are green as Prell shampoo…OK, we can’t write lyrics like Barry Manilow’s, but we can tell you that Lola is gorgeous and sweet. She was found as a stray and would love a forever home. Meet Lola on the shelter side of Companion Animal Village at 7700 East Spring St., (562) 570-PETS. Ask for ID#A491913.

Sponsored by:

on first visit or $3 off next visit. $25 min. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 5/31/13. one per customer. BK store only.

Expert Care • Gentle Grooming • Walk-Ins Welcome*

FOLBA

* AS SPACE PERMITS

ST3450 - May 17_Layout 1 5/17/13 11:46 AM Page 10

NEWS

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

MAY 17, 2013

Three ID-theft suspects sought; two others in custody

The Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) has in custody two suspects connected to a fraud ring that targeted a local big-box chain store and is asking for the public's help in identifying three additional suspects. The two suspects currently in custody are identified as 43-year-old Ayesha Wilson of Long Beach and 34-year-old Nanette Macon of Adelanto, whom the LBPD says are responsible for 39 identity-theft incidents committed at the Sam’s Club store located at 7480 E. Carson St., as far back as 2009. Wilson was arrested on Feb. 24, 2013, by the Beverly Hills Police Department on unrelated charges, and Macon was arrested on April 22, 2013, by the San Bernardino Sheriff’s Department, also on unrelated charges. The ongoing investigation led detectives to Wilson and Macon, and the case was presented to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office. The DA’s office subsequently filed 21 counts of identity theft against Wilson and 18 counts of identity theft against Macon. Their preliminary hearing will be held in May in Long Beach Superior Court. With the assistance of Walmart Global Investigations, the investigative unit of Walmart, which is the parent company of Sam’s Club, it was determined that three additional suspects were a part of the same fraud ring and were responsible for at least 10 additional cases of identity theft. These suspects would also establish credit accounts using personal identifying information from various victims, mostly located out of state. They would then engage in fraudulent transactions with Sam’s Club, purchasing various items including gift cards and electronics, such as tablets and computers. Detectives have not been able to identify the three outstanding suspects by name, but they believe they are located in the Los Angeles County area and are hoping someone may recognize them in photos taken at Sam’s Club at the time they established accounts. Those who may have information on the identities of these suspects are asked to call Long Beach Police Identity Theft Detective Andre Sanchez at (562) 570-7602. Anonymous tips may be submitted by calling 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), texting TIPLA plus the tip to CRIMES (274637), or visiting lacrimestoppers.org . Source: LBPD

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Photos courtesy LBPD

Suspect 3

LBCC faculty member elected VP of Academic Senate for California Community Colleges

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY & THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. To purchase an annual subscription, send this form and a check for $50 to:

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Suspect 2

The Long Beach Police Department has two suspects in custody in connection with a fraud ring that targeted a local big-box chain store. Police are seeking the public's help in identifying three additional suspects pictured right. (Three photos are provided for each suspect.)

E

Support Your Local Newspaper

Suspect 1

David Morse

Long Beach City College (LBCC) faculty member David Morse was recently elected as vice president of the Academic Senate for the California Community Colleges (ASCCC). Morse, a member of the ASCCC Executive Committee since 2009, served as Academic Senate secretary from 2011 to 2013. Morse was a member of the LBCC Academic Senate from 2001 to 2012, and served as Academic Senate president from 2005 to 2007. As Senate president, he co-chaired numerous college committees, including the Enrollment Management Oversight Committee, the Educational Master Planning Committee, Academic Council, and Hiring Priorities. He has also sat as a member of various other

college committees, including Budget Advisory, and was a co-chair for Standard 10 of the LBCC Accreditation Self-Study in 2002. He served as cochair of various task forces to revise LBCC’s planning structure and its program review process. As a member of the ASCCC Executive Committee, Morse has chaired the statewide Transfer and Articulation Committee (2010-11), the Curriculum Committee (2011-2012), and the Governance and Internal Policy Committee (2012-2013), and he has been a member of other ASCCC committees and task forces. He has served as co-chair of the Chancellor’s Office System Advisory Committee on Curriculum for the past two years and was a member of the

SB 1143 Student Success Task Force in 2011. “Being elected to serve as the next vice president is an honor and a great opportunity,” Morse said. “I look forward to continuing to represent the voice of the faculty in discussions at the state level.” Morse began teaching at LBCC as an hourly instructor in 1991 and returned to the college as a member of the full-time faculty in 1998. He holds a bachelor’s degree in English and history from the University of Michigan, a master’s degree in English from the University of Kansas, and a Ph.D. in English from the University of Southern California. Source: LBCC

THREE FURNISHED MODELS!

Lo

Maybe you grew up here, like Alex. Maybe you covet the Pastrami Omelets at The Golden Eagle Restaurant. And still go up to Sunset View Park to see the sun set the horizon on fire. You love it here for lots of reasons, and now there’s a new one: Aragon in Signal Hill. You’re gonna love your new life on The Hill. Gated Solar To Townhomes From the Mid $300,000s 1,189 – 1,879 Square Feet 2-3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, 2-3 Car Attached Garage O N

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Sales Center: 1870 Orizaba Ave., #102, Signal Hill, CA 90755 | Open Daily 10AM - 6PM; Wednesday 2PM - 6PM | aragon@mbk.com | MBKHomes.com

562.494.9625

MBK Homes reserves the right to modify price, plan, features and specifications without prior notice or obligation. Subsequent sales may have resulted in unavailability of any or all price levels. Square footage is approximate. Models do not reflect racial raci al preference. License #: 01304983; Contractor License #: 844533, 732455, 882348

ST3450 - May 17_Layout 1 5/17/13 11:46 AM Page 11

NEWS

MAY 17, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Equality and justice for all

The California Conference for Equality and Justice (CCEJ) hosted its 50th Annual Humanitarian Awards Dinner at The Renaissance hotel in downtown Long Beach on May 15, celebrating the organization's many partnerships for public-service work in the community throughout the past half-century. Founded in 1963, the nonprofit organization partners with various groups, foundations, institutions and government agencies as a collaborative effort to fight “bias, bigotry and racism” in the Long Beach area through advocacy, conflict resolution and educational programs. Among the past honorees who are pictured are (second row, from left) founding members Gene and Ann Lentzner, former Long Beach Mayor Eunice Sato (sitting) and former Long Beach Mayor Beverly O’Neill. CCEJ’s 2013 Humanitarian Award Honorees (not pictured) included: Port of Long Beach Executive Director J. Christopher Lytle; Ivy Goolsby, marketing director and manager of the Long Beach Division of International Realty & Investments, Inc.; Long Beach Nonprofit Partnership Executive Director Judy Ross; and outgoing Cal State Long Beach President F. King Alexander. Also recognized were philanthropists Ray and Barbara Alpert, who received the “Building Bridges” Award. “We need to continue to listen to people’s stories and continue to lift up voices that are not heard, providing comfort and strength to those who continue to suffer from the effects of bias, bigotry and racism, and help others climb that mountain with us,” said Wendelyn R. Nichols-Julien, CCEJ president. “I'd like to think that CCEJ’s work over 50 years has really made a tangible impact on our community and an improvement in quality of life in Long Beach.”

11

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

SH Chamber Luncheon Date: thursday, may 23, 2013 Location: Signal hill Park community center (1780 E. hill St.) Speaker: John morris, head deputy la county district attorney’s office “fraud Prevention in Business” doors open at 11:45am for networking and the program starts at noon. Enjoy a delicious lunch catered by The Great Plate while mingling with other members of our business community, local officials, and legislative representatives. Cost is $25 per person but will be discounted to $15 for 2012-2013 current members with advance non-refundable reservations made before noon on the day before the luncheon. Non-members are welcome at a cost of $25 per person. Please make your reservations by e-mail to shcc@verizon.net or leave a message at 562-424-6489 and make your payment at the door via cash, check, mastercard or visa only.

Golden Eagle

Restaurant

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Ph: 562-713-4630

email: trogers@coldwellbanker.com

© 2004 Coldwell Banker Corporation. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT Incorporated. If your property is listed with another broker, this is not intended as solicitation.

HAPPY HOUR MENU • Fish Tacos

(3) Fried fish tacos with cabbage slaw, cilantro aioli and spicy salsa $6

• Build-Your-Own Bruschetta Herbed toast points with goat cheese spread, roasted red bell pepper hummus and diced tomato and basil mix $7

• Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps $8 • Kobe Beef Sliders (2) Pretzel bread bun, pickled red onion, arugula, feta cheese, sriracha aioli $7

• Homemade Potato Chips $4 • Tabasco Popcorn $4 DRINKS

• Draft Beer $2 off • Well Drinks $4 • Well Martinis $6 For more information, visit our website

ST3450 - May 17_Layout 1 5/17/13 11:46 AM Page 12

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4348 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 120030652 Doc ID #0001372480892005N Title Order No. 12-0055147 Investor/Insurer No. 137248089 APN No. 7217-025-001 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/19/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by REGINA UGALDE, A SINGLE WOMAN, dated 05/19/2006 and recorded 6/7/2006, as Instrument No. 061249550, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 06/06/2013 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2270 SARAH COURT, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 907554048. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $858,202.48. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition,

PUBLIC NOTICES

but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 120030652. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: 07/18/2012

TST4351 BID INVITATIoN FoR HUD SECTIoN 3 SUBCoNTRACToRS IN THE loS ANGElES / loNG BEACH AREA

Bidding Wednesday May 22, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., City of long Beach Contract No. R6959, ocean Blvd. Erosion and Enhancement Project, Phase 2

Condon-Johnson is willing to further break down items into economically feasible units to facilitate and encourage Section 3 participation. We are requesting quotes on the following, including but not limited to: Concrete saw cutting, concrete demo export & disposal, concrete sidewalk, grading, landscaping planting & irrigation, reinforced concrete grade beam, repair existing hot dipped galvanized steel hand railing, soil export & disposal, survey, temporary construction fencing, temporary relocation & irrigation of existing trees, traffic control and trucking. Plans and specifications are available on-line at www.longbeach.gov/purchasing/default.asp. We are available to assist in questions regarding the scope of work, bid preparation, obtaining bonds, lines of credit, or insurance as required by contract. Must be properly licensed for the type of work performing and may be required to furnish bonding for insurance, equipment, material and/or supplies. For assistance or if there are questions please contact us. Condon-Johnson & Associates, Inc., 9685 Via Excelencia, Suite 106, San Diego, CA 92126, Phone (858) 530-9165, Fax (858) 530-9171 (An Equal Opportunity Employer)

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4381722 05/03/2013, 05/10/2013, 05/17/2013

TST4356 TSG No.: 7852235 TS No.: CA1300251489 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN: 7211-004-011 Property Address: 924 E VERNON ST SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/24/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 06/06/2013 at 10:00 A.M., First American Title Insurance Company, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 05/31/2007, as Instrument No. 20071312499, in book , page , , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of California. Executed by: JACK ROLAND MCCLANAHAN, A SINGLE PERSON, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 7211-004-011 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 924 E VERNON ST, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $288,523.50. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has caused a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown

Apartment Rental: 2 BD/1.5 BA. in Signal Hill.

Reduced rent/Remodeled Interior

Pet-friendly with pet dep., 1 yr. lease, water and trash paid, huge walk-in closet, private yard. Call 310-831-7020 for appt.

EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Thursday, May 9 Residential burglary 9:35am– 2300 block Earl Ave.

Assault 9:59am– 2500 block Elm Ave.

Tuesday, May 14 Battery 3pm– E. Bixby Rd./Brayton Ave.

Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide

Thursday, May 9 Auto burglary 8:46am– 2500 block E. Willow St.

Auto burglary 10:30am– 1400 block E. Willow St.

Commercial burglary 8:24pm– 2700 block Cherry Ave. Suspect in custody

Friday, May 10 Residential burglary 10:15am– 2600 block E. 20th St.

Auto burglary 1pm– 2300 block Redondo Ave.

Saturday, May 11 Battery 2am– 2500 block Palm Dr.

Grand theft 8:43am– 2000 block Molino Ave

Tuesday, May 14 Theft of elderly by caretaker 8:20am– 2000 block St. Louis Ave. Petty theft 7:37pm– 1600 block E. Willow St. Wednesday, May 15 Non-injury hit-and-run 4:24pm– 2500 block Palm Dr. Spouse abuse 6:24pm– 2700 block E. Willow St. Auto burglary 8pm– 1100 block E. Willow St. Auto burglary 10:34pm– 1100 block E. Willow St.

on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916)939-0772 or visit this Internet Web http://search.nationwideposting.com/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case CA1300251489 Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse. First American Title Insurance Company First American Title Insurance Company 3 FIRST AMERICAN WAY SANTA ANA, CA 92707 FOR TRUSTEE'S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916)939-0772 First American Title Insurance Company MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.NPP0216424 SIGNAL TRIBUNE 05/17/2013, 05/24/2013, 05/31/2013 TST4342 / 2013 062774 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: THE CANDY APPLE LADY, 4922 Grisham Ave. #101, Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: VANISHA ANDERSON, 4922 Grisham Ave. #101, Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Vanisha Anderson. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 28, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: April 26, & May 3, 10, 17, 2013.

TST4343 / 2013 080306 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: 1. FELIX AUTO DETAILING, 2. FELIX MOBILE DETAILING, 2125 Ohio Ave Unit G, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: 1. LUIS DONINGO FELIX JR., 2. PAULA RAE FELIX, 2125 Ohio Ave. Unit G, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Luis Domingo Felix Jr.. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on April 19, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: April 26, & May 3, 10, 17, 2013.

TST4344 / 2013 082850 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CRAIG & SON WOODWORKING, 1976 Freeman Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: JAMES H. CRAIG II, 3031 Rowena Dr., Los Alamitos, CA 90720. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: James H. Craig II. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on April 28, 2008. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on April 23, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: April 26, & May 3, 10, 17, 2013. TST4345 / 2013 082851 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: THE HAMUD RESIDENTIAL HOMES, 2517 E. 219th Pl., Carson, CA 90810. Registrant: NORMA HAMUD, 2517 E. 219th Pl., Carson, CA 90810. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Norma Hamud. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: April 26, & May 3, 10, 17, 2013. TST4346 / 2013 082852 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: HARBOR GENESIS CHRISTIAN COLLEGE, 627 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. Registrant: THE POWER OF THE POTTER'S CHRISTIAN CENTER INC., 627 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and cor- rect. Signed: Norma Hamud, CEO. The regis- trant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on April

MAY 17, 2013

23, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune April 26, May 3, 10, 17, 2013. TST4355 / 2013 095600 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MANNY'S AUTO CARE, INC., 1441 E. Anaheim St., Wilmington, CA 90744. Registrant: MANNY'S AUTO CARE, INC., 1441 E. Anaheim St., Wilmington, CA 90744. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Manuel Medina Castillo, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on January 8, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 9, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013.

TST4354 / 2013 092701 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SQUARE ONE FINANCIAL SVCS, 5700 Ackerfield Ave. Apt. 246, Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: TYRONE GREGORY, 5700 Ackerfield Ave. Apt. 246, Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Tyrone Gregory. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 6, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013.

TST4358 / 2013 094692 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: HARBOR OCEAN SPA, 24815 Western Ave., Harbor City, CA 90717. Registrant: KEVIN A . M U R R AY, 5 0 6 2 Q u a i l C i r. , Huntington Beach, CA 92649. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kevin A . M u r r a y. T h e r e g i s t r a n t h a s b e g u n t o transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on May 8, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 8, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Profess i o n s C o d e ) . P u b . T h e S i g n a l Tr i b u n e : May 17, 24, 31, & June 7, 2013. TST4357 / 2013 083504 STATEMENT oF ABANDoNMENT oF USE oF FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: N I N A ' S P I Z Z A , 2 4 0 3 W. C a m e r o n S t . , Long Beach, CA 90810. The fictitious b u s i n e s s n a m e r e f e r r e d t o above was filed on September 10, 2012, original File No. 2012181333, in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant: AGUSTINA MENDOZA DE CARRILLO, 2403 Cameron St., Long Beach, CA 90810. This business is conducted by: an Individual. Signed: Agustina Mendoza De Carrillo. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on April 23, 2013. Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 17, 24, 31, & June 7, 2013.

dnt txt n drv A reminder from the Signal Tribune

ST3450 - May 17_Layout 1 5/17/13 11:47 AM Page 13

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Forester

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for the festival celebrates its 30th anniversary this year. His presence at the festival means something to a number of his friends. John Thomas, who is a historic-preservation consultant in Long Beach, has known Forester since 1991. Thomas described how Forester and others who were living with HIV and AIDS made the health crisis real. He praised his friend’s ability to speak with candor about his health. “He would say, ‘I’m sick, but I’m going live. I’m going to continue. I’m going to enjoy. I’m going to contribute to my community,’ Thomas said. “That level of tenacity, that’s Larry.” Another friend, Michael Barber, owner of Paradise Restaurant and Bar in Long Beach, has known Forester for about 20 years. He acknowledged that a diagnosis of HIV and AIDS felt like a death sentence at the time. “He was able to live through that and was always optimistic,” Barber said. “And he just always had this

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spirit and drive to go on. He never complains about being ill. He always talks about what he can do.” Besides his role on city council and other volunteering work with HIV/AIDS patients, Forester has dedicated a great deal of his time with the Conservation Corps of Long Beach. The organization is focused on education for at-risk young adults around 18 to 24 years of age. It helps young adults in the program develop life skills and even offers them the chance to get a high-school degree. Mike Bassett, the Corps’ executive director and CEO, has known Forester for about 15 years. Bassett says that Forester is a regular speaker to the young adults in the Corps. He says that Forester is very frank about how he contracted AIDS. Bassett adds that Forester’s health never held him back from his dedication to the Corps. “I don’t know where he gets his energy when he’s fighting something [as] serious as AIDS,” Bassett said, “but he is one person that I know that will never let you down. Ever.” Forester on a Friday afternoon was

a little tired after his long day at the WRD’s headquarters in Lakewood. He spoke rapidly and in a matter-of-fact tone when he remembered the day he told his father he contracted HIV. He remembered how he needed his dad to help him think through his disease logically, step by step. Forester says that he has stayed away from relationships, stayed away from sex. He acknowledged that others did not make the same choice he’s made and are in relationships where both partners have been open about their status and practice safe sex. While being interviewed, he often anticipates a question and answers it before it’s asked. “Any regrets in life? Absolutely. No partner. But I’ve chosen that route…Many people living with HIV and AIDS have partners,” Forester said. “I just, for whatever reason, my mind just says, ‘Larry, you’ve had a good life. You’ve had fun. You’ve played in San Francisco in the ‘70s… there’s other things to do.’” Former Signal Hill Councilmember Ellen Ward says that Forester’s

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14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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NEWS

MAY 17, 2013

Dealerships

continued from page 3

Elise McCaleb, Signal Hill economic development manager, said plans for the three-acre lot in addition to a vacant six-acre property previously slated for a CarMax facility, are both on hold until the Signal Hill redevelopment successor agency receives approval from the State Department of Finance for a “finding of completion” and then a long-range property-management plan. Meanwhile, market reports show that the U.S. car-sales industry, as a whole, continues to rebound from the economic downturn, as many dealers are seeing an increase in sales due to the “pent-up demand” caused by the recession. Signal Hill Finance Director Terry Marsh said new motor vehicle sales in the entire city of Signal Hill were up 23.7 percent over the previous year during the third quarter of 2012, which lasts from July to September.

Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

The owners of Boulevard Buick GMC Cadillac opened their Cadillac dealership in 2012 and have seen a steady rise in car sales, according to Ron Charron, coowner and president of the dealership.

She added that seven of the City’s top 25 sales-tax revenue producers were car dealerships last year. Marsh said more current sales-tax revenue statistics will be available next month. Glenn E. Thomas Dodge Chrysler Jeep, a family-owned dealership that’s

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been in existence in the local area for more than a century, saw a 50-percent increase in sales last year over 2011, while so far this year the dealer is up by 10 to 12 percent over 2012, Davis said. “It’s definitely a lot better than it’s been in the past,” Davis said. “I think it’s a combination of the fact that there’s been a lot of pent-up demand, people are driving older cars and they got to get a new one, and more people are working now. The housing industry seems to be coming back, and, generally as they grow we grow. So I think all those interest rates are really low. So car-loan financing is low. So there’s a lot of good things.” Nearby, the owners of Boulevard Buick GMC Cadillac have also seen a steady increase in sales after opening their new Cadillac dealership in August 2012. The dealership at 2850 Cherry Ave. in the auto center was relocated from its former location at Redondo Avenue and Willow Street, a site that is now being leased for vehicle storage by Hooman Toyota. Ron Charron, co-owner and president of Boulevard Buick GMC Cadillac, said overall auto sales for the Boulevard dealership, which now owns three car-dealership franchises after being in existence for nearly 50 years, have increased so far this year by a little more than 20 percent over 2012. “Business has been good,” he said. “It’s nice to [have our Cadillac dealership] next to our Buick and GMC stores. We’re also next to high-line competition, which are BMW and Mercedes. So it’s been very good to us.” After going through a couple of “rough years,” business as a whole continues to improve for dealerships at the Signal Hill Auto Center, located along Cherry Avenue from Willow to Spring streets, as the economy continues to improve, Charron said. A big surprise for Boulevard Buick GMC Cadillac, however, has been a recent shift of younger-generation customers age 20 to 30, expressing a loyalty to the American-made car brand, he said. Carron said the quality of automobiles has improved over the decades as well. “GM is building a much better car than they were 15 years ago, so that’s also helping us,” he said. Cadillac’s smaller ATS models now comes in a two-door coup model and was made to reach a new, younger demographic. Cadillac has also sold its large Sedans, and XTS models, designed to compete with BMW’s 3 Series models. Next year, Cadillac plans to offer its new electric car, known as the ELR, in addition to its new Escalade Luxury SUV, Charron said. Buick has also improved its sales and leases with new models, such as the Encore and Verano, which are smaller and have better gas-mileage than older models, he said. “We’re seeing a lot more less-than30-year-old people buying Buicks, when 10 years ago, it was your grandfather’s car,” Charron said. “We’re happy to see the shift. The quality is great. The ranking is there with J.D. Power and Associates. It’s a true competition to the imports.” ß

ST3450 - May 17_Layout 1 5/17/13 11:47 AM Page 15

MAY 17, 2013

Vets

continued from page 1

to go through it alone,” he said. Frank McIlquham, a Signal Hill resident and retired banker, formed Rock For Vets, also known as The Rock Club, as a small choir group with its first gig in May 2010 at California State University, Long Beach, hoping to raise funds for musical equipment as an independent nonprofit. Now with 25 to 30 band members, including music coaches and McIlquham’s partnering director, Jerry Salas, the music instructional and educational program has grown its ranks over the years and today partners with the Veterans Affairs (VA) Hospital in Long Beach. The Veterans Health Administration currently works with the group to have professional psychologists prescribe the group as music-therapy rehabilitation for returning veterans, while allowing the band to rehearse twice a week at the Pantages Theater inside the VA Hospital. Though not a veteran himself, McIlquham said he comes from a long line of military service and wanted to do his part to give back to the men and women who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. The program is a prime example of music-therapy rehabilitation, a growing field in the mental-health community. However, McIlquham said he wants to push the “music-education” angle of the program to promote music learning, adding that the program provides much more than just an “individual experience.” “This program has now allowed veterans to open up and communicate with each other and have a sense of self-worth and self-confidence again,” he said. “It’s probably something they haven’t had in a little while.” Cristine Calderon, 32, who sings in the band, served with the U.S. Army in the information technology field right out of high school in 1999 and was released from duty through a medical discharge just a year after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The Whittier resident learned about the band through a flier she saw in the VA Hospital’s vocational-rehabilitation program. Calderon said that, since then, being able to sing in the band and learn how to play the bass has helped family relationships and improved her selfesteem. “I wasn’t fully functioning,” she said. “I was just battling with depression and anxiety. And then the group helped me get a better sense of self-worth and a positive attitude to have a brighter outlook.

Ultimately, it’s like an extended family. The people in my group, I consider them like brothers and sisters.” Calderon said she is now looking into becoming a musical therapist and is taking classes at Cypress College. She added that the band has even dissuaded some veterans from committing suicide. Charlie Roche, 65, who joined the Navy out of high school and served until 1971 for six years, including a stint in the Vietnam War, said the group has allowed him to reconnect with his musical roots. He once played in a Vietnamese band in a ramshackle club made of bamboo in the late 1960s while serving in Vietnam, in addition to bands in the United States. Struggling with depression and drug addiction, he learned about the band while living at Villages at Cabrillo, a residential alcohol- and drug-abuse treatment center for veterans in Long Beach. Today, Roche, who is a father and works as a security guard, said he has been sober for 13 years and volunteers as a musical coach for the band. “When we’re out there, the feeling on stage… it’s like a current of energy,” he said. “It’s really great, and it really is therapeutic… I don’t think everybody realizes that you can’t just go from one day you’re completely tense because you don’t know if you’re going to have to kill somebody or they’re going to kill you or come out from behind a wall and shoot you, to the next day you’re on a plane heading for home and you’re done with that duty. All of a sudden, you’re at home thinking, ‘Wow, I still feel tense.’” The band, however, doesn’t follow the traditional military-regimented song list. Elliott said the band’s musical arrangement ranges from: the country’s national anthem, “God Bless America,” and “The Star-Spangled Banner” to classic rock of the ‘60s and ‘70s, such as “Brown-Eyed Girl” by Van Morrison, “Come Together” by the Beatles and “Slow Ride” by Foghat, to more modern tunes by bands such as the Foo Fighters. “It’s a wide array,” he said. “We play these songs that [veterans] can relate to, and then we play something more updated so other audience members can relate. You got to be very well-rounded if you’re going to go out and reach the masses.” The band has been able to play some large venues as well. Last year, on Nov. 10, the group played at the City of Los Angeles’s First Annual Veterans Appreciation Festival in front of the U.S.S. Iowa, a decommissioned battleship that serves as a museum in San Pedro. The band was also featured last year

NEWS

in an episode of the A&E reality TV show Gene Simmons Family Jewels in which Simmons, bassist of rock band Kiss, performed onstage with Rock For Vets band members. This year, Rock For Vets is scheduled to play during Memorial Day and during the second annual Meals on Wheels of Long Beach and Rock For Vets Variety Show Fundraiser on June 29 from noon to

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5pm at the Ernest Borgnine Theatre located at the Scottish Rite Theatre, 855 Elm St. in Long Beach. Proceeds from the variety-show concert will help feed homebound veterans in the Long Beach and Signal Hill area with daily meals from Meals on Wheels, while providing funding for the Rock For Vets operations. In addition to Rock For Vets, other

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

15

bands to perform include Freddie Davis Jr., who performed with The Drifters, The Platters and Hank Ballard’s The Midnighters, Long Beach-based Boxcar 7, The Windy Ridge Bluegrass Band and the Pin-up Doll Platoon. The concert will also include a silent auction and gourmet-food trucks. Varietyshow tickets cost $25. To purchase tickets, visit mowlb.org . ß

ST3450 - May 17_Layout 1 5/17/13 11:47 AM Page 16

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