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OC Breast Cancer Walk Sept. 26 LB Breast Cancer Walk Oct. 2

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S erving B ixBy K nollS , C alifornia H eigHtS , l oS C erritoS , W rigley VoL. 32 No. 15

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Your Weekly Community Newspaper

September 17, 2010

Recovered and reinvested Life-long LB resident organizing 55th

reunion of Wilson High’s Class of ’55

Photo by Cort Huckabone

Youth who participated in the Summer Youth Employment Training Program pick up their paychecks at Veterans Park last week. More than 335 employers have benefited from 209,000 hours of subsidized work through the efforts of 1,045 youth, thanks to the Pacific Workforce Investment Network’s Summer Youth Employment Training Program. As of August 27, more than $674,000 in payroll had been earned by the youth, and saved or used to support the local economy. About 1,000 of those young workers retrieved their checks last Friday afternoon at Veterans Park. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, provided by the LA County Department of Social Services, was used to pay wages and workers compensation for the youth.

Darlene Quinn shares more than 70 years of Long Beach history. She was born in the historic Harriman Jones Hospital, attended Woodrow Wilson High, taught in the local school system, meets with her Toastmasters Club at the enduring Belmont Shore Fire Station and once ran a charm school for local teens. Now, she is chairing the 55th reunion of Woodrow Wilson High School’s Class of ’55, an event Sept. 17, 18 and 19 at the Marriott Hotel to which more than 140 people are expected to attend, many of whom are still local to Long Beach. “While most classes have been forced to combine two or more years of graduating classes together to get enough people to hold significant reunions, the Class of ‘55 is very much alive with 140 in attendance for the 55th reunion,” said Quinn. “Classmates are coming from across the nation and Canada.” Quinn said they have a dynamic committee of 25 people who meet at least a couple of times a year. “I have

found this group more dependable and with far better follow-through than many highly paid executives with whom I’ve worked in the past,” she said. “The class of ‘55 held reunions every 10 years until after our 30th, then every five years. After our 40th, which was held in Catalina Island, the site of our Senior Ditch Day in ’55, we began having them every two-and-a-half years.” For the celebration of their 50th year reunion, which coincided with the 50th anniversary of Disneyland, the class returned to the area of their first reunion in 1960– the Disneyland Hotel, where Darlene became acquainted with Jack Quinn, whom she married four months later. In addition to organizing Wilson High’s reunion, Quinn is also an award-winning author at age 70-plus. Her new book Twisted Webs is based on her experience on a nine-member management team for the Bullocks Wilshire specialty department stores. ß

Nick Diamantides

rights-of-way, and there are about 3,600 of them, consisting of 70 different species, in the city. She noted that 71 percent of them are in good health. Muñoz also explained that, according to City policy, public works will consider removing a tree if one or more of the following criteria exist: the tree is dead, diseased, or severely declining; the tree is poorly structured, making it potentially hazardous; it is a seedling or “volunteer growth;” the tree blocks ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) access or utilities, or obstructs signs; or the tree is severely damaging adjacent hardscape or utilities. The residents who spoke at the meeting want another criterion to be added to that list– the tree is impairing the view once enjoyed from a nearby residence. Muñoz and other

Courtesy newsandexperts.com

In addition to serving as chair for Wilson’s upcoming reunion, Darlene Quinn has published a book based on her experience on a nine-member management team for the Bullocks Wilshire specialty department stores.

LB granted $2.5 million Residents attend Signal Hill Parks for joint restoration of Commission meeting to protest tall trees DeForest Wetlands The City of Long Beach will receive a 2010 River Parkways Grant worth $2.5 million for the DeForest Wetlands Restoration project, the State of California Resources Agency announced Tuesday. “The funding will allow the City of Long Beach to bring river wetlands and wildlife back to the County’s Storm Water Detention Basin while still maintaining watershed protection for the local community,” said Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe. “This project will be the longest public open-space project on the Los Angeles River to date.” The DeForest Wetlands Restoration Project is part of a larger Lower Los Angeles River Parkway Plan that will implement wetlands along the lower Los Angeles River, as a joint project between the City of Long Beach and

the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works. South of the project site is Los Angeles County’s recently completed Dominguez Gap Wetlands project. Both projects combined will create more than 86 acres of functional wetland and riparian habitat along the lower Los Angeles River. The DeForest Wetlands Restoration Project is also part of Long Beach RiverLink, a plan to create integrated open space with improved habitat and a recreation network along the Los Angeles River that will connect Long Beach and the natural river systems. “This is great news for the City of Long Beach,” Mayor Bob Foster said. “By restoring these wetlands, we’ll be adding more open space for the public’s use as well as improving water quality.” ß

Staff Writer

A group of about 20 hilltop residents showed up at the Signal Hill Parks Commission meeting last Wednesday (Sept. 8) to demand that the City cut back or remove the tall trees that are impacting their views. During the meeting, Department of Public Works Director Barbara Muñoz updated the Commission on the Master Street Tree Plan that the public works department is currently drafting. Muñoz noted that the existing plan is about 10 years old and needs to be updated. The residents want the new plan to include provisions that protect views from trees that are too tall. Muñoz explained that street trees are those that are planted in public

City officials do not want view impairment to be listed as a criterion for tree removal because of the subjective nature of what constitutes a view and complex legal issues that can spring from a city’s binding itself to protect private views. Alan MacKnight, who lives near Panorama Trail, commended public works staff for the work they had done on the Master Street Tree Plan. He insisted, however, that in the 1990s City policy was to not plant trees that would exceed 12 feet in height and would impair the views of residents who lived uphill from the trees. He added that trees planted in the ‘90s are now so tall that they are severely impacting the views of residences on the hill. “The value of that view property is reduced, and indisee trees page 10

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COMMUNITy

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

Gabelich tells residents of budget woes, charter amendments, positive changes Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

READ ALL ABOUT IT The Long Beach Main Library, 101 Pacific Ave., is hosting mixed-media artist and painter Jaye Whitworth and her series entitled Read This Painting. Her work will be displayed in the upper and lower exhibit galleries, as well as on the display wall in the children’s department through October. Call (562) 570-7500. SCRABBLE SCRAMBLE The Covenant Presbyterian Church will host a Scrabble Scramble Tournament on Friday, Sept. 17, beginning at 6pm. All proceeds benefit the local nonprofit Rising TIDE at Marguerite Kiefer Education Center, a program serving over 300 inner-city children and youth. Contact Sandra Lawler at (562) 432-4293 or sallas21@aol.com. GLASS CLASS The Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum, 18127 S. Alameda St., will host a “Stained Glass Art” activity class on Sunday, Sept. 19 from 1pm to 3pm, as part of its Weekend Activity Series. This is an interactive and educational workshop in which participants will learn how to make their own stainedglass art piece, as well as learn about air balloons by creating their own 1910 hot air balloon. This free activity is open to all ages. Call (310) 603-0088. Visit dominguezrancho.org. DNA DECONSTRUCTED The next meeting for the Questing Heirs Genealogical Society of the greater Long Beach area will be Sunday, Sept. 19 from 1:15pm to 5pm in the Parish Hall of Resurrection Lutheran Church, 1900 E. Carson St. The subjects will be cemetery research and DNA. This meeting is free and open to the public. Call Liz Myers at (562) 760-3027 or visit cagenweb.com/questing. CHAMBER CHOW The Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce’s September membership luncheon will take place Thursday, Sept. 23 from noon to 1:30pm in the Signal Hill Park Community Center, 1780 E. Hill St. Featured speaker will be Janis Kent, architect and founding president of the Certified Access Specialist Institute, with a presentation on Navigating Today’s Accessibility Concerns and Issues. Learn how to make a business compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act and the recently passed California Senate Bill 1608 while socializing with Chamber members, local officials, and legislative representatives. Lunch prepared by Triple R Catering. Cost is $25 per person but will be discounted to $15 for members with advance non-refundable reservations made before noon on the day before the luncheon. Nonmembers are welcome at a cost of $25 per person. Make reservations by leaving a voice-mail message at (562) 424-6489. JUSTICE LEAGUE The California Conference for Equality and Justice (CCEJ), formerly known as The National Conference of Christians and Jews (NCCJ), will introduce its officers and new board members at its 47th Annual Dinner meeting and report to the community on Thursday, Sept. 23, at the Hyatt Regency– Long Beach, 200 South Pine Ave. There will be a reception at 5:30pm with dinner at 6:30pm. Tickets are $75 per person. Contact CCEJ at (562) 435-8184. REUNITE FOR A NIGHT… OR TWO Millikan High’s graduating classes of 1959 and 1960 (the first graduating class to spend all three high-school years at Millikan) will reunite to celebrate a 50th class reunion at 6pm on Saturday, Sept. 25, at the Hyatt Regency– Long Beach, 200 South Pine Ave. A pre-reunion mixer will be Friday, Sept. 24, at 6pm. Cost is $100. Discounted hotel rooms are available by mentioning Millikan Class Reunion. For more info, call Gary Blodgett at (562) 943-1936. PROPOSITIONS EXPLAINED The Long Beach Area League of Women Voters will present a nonpartisan review of all the propositions on the November ballot on Saturday, Sept. 25 from 10am to noon at the Los Altos Library, 5614 E. Britton Dr. The pros and cons of each proposition will be presented to help the audience understand the purpose of each proposition, what a “yes” versus a “no” vote means, the fiscal impact, and who supports and opposes the proposition. The event is free and open to the public, and ample street parking is available. Call Renee Simon at (562) 431-8558 or the League office at (562) 277-0842.

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Much of what 8th District Long Beach City Councilmember Rae Gabelich had to say at her “community coffee” last Saturday was somber news. She did, however, talk about some of the positive things happening in the city as a whole, as well as in her district. About 40 people attended the meeting, which took place in the Mirage Coffee House, 539 East Bixby Rd. After asking the audience to observe a moment of silence for the victims of the 9/11 terrorist attack, Gabelich introduced Long Beach Police Chief Jim McDonnell, who gave a 45-minute presentation on the state of the police department. (See related story on page 3.) After the chief’s comments, Gabelich reminded the attendees that the city is still in desperate financial straits. “This coming Tuesday, the council must adopt the budget that will close an $18.5 million shortfall,” she said. On a positive note, Gabelich told the audience that, after months of discussions, the council had restored some of the proposed budget cuts, including funding for the Long Beach Municipal Band and the neighborhood parades. “However, the major cuts include more than 50 police officers and more than 20 firefighters, and significant cuts to services in all areas of the city,” she said. “And the cuts will only get worse next year.” Gabelich reminded the audience

File Photo

8th District Councilmember Rae Gabelich

that for several years she has talked about the need for Long Beach residents to decide what kind of city they want to live in and to decide if they are willing to pay for it. She was alluding to the fact that, over the past few years, she has publicly stated that she believes the city needs to increase the utility user’s tax. In November 2000, local voters passed a ballot measure which reduced the tax by 50 percent, causing a sharp reduction in city revenues, and, according to Gabelich, it is a major factor in the city’s ongoing budget problems. Any increase in the utility user’s tax would have to be approved by the voters. Gabelich also briefly discussed the three charter amendments on the November ballot. One would change the formula in which the port transfers money to the city’s Tidelands

Fund, which pays for lifeguards, beach maintenance and other programs and infrastructure along Long Beach’s coastline. “Currently, the city receives 10 percent of the net operating revenues from the port, but, as you know, there are many ways to add expenses to reduce the net amount of revenues,” Gabelich explained. “The charter amendment will change that formula to five percent of gross revenues.” Gabelich then described the charter amendment that would eliminate the city’s civil service department and consolidate its functions with the city’s human resources department. “There would still be a civil service commission to review city employee issues, but the HR department would take over the testing and hiring duties currently performed by the civil service department,” she explained. The third charter amendment Gabelich described would increase the points awarded to veterans in the hiring process for city civil service positions. Gabelich also briefly mentioned a proposed city tax on marijuana sales that would go into effect only if Proposition 19– legalizing marijuana for recreational use in California– passes in November. Switching to other topics, Gabelich said she was glad to see the start of street improvements on Atlantic Avenue between San Antonio Drive and 52nd Street. “The grinding and repaving should take place within the next couple of weeks,” she said, adding that street improvement work will soon begin on Long Beach Boulevard between Del Amo Boulevard and the 710 Freeway. “This will include repaving the street, streetscape improvements, including new trees and converting 56th Street and Ellis Street into one-way streets, as part of our one-way couplet,” she said. Toward the end of her presentation, Gabelich reminded the audience of her staunch opposition to Cabe Toyota’s proposal to erect an 80-foot electronic billboard at the southeast corner of Wardlow Road and Long Beach Boulevard. She noted that the Long Beach Planning Commission denied the request last year, but Cabe appealed that decision to the city council, which will decide on the matter Oct. 7. “It is important for you to come to the council meeting so the rest of the council knows how the community feels about the proposal,” Gabelich said. In closing, Gabelich said she was glad to see the new Marshalls store up and running in the Bixby Knolls Shopping Center, and she encouraged everyone to shop there as well as to support all the stores and restaurants in the area. During the question-and-answer period, several residents made suggestions as to how the city could cut expenses, including reducing street sweeping to every other week in certain neighborhoods. ß

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NEWS

SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

3

LBPD chief optimistic about department’s strength in spite of budget cuts Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Jim McDonnell has been chief of the Long Beach Police Department for about six months. In spite of ongoing budget cuts that have significantly reduced the number of patrol officers and detectives, McDonnell exudes optimism and insists that the department will continue to effectively carry out its mission to protect the city’s residents and businesses. McDonnell spoke to the residents who attended 8th District Long Beach City Councilwoman Rae Gabelich’s “Community Coffee” at the Mirage Coffeehouse last Saturday (Sept. 11.) “Looking at the crime picture here, we’ve had tremendous success in this city in the last two years with doubledigit crime reduction,” he said. McDonnell noted that the department needs to do a better job of publicizing its crime-reduction success, but, unfortunately, TV news media concentrate primarily on violent crimes and tragedies. “We want to be able to draw

them down for the good stories, to give the full picture,” he said. “Too often people that don’t live in Long Beach hear about gangs, murders and horrendous traffic accidents.” McDonnell said more people should know how the LBPD compares with other local law-enforcement agencies. “The LA Sheriff’s Department has a 7.2-minute average response time for emergency calls for service. The LAPD (recently) went from 6.2 minutes to 5.7 minutes on average, and they celebrated that,” he said. “The response time right now in Long Beach is 3.8 minutes. We want to be able to maintain that. It’s important to me that when you call 9-1-1, we get there as quickly as we possibly can.” McDonnell acknowledged, however, that maintaining that rapid response time will be a challenge with the city’s continually shrinking budget, which has forced the layoffs of more than 100 sworn police officers so far. “We had 1,020 (sworn officers) a little over a year ago. We are now down to 901, and for the next budget

year we are looking in the ballpark of 867 or so,” he said. “This means that some of the things we have been able to do, we won’t be able to do as much of. My goal is to continue to keep us as a full-service police department.” McDonnell said the LBPD will continue to make arrests and conduct investigations for all crimes committed in the city. “The reality of it is that it may take a little bit longer, but we are not going to let anything fall by the wayside,” he said. Reflecting on the terrorist attacks that happened on September 11, 2001, McDonnell said it would be naïve to think something like that would not happen again. He explained that, in addition to terrorist attacks, law-enforcement agencies are bracing for the possibility that the kind of mass killings now taking place in Mexico will begin happening in the United States. “When you look at the level of violence that is happening with the drug cartels on the other side of the border, that is not going to stay south of the border,” he said. “The cartels are

selling their dope here through the gangs, which are their drug-distribution network.” He noted that Latino gangs in this area pay taxes to the Mexican mafia in order to participate in that organization’s multi-level marketing of illegal drugs. He explained that all local, state and federal law-enforcement agencies are trying to prevent the violence from spreading north of the border by sharing information with each other and beefing up their see cuts page 11

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$950,000 to be spent on I-405 improvements in LB, Carson Congresswoman Laura Richardson has announced that $950,000 has been awarded to help fund needed improvements along I-405 in the 37th Congressional District. This funding includes a $712,500 grant for a modification at the I-405 and Wilmington Avenue interchange in Carson and a $237,500 grant for ramp improvements at the I-405 and Cherry Avenue interchange in Long Beach. “With hundreds of thousands of people using I-405 each day, these projects are necessary to relieve congestion and to improve the safety of this stretch of the interstate,” Richardson said. “I-405 is one of the most important transportation corridors in Southern California, and it is

vital that we take the necessary steps to relieve traffic congestion by modernizing and expanding these key sections of the freeway. The improvements will provide improved access and use of the interstate by the people who live here, and it will improve the flow of goods to and from the ports.” The I-405 and Wilmington Avenue interchange modification in Carson will include the widening of Wilmington Avenue from 223rd Street, south of I-405, to 220th Street north of the interchange, and the construction of a new northbound I-405 on-ramp from Wilmington Avenue. The Cherry Avenue I-405 ramp improvements will reconfigure the collector/distributor road to eliminate the

need for aging bridge structures, reconfigure the interchange to provide full directional traffic movements, create the opportunity to install an additional lane in each direction on I405 in the project area, and possibly eliminate the southbound I-405 Spring Street and the northbound I405 Orange Avenue on and off ramps. “These projects are important to keep our roads modern and traffic moving smoothly through the 37th District,” Richardson added. “And, in addition to the benefits of a modernized highways system, this money also creates local jobs for completing the work, which brings money into our local economy.” ß

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For T.J. and Lauri Sullivan of AAA Calvert Electrical, Heating & Air Conditioning, their business is their life. “We think of it as our baby. Even when we’re not on the job, we spend a lot of time thinking and talking about the business. We talk about what went on with our customers that day and how we can make sure everyone is completely happy with what we do. Always that is our ultimate goal,” said Lauri. T.J. gained his work ethic from his father Tom Sullivan Sr., who founded the business in 1966. Originally, Tom focused mainly on electrical contractor work, doing a lot of oil field, industrial, commercial and residential jobs. It wasn’t until 1983 that he purchased Calvert Heating and Air Conditioning. T.J. began working for Tom in 1978 at the age of 16, and then went to trade school to become an electrician. After graduating, he continued on at his father’s business and began to build a strong following and customer base. After Tom purchased Calvert Heating and Air Conditioning, T.J. went back to trade school for air conditioning training. Lauri, T.J.’s wife of over 20 years, came into the business in 2004 when T.J.’s mother, Pat, passed away. Up to that point, Pat had handled every aspect of the administrative work. In July of 2005, T.J. and Lauri took over the business. “At that time my dad really only had one employee, which was me. When Lauri and I started handling things ourselves, the first thing we did was hire an air conditioning technician, Tom Gardner. Since then, we’ve hired two more

electricians, Mike Phipps and Eddie Diaz, and a helper, Dean Christofferson. By 2009 our volume had increased so greatly that Lauri hired an additional person, Leonanna Myers, to help with the daily office tasks,” said T.J. The work picture also changed a bit. AAA Calvert mostly did commercial work when Tom was running the business. When T.J. and Lauri took over the company, they decided to expand their business by reaching out for more residential jobs in order to assist local homeowners with their electrical, heating and cooling needs. Though there have been some changes, some things stay the same. AAA Calvert still resides in the same complex that they have since the 1970s. And good old-fashioned customer service remains a top priority. “Customer service is a lost art. If someone calls, they’ll get somebody on the phone. We try to deal with customers like they are family friends. We’re here to take care of the problem– and we follow up. That’s a big part of it,” said T.J. “We really go out of our way. There are times we go out, and it’s something so simple that we don’t even charge for it. If we go out to a little old lady’s house and the breaker is tripped, we just reset it. I just tell them to call us when they really have a problem.” Administrative assistant/dispatcher Leonanna Myers is a big part of the team effort, and she admires the way T.J. and Lauri treat their customers. “I feel like they really try to not just make every caller a customer, but make every customer a friend. I don’t think a lot of companies are like that, and I

think it’s pretty cool to be a part of that,” said Leonanna. The rest of their employees are just as dedicated to making their customers happy. “All of our guys are polite, considerate, conscientious, and they care about being kind to people. We’ll do whatever we need to do to make sure the customer is satisfied, and we always stand by our work,” said Lauri. “In turn, we get a lot of referrals. We just have lot of nice customers. Not only nice customers, but customers we connect to. That’s what makes you feel good when you go home. When you solve someone’s problem or create a connection with a customer– that’s what’s gratifying.” AAA Calvert is located at 2502 North Palm Drive, Suite A in Signal Hill. For more information, or to make an appointment, call (562) 429-1546. They would love to hear from you!

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HEALTH

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

LB hospitals, Health Department working together to combat whooping-cough epidemic PUBLISHER/EDITOR IN CHIEF

Whooping cough (pertussis) has been declared an epidemic in California this year, with case numbers projected to be the highest in 50 years. Almost 2,800 people in the state have been sickened with the disease, with 159 hospitalizations and seven deaths (all deaths have been in infants less than two months of age). Long Beach has had 31 cases to date this year, compared to only eight cases at this time last year. Pertussis is contagious and is spread by coughing or sneezing. Pertussis causes a severe, long-lasting cough illness in adolescents and adults; complications are rare in this age group, but days to weeks of school or work may be missed. However, complications are more common in infants who get infected before they are fully vaccinated; they can become very ill and require hospitalization or even die from pertussis. Seventy-five percent of the recent hospitalizations statewide have been in infants less than 6 months of age. Pertussis vaccine has been available for infants over 2 months

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for the program and are in the process of implementing protocols to routinely offer the vaccine to women after they give birth. The City of Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services (Health Department) is assisting the hospitals with advice, coordination of efforts, educational materials and additional vaccine. The hospitals and the Health Department are also working on plans to offer vaccine to the family members of newborns. Health officials are urging families who are expecting babies to take advantage of this program and to get vaccinated before the baby’s arrival to ensure protection. Tdap is available through many local healthcare providers and at the Health Department. Appointments for vaccines at the Health Department may be made by calling (562) 570-4315. For more information on whooping cough, call the Health Department’s Immunization Program at (562) 570-4212 or visit the Long Beach Health Department’s website at longbeach.gov/health. ß

OPINION

The Signal Tribune

The Signal Tribune welcomes LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. Letters should be signed, dated and include a phone number in order to verify authenticity.

of age and young children for many years, but the protection it gives decreases over time; a booster vaccine for older children and adults called “Tdap” (tetanus/diphtheria/acellular pertussis) was finally licensed in 2005. A Tdap booster can take the place of a tetanus booster and is recommended for children between the ages of 11 and 18 and for all adults. In order to combat the epidemic, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) initiated a program that has made free vaccine available to birthing hospitals to vaccinate new mothers and family members who will be close to newborn infants. Most infants get infected by a close family member or caretaker, so to protect newborns, health officials recommend Tdap booster vaccination of all older children and adults in the family, as well as any other caretakers of the infant. All three birthing hospitals in Long Beach (Long Beach Memorial Medical Center/Miller Children’s Hospital, St. Mary’s Medical Center and Pacific Hospital of Long Beach), have signed up

Among the roasters who will be providing the good-natured tributes are Supervisor Don Knabe, Press-Telegram columnist Tom Hennessy, Signal Tribune publisher Neena Strichart and jazz legend Al Williams. Gloria Cordero, a partner with the ABC Advocacy Group and a longtime friend of Gabelich and Grabinski, will be the roastmaster.

Thoughts from the Publisher

by Neena Strichart

I have heard it said that people most fear speaking or singing in front of a large group. Remembering how I felt giving an oral book report in front of my peers at Signal Hill Elementary School, or having to recite a poem for church, I have to say that I too suffered from the public-performing phobia. Through the years I have faced my fear of public speaking and just did it anyway. I have learned to keep it short and to the point, and I have done my best to not only inform my audience but to entertain them a bit as well. you’ll have to ask those who have been within earshot of my various speeches whether or not I have been successful. During the big karaoke craze a few years ago, I also tackled the singing-in-public thing, often choosing to belt out the Neena version of “La Bamba” (yes, in Spanish), and more recently have tried my hand at Curley’s in Signal Hill singing “Believe” by Cher or “Feel Like a Woman” by Shania Twain– especially after a glass or two of adult beverage. It looks as if my practice at addressing crowds will come in handy later this month since I have been asked to be one of the

“roasters” at the “Ray Grabinski and Rae Gabelich Get Roasted” benefit, which is being held to help the Knights of Pythias with their wilderness education program for at-risk youth. One of the “knights” sent over the following details for the event. Read below– I hope to see you there. Eighth District Councilwoman Rae Gabelich and former 7th District Councilmember Ray Grabinski will be the subjects of an evening of jokes, barbs and humorous anecdotes from some distinguished community leaders, all to help at-risk youth have the opportunity to attend a wilderness camp. The Rae-Ray Roast, which will raise money for the Pythian Youth Foundation’s (PYF) Wilderness Camp in the Sequoia National Forest, will take place on Thursday, Sept. 30 at the law offices of Keesal, Young & Logan. The celebration begins with a reception at 5:30pm. William Grisolia, a 2010 Music Award Nominee for Best Blues Song of the Year, will provide entertainment. A limited number of tickets are available at $50 each.

“The Rae-Ray Roast will be a celebration of friends and friendships that have resulted in more than four decades of service to the Long Beach community,” said Thomas White, executive director of the Pythian Youth Foundation. “The roast is an opportunity for friends to reflect on the power of friendships and a time to say thanks to two dynamic citizens of our community.” The Pythian Youth Foundation is a nonprofit charitable organization founded in 1946 to develop and manage a 19-acre wilderness camp that was granted by President Harry S. Truman. The foundation and its sister organization, the Children’s Welfare Foundation, have quietly worked behind the scenes in Long Beach for the past ten years. Working closely with the YMCA, Police Athletic League, the Signal Hill Community Association and other public and nonprofit organizations, PYF has provided free camperships for children between 9 and 11 years of age. They have also sponsored book drives in partnership with the Long Beach Public Library to promote literacy and given away thousands of bicycle safety helmets to help prevent head injuries.

Rae Gabelich was elected to the Long Beach City Council in 2004 and re-elected without opposition in 2008. She represents the Eighth District, which includes Bixby Knolls, Los Cerritos and part of North Long Beach. On the City Council, Gabelich has focused on improving public safety, revitalizing the business corridors in Bixby Knolls and North Long Beach, and protecting the quality of life in the neighborhoods. She is a retired flight attendant for United Airlines, and she has a son, Guy. Her late husband, Gary Gabelich, set the world land speed record in 1970, and she has maintained that enthusiasm for racing, helping to establish and organize the annual Bixby Knolls Dragster Expo and Car Show. Ray Grabinski has been a friend of Long Beach for the past 50 years. He was raised in North Long Beach, graduated from Long Beach Jordan High School, attended Long Beach City College and is a US Army veteran. As a widowed father living in the Bixby area, he raised four sons– Ray Jr., Bill, Mike, and Matt. He was first elected to the Long Beach City Council in 1986 and served as 7th District Councilman through 1994. In 1998, he was re-elected as 7th District Councilmember for a third term. Ray recently retired from the University of California 4-H Program, where he served as resource development coordinator for Los Angeles County. For reservations or event information, contact Thomas White at (562) 881-0165 or email pythianyouthcamp@earthlink.net.

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Wet, but not wild The death toll continues to rise at SeaWorld after a 12-year-old orca named Sumar died at the theme park’s San Diego location. Sumar died far short of the expected 50- to 60-year lifespan of orcas who roam the vast oceans, their rightful homes.

TO

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Orcas are intelligent marine mammals who think and plan and work cooperatively. They share complex extended family relationships and swim for up to 100 miles every day. At SeaWorld, their worlds have been reduced to tiny, barren concrete tanks where they perform tricks for food and splash shrieking crowds. These animals will continue to live and die in misery as long as the public buys a ticket. The next

time your family is considering a trip to SeaWorld, please ask yourself if it’s right to expect the lifelong confinement of intelligent and aware animals for a few hours of diversion. Please say no. Visit PETA.org to learn more. Jennifer O’Connor Research Specialist PETA Foundation

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HEALTH

Help not wanted: free resources aid families in overcoming resistance of seniors who need assistance Just when you thought that a family caregiver’s job couldn’t get more difficult, consider this: Many of the estimated 1,000,000 households caring for a senior in Los Angeles and Orange counties are trying to help an aging relative who’d rather not have help. A study of family caregivers who responded to a survey on caregiverstress.com revealed that more than half of the respondents (51 percent) said that their aging relative was very resistant to care. These seniors often object to help, whether it’s from their own children or a professional who tries to come into their homes to assist. “This is a real problem for family caregivers worried about the safety of a senior loved one who might be forgetting food on the stove or neglecting to take their medications,” said Debbie Teofilo, owner of the Home Instead Senior Care office serving the Greater Long Beach/Seal Beach area. But experts say that keeping fiercely independent seniors safe at home isn’t a lost cause; there are solutions for them and their family caregivers. That’s why the Home Instead Senior Care network is launching Caring for Your Parents: Education for the Family Caregiver. The unique, educational program includes a number of resources that address senior resistance to care as well as a variety of other topics such as choosing an in-home care provider, the signs of aging, long distance caregiving and communicating with aging parents. The free materials and videos are available at caregiverstress.com. Why do seniors resist help? “If seniors admit they need help, they feel their independence is in question,” said Teofilo. “Seniors believe that once they acknowledge they need help, they’ll lose control of their affairs. They are trying to maintain dignity. Unless they feel they can trust someone, they resist change. I believe it’s the fear that life as they’ve known it will be taken away from them.” Sometimes seniors only want help from a son or daughter, which can put undue pressure on that family caregiver who feels he or she can’t call for professional help. Most caregivers can

go into “crisis mode” to rally around a loved one in the short-term, “but you can’t be totally immersed in a crisis mode long-term without your own family, work and health suffering,” according to family caregiving consultant Dr. Amy D’Aprix, who holds a Ph.D. and master’s degree in social work and is author of From Surviving to Thriving: Transforming Your Caregiving Experience. The strain can take a particular toll on working family caregivers. The Home Instead Senior Care study revealed that 42 percent of caregivers spend more than 30 hours a week caregiving. That’s the equivalent of a second full-time job. The following are strategies from Home Instead Senior Care and family caregiving consultant Dr. Amy D’Aprix to help family caregivers turn resistance into assistance. 1. Understand where the resistance is coming from. Ask your parent why he or she is resisting. “Mom, I notice that every time I bring up the idea of someone coming in to help, you resist it. Why is that?” Oftentimes, older adults don’t realize they are being resistant. 2. Explain your goals. Remind your loved one that you both want the same thing. Explain that a little extra help can keep her at home longer and will help put your mind at ease as well. Have a candid conversation with him about the impact this care is having on your life. Oftentimes, seniors don’t understand the time commitment of a caregiver. 3. Bring in outside help. If a relationship with a parent is deteriorating, ask a professional, such as a geriatric care manager, for an assessment. A third-party professional can provide valuable input. Also, go to 4070talk.com for tips on how to talk with a loved one. If you are having problems getting through to your older adult, consider asking another family member or close friend to intervene. If you’re not making headway, perhaps there’s someone better to talk with your parents. 4. Research your options to find

the best resources for your loved one. Contact your local Area Agency on Aging or a geriatric care manager to research resources in your community, or go to homeinstead.com and click on the resources tab for The Home Care Solution, a guide for family caregivers to help them find the best in-home care for their loved ones. If you decide outside help is needed, reassure your parents and tell them you have researched caregivers and you are confident you have found the best one you can find to come into the home to help. 5. Respect your parent’s decisions. Sometimes you won’t agree with your parent’s decisions and that’s okay. As long as your loved one is of sound mind, he or she should have the final say. A note: If your senior has dementia, seek professional assistance from a doctor or geriatric care manager. Logic often will not work, and other strategies must be employed. ß

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Different forms of substance abuse increasing among women By Richard N. Waldman, MD An estimated 20 million Americans– including nearly 10 percent of non-pregnant 1 women ages 15 to 44 and 5 percent of pregnant women– reported illegal drug use in 2008. Substance use and abuse are increasing among women and affect women of all backgrounds, regardless of age, socioeconomic status, or race. Marijuana is, by far, the most commonly used illegal drug, taken by roughly 75 percent of illicit drug users. Recreational use of prescription drugs is on the rise, especially among women, with more than six-million people reporting non-medical use of prescription drugs such as opiates, tranquilizers, and stimulants. Use of other street drugs, such as cocaine, methamphetamines, heroin, hallucinogens, and inhalants, also remained high. Illegal drug use in women increases the risk of physical and mental health issues, such as reproductive problems, liver disease, stroke, certain cancers, STDs, and depression. Because they can cross the placenta to a fetus, illegal drugs are especially dangerous to use during pregnancy. Illegal drug use during pregnancy can lead to preterm birth, birth defects, still birth, and newborn-related problems, including addiction at the time of birth, breathing difficulties, irritability, and bonding troubles. Substance abuse and dependence are treatable medical conditions, not signs of weakness, bad character, or lack of will power. Many women are reluctant to admit that they are having

problems with substance abuse, fearing repercussions at work or with the police, social isolation, or loss of their children. Others may not be aware of the extent of their dependence on drugs or may be in denial. But if you or someone you know has a substance abuse problem, it is important to seek help. Signs of dependence may include: • A need for increased amounts of the drug to receive the desired effect • Experiencing mental and physical withdrawal symptoms, such as anxiety, depression, irritability, nausea, vomiting, and tremors • A persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control use • Giving up important social, work, or recreational activities because of substance use Remember that casual drug use can quickly turn into dependence. It is best to avoid using illegal substances, including prescription medications that were not prescribed to you. If you are pregnant, that goes double. Pregnant women should also inform their doctor of any medications that they take so they can be sure they are safe to use during pregnancy. your doctor can be an excellent resource for advice and educational information on illegal and prescription drug abuse and can refer you to health professionals and support groups that can help. Richard N. Waldman, MD is president of The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. -------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION recoverymonth.gov

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Signal Hill arts-based education WRD recognized for contributions to water-reuse industry program receives $1-million grant The nonprofit WateReuse Associ- service area. These efforts replace imported ation has named the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) the WateReuse Institution of the year for 2010. The award recognizes institutions whose significance and contributions to the community continue to advance the water-reuse industry. The award was presented at the 25th Annual WateReuse Symposium in Washington, D.C. to WRD for taking major steps to eliminate imported water for groundwater replenishment in south Los Angeles County. WRD manages two of the most heavily used groundwater basins in the state. Groundwater from these basins provides 40 percent of the overall water supply to the 4 million residents in 43 cities in WRD’s

Photo by Beverly White

Local elementary students participating in Dramatic Results’ Math in a Basket program.

The US Department of Education has awarded a $1.1-million grant to Dramatic Results, an award-winning educational artsbased charitable agency which has served more than 17,000 students with innovative learning environments to provide arts education programs to Long Beach Unified students over three years. The funding will support Dramatic Results’ Write-On Arts program, a language arts/visual arts integrated program, for 600-plus students as part of their regular instructional day and provide professional development for 60-plus classroom teachers working in the lowest performing inner-city schools in Long Beach. “With our two past federal grants for Math in a Basket, we have fostered academic motivation within the classroom for over 1,200 students, while bringing up their math

scores,” said Beverly White, Dramatic Results operations manager and evaluation coordinator. “With this longitudinal Write-On Arts project, we hope to continue to enhance academic motivation and positive group collaboration, this time integrating art with English language arts to increase student proficiency.” One of only two three-time grantees of this award in the state of California, Signal Hill-based Dramatic Results was successful in securing these federal funds because of significant gains in students’ CST scores after participating in Dramatic Results’ programs. Founded in 1992, Dramatic Results’ mission is to facilitate student success by stimulating curiosity and fostering creativity through a handson, arts-based approach to learning. -----------------------------------MORE INFORMATION dramaticresults.org

More than ten percent of the state’s population relies on WRD to replenish the groundwater basins. As a result, the District has developed water-reuse projects that simultaneously meet regional needs while contributing to long-term statewide solutions. Programs like WRD’s Water Independence Now (WIN) help ensure that the region has a reliable source of local water supply as the future of imported water becomes less certain. The WIN program is a nationally recognized model of local water supply development that includes the Leo J. Vander Lans Advanced Water Treatment Plant in Long Beach, California and the Groundwater Reliability Improvement Program (GRIP).

water with purified wastewater for the protection and replenishment of the groundwater basins. “This is a great honor for WRD to receive the WateReuse Institution of the year. This award symbolizes the recognition from our colleagues as it recognizes our commitment to securing our region’s water sources by using innovative water-reuse projects,” said WRD Board President Sergio Calderon. “This award is further evidence of WRD’s leadership in developing a local, reliable and sustainable water supply that includes smart water recycling projects,” said WRD General Manager Robb Whitaker. “Our projects will have permanent benefits that greatly contribute to solving California’s water crisis.” ß

Experts to teach about historic preservation during restoration fair you’ve got the bungalow, the yard, and the walkability factor. your bike is parked in the garage, and there’s a coffeehouse just around the corner. you’ve been reading Cottages and Bungalows magazine and you’re pumped to spiff up your casa. And then you realize that what makes living in an historic district special is that your neighbors aren’t building mansionettes or putting in vinyl windows. But what changes can you make on your house? Who has the answers? Who has ideas? The Restoration Trade Fair– now in its third year– is the place to get these questions answered from the experts. During the day-long fair on Sunday, Sept. 19 from 9:30am to 4pm at Luther Burbank Elementary, 501 Junipero Ave., attendees can meet neighbors, figure out house-improvement budgets, and tap into resources far and wide– from city officials, community experts, specialized contractors and consultants– all educated and certified in historic and preservation topics. Event highlights will include: • More than 50 specialty vendors and exhibitors. On hand will be a variety of non-profit, city, heritage, historic and community groups providing educational services to add color and character to the day. Plus, top-notch local vendors and artisans offering services and consulting in a variety of areas, including landscaping and nursery resources, interior/exterior design, lighting, flooring, furniture and cabinetry, paintsee Fair page 11

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Dawn Mendelson works on the design for a historic mosaic mural that will be created during Sunday’s Restoration Trade Fair. The mural will eventually hang in Burbank Elementary’s reception area.

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Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

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LB Playhouse’s earnest provides some unexpected sizzle Neena Strichart Publisher

Discovering that our usual play reviewer Vicki Paris Goodman would be unable to attend opening night of Long Beach Playhouse’s The Importance of Being Earnest was a pleasant surprise for me, as I so wanted to have the opportunity to experience the performance and share it with our readers. Having read the play in college and seeing several different theatre companies give their interpretations of Oscar Wilde’s 19th century farcical comedy, as well as the musical version, Earnest in Love, I do consider myself a bit of an Earnest aficionada. The history of Wilde’s play takes us back to London on Valentine’s Day, 1895, when the curtains first rose for The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People. Now, more than a century later, the story line still plays to a comedy-loving audience’s hunger for witty dialogue and farcical humor. Exploiting the social workings of Victorian-era London, the play’s major premises focus on the pettiness of the upper class’s perception of what is proper and important and their total disregard for anyone or anything that they deem beneath them. With that said, I must say that this particular cast did an exceptional job of story telling and of entertaining the audience. The nine-person ensemble played their parts to perfection, and I especially got a kick out of the two main characters, Algernon Moncrieff (Paul Griffiths) and John Worthington (Matt Landig). Although neither was “really” named Earnest, (or were they?), the two reminded me of the characters Frasier and Niles on the once popular television sitcom Frasier. Just like those metrosexual brothers, Algernon and John are also self-indulgent and quite judgmental of those they

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rectly the City’s revenues will be impacted by that,” he said. “My strong recommendation is that you consider modifying the plan for specific areas where views are important.” MacKnight also recommended that the City remove trees that impact views and replace them with trees that do not grow to such heights. Sanford Simmons, who lives in Promontory Crest, agreed with MacKnight. He added that being able to enjoy the magnificent view was the main reason most people purchased homes on the hill. “I would like to be able to see the view that we used to be able to see,” he said. “The

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deem gauche or unsophisticated. They justify their actions and convince themselves, and sometimes the audience, that their selfish behavior is a result of their silver-spooned birthrights. Oddly enough, the characters are quite likeable even if they are narcissistic. Although not part of the two main romantic partners, John’s ward Cecily’s governess Miss Prism (Teri Ciranna) and her crush Reverend Canon Chasuble (Tim Forsyth) give off the rawest sensual chemistry I’ve ever witnessed on stage. Holy cow! The couple may be in their senior years, but their relationship made even me blush. Wow! I was glad the Playhouse now al-

lows patrons to bring beverages to their seats– I sure needed something wet to cool me down after all that passion! For a good time with lots of laughs, don’t miss Long Beach Playhouse’s Importance of Being Earnest– it’s sure to make you think differently about the Victorian era. Long Beach Playhouse is located at 5021 E. Anaheim St. Tickets are available for The Importance of Being Earnest through Saturday, Oct. 9. Friday and Saturday night performances begin at 8pm, and Sunday matinees start at 2pm. Regular ticket prices are $22/$20/$12 and are available by calling (562) 494-1014 or at lbplayhouse.org ß

city does not allow residents to build fences that would impair their neighbors’ views, so why should the city be able to plant trees that block views?” Local realtor Matt Simmons (son of Sanford), who also lives on the hill, told the commission that view homes have always sold for more than homes in the interior of the same neighborhoods. “We are here because we have lost our views and our property values have been lowered,” he said, adding that he is angry that tree removal criteria do not include trees that impact views. Commissioner Ken Davis, who is also a realtor, said he understands the concerns of the residents who spoke at the meeting and he is empathetic, but he noted that the issue of tree removal is very complex. “We have residents who walk through the city and love the tall trees and do not want them removed,” he said. “We have to make sure we are treating everybody in the city equally.” Davis added that he agrees that appropriate-sized trees should be planted in certain areas, but coming up with a city policy to accomplish that task and taking on all the legal ramifications of such a policy is not something most cities are prepared to

do. He explained that it is extremely difficult to determine what is a primary view (worthy of protection) and what is not. Commissioner Denise Damrow, who is an attorney, echoed Davis’s remarks. She added that, from a legal standpoint, the city is not required to protect residents’ views from trees that have increased in height. Muñoz noted that, while the Draft Street Tree Policy does not list view protection as a criterion, it does allow City staff to evaluate a request from a property owner for the removal of a tree adjacent to his or her property. “I believe the new Street Tree Policy would be helpful in resolving some street-tree removal requests,” Muñoz said. “The new policy will now allow city staff to evaluate a tree removal request beyond our typical removal criteria. Obviously, we will not please everyone, especially owners who want to remove all the trees on both sides of a street and several trees within an adjacent park.” Muñoz added that the Master Street Tree Plan, which includes the Street Tree Policy, will likely be presented to the Signal Hill City Council for approval sometime in October. ß

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intelligence efforts. The chief also explained that one of his goals is to get more advanced technology as part of the LBPD’s arsenal for law enforcement and crime prevention. “We are trying to get cameras in strategic places, particularly for the violent crime issues,” he said, explaining that cameras eliminate the need for eyewitnesses for crime prosecution. He added that cameras also eliminate the need for hundreds of hours of surveillance time. “The technology costs up front, and in tough budget times, that is an issue,” he said. “But the benefit in the long term far outweighs the cost.” Other high-tech equipment the chief hopes to obtain for the LBPD includes automated license plate readers which can almost instantly determine if a certain car is reported as stolen or implicated in a crime, and shot-spotter technology, which can pinpoint the exact address where a gun was fired. McDonnell also talked about how Homeland Security measures being taken by local law-enforcement agencies in the Los Angeles/Long Beach area are serving as a model for law-enforcement agencies throughout the United States. “We know our counterparts in the other agencies,” he said. “We work with them on a regular basis,” he said. “We opened up the Emergency Operations Center (at the Port of Long Beach). Everybody has a role, and everybody knows their role, and we know what the other people’s roles are.” After his comments, McDonnell fielded questions from the audience. Most of the questions pertained to how police staffing levels would be impacted by budget cutbacks. In closing, McDonnell said that citizens getting involved in their communities is one of the strongest deterrents to crime. He urged all residents to take an active interest in what is happening in their neighborhoods. ß

ing and finishing, house numbers, and more. • Workshops and speakers, covering topics such as: How to Buy in a Historic District, Discovering your Home’s History, and How to Work with an Architect. • Architectural photography movie and lecture. Screening at the Art Theatre on 4th Street will be Visual Acoustics, a film about mid-century architectural photographer Julius Shulman, directed by Eric Bricker and narrated by Dustin Hoffman. • Community mosaic project. Attendees may participate in an historic

mosaic mural at Luther Burbank Elementary School, a project of the Garden of the Mind. Inspired by Luther Burbanks’ Shasta Daisy, the mosaic mural will hang in the school’s reception area. • Morning swing music, courtesy of the Union Station Band, a 1930s- and 1940s-era swing orchestra. The event is a fundraiser for the nonprofit Rose Park Neighborhood Association (RPNA). Funds will be used for education and participation in RPNA restoration activities. The event is free to RPNA members and children under 18; $5 for all others. There is no on-site parking. -----------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION rpna-tradefair.org

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orozco’s Business

MEGA MIXER Friday, September 24 • 5:30-8:30PM

3619 Atlantic Avenue • Long Beach

Meet, greet, mix, mingle, and network. Bring a canned donation for LBRM

guest Speaker Chief of Police, Jim McDonnell featured Community Partners that will be joining us are: Costco, AAA Club, Napa Auto Parts, Time Warner Cable, Long Beach Memorial Hospital, Petroleum Club, Kiwanis, Toastmasters, Long Beach Rescue Mission, Signal Tribune, Boys and girls Club, YMCA, The Rock Club, InkPeace, Marriot Hotel, SBN (Small Business Network).

St3215 - Sept 17:layout 1 9/17/10 11:51 aM Page 12

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

Monthly Membership Luncheon - September 23, Noon-1:30pm Featured Speaker: Janis Kent Topic: Make your business compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act Signal Hill Park Community Center • 1780 E. Hill Street (behind the library) • Lunch by Triple R Catering $15 with reservations / $25 at the door • RSVP by calling (562) 424-6489

C h a M B E r   M i x E r S   a r E   E v E r y   2 N d   T h u r S d ay

camoves.com/terry.rogers

ph: 562-713-4630

email: trogers@coldwellbanker.com © 2004 coldwell banker corporation. an equal opportunity company. equal Housing opportunity. owned and operated by nrT incorporated. if your property is listed with another broker, this is not intended as solicitation.

golden eagle

accounting, bookkeeping, & Tax Services

restaurant

certified Quickbooks pro advisors/Training

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner • Combos

Phone:

1 OFF

back office cambodian & Spanish Speaking

$ 00 

cTec registered Tax preparers

orders $4.99 or more

562-283-0558

Fax: 562-283-0561

2669 MyRTLE AvE., STE 207 Signal Hill • www.madkatinc.com

Dine In or Take Out

HourS Mon-fri 6am-930pm Sat 6am-8:30pm Sun 6:30am-7:30pm

“Thank you for your loyal support”

-Louie & Jim

2101 E. WILLoW ST., SIgNAL HILL 562-492-1216 oR 562-492-1336

St3215 - Sept 17:layout 1 9/17/10 11:51 aM Page 13

SEPTEMBER 17, 2010 TST3534 notiCe of truStee'S Sale tS # Ca-09-252030-ed order # 090133096-Ca-dCi you are in default under a deed of truSt dated 7/21/2006. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeeding againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer. a public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. the sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the deed of trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the deed of trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. the amount may be greater on the day of sale. BenefiCiary May eleCt to Bid leSS tHan tHe total aMount due. trustor(s): SereivudtH eung, a Married Man aS HiS Sole and SeParate ProPerty recorded: 7/27/2006 as instrument no. 06 1665370 in book -, page - of official records in the office of the recorder of loS angeleS County, California; date of Sale: 10/8/2010 at 10:30 aM Place of Sale: at the West side of the los angeles County Courthouse, directly facing norwalk Blvd., 12720 norwalk Blvd., norwalk, Ca 90650 amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $617,358.61 the purported property address is: 1876 Stanley ave Signal Hill, Ca 90755 assessors Parcel no. 7216-024-004 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. if no street address or other common designation is shown, please refer to the referenced legal description for property location. in the event no common address or common designation of the property is provided herein directions to the location of the property may be obtained within 10 days of the date of first publication of this notice of Sale by sending a written request to JPMorgan Chase Bank, n.a. 7301 Baymeadows Way Jacksonville fl 32256. Pursuant to California Civil Code 2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: [ 1 ] the mortgage loan servicer has not obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; [ 2 ] the timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does apply to this notice of sale. if the trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. if the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. the Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's attorney. date: 9/3/2010 Quality loan Service Corp. 2141 5th avenue San diego, Ca 92101 619-645-7711 for non Sale information only Sale line: 714-730-2727 or login to: www.fidelityasap.com reinstatement line: 619-6457711 Quality loan Service, Corp. if you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. tHiS notiCe iS Sent for tHe PurPoSe of ColleCting a deBt. tHiS firM iS atteMPting to ColleCt a deBt on BeHalf of tHe Holder and oWner of tHe note. any inforMation oBtained By or Provided to tHiS firM or tHe Creditor Will Be uSed for tHat PurPoSe. as required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. aSaP# 3722572 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010 TST3535 notiCe of truStee'S Sale trustee Sale no. 201058880 loan no. r12110900-rC title order no. 4466431 you are in default under a deed of truSt dated 03-12-2004. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeedingS againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer. on 10-07-2010 at 10:30 a.M., PlM lender ServiCeS, inC. as the duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to deed of trust recorded 04-15-2004, Book , Page , instrument 04 0924472, and as modified by the Modification of deed of trust recorded on 12-12-2005, Book , Page , instrument 05 3043882, and as modified by the Modification of deed of trust recorded on 07-302007, Book , Page , instrument 20071786509 of official records in the office of the recorder of loS angeleS County, California, executed by: SHaronda lynn allen, as trustor, WaSHington Mutual BanK, fa, a federal aSSoCiation, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction the trustor's interest in the property described below, to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. the sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the deed of trust. the sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the deed of trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. the amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: at tHe WeSt Side of tHe loS angeleS County CourtHouSe, direCtly faCing norWalK Blvd., 12720 norWalK Boulevard, norWalK, Ca amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $180,923.47(estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property purported as: 2599 Walnut ave, unit 223, Signal Hill, Ca 90755 aPn number: 7211-026-132- oBtained Will Be uSed for tHat PurPoSe. tHe land referred to in tHiS guarantee iS Situated in tHe State of California, City of Signal Hill, County of loS angeleS and iS deSCriBed aS folloWS: a CondoMiniuM CoMPriSed of: ParCel 1: (a) an undivided 1/82nd intereSt in and to lot 1 of traCt no. 31155, in tHe City of Signal Hill, County of loS angeleS, State of California, aS Per MaP reCorded in BooK 1004 PageS 95 and 96 of MaPS, in tHe offiCe of tHe County reCorder of Said County. exCePt tHerefroM all oil, MineralS, and otHer HydroCarBon SuBStanCeS in and under Said land, WitHout, HoWever, any rigHt of SurfaCe entry for tHe PurPoSe of drilling for, Mining or otHerWiSe extraCting Said SuBStanCeS, togetHer WitH any SuBSurfaCe leaSeS tHereto and revenueS tHerefroM, otHer tHan Set fortH in tHat Certain unit agreeMent reCorded MarCH 1, 1972 aS inStruMent no. 3250, aS reviSed in tHat Certain doCuMent reCorded noveMBer 18, 1974 aS inStruMent no. 3210, offiCial reCordS aS reServed By franCeS t. CloCK, edWin H. CloCK, PHilliP t. CloCK, ralPH CloCK, JoHn H. MC WHinney and PatriCia MC WHinney van de Water, in deed reCorded oCtoBer 25, 1978 aS inStruMent no. 781183923, offiCial reCordS. exCePt tHerefroM unitS 1 to 82 inCluSive aS defined and delineated on a CondoMiniuM Plan reCorded aPril 22. 1985 aS inStruMent no.

PUBLIC NOTICES 85-450742. offiCial reCordS. (B) unit 55, aS defined and delineated on tHe aBove referred to CondoMiniuM Plan. ParCel 2: an exCluSive eaSeMent, aPPurtenant to ParCel 1 aBove for all uSeS and PurPoSeS of a "ParKing SPaCe" over and aCroSS tHat Portion of lot 1 of Said traCt no. 31155. defined and delineated aS "reStriCted CoMMon area" PS-55 on tHe aBove referenCed CondoMiniuM Plan. ParCel 3: an exCluSive eaSeMent, aPPurtenant and to ParCel 1 aBove, for all uSeS and PurPoSeS of a "garage SPaCe" over and aCroSS tHat Portion of lot 1 of Said traCt no. 31155. defined and delineated aS "reStriCted CoMMon area" g-55 on tHe aBove referenCed CondoMiniuM Plan. the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. the property heretofore described is being sold "as is". regarding the property that is the subject of this notice of sale, the undersigned, as mortgage loan servicer or as authorized agent for the mortgage loan servicer declares that: (1) it has not obtained from the Commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Civil Code section 2923.53 that was current and valid on the date the notice of sale was recorded; and, (2) the time frame for giving a notice of sale specified in Civil Code Section 2923.52 subdivision (a) does not apply to this notice of sale pursuant to Civil Code Sections 2923 52 or 2923.55 date: 09-13-2010 for truStee'S SaleS inforMation, PleaSe Call 714-730-2727, or viSit WeBSite: WWW.lPSaSaP.CoM PlM lender ServiCeS, inC., aS truStee PlM lender ServiCeS, inC.. agent for or aS ServiCing agent (408)-370-4030 eliZaBetH godBey, viCe PreSident PlM lender ServiCeS, inC. iS a deBt ColleCtor atteMPting to ColleCt a deBt. any inforMation aSaP# 3734528 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010 TST3519 notiCe of truStee’S Sale trustee Sale no. 442259Ca loan no. 3010765307 title order no. 411137 you are in default under a deed of truSt dated 09-22-2006. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeedingS againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer. on 09-242010 at 10:30 aM, California reConveyanCe CoMPany as the duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to deed of trust recorded 09-28-2006, Book , Page , instrument 06 2157267, of official records in the office of the recorder of loS angeleS County, California, executed by: roger r. KuSKe, a Married Man aS HiS Sole and SeParate ProPerty, as trustor, WaSHington Mutual BanK, fa, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the deed of trust. the sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the deed of trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. the amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: at tHe WeSt Side of tHe loS angeleS County CourtHouSe, direCtly faCing norWalK Boulevard, 12720 norWalK Blvd. , norWalK, Ca legal description: lot 16 of traCt no. 53467, in tHe City of Signal Hill, County of loS angeleS, State of California, aS Per MaP filed in BooK 1288, PageS 30 tHrougH 34 inCluSive of MaPS, in tHe offiCe of tHe County reCorder of Said County. exCePt tHerefroM all rigHtS of grantor (inCluding royalty intereSt), if any, to oil, gaS, MineralS, and otHer HydroCarBon SuBStanCeS in and under tHe aBove deSCriBed real ProPerty BeloW a dePtH of 500 feet But WitHout any rigHt to uSe of or entry to tHe SurfaCe and tHe uPPer 500 feet of SuCH real ProPerty, aS reServed in deed reCorded July 29, 1992 aS inStruMent no. 92-1384335. alSo exCePt froM tHe land, for tHe Benefit of grantor, itS SuCCeSSorS in intereSt, or

otHerS, eaSeMentS for aCCeSS, uSe, enJoyMent, MaintenanCe, rePairS, and for otHer PurPoSeS, all aS deSCriBed in tHat Certain deClaration of eStaBliSHMent of ConditionS, CovenantS and reStriCtionS for ProMontory eaStBluff, reCorded May 17, 2004 aS inStruMent no. 04-1240342 of offiCial reCordS, inCluding any aMendMentS tHereto (ColleCtively, tHe ‘’deClaration’’). amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $869,292.09 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 2655 eaSt Catalina drive Signal Hill, Ca 90755 aPn number: 7215-029-016 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. the property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. in compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by united States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by email; by face to face meeting. date: 08-27-2010 deClaration PurSuant to California Civil Code SeCtion 2923.54 Pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.54, the undersigned loan servicer declares as follows: 1. it has obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.54 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; and 2. the timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 or Section 2923.55.California reConveyanCe CoMPany, as trustee (714) 259-7850 or www.fidelityasap.com (714) 573-1965 or www.priorityposting.com California reConveyanCe CoMPany iS a deBt ColleCtor atteMPting to ColleCt a deBt. any inforMation oBtained Will Be uSed for tHat PurPoSe. deBoraH BrignaC, viCe PreSident 9200 oaKdale ave MailStoP n110612 aSaP# 3712079 CHatSWortH, Ca 91311 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010 TST3514 / 20101150787 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: CHange your life, 107 S. fair oaks ave. #002, Pasadena, Ca 91105. registrant: 1. adaM CHriSting, 14253 eastridge drive, Whittier, Ca 90602, 2. PatriCK SHen, 385 San Palo Place, Pasadena, Ca 91105. this business is conducted by: a Joint venture. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: adam Christing. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on august 18, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: august 27, & September 3, 10, 17, 2010. TST3515 / 20101153421 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: Blu Button, 2112 e. 4th. St., long Beach, Ca 90814. registrant: eStHer eugene KiM, 2315 e. 6th. St., long Beach, Ca 90814. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: esther Kim. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on august 18, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: august 27, & September 3, 10, 17, 2010. TST3517 / 20101163916 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: ready Pet go!, 3324 daisy ave., long Beach, Ca 90806. registrant: Jeffrey JoHnSon, 3324 daisy ave., long Beach, Ca 90806. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Jeffrey Johnson. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was . this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on august 20, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 3, 10, 17, 24, 2010.

TST3520 / 201011633124 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: train of tHougHt ConSulting & Mediation, 4433 e. village rd., Ste. l, long Beach, Ca 90808. registrant: Brigitte dutil, atr, Mft, 603 Molino ave., long Beach, Ca 90814. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Brigitte dutil. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was January 1, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on august 20, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 10, 17, 24, & october 1, 2010. TST3521 / 20101218227 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: aCCeSS aPPraiSal ManageMent, 6731 e. el Carmen St., long Beach, Ca 90815. registrant: JoHn PySter, 6731 e. el Carmen St., long Beach, Ca 90815. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: John Pyster. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on august 31, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 10, 17, 24, & october 1, 2010. TST3522 / 20101241852 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: loCS-MytH @+ natural eSSenCe, 4142 Business St., long Beach, Ca 90807. registrant: danyette Marie tHoMaS, 1878 golden ave., long Beach, Ca 90806. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: danyette M. thomas. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 3, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 10, 17, 24, & october 1, 2010. TST3523 / 20101241853 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: national SoftWare SolutionS, 5202 e. Brittain St., long Beach, Ca 90808. registrant: Bryan BlaKeley SMitH, 5202 e. Brittain St., long Beach, Ca 90808. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Bryan B. Smith. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 3, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 10, 17, 24, & october 1, 2010. TST3524 / 20101256814 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: CM travel, 1031 e. tehachapi dr., long Beach, Ca 90807. registrant: CHeryl ann Mcnulty, 1031 e. tehachapi dr., long Beach, Ca 90807. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Cheryl ann Mcnulty. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was december, 2009. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 8, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 10, 17, 24, & october 1, 2010. TST3529 / 20101246723 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: fieldS inSuranCe agenCy, 5000 e. Spring St. #550, long Beach, Ca 90815. registrant: 1. SCott f. fieldS, 7331 e. Crows Parkway, orange, Ca 92867, 2. JoHn l. de la torre, 4465 Cerritos ave., long Beach, Ca 90807. this business is conducted by: a general Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: John de la torre. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was august 20, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 3, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself au-

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

13

thorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 17, 24, & october 1, 8, 2010. TST3530 / 20101284874 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: SuMMit Safety teCHnologieS, 4320 Sunfield ave., long Beach, Ca 90808. registrant: 1. MiCHael d. laWrenCe, 2. viCtoria B. laWrenCe, 4320 Sunfield ave., long Beach, Ca 90808. this business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michael d. lawrence. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was September 13, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 17, 24, & october 1, 8, 2010. TST3531 / 20101303718 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: dutil'S inCoMe tax ServiCeS, 2623 Hardwick St., lakewood, Ca 90712. registrant: roBert J. dutil, 2623 Hardwick St., lakewood, Ca 90712. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: robert J. dutil. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 15, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 17, 24, & october 1, 8, 2010. TST3532 / 20101303719 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: dutil'S fiduCiary ServiCeS, 2623 Hardwick St., lakewood, Ca 90712. registrant: roBert J. dutil, 2623 Hardwick St., lakewood, Ca 90712. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: robert J. dutil. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 15, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 17, 24, & october 1, 8, 2010. TST3533 / 20101303720 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: leaP finanCial, 909 e. Marshall Pl., long Beach, Ca 90807. registrant: 1. rHina M. ovalle, 2. Juan e. ovalle, 909 e. Marshall Pl., long Beach, Ca 90807. this business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: rhina M. ovalle. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was September 14, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 15, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 17, 24, & october 1, 8, 2010. TST3528 / Case No. NS022980 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANgE oF NAME SUPERIoR CoURT oF CALIFoRNIA, CoUNTY oF LoS ANgELES, 415 West ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802, SoUTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT. Petition of Cristina Margaret arranaga, for Change of name. to all intereSted PerSonS: 1. Petitioner CriStina Margaret arranaga, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CriStina Margaret arranaga to Proposed name: CriStoPHer auguSt arranaga. 2. tHe Court orderS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. notiCe of Hearing date: october 19, 2010; time: 1:30 P.M.; dept. g, room 51. the address of the court is the same as above. a copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, tHe Signal triBune, 939 e. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, Ca 90755: September 17, 24, & october 1, 8, 2010. ___//ss//___ douglas M. Haigh, Commissioner of the Superior Court dated September 7, 2010

PUBLIC NOTICES ciTy oF Signal Hill TST3527 2175 Cherry Avenue Signal Hill, California 90755-3799

A-5 Attention is directed to the provision in Section 1777.5 of the Labor Code concerning the employment of apprentices by the Contractor or any subcontractor under the Contractor.

NOTICE INVITING BIDS

A-6 Before a Contract is entered into with the successful bidder, the bidder shall present evidence in writing to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, that he/she has a current combined single limit liability policy with aggregate limits for Bodily Injury and Property Damage in the amount of two million dollars ($2,000,000).

A-1 Sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, California, until 10:00 AM on September 30, 2010 and on the same day shortly thereafter, they will be publicly opened and read for construction of RESERVOIR PARK UPGRADES PROJECT, NO. 725, in accordance with the Specifications and Construction Drawings therefore. Bids must be made on the forms provided for this purpose, addressed to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, marked "Bid for," followed by the title of the project and the date and hour for submitting bids. Bids are required for the entire work as shown on the Construction Drawings and as described in the Bid Schedule and the Specifications. The work to be accomplished under this contract consists of fine grading, concrete and concrete paver installation, planting, irrigation, installation of exercise equipment stations and decomposed granite paving. All work must be completed within thirty (30) working days after receipt by the Contractor of the Notice to Proceed from the City. A-2 The contract documents, which include the Specifications and Construction Drawings, may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Finance Department for $25.00 or $30.00 by mail. The documents are entitled “RESERVOIR PARK UPGRADES, PROJECT, NO. 725" A-3 Bids will not be received unless they are made on a proposal form furnished in the Contract Documents by the City of Signal Hill. Each bid must be accompanied by cash, certified check, cashier's check or bidder's bond, made payable to the City of Signal Hill for an amount equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the amount bid, such guarantee to be forfeited should the bidder to whom the contract is awarded fail to enter into the Contract. A-4 All bids are to be compared on the basis of the estimate of quantities shown in the Bid Schedule(s) and as stipulated herein. Bids will not be accepted from the contractors who are not licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, Division III of the Business and Professions Code of the State of California. The Contractor shall be required to possess a currently active Class A license at the time the bid is submitted.

A-7 Pursuant to the provisions of Section 1773.2 of the Labor Code of the State of California, the minimum prevailing rate of per diem wages for each craft, classification or type of workman needed to execute the contract shall be determined by the Director of Industrial Relations of the State of California which are on file with the City Clerk of Signal Hill and copies will be made available to any interested party on request. These rates shall be the minimum wage rates for this project. A copy of the Contractor's certified payroll, as well as those of all subcontractors, will be required to be submitted with each invoice. A-8 Attention is directed to Government Code Sections 4590 and 14402.5 permitting the substitution of specified and approved securities for contract retention of funds. All such securities shall be subject to the review and approval of the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-9 The successful bidder will be required to furnish a payment bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price and a faithful performance bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price, and said bonds shall be secured from a surety company satisfactory to the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-10 The City of Signal Hill reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or delete portions of any and all bids or waive any informality or irregularity in the bid or the bid procedures and shall be the sole judge of the bids received. A-11 It is estimated that this contract will be awarded on October 19, 2010 by the City Council. It is desired that work begin the week of November 22, 2010. BY ORDER of the City of Signal Hill. Advertised at City Hall on: Advertised in the Signal Tribune:

September 10, 2010 September 10 and 17, 2010

St3215 - Sept 17:layout 1 9/17/10 11:51 aM Page 14

CULTURE

14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

Center, Pride to Photo exhibit documents young black men’s transition to manhood host Q Film Fest The Long Beach Central Area Association will sponsor a special pre-screening exhibition entitled Through Our The Center Long Beach and Long Beach Lesbian & Gay Pride will present a special festival preevent at 7pm on Saturday, Sept. 18 at the Long Beach Pride office, 1017 Obispo Ave, to highlight audience favorites from past Q Film Festivals and give a sneak peek at this year’s fest. Admission is free with the purchase of any Q Film Festival ticket or pass. Food and beverages will be provided. Ticket prices range from $5 to $15 for individual screenings and parties. An All Fest pass, which allows admission into all screenings and parties, is $120. An All Film pass, allowing admittance into all screenings but not parties, is $85. Another pass granting admission to five films of the holder’s choice will also be available for $40. Tickets and passes may be purchased through the Q Film Festival page at centerlb.org as well as through the Long Beach Pride website at longbeachpride.com.

Eyes: The Young Black Men’s Photovoice Project at Houghton Park Community Center, 6301 Myrtle Ave. The one-day exhibit will be presented Saturday, Sept. 18, starting at 1pm with a discussion beginning at 2pm. Through Our Eyes explores the factors affecting young black men’s transition to manhood through powerful photographs and riveting personal accounts. Digital cameras were given to a socio-economically diverse group of young black men living in Los Angeles, and they were asked to capture the elements that influence their development from boyhood to manhood. Twelve participants, aged 16 to 26, completed all phases of the project– a three-month period of photo taking, photo sorting, discussions, and theme/sub-theme development. The project was envisioned by a 12-member community/academic advisory board with members from various family, health, arts, neighborhood, education, and social service organizations inter-

Give your car a bubble bath! 9 Save 9 $20 $ just

79

Photo by Rab Razzak

Albert Brady is one of the men who participated in Through Our Eyes: The young Black Men’s Photovoice Project, which explores the factors affecting the transition to manhood through photographs and personal accounts.

ested in addressing premature morbidity and mortality in black men in Los Angeles. This transitional age was thought to be important because it is considered a dangerous time for young black males, yet an interventional point to promote a safe and healthy life trajectory. The photovoice process is based on health promotion principles and theory from Paulo Freire’s work on education for crit-

ical consciousness, feminist theory, empowerment education, and a community-based approach to photography. Long Beach Central Area Association President John Malveaux had seen the premiere presentation in Los Angeles and invited Dr. Nazleen Bharmal, principal investigator, to bring the project to Long Beach. Project partners include: Ninth

District Councilmember Steve Neal; Long Beach Parks Recreation and Marine; Long Beach Grip Project; NAACP- Long Beach Chapter; St. Mary Medical Center; and Felton Williams Ph.D., president of LBUSD Board of Education. The exhibit and discussion are free and open to the public. ----------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION vimeo.com/13552325

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St3215 - Sept 17:layout 1 9/17/10 11:51 aM Page 15

BUSINESSES & SERvICES

SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

A C C O U N T I N G / TA X E S

accounting, bookkeeping & Tax Services

AI R CON DITION I NG / H EATI NG

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AI R CON DITION I NG

BUSINESS MACHINES

COMPUTER SERVICES

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COPIERS • FACSIMILES LASER PRINTERS SALES, SERVICE & SUPPLIES

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MEDICINE

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ROOFING

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Signal Tribune

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16 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

SEPTEMBER 17, 2010


ST3215 - Sept 17