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2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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WHAT MAKES A

PARTNERSHIP?

OVER

150,000 DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CALLS ARE MADE TO CALIFORNIA LAW ENFORCEMENT

EACH YEAR.

The California Partnership to End Domestic Violence believes that by sharing expertise, advocates and legislators can end domestic violence. We inspire, inform and connect all of those working on this issue, because together we’re stronger.

Dear Friends:

Ending domestic violence in California: It’s a bold goal. And it will take all of us working together to get there. At the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence, we know that grassroots advocates running local domestic violence organizations need support and resources to best serve their communities. Legislators need reliable information so they can pass bills that will truly protect public safety. And donors and supporters want to know that when they get involved, their actions will make a difference. The Partnership exists to bring all of these groups together at the state level, so we can share knowledge, strategize, and effectively protect our communities. We saw the power of that alliance recently, when former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger eliminated funding for all domestic violence shelters in California. The Partnership established an emergency support fund and ultimately was able to get the funds restored. You’ll read more about that victory in this report. You’ll also read about Giovanna Martinez, who works tirelessly every day to prevent teen dating violence. With the help of the Partnership, she overcame shyness and a fear of flying to testify in Sacramento about legislation that would have put her educational programs in jeopardy. Finally, you’ll meet Tracie Stafford, a domestic violence survivor whose story, perhaps more than anything, shows why our work is needed. In this time of rampant budget cuts to social services, it’s more crucial than ever to have a strong voice on domestic violence issues in the state Capitol and in our local neighborhoods. We’re incredibly grateful for your support. Together, we will end domestic violence in our state. Yours in Partnership,

Tara Shabazz Executive Director

IMPACT W

hen then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger used a line-item veto to eliminate state funding for domestic violence shelters in 2009, it was a watershed moment for California’s domestic violence movement. Within six weeks, six shelters had closed statewide.

One rural shelter was run by the Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Coalition of Grass Valley. “Losing state funding was a huge challenge,” says shelter executive director Niko Johnson. “We were the only facility that served domestic violence survivors in a 900-square-mile area. To sit across from someone and say, ‘I realize you’re in a very dangerous situation, but we can’t help you’…it was a very hard time.” Statewide, the Partnership sprang into action, educating legislators and launching a national media campaign. One story in The New York Times caught the attention of acclaimed musician Moby, who contacted the Partnership.

“I knew firsthand the toll domestic violence could take on a family, so when I heard about the shelter crisis in California, I knew I had to help. I chose to work with the Partnership because I trusted that they could leverage my donation to have the most impact statewide.”

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MOBY, Internationally Renowned Recording Artist

WORKING TOGETHER TO SAVE FUNDING FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

“I knew firsthand the toll domestic violence could take on a family,” Moby says. “So when I heard about the shelter crisis in California, I knew I had to help. I chose to work with the Partnership because I trusted that they could leverage my donation to have the most impact statewide. Working together, we organized a media campaign that helped get the funding reinstated, which ensured that California shelters could keep their doors open and keep saving lives.” Working with the Partnership, Moby donated proceeds from two California concerts to benefit the shelters, and gave impassioned media interviews about the shelters’ plight. The California crisis became a national story. Ultimately, the Legislature reinstated the funding. Moby wasn’t the only one giving media interviews. After the Grass Valley shelter closed, local residents created a system of safe houses, in which community members opened their homes to victims. The Partnership suggested that Dr. Phil address the issue on his show, and Niko appeared on the show soon after. Dr. Phil donated $15,000 toward reopening the shelter, and helped launch a capital campaign to buy a permanent Grass Valley facility. “Not only were we able to open a new shelter, but we also shed light on the work that we do in our community,” says Niko. “I don’t think we’d be in the place we are now if it hadn’t been for the Partnership.”

“Losing state funding for our shelter was a huge challenge. Working with the Partnership, not only were we able to open a new shelter, but we also shed light on the work we do in our community. I don’t think we’d be in the place we are now if it hadn’t been for the Partnership.” NIKO JOHNSON, Executive Director, Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Coalition of Grass Valley

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SUPPORT T

alking to teens about dating violence isn’t the easiest job, but for Giovanna Martinez, it’s a calling.

Gio began educating young people about unhealthy relationships at age 19, after growing up in a violent home. “My dad was very abusive to my mom,” Gio says. “No one talked about relationships—the warning signs, and that jealousy does not equal love. So my first real boyfriend was abusive and I was with him for a long time, not knowing.” Gio and her colleagues at WomenShelter of Long Beach gave presentations to over 2,500 youth at schools and community centers in 2010. “Every presentation we do, we have kids coming forward, saying ‘This is happening in my family and I didn’t realize it was abusive,’ or ‘I see this happening with my friends.’”

“Working with the Partnership empowered me. To learn what is done behind the scenes for the people you serve, it motivates you to keep doing the best you can.” GIOVANNA MARTINEZ

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But in April 2011, a bill was floated in the California Senate that could have jeopardized Gio’s work. It would have required that schools notify parents before students attend a dating violence workshop, and allowed them to opt out.

HELPING FRONT-LINE ADVOCATES SPEAK OUT ABOUT THEIR WORK

The Partnership was studying the bill, and contacted Gio. She immediately saw two problems: First, abusive parents could prevent their children from attending presentations. Second, school districts would have to find something to do with the kids who opted out, meaning the workshops would no longer be cost-neutral. Working with Partnership staff, Gio organized teens to lobby against the bill. The team hatched a plan for Gio to travel to Sacramento to speak with legislators. There was just one problem: Gio was terrified of flying. But with encouragement from Partnership staff, she took the plunge. She met with staff for Senate Education Committee Chair Sen. Alan Lowenthal, and her speech was persuasive. A week later, Lowenthal killed the bill. “Working with the Partnership empowered me,” says Gio. “To learn what is done behind the scenes for the people you serve, it motivates you to keep doing the best you can.”

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INSPIRATION W

hen Tracie Stafford was chosen Mrs. California in 2007, the entrepreneur and first African-American to wear the crown seemed to have everything going for her. But Tracie had also overcome tremendous adversity in her life. Raised in a violent household, as an adult she endured a fiveyear relationship in which she regularly received brutal beatings.

Tracie left her abuser and went on to find personal and professional success. But she says she didn’t truly begin to heal from her experience until one of the Partnership’s campaigns gave her the chance to tell her story for the first time.

“The Partnership changed my life. They’ve given me a platform to make a difference for others as well as myself.” TRACIE STAFFORD

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At a public hearing before the California State Legislature, Tracie revealed the abuse she had suffered and urged legislators to help break the cycle of violence. That one speech inspired many more: Tracie now works fulltime as a public speaker and advocate in the movement to end domestic violence, and is writing a book on women and self-esteem. “The Partnership changed my life,” says Tracie. “They’ve given me a platform to make a difference for others as well as myself.”

TRANSFORMING THE LIVES OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SURVIVORS

IN A SINGLE DAY, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AGENCIES IN CALIFORNIA...

5,261

SERVED VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC ABUSE

FIELDED HOTLINE

57

CALLS PER HOUR

LACKED RESOURCES TO MEET

614 REQUESTS

Source: 2010 National Census of Domestic Violence Services

FOR HELP

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EXPERTISE A

dvocates and prosecutors don’t always see eye to eye, although they share the objectives of protecting public safety and holding offenders accountable. Advocates and DAs must cooperate to ensure justice for victims, so in 2011 the Partnership pioneered a training program to bring the groups toward an understanding of how to cooperate throughout the legal process.

In 2008, the Partnership helped pass a law preventing judges from incarcerating victims for refusing to testify against their abusers in court. The California District Attorneys Association had opposed the legislation, so the Partnership engaged allies like Riverside County DA Jerry Fineman to create a learning space where both perspectives were heard. These popular trainings have been held in Riverside and Alameda Counties, with more planned for 2012. Says Fineman, “I so appreciate the opportunity to collaborate with the Partnership in creating the joint trainings for domestic violence advocates and prosecutors. The trainings are groundbreaking; they bridge the gap that prevents us from achieving our common goals. I look forward to future collaborations with the Partnership, and with their member advocates.”

“I so appreciate the opportunity to collaborate with the Partnership in creating the joint trainings for domestic violence advocates and prosecutors. The trainings are groundbreaking; they bridge the gap that prevents us from achieving our common goals. I look forward to future collaborations with the Partnership, and with their member advocates.”

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District Attorney JERRY FINEMAN

BUILDING BRIDGES BETWEEN PROSECUTORS AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ADVOCATES . . .

IN 2011, MORE VICTIMS HAVE A SAFE PLACE TO TURN...

1400

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

ADVOCATES & PROFESSIONALS TRAINED

424 SURVIVOR REFERRALS

TO LOCAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ORGANIZATIONS

300 REQUESTS

FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE–RELATED INFORMATION AND RESOURCES

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SUSTAINABI W

hile domestic violence survivors and their allies have made great strides toward the goal of a California free of domestic violence, the recession and cuts in government budgets pose major challenges. Demand for services has increased, while funding has shrunk. We know that grassroots domestic violence advocates don’t have the time or resources to face these challenges alone. The Partnership allows all Californians working to end domestic violence to join forces, making our work stronger, smarter, and more effective.

By supporting the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence, you ensure that:

“Compliments are in order to the level of support and organization that the Partnership has created. I’m very impressed and thankful that you allowed me the opportunity to be connected to my peers. Not only is it great to know what’s happening in the field, but also validating to know that my agency is on the right track.”

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DIRECTOR OF A PARTNERSHIP MEMBER PROGRAM

Domestic violence advocates from Humboldt County to Los Angeles are connected to each other and well represented in the Capitol Legislators have access to the expert knowledge they need to make sure their bills are in the interest of public safety California domestic violence professionals are part of a national movement, building alliances with law enforcement groups and others who have the power to make a difference on the issue The voices of California domestic violence professionals are heard in the press, reaching the public with their message about the need to end domestic violence now All those working to end domestic violence can share best practices, staying informed and inspired

I LITY YOUR SUPPORT MEANS A STRONG VOICE IN SACRAMENTO FOR ENDING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND CREATING SAFER COMMUNITIES

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION Statement of Activities and Change in Net Assets for Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2010

ASSETS

2010 2009

Current Assets: Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $324,351 . . . . . . $285,195 Grants receivable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $303,182 . . . . . . $308,993 Prepaid expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,685 . . . . . . . $13,815 Total current assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $660,211 . . . . . . $608,003 TOTAL ASSETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $660,211 . . . . . . . $608,003

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Current Liabilities: Accounts payable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $58,951 . . . . . . $188,562 Accrued liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $51,560 . . . . . . . $42,216 Refundable advances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $145,249 . . . . . . . $70,085 Total current liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $255,760 . . . . . . $300,863 Net assets – unrestricted . . . . . . . . . . . . . $404,451 . . . . . . $307,140 TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS . . . . $660,211 . . . . . . . $608,003

WAYS TO GIVE To make a secure online donation visit www.cpedv.org or mail your tax-deductible contribution to The Partnership, P.O. Box 1798 Sacramento, CA 95812

PARTNERSH I THE PARTNERSHIP BOARD OF DIRECTORS Ben Schirmer, Board President Rainbow Services, Ltd.

Michelle Coleman Peace for Families

Danielle Lingle Center for Community Solutions

Sharon Turner, Vice President STAND! For Families Free of Violence

Jessica Dayton Community Overcoming Relationship Abuse

TuLynn Smylie WomenShelter of Long Beach

Adrienne Lamar, Secretary Jenesse Center

Nicholle Gonzalez-Seitz Interface Children Family Services

Kathleen Krenek, Treasurer Next Door Solutions to Domestic Violence

Sharyne Harper Humboldt Domestic Violence Services

Genevieve Bardini-Davis Valley Crisis Center

Marsha Krouse-Taylor Casa de Esperanza

Paula Cohen Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles

Janine Limas Hageman Interval House

Anastacia Snyder Catalyst Domestic Violence Services Maricela Rios-Faust Human Options Nilda Valmores My Sister’s House

THE PARTNERSHIP STAFF

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Tara Shabazz Executive Director

Lisa Fujie Parks Prevention Program Manager

Heather Minton Public Policy Specialist

Kathy Moore Associate Director

Marsha Guyton Administrative Coordinator

Richard Nakamura Finance Director

Jo Anna Davis Membership Specialist

Camille Hayes Public Affairs Specialist

Allen Pontes Finance Coordinator

Tiarra Earls Policy & Communications Associate

Jacquie Marroquin Program Coordinator

Alicia Stonebreaker Program Coordinator

IP FUNDING PARTNERS The Allstate Foundation Blue Shield of California Foundation California Department of Public Health California Emergency Management Agency The California Endowment

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Macy’s Mary Kay U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

United Way Verizon Verizon Hopeline Walter & Elise Haas Fund The Women’s Conference

U.S. Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women

INDIVIDUAL DONORS James Alder Mehark Ayati Jane Bean Ginger Cooper Bill Cornell Laura Couerson Heidi Cuda Christina de Zafra Frieda De Lacknet Naomi Despres Susan Doro William Fearman Rosemarie Goin

Allan Graham Camille Hayes Steven Hayes James R. & Amy Huffman Oliver Helen Hwang Rebecca Kaminsky Olivia Klaus Laura Kobets Pedro Labitoria Moby Stephanie Mojica Laura Monkman Debra Obenshain

Elizabeth Offenbacker Howard Paules Kenneth Piercy Patricia Rockenwagner Jessica S. Rosenthal Cheryl Ryba Colin Smith Bryan Stafford Tracie Stafford Anne Marie Vu Natasha Wagner Debrah Whetstone Cynthia Woodty

84%

OF DOMESTIC

VIOLENCE PROGRAMS IN CALIFORNIA REPORTED HIGHER

DEMAND

FOR SERVICES IN 2010

02$

88%

OF PROGRAMS

REPORTED A DECREASE

IN FUNDING 02$

Design by Mission Minded 路 www.Mission-Minded.com

P.O. Box 1798, Sacramento, CA 95812-1798 Phone: 916-444-7163 Fax: 916-444-7165 www.cpedv.org


Partnership Annual Report 2011