Issuu on Google+

2008

Health care organizations are marked by change. New client needs, current research findings, political transitions, technology and the economy have a significant effect on all aspects of community-based work. For the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, it is hard to imagine a year as filled with change as 2008. In August of 2008, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control released a long-awaited report that revealed the nation’s rate of new HIV infections to be 40 percent higher than previously believed. While this news sent shock waves through the public health community, it corroborated something those of us in the Bay Area have long known: it is imperative that we break the cycle of new HIV infections. Data tell where these infections will occur, what individual risk factors are responsible, and whether newly infected people will seek appropriate medical care and treatment. Ahead of the national curve, the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, together with peer organizations and local government, has watched the HIV prevention landscape for many years, calling for innovative ideas to bring infection rates down once and for all. As we review the year with our clients, volunteers, Board of Directors, and staff, we are paying close attention to HIV prevention. Look for it on every page of this report and bear witness to the Foundation’s capacity to maximize opportunities to deliver on our promise to change HIV prevention in San Francisco. The work of the San Francisco AIDS Foundation is sustained by our supporters and by the people we serve. We are profoundly grateful to you and look forward to sharing details of our work in 2008 and in the future.

Sincerely,

Andrew Belschner Chair, Board of Directors

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

Mark Cloutier Chief Executive Officer

3

PREVENTION AND CARE Breaking news

to testing for HIV and other sexually

What does science say?

A few hours before the XVII Interna-

transmitted infections, and on dissem-

This spirit of innovation was most ap-

tional AIDS Conference in Mexico City,

inating accurate information about HIV

parent in one of the Foundation’s most

the U.S. Centers for Disease Control

transmission have developed based

promising new programs: the Innova-

revealed that more than 56,000 people

on epidemiologic evidence. Only by

tive Projects Initiative. In order to de-

are newly infected with HIV each year—

improving HIV prevention can we

vise HIV prevention programs at the

a 40 percent increase over the figure

imagine a future without HIV and AIDS.

vanguard of scientific knowledge, the

CDC used for years. Though this dis-

Adopted in February, the Founda-

Foundation deployed its resources

turbing story made headlines for several

tion’s statement of purpose puts this

and staff ingenuity to improve detec-

weeks in the summer of 2008, it pointed

prevention focus in transparent lan-

tion of acute HIV infection.

to something that has been evident for

guage:

many years in San Francisco: HIV infection rates must be reduced.

At the San Francisco AIDS Foun-

dation, much of our ongoing work evolves from the idea that HIV prevention must meet the epidemic’s current conditions—not those of the last 20, 10, or even three years. Over the last several years, we have worked with community partners, staff, and clients to locate and expand promising prevention interventions. Programs focusing on substance abuse, on access

Evidence tells us as many as half of

all new HIV infections in San Francisco

The San Francisco AIDS Founda-

can be traced to individuals in the acute

tion provides leadership to pre-

infection stage, a period when the virus

vent new HIV infections. Linking

rapidly replicates and an individual is

community experience with sci-

at highest risk of transmitting HIV. With

ence, the Foundation develops

technical guidance on program design,

ground-breaking prevention pro-

evaluation, and budgeting, interdisci-

grams and bold policy initiatives

plinary staff teams used their experience

to promote health and create

with our clients and knowledge of HIV to

sustainable progress against HIV.

craft programs to help detect cases of

Established in 1982, the Founda-

acute infection. These proposals were

tion refuses to accept that HIV

evaluated and two programs—an ex-

transmission is inevitable.

pansion of RNA testing with careful monitoring and follow-up and a peer-topeer training program for transgender individuals—were fully funded with the Foundation’s unrestricted income. Both of the Initiative activities will be launched

For years, whenever I went for an HIV test, it felt rushed and impersonal. I felt like I could not talk about what I had done without being judged somehow. Magnet is different. The first time I went inside, it was to play with the colored magnets on the wall. The space is designed as an adult playground, where you can do what you want, but you have access to services adults need. Of course, Magnet is very San Francisco. You can say whatever, be whatever…and when it came time for the testing conversation, everyone was open to hearing what I had to say without feeling any shame. For an HIV test, I cannot think of anything more important than making someone feel at ease. As a single gay man who wants to have sex from time to time, I appreciate being open about sex. I don’t know how you could leave there and not feel better about being a sexual being.

PHOTO: JENN HEFLIN

in 2009.

Walid Dalal

4

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

52

ulations in greatest need: communities

In the public policy arena, the San

of color and gay men of all races. With

Progress in our own backyard

Francisco AIDS Foundation continued

the outcome of November’s election

In California, the Foundation achieved

to lead advocates in California and

came revitalized hope that the Strat-

several key legislative victories in

throughout the nation, calling for ad-

egy’s call for measurable prevention

2008. The Foundation fought cuts to

equate public resources to fight HIV

and treatment targets and evidence-

Medi-Cal and to prevention and care

and legislation that advances the hu-

based programs would gain serious

programs brought on by state and

man rights of all people living with or

consideration in the administration of

city budget deficits—cuts that would

affected by HIV and AIDS.

President Barack Obama beginning in

have had a disproportionate effect on

January 2009.

low-income individuals. A first-in-the-

brought to public health advocacy a new

As the economic downturn wors-

nation bill to make HIV testing reim-

energy and revitalized urgency about

ened, the Foundation lobbied against

bursable by private health insurance

comprehensive planning at the national

cuts to important prevention and care

was signed into law in September. On

level. Nowhere was this more evident

programs, and worked with allies in

the heels of last year’s elimination of

than in the collective call for a National

support of the re-authorization of the

written consent for an HIV test, this

AIDS Strategy. The Foundation played a

President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS

legislation further simplified HIV testing

key role in defining the Strategy’s platform

Relief (PEPFAR), which was signed into

in California, enabling better detection

and working with all major presidential

law in July. With this reauthorization

of new infections and bringing more

candidates to earn their endorsement.

came the first promising signs that the

people into appropriate care and treat-

Central to the National AIDS Strat-

travel ban preventing HIV-positive indi-

ment sooner.

egy is the need to coordinate HIV pre-

viduals from entering the country would

vention services and focus on the pop-

soon be lifted.

Fernando Castillo I’ve been a part of this movement for many years but I had never been to Washington before the Foundation invited me to lobby members of Congress for funding and legislation as part of AIDS Watch. Because I’m one of the founders of El Grupo I know how important it is to show our faces and talk about the needs of people living with

AIDS. AIDS Watch gave me a chance to tell my story where it can make a difference. I opened up my life all day, talking to different people, letting others know what I’ve been saying to myself for years. And there’s so much people don’t know. They don’t know how many Latinos have HIV and AIDS. They don’t know about transgenders and

The 2008 presidential campaign

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

PHOTO: JENN HEFLIN

6

Capitol ideas

HIV. They don’t know about syringe exchange. And now I know how the federal budget gets put together. I know that if we don’t remind people that we’re still here, funding dries up and programs can disappear. But medication costs less than time in the hospital. I told that to everyone in Washington.

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

7

Individual by individual

they are, offering a non-judgmental

Services available at the San Francis-

framework that encourages healthy

co AIDS Foundation serve the commu-

choices and reduces risky behavior.

nity by improving individual health one

Principles of harm reduction govern

person at a time. Providing housing,

many of the Foundation’s HIV preven-

financial benefits counseling, HIV and

tion and support activities, and out-

STD testing, treatment for substance

comes in several areas throughout the

abuse, and much more, our programs

year demonstrated the enduring value

are designed to meet clients where

of this approach.

The

8

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

PHOTO: JENN HEFLIN

Ken Campbell I saw this flyer about a roundtable for guys who use speed and have sex. They were looking for peer educators. I’ve been passing out information, condoms, lube, and clean rigs ever since. When I first see someone who looks like he needs help, I ask if he’s got any cleans. In this city, there is no reason for anyone to use a dirty rig, ever. That’s my “in” and I go from there. Where are they with using? What kind of info do they need? Transitional housing? A doctor? Mental health? Food? Then I let them know about the Speed Project’s drop-in groups, movies, workshops about safer injection, legal help, safer play…because people who party don’t always find welcoming arms. The Speed Project doesn’t judge you first thing. They don’t care if you’re sober, just that you may need help. I’d never heard of harm reduction until I got to the Speed Project. But I get it now: “Any positive change.” It makes sense because not everyone is ready to give it up.

PHOTO: JENN HEFLIN

country’s

Foundation largest

operates

the

An uncommon community

syringe-exchange

In many ways, the Foundation’s lifeblood

program, distributing 3.2 million clean

was its community programs—Black

syringes a year through storefront,

Brothers Esteem, El Grupo, and the

mobile,

exchange

Speed Project—which empower indi-

sites. This year, the 20th anniversary

and

secondary

viduals to advocate for access to appro-

of syringe exchange, the Foundation

priate care and services. The Brothers’

pointed with pride to a city-wide in-

original photography show, “Soul Food,“

fection rate among IV drug users of

was displayed at the San Francisco Pub-

less than one percent. New bilingual

lic Library throughout Pride month, docu-

exchange sites were opened in the

menting how spiritual health supports

Mission, as well as a mobile cart that

both physical and mental health.

serves clients unwilling—or unable—

to visit an exchange site. All year, a

center for gay men in the heart of the

steady flow of international visitors

Castro, expanded hours made 3,300

sought expert guidance on designing

HIV tests possible—an increase of 70

syringe-exchange programs to prevent

percent over the previous year. Magnet

HIV around the world.

repeatedly facilitated community con-

At Magnet, the community health

The Foundation increased services

versations about health concerns, in-

at the Stonewall Project for substance

cluding a town hall meeting about staph

abusers this year as well, including

infection that generated participation

Spanish-language individual and group

from researchers, activists, and the me-

counseling for gay men who use meth-

dia. Magnet also served the neighbor-

amphetamine. Tweaker.org, Stonewall’s

hood when a small cluster of tuberculo-

popular website, ramped up its Spanish-

sis cases required immediate attention

language content. Overall, Tweaker.org

from area business owners and the San

boasted 2,300 unique visitors each day.

Francisco Department of Public Health.

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

9

sfaf.org

Knowledge is power

out this responsibility with comprehen-

With a changing economic land-

sive outreach that delivered information

scape, seminal scientific and epide-

in myriad ways to different audiences.

miologic discoveries, and the promise

We produced two HIVision public fo-

of new national leadership, the need

rums that enriched local conversation

to communicate clear and accurate

about HIV: “What’s Going On: HIV and

HIV information grows exponentially.

Black Gay Men” and “Abuse and Trau-

The Foundation is troubled to know

ma: Lessons for HIV Prevention and

that even in San Francisco, one in

Care.” Designed to bring research and

four people living with HIV does not

evidence to bear on timely policy and

know it, frustrating prevention efforts

programmatic issues, HIVision provides

and keeping these individuals from

a safe venue to engage the community

the benefits of appropriate health

on potentially controversial topics.

care. Though the Bay Area has a rep-

niversary of BETA, the Bulletin of Ex-

best-informed regions for HIV/AIDS

perimental Treatments for AIDS. One

prevention and care, the San Fran-

of the leading publications to review

cisco AIDS Foundation maintains that

and disseminate research on ground-

making available accurate, accessi-

breaking HIV treatments, BETA and its

ble information about HIV and AIDS is

Spanish-language

as

among its most important functions.

BETA en español added to their pages

developments in HIV prevention, invaccines, and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Heard online The sfaf.org podcast built on its pioneering reputation with its first full year of coverage, investigating current topics in HIV prevention, clinical practice, and policy. Routinely appearing as a “top ten” HIV/ AIDS resource on web searches, the

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

Congresswoman Barbara Lee.

tion from the nation’s universities, the

awareness into the streets on World

San Francisco Department of Public

AIDS Day, December 1, with hundreds

Health, and, in a series produced at

of volunteers mobilized at the city’s

the International AIDS Conference,

transit hubs as human billboards, de-

The

Foundation

brought

HIV

livering simple messages about HIV all over the world. Our World AIDS Day campaign was welcomed enthusiastically by Bay Area commuters and led to greater visibility around the region, including a substantial increase in traffic to the Foundation’s websites where accurate and detailed information can be found.

sister-publication

cluding research into microbicides,

10

welcomed

The year marked the 20th an-

utation for being among the world’s

This year, the Foundation carried

podcast

guests researchers in HIV preven-

Duane Cramer Because of the mystery surrounding my father’s death in 1986, AIDS always occupies a unique place in my mind. To counter any silence, I do whatever I can to raise awareness about HIV and AIDS. The Foundation asked me to moderate “What’s Going On: HIV and Black Gay Men,” a public forum reviewing current research that examines why HIV and AIDS still disproportionately affect the Black population. All night,

it was clear that not enough attention, not enough dollars, and not enough publicity are directed towards finding effective strategies for the community that continues to be the most devastated by HIV in the country. Folks from every sector—researchers, community people, CBO and public health people—came out to learn how to fine-tune current prevention strategies or implement new ones that are more effective. It’s time for a heightened sense of urgency. We cannot afford to move slowly or keep anyone from participating in this conversation. If community involvement isn’t happening, it needs to happen. And not behind closed doors.

SAN SANFRANCISCO FRANCISCOAIDS AIDSFOUNDATION FOUNDATION••2008 2008Annual AnnualReport Report

511

Endurance

tion programs and creating a space deep

ties that provide crucial HIV/AIDS ser-

The Foundation’s fundraising events

in Redwood Country for individuals to re-

vices. Beyond the 25,000 participants,

are legendary. Based on the underlying

member those we’ve lost to HIV.

the number of community partnerships

idea that everyone can do something

>1 (Greater than One), another new

doubled this year as peer organizations

to support HIV prevention, these en-

endurance program, recruited individu-

brought their own teams of willing walk-

durance events draw on the strength,

als to fundraise and train for the 2009

ers into Golden Gate Park.

willingness, and energy of amateur

San Francisco Marathon and Avia Wild-

cyclists, marathoners, triathletes, and

flower Triathlon. Beginning in January,

AIDS/LifeCycle, the standard-bearer in

everyone who sees a good walk in the

veteran athletes and newcomers will train

endurance fundraising events, enjoyed re-

park as a way to fight HIV and AIDS.

together and attract supporters to the

cord participation and fundraising success.

In 2008, the Foundation introduced a

Foundation who see the close connec-

The largest number of participants yet—a

number of new programs to its calendar

tion between conquering a marathon or

cool 3,000 cyclists and roadies—left San

of endurance events. The Seismic Chal-

triathlon and maintaining excellent health

Francisco on a picture-perfect seven-day

lenge debuted as a two-day, 200-mile

regardless of one’s HIV status.

journey to Los Angeles. A record $11.4 million was raised to further the work of

ride through beautiful coastal terrain. Be-

the two sponsoring agencies. Messages

mic Challenge followed a course that co-

In July, AIDS Walk San Francisco, now

about HIV prevention reached thousands

incided with the famous San Andreas fault

in its 22nd year and the city’s largest

line. Seismic’s inaugural cyclists and crew

single-day fundraiser, brought a record

took the weekend to reach the Golden

$4.5 million to the Foundation and other

Gate Bridge, raising money for Founda-

organizations in the six Bay Area coun-

When we pick people up, they’re tired and sometimes frustrated, but usually good-spirited. It’s my job to transport them safely back to camp, but a few are looking for a shoulder or an ear. Because I’m a sexuality educator, I

SAN SANFRANCISCO FRANCISCOAIDS AIDSFOUNDATION FOUNDATION• •2008 2008Annual AnnualReport Report

PHOTO COURTESY OF MIDORI

ginning in Fort Bragg, California, the Seis-

A walk in the park

Midori When I drive a sweep vehicle on AIDS/ LifeCycle, I try to keep people’s spirits up. The van is decorated with bunnies and I show up wearing bunny ears, so this isn’t that hard. 126

For the seventh consecutive year,

of Californians lining the route or learning about AIDS/LifeCycle through local media, turning our cyclists and roadies into ambassadors for HIV prevention and care.

know that personal stories are where it’s at. I once spoke to a cyclist who was just coming out as gay, just coming out as HIV-positive. For him, AIDS/LifeCycle was about feeling like he was a part of something. Becoming less alone, more like

himself on the ride, I know he’ll be less likely to have uninformed or unsmart sex. Of course the cyclists are nuts. That’s why I participate. I like to help the crazy people.

SAN SANFRANCISCO FRANCISCOAIDS AIDSFOUNDATION FOUNDATION• •2008 2008Annual AnnualReport Report

136

TOP FUNDRAISERS Walking, running, and cycling, more than 10,000 event participants each year raise significant resources and demonstrate strength and commitment that extend beyond their numbers. Here we recognize the top 10 fundraisers in AIDS Walk, the San Francisco Marathon, and Seismic Challenge as well as the cyclists and roadies of AIDS/Lifecycle who each raised $10,000 or more. Thank you to all these participants and their donors. AIDS/Lifecycle 7 2008 AIDS Walk San Francisco Virginia Wulff Steven Sams Glenn Murphy Robert Graney Bob Wulff

Bill Dow Richard McAllister Max Kirkegerg Bruce Smith Ben Johansen

2008 AIDS Marathon Tony Sachs Tim Ramos Michael Cipresso Jason Atwater Chip Stewart

Kevin Sheehy Ruben Leal James Crumbacher Donald Fritsche Bob Dinelli

Laird Rodet Michael Stubbs Enrique Miguel Thurman Julie Brown Mitchell Bolen

14

Galen McKinzie Evan Stewart Robin Sokolow Nathan Brostrom Helena Younossi

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

PHOTO: SABINE NIEWIADOMSKI

2008 Seismic Challenge

Dan Bernal Rodney Wong John Hauenstein Heather Kitchen Lisa Sterman Robert Sundstrom Michael Burdick David Alport John Coghlan Peter Taback David Galullo John Bradfield Shawn Hassler Paul Ikeda Keith Loring Tracey Jaquith Andrew Frankle Geoffrey Applegarth Wesley Shirts Ken Ruebush Dale Leininger James Loduca Frank Duff Barbara Kimport Eric Steiner Michael Palumbo Robert Quon Sal Bednarz

Alex Vaz Waddington Laurie Bertolacci David Goldsmith Norman Armstrong Danl Plyler Diane Hacker Sandy Blumberg Matthew McDermott John Wong Sabine Sturm Joseph Lopez Rob Cole Ray Cinti Stephen Massey Greg Sirota Robert Suarez Eric Rozendahl John Coundouris Richard Fabian Carol Barriger Joel Sale Chris Ligouri Travon (Tray) Robinson E.J. Bernacki Cynthia McCool John Walker Narihiro Kim Debra Despues

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

15

FINANCIAL REVIEW The financial information presented on these pages reflects audited statements for the San Francisco AIDS Foundation for the year ended June 30, 2008. Sources of Support The San Francisco AIDS Foundation continues to be highly reliant on the generosity of private donors to support its programs. Of the $23,723,706 (figure 1) in revenues for the year ended June 30, 2008, 69% came from private giving and 31% from government grants at the federal, state, and local levels. The private revenue came from a variety of sources. AIDS/LifeCycle, AIDS Walk San Francisco, the AIDS Marathon, and generous individual donors each provide significant resources to support our work. Government revenue includes grants from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, the National Institutes of Health, San Francisco city and county general funds, and the state of California. Expenditures Expenses for the year were allocated as shown in the following two charts (figures 2 & 3). The Foundation has always prioritized services that provide for those most in need. Program expenditures, which are shown in greater detail in a separate chart (figure 2), accounted for 66% of expenditures last year. Support service expenses accounted for 8.4% of total expenditures. Fund development, at 25.6%, represents the costs of raising the large volume of private gifts and event sponsorships that support the Foundation. The San Francisco AIDS Foundation ended the year with a surplus of $175,000. The current surplus is the result of

16

record-breaking success in attracting strong cyclist, volunteer, and corporate support for AIDS/LifeCycle, now in its 8th year, as well as continued success in other fundraising campaigns. Expenditures by program area (figure 3) reflect how the Foundation invested income to serve those in need. Client advocacy and treatment education provides clients with a variety of HIV services, treatment information, and substance abuse counseling designed to assist in managing HIV health and personal treatment regimens. The Foundation operates housing services programs providing housing subsidies for people living with HIV. Our public policy programs include advocacy for funding for HIV-related programs as well as efforts to inform HIV-related public policy with accurate epidemiology and sound public health principles. The Foundation’s HIV prevention and community-level intervention programs provide a range of activities, including HIV testing, telephone hotline services, needle exchange programs, facilitated groups, community events, and volunteer activities to support all program functions. Global treatment access programs focus on implementing effective models of HIV treatment access and delivery in the developing world.

FINANCIAL REVIEW Figure 1 SOURCES OF REVENUE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOTAL: $23,723,706 Fiscal year ended June 30, 2008

Private giving and other non-government sources 69.1%

Government grants 30.9%

Figure 2 EXPENSE ALLOCATION BY FUNCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOTAL: $23,548,811 Fiscal year ended June 30, 2008

Program services 66.0%

Fund development 25.6%

Support services 8.4%

Figure 3 EXPENDITURES BY PROGRAM AREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOTAL: $15,548,297 Fiscal year ended June 30, 2008

Client advocacy and treatment education 30.6%

Housing services 20.5%

Public policy 8.5%

HIV prevention & community level intervention 31.8%

Global treatment access 8.6%

The San Francisco AIDS Foundation is audited annually by the independent accounting firm of PriceWaterhouseCoopers, LLP. To obtain a complete copy of the financial statements and independent auditor’s report, call the San Francisco AIDS Foundation’s Development Department at (415) 487-3061.

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

17

FINANCIAL REVIEW San Francisco AIDS Foundation Statements of Activities and Changes in Net Assets

San Francisco AIDS Foundation Statements of Financial Position

Years Ended June 30, 2008, and June 30, 2007

Years Ended June 30, 2008, and June 30, 2007

PUBLIC AND GOVERNMENT SUPPORT: Government grants Contributions and grants: Individuals Corporations and foundations Donated goods and services Special events

2008 $7,340,392

2007 $5,663,386

2,971,928 543,608 281,077 12,027,507

1,952,559 496,963 178,665 12,368,919

23,164,512

20,660,492

Total public and government support

REVENUES AND GAINS: Net realized and unrealized gains on investments Investment income Service revenues Other

Total public support and revenues

EXPENSES: Program services Support services Fund development

Total expenses

Increase in Net Assets

NET ASSETS, BEGINNING OF YEAR NET ASSETS, END OF YEAR

18

FINANCIAL REVIEW

(626,869) 597,667 261,372 327,024

400,304 603,511 217,299 237,479

23,723,706

22,119,085

15,548,297 1,965,715 6,034,799

13,607,978 1,271,833 5,654,673

23,548,811

20,534,484

174,895

1,584,601

11,404,015

9,819,414

$11,578,910

$11,404,015

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

ASSETS Cash Investments Accounts receivable Contributions receivable, net Prepaid expenses Security deposits and other assets Property and equipment, net

2008 $2,521,505 7,728,827 2,033,995 404,893 499,286 244,023 1,329,100

2007 $1,238,414 12,151,084 1,782,710 672,309 341,434 240,385 637,281

TOTAL ASSETS

14,761,629

17,063,617

LIABILITIES: Accounts payable and accrued expenses Accrued payroll and related liabilities Grants payable Refundable advances Capital lease obligations

1,347,379 883,057 561,500 215,675 175,108

1,557,817 725,326 3,075,224 189,003 112,232

TOTAL LIABILITIES

3,182,719

5,659,602

NET ASSETS: Unrestricted Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted

11,040,966 118,315 419,629

10,983,930 19,667 400,418

TOTAL NET ASSETS

11,578,910

11,404,015

$14,761,629

$17,063,617

TOTAL LIABILITIES & NET ASSETS

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

19

INSTITUTIONAL DONORS GOLD

American Medical Response ChevronTexaco The Evelyn & Walter Haas, Jr. Fund Gap Foundation Gilead Sciences, Inc. Google Nordstrom The Shopoff Group Wachovia Williams-Sonoma, Inc.

ABC7, KGO-TV/DT Academy for Educational Development (AED) Adobe Systems, Inc. Autodesk Bank of America Foundation Bank of the West Barclays Global Investors BD Biosciences

Bebe Stores, Inc. Bio-Rad Laboratories Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS The California HealthCare Foundation Cannondale Catholic Healthcare West Charles Schwab & Co., Inc.

The Charles Schwab Corporation Foundation Clif Bar and Company The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Electronic Arts The Elton John AIDS Foundation Energy 92.7 The Examiner FedEx Gap, Inc.

20

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

PHOTO: ZOË WESENBERG

Foundation staff members, clients, and volunteers marked the 20th anniversary of World AIDS Day on Dec. 1, 2008, by taking to the streets of San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley to share current information about HIV and AIDS. The early morning demonstration at 10 key transit locations informed Bay Area residents about the progress made to fight HIV/AIDS over the past three decades and the challenges that remain. Images on the following pages illustrate the visually compelling messages displayed during the outreach event.

PHOTO: ZOË WESENBERG

PLATINUM

Genentech, Inc. The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation IBM Employee Services Center Jamieson Foundation Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc. Joie de Vivre Hotels Kaiser Permanente KKSF Smooth Jazz 10 3.7 Levi Strauss Foundation Macy’s West Microsoft Corporation Morrison & Foerster LLP The Morrison & Foerster Foundation Paceline Products Paul Mitchell Pfizer, Inc. PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP POWERAde Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund Safeway, Inc. San Francisco Marriott SF Weekly Silicon Valley Community Foundation Skunk Train Target TDG Inc dba SF Mix Twin Peaks Tavern UCSF

Union Bank of California Visa International Walgreens Washington Mutual Wells Fargo Bank Wells Fargo Foundation

SILVER Anonymous AAA of Northern California, Nevada & Utah Accenture Advanced Projects International AGT Crunch Acquisition LLC American Airlines Applied Biosystems/ Applera/Celera Diagnostics AT&T Bank of America BestBuy Purchasing LLC A Black Tie Affair Catering Blue Shield of California Brown & Toland Medical Group Crunch Cisco Systems Foundation Clickfox, Inc. Committed 2 Community Coordinated Resources, Inc.

The Corkery Group eBay Foundation Entertainment AIDS Alliance Ernst & Young LLP Federated Department Stores Foundation Fenwick & West LLP Gaia Fund Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Integrated Archives Systems, Inc. Intuit Foundation Jolson Family Foundation Jones Day Foundation Kilowatt King Oscar U S A KLA Tencor Foundation Live 105 The Marcia and John Goldman Foundation MZA Events, Inc. Perkins Coie LLP Peter Walker and Partners

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

PG&E Corporation The Polo Ralph Lauren Foundation Powerhouse Prideworks Rose Group, Inc. The San Francisco Rotary Foundation Sephora Seyfarth Shaw LLP The Shifting Foundation Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, Inc. Sports Basement Starbucks Coffee Company The Sundance Stompede The TJX Companies, Inc. Thoughtworks Viacom Wallis Foundation Wild 94.9 Winston & Strawn LLP

21

7x7 Magazine Alcatel Lucent American Express Employee Gift Matching Program AT&T Foundation BEA Systems, Inc. Blazing Saddles Bloomingdale’s, Inc. Blue Water Party Rentals Brookside Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery CBS 5/UPN Bay Area Chubb Federal Insurance Company Coach Matching Gifts Program Cornerstone Research, Inc. CPP, Inc. CREDO Mobile DFS Group Limited

Elizabeth Cafferata Foundation Ellison, Schneider & Harris LLP F H S Limerick Givaudan Corporation Harb, Levy & Weiland Harry Denton’s Starlight Room Herth Real Estate The Hilltop Group Charitable Foundation Horizons Foundation Huron Consulting Group LLC Imperial Council of San Francisco, Inc. KLA Tencor La Kalle 100.7/105.7 FM LVMH Magic Smile Family Dentistry Mal Warwick & Associates, Inc.

Tonamora Foundation Touchstone Climbing Ubisoft UCSF Medical Center Administration UnitedHealthCare Services, Inc. Velo Girls Coaching Services Wimba, Inc. Y & H Soda Foundation

Bike Chicago Bingham, Osborn & Scarborough Bingham, Osborn & Scarborough Foundation Biosoteria, Inc. Bob’s Steak and Chop House Breakaway Performance Centers Brokaw Family Foundation Brush Wellman, Inc. Business Wire Cactus Academy The California Endowment Castagnola’s Restaurant The Cheese Board Collective, Inc. Chicago Title Company Cinema 7, Inc. Citigroup Foundation Cole European The Commerce Group, Inc. Computer Associates International, Inc. Constantine Commercial Carpet Consumer Source Copper River Management, LP Crowther Prentiss Corp. D2 Properties

CORNERSTONE 3jam, Inc. ADMI ACE INA Foundation The Active Network, Inc. (Active.com) Advanced Air Technologies Advent Software Alicia Rios Realtor Alternative Relief Coop American Association of Pharmacists American Cyclery American International Group, Inc. (AIG) The Anna’s World Fund Anchor Brewing Co ArthroCare Corporation BCV Architects Bears Of San Francisco Best Beverage Catering Best Buy Children’s Foundation PHOTO: JOHN HERSHEY

22

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

Dayton Foundation Deloitte & Touche LLP Desert Hunt Invitational Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation ECC Endurance Performance Training Center Esurance, Inc. Financial Avengers, Inc. Fire Horse Productions, Inc. Fremont Group Foundation The Garner Foundation, Inc. Geller Sullivan #1 LLC

Glaceau Vitaminwater GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Gordon & Rees Grainger Gunn YCS Club The Gymboree Corporation The Hache Group Hebanks and Associates Hewlett-Packard (HP) The Hofmann Foundation hooksASD Hope Wine Humboldt Patient Resource Center

Jackson & Hertogs LLP Jensen’s Mail & Copy Juniper Networks’ Company Matching Gifts Program Kiesel, Boucher and Larson LLP Kiyohara Kochis Fitz/Quintile Korn/Ferry International Korzeniewski Family Foundation Lehman Brothers MacFarlane Partners Mary Wohlford Foundation Mason East, Inc.

General Reinsurance Corporation (GenRe) Gensler Gerson Bakar Foundation

Inner Light Ministries InterContinental San Francisco Integrity First Real Estate

Mastercard International Maxhire Solutions, Inc. Maxonic, Inc. McAfee, Inc.

PHOTO: JOHN HERSHEY

BRONZE

Marin Cyclists Mark G. Anderson Consultants Mellon Financial Corporation Michael Palm Foundation Mike’s Bikes MOViN 99.7 FM Of Partners Oracle Corporation Palace Hotel Association Patelco Credit Union PC World Communications PepsiCo Phillips Spallas & Angstadt POLLACK Architecture Port-A-Pit Barbecue Company Robert Half International Roche Molecular Systems, Inc. Rosendin Electric, Inc. Salesforce.com Foundation San Francisco Federal Credit Union Scicon Technologies Corp Sex Positive Community Center Symantec Corporation TCS-Insurance, Inc. Temple Emanu-El

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

23

McCarthy Building Companies The McGraw-Hill Companies McKesson Corporation Menke & Associates, Inc.

24

Paramount’s Great America The Pedaler Pitney Bowes Positive Being Quark RealNetworks Foundation Reiter Berry Farms, Inc. Revolutions in Fitness Roaring Mouse Cycles Robinson Family Trust Room & Board Royal Ambulance Saint Barnabas Church Salon Suppliers, Inc. San Francisco Apartment Guide San Francisco Fire Fighters Local 798

San Francisco Health Plan Sara Lee Foundation Savvy Construction SEIU United Healthcare Workers

SFDSA Foundation SFPOA Community Service Committee Siress Smith Barney South Bay Soda Systems, Inc. Splashlight Studios South, LLC Sprint St Francis Foundation Sterling Rice Group Sui Generis The Swinerton Foundation Swirl On Castro Sybase TBW Media Telespree Communications

Tibotec Therapeutics Time Warner, Inc. Townsend Management, Inc. The Traverse Foundation Trifiniti Endurance Performance Coaching Tyco Electronics UFCW 8 Ultra Records, Inc. Univesity Solutions, Inc. URS Charities Foundation VanCamp Dentistry The Vertical Group The VF Foundation Volunteers of America Bay Area Watson Wyatt Worldwide Wareham Property Group, Inc. Wiggins, Richard & Romano Winzler & Kelly Consulting Engineers Woodward Family Foundation Endowment Fund Xhema of New York Xilinx Community Fund Xinet, Inc. Yahoo! Inc. The Zurich US Foundation

SAN FRANCISCO AIDS FOUNDATION • 2008 Annual Report

San Francisco AIDS Foundation 2008 Board of Directors Andrew Belschner, Chair Dan Bernal LeRoy Blea Denise Bradby Jonathan Deason Christopher G. Esposito David Galullo Michael Kidd Tom Perrault Michael Richey Eric R. Roberts Lorna Thornton Helena Younossi

San Francisco AIDS Foundation 2009 Board of Directors Andrew Belschner Dan Bernal Denise Bradby Carol Brosgart, MD Jonathan Deason Christopher G. Esposito David Galullo Michael Kidd Tom Perrault Michael Richey Eric R. Roberts Lorna Thornton, MD, Chair

Pangaea Global AIDS Foundation Board of Directors

PHOTO: SABINE NIEWIADOMSKI

Merrill Lynch & Co. Foundation, Inc. Meyer Crest, Ltd. Monticelli Painting and Decorating, Inc. Motorola MV Nutrition/NU4U National Council of Negro Women, Inc. Neat Receipts New Frontiers Software Nortra Cables NOVA Research Company Obscura Digital Old Republic Home Protection Omidyar Network Fund, Inc. Oneupweb

Pacific National Bank The Palm Foundation The Palo Alto Medical Foundation Panther San Francisco, Inc.

Elaine M. Daniels, MD, PhD Lokelani Devone Joseph Garrett, JD, Chair Lonnie Payne Eric Roberts George Rutherford, MD, MPH Helena Younossi, JD

Established in 1982, the Foundation refuses to accept that HIV transmission is inevitable.

995 Market Street, Suite 200 San Francisco, CA 94103 415.487.3092 feedback@sfaf.org www.sfaf.org


Annual Report 2008 San Francisco AIDS Foundation