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The book tells the story of the rugs’ collection, the individuals involved and the evolution of scholarship in this field. Beautifully illustrated, the book is divided into design categories, including Tigers and Leopards, Dragons, Tantric, Geometrics, Medallions, Warp Face Backs, and Nomadic, among others. It also includes technical information and a visual glossary that will be useful for collectors and designers alike. The book documents a previously little-known aspect of Tibetan history and culture that deserves to be recognized and is an essential addition to any collector’s and design libraries.

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The Piccus Collection of Tibetan Rugs was formed during the exciting “window of opportunity” that existed during the 80s and 90s to collect in this previously little-known area. The Collection demonstrates the genuine aesthetic sense and cultural achievements of the unknown Tibetan weavers who produced these masterpieces.

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ugs have been woven and used in Tibet for centuries, but until recent years, have been ignored by collectors and scholars alike because available examples were generally brightly colored, chemically dyed, clearly modern commercial production of little aesthetic appeal. This situation changed in the mid-1980s when the Chinese authorities began to allow tourism and foreign visitors discovered early, naturally dyed examples that had not been seen in the West.

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This volume is his attempt to share the beauty and history of these artistic treasures with others who admire Tibet, its history and its culture.

the piccus collection of tibetan rugs

Tibetan Rugs

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Piccus’s interest in Tibetan rugs was sparked by the appearance of early examples during the mid-1980s, when Chinese authorities first allowed foreigners to visit Tibet. From the time of his first purchase in 1988 until his move to San Francisco in 2000, Piccus matched his passion for collecting Chinese furniture with an equal passion for early Tibetan rugs, an art form that reflects the culture and heritage of the weavers from the high plateaus of Tibet.

sacred & secular

the Piccus Collection OF

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ob Piccus embarked on an international business career that took him and his Shanghai-born and US-educated wife Alice to Europe, the US, and Hong Kong for forty years from 1960 to 2000. In Hong Kong, the two immersed themselves in the vibrant local art scene, and their collection of Vietnamese ceramics and classical Chinese furniture are celebrated.

sacred & secular  |  the piccus collection

about the collector

Sacred & Secular

robert p. piccus

sacred & secular

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ugs have been woven and used in Tibet for centuries, but until recent years, have been ignored by collectors and scholars alike because available examples were generally brightly colored, chemically dyed, clearly modern commercial production of little aesthetic appeal. This situation changed in the mid-1980s when the Chinese authorities began to allow tourism and foreign visitors discovered early, naturally dyed examples that had not been seen in the West. The Piccus Collection of Tibetan Rugs was formed during the exciting “window of opportunity” that existed during the 80s and 90s to collect in this previously little-known area. The Collection demonstrates the genuine aesthetic sense and cultural achievements of the unknown Tibetan weavers who produced these masterpieces. The book tells the story of the rugs’ collection, the individuals involved and the evolution of scholarship in this field. Beautifully illustrated, the book is divided into design categories, including Tigers and Leopards, Dragons, Tantric, Geometrics, Medallions, Warp Face Backs, and Nomadic, among others. It also includes technical information and a visual glossary that will be useful for collectors and designers alike. The book documents a previously little-known aspect of Tibetan history and culture that deserves to be recognized and is an essential addition to any collector’s and design libraries.

Sacred & Secular t h e P i c c u s C o l l e c t i o n OF

robert p. piccus

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T i b e ta n R u g s

Serindia Publications, Chicago

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CONTENTS About the Collector

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Acknowledgements 7

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Introduction 8

A Collector’s Odyssey

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Notes on the Collection

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the piccus collection of tibetan rugs tigers and leopards

40

tantric 76 dragons 80

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

medallions 92

Serindia Publications, Inc. PO Box 10335 Chicago, Illinois 60610 USA info@serindia.com www.serindia.com

Piccus, Robert Peter. Sacred and secular : the Piccus collection of Tibetan rugs / Robert P. Piccus. -- 1st ed. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 978-1-932476-55-2 (hardcover : alk. paper) 1. Rugs, Oriental--China--Tibet--Catalogs. 2. Piccus, Robert Peter--Art collections--Catalogs. 3. Rugs--Private collections--United States--Catalogs. I. Title. NK2883.A3T5265 2011 746.7’515074--dc23 2011025030

squares 126

All rights reserved. This book may not be reproduced in whole or in any part, in any form, without permission from the publishers. Photography of the Collection: Don Tuttle Design and graphics: Natthaphat Meksriwan

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British Library images © The British Library Board. All Rights Reserved. Pitt Rivers Museum images © Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. British Museum images © The Trustees of the British Museum. All rights reserved.

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© 2011 Robert P. Piccus and Serindia Publications

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First published in 2011 by Serindia Publications

Front and back covers:  Detail, tiger rug and crossed vajra, Plate 2. Back cover inset:  Detail, tiger rug, Plate 3.

geometrics 140 minimalist 164 textile patterns

176

runners 190 saddles 196 warp face back

214

nomadic tsukdruks

248

nomadic woven

262

Visual Glossary

272

Glossary 286

ISBN 978-1-932476-55-2

Annotated Bibliography

288

Printed in China

Photographic Archive Resources

294

about the collector

acknowledgements For Alice and me, collecting has always been a social activity that brought us together with many friends who share our passion. While it would be difficult to credit everyone, I want to highlight a few individuals who have helped and inspired

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Bob and Alice Piccus. Photo by Lilian Tang.

First my thanks to Alice, beloved wife, mother and best friend, who has put up with so many years of distraction and financial indiscretion with the good spirit and humor for which she is famous. For this book, I am grateful in particular to Tom Cole, pioneering scholar of Tibetan weavings and friendly critic, who has helped in many ways including technical analysis, such a burden to me; and to Don Tuttle for his masterful photography and artistic suggestions.

Bob Piccus embarked on an international business career that took him and his

My thanks also to a long list of collector, scholar and dealer

Shanghai-born and US-educated wife Alice to Europe, the US, and Hong Kong for

friends: Monisha Ahmed, Tony Anninos, Debby Ashencaen

forty years from 1960 to 2000.

and Gennady Leonov, Terese Tse and Bruce Bartholomew, Bob Brundage, Anthony d’Offay, Annie Dorsey, Arthur Kan, David Kamansky, Arthur Leeper, Mimi Lipton, Bill Liske,

substantial collections of classic Belgian stamps, Indian postal history, maps, and

Stephen McGuiness, Dan Miller, Jeffrey Moy, Kumi and

antiquarian books while living in Belgium and New York City. Moving to Hong

John Ruddy, Tom Rutherford, Mohan Sakya, Danny Shaffer

Kong in 1968, the two immersed themselves in the vibrant local art scene, collecting

Joe Spitzer and Lillian Tang, Thomas Wild, Nick Wright, and

Vietnamese ceramics, Tibetan silver ritual objects and manuscript covers, Indian

my late and much lamented friend Robert “Dutch Bob” van

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Collecting having been a passion since schoolboy days, Piccus began to amass

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and Southeast Asian sculpture, Chinese rugs, and classical Chinese furniture.

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us, with apologies to those I have missed.

Grevenbroek.

Piccus’s interest in Tibetan rugs was sparked by the appearance of early examples

Last but by no means least, I want to acknowledge the

during the mid-1980s, when Chinese authorities first allowed foreigners to visit

extraordinary efforts by Shane Suvikapakornkul and his

Tibet. From the time of his first purchase in 1988 until his move to San Francisco

Serindia team to make sense of my often vague and disjointed

in 2000, Piccus matched his passion for collecting Chinese furniture with an equal

input resulting in a book I hope readers will recognize as a

passion for early Tibetan rugs, an art form that reflects the culture and heritage of

worthy expression of the artistic achievements of those

the weavers from the high plateaus of Tibet.

unnamed artisans of the Tibetan plateau.

This volume is his attempt to share the beauty and history of these artistic treasures

Robert P. Piccus

with others who admire Tibet, its history and culture.

San Francisco, June 2011

SACRED & SECULAR

acknowledgements

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A photograph taken by Sir Charles Bell in the collection of the British Library (left, bl 1112/5 (352) © The British Library Board. All Rights Reserved) illustrates Tibetan women weaving a runner rug on a vertical loom. One of the rugs in the Piccus Collection (right, Plate 113) shows a similar design after textile patterns.

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Introduction

rug design pool. We have only to consider the medallion and gül design elements3

opportunity for collectors to build serious collections of Tibetan rugs. This

derived from Central Asian sources that are featured on so many Tibetan rugs, or

book is meant to recognize and chronicle the efforts of the dealers, scholars, and

the adoption of Chinese textile patterns, to appreciate the impact of trade on the

collectors to identify, understand, and collect the work of Tibetan weavers. An

Tibetan rug designs.

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he period from approximately 1985 to the present has provided a unique

awareness of the complexities of Tibetan history, religion, geography, and political Although isolated and protected over the centuries in their remote mountain

rug production. The high Himalayan plateau is a natural fortress that has allowed

fastness, the Tibetans did have trade and religious relations with their neighbors,

the Tibetan people to isolate and defend themselves from the surrounding regions.1

both of which contributed to and influenced their cultural, economic, and artistic

The Tibetans, however, are natural traders who found welcome markets for the fine

development.4 Jesuit missionaries, active in China during the reign of the Kangxi

lustrous high lanolin content wool produced by the Tibetan herders.2 The Tibetans,

emperor, visited Lhasa in the 17th century, as did a few intrepid and generally

trading their wool to India, China, and Central Asia, were influenced by what they

unwelcome travellers such as George Bogle in the 1770s, who mentioned in passing

observed in their travels, and brought back materials and ideas that expanded their

seeing carpets in use.5 Rugs of various types have been woven on the Himalayan

1.  Denwood, 1974, pp 1-8. Introduction. Also see historical works listed in the bibliography by Beckwith, Bell, Grousset, Richardson, and Stein. 2. Olsen, 1996

3.  Taken from the Turkish word for “rose,” this is a kind of medallion-shaped design element found on many Central and Western Asian rugs. Tibetans adopted this design element through trade relations. 4.  Denwood, 1974, pp 3-4, 7-8 5.  Denwood, 1974, p 83

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factors helps us understand the influences on Tibetan culture and art, in particular

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SACRED & SECULAR

INTRODUCTION

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Plates 1–29

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TIGERS AND LEOPARDS

plate highlights

Wall hangings: Plates 1, 3–5 Squares: Plates 2, 15–21, 29 Khadens: Plates 6–12 Runners: Plates 13, 14 Throne back: Plate 24 Saddles: Plates 22, 23 Horse Trapping: Plate 25 Panels: Plates 26–28 40 sacred & secular

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Tigers are not native to Tibet but their presence in neighboring India and China accounts for their importance in Buddhist iconography and usage in Tibet. The tiger, in the sense of the lion as the king of beasts, is seen as the symbol of power, strength, and fearlessness.1 A full tiger pelt was often depicted as the seat or throne of various deities and was therefore used as a throne, meditation seat, or place of honor for a high-ranking lama. The leopard, even rarer than the tiger, occupied a similar iconographic role as symbolic of female wrathful deities. The scarcity of genuine pelts resulted in the weaving of tiger rugs as well as the rare leopard spot rugs in the 19th century.

1. See Robert Beer, The Encyclopedia of Tibetan Symbols and Motifs (London: Serindia Publications, 1999) p 78.

I have concentrated on pieces featuring abstract patterns that are typical of the early production made to substitute for rare genuine pelts. I have avoided more recent pieces that depict single or paired tigers on their own or frolicking in bamboo groves, often referred to as “happy tigers” (Fig. 1). It is difficult for me to imagine how these pieces fit into the way Tibetans view tigers as protectors and symbols of strength. The same logic applies to the representation of leopards or lions as “dancing snow lions” (Fig. 2). My conclusion is that such later pieces were made to be sold as decorative objects rather than to be used in any traditional sense. Tiger rugs in the collection as well as the single leopard spot example range in age from the early 19th to the early 20th century. They include wall hangings, khaden, runners, khangama seating and throne covers, throne backs, and panels used in monastery halls as well as saddle pieces and horse trappings. Design elements, along with tiger stripe or leopard spot patterns, include crossed vajras indicating monastic use as well as medallions, Chinese characters and the variety of border treatments including key fret, pearl, and rosette patterns derived from Xinjiang and Central Asian rugs. Small rectangular panels were often sewn into tubes, filled with straw, and hung as protective totems on both sides of the entryways to temples and monasteries.

Fig. 1 “Happy Tigers” Photo by Arthur Kan.

Fig. 2 “Dancing Snow Lions” Photo by Arthur Kan. tigers and leopards 41

1 TIGER RUG

19th century or earlier Acquired: February 1995 Exhibited: ACOR 4 Denver, 1998 Catalogued: Liske, Denver, 1998

179 cm × 71.1 cm (70.5 in × 28 in)

warp: 

Z2S light grey wool/goat hair

weft: 

2 sheds dark grey wool

colors

(5):  ivory, brown, light blue, medium blue, light yellow

knots: 

3-, 4-, 5-ply wool 4.5 h × 3 v = 13.5 kpsi

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knot count: 

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size: 

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71.1 cm (28 in)

179 cm (70.5 in)

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This abstract tiger rug is woven in a rare horizontal format. The limited natural color palette, large loose knotting and archaic key and pearl borders suggest an early date. The ivory ground is unusual, adding presence to the composition. All factors have combined to make this an exceptionally rare and pleasing rug.

42 sacred & secular

tigers and leopards 43

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2 TIGER RUG

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Early 19th century Acquired: November 1991

74.9 cm (29.5 in)

size: 

95.3 cm × 74.9 cm (37.5 in × 29.5 in)

warp: 

Z2S ivory wool

weft: 

2 sheds ivory wool; 3 shoots one ivory & two yellow; 3 shoots one ivory & two light blue

colors

(5):  walnut brown, dark brown, light yellow, light blue, ivory

knots: 

6-ply wool

knot count: 

44 sacred & secular

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95.3 cm (37.5 in)

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This square rug is a rare example of a crossed vajra design applied over an abstract tiger stripe pattern. This was most likely a throne cushion meant for a high lama.

8 h × 6 v = 48 kpsi

tigers and leopards 45

4 TIGER RUG

19th century Acquired: November 1991

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This example combines a partial pelt design over a plain field. A similar example is published in a catalogue by the Milan dealer Nilufar, 1996, page 12, who speculates this unusual size rug was meant to encircle a pillar. Another possible usage could be to frame a raised platform that formed the throne of a high lama.

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96.5 cm (38 in)

96.5 cm × 63.5 cm (38 in × 25 in)

warp: 

Z2S wool

weft: 

2 sheds ivory wool (3 sheds at the ends)

colors

(6):  dark brown, golden brown, black, yellow, red,light red, ivory

knots: 

3-, 4-ply wool

knot count: 

7.5 h × 4 v = 30 kpsi

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63.5 cm (25 in)

size: 

3 TIGER RUG

Early 19th century Acquired: November 1991

95.3 cm (37.5 in) 55.9 cm (23 in)

size: 

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This rare example combines a finely woven abstract tiger stripe pattern similar to Plate 2 with a key border.

95.3 cm × 55.9 cm (37 in × 23 in)

warp: 

Z2S ivory/grey wool

weft: 

2 sheds grey/ivory wool

colors

(5):  golden brown, dark brown/black, dark blue, light blue, ivory

knots: 

3-, 4-, 5-ply wool

knot count: 

46 sacred & secular

8 h × 4 v = 32 kpsi

tigers and leopards 47

Dragons

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Plates 31–39

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80 sacred & secular

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Wall hangings: Plates 31, 32 Khadens: Plates 33–38 Throne back: Plate 39

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plate highlights

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Tibetans have adopted the dragon, a most powerful symbol, from Chinese iconography. In Chinese terms, the dragon represents male strength and energy to complement female attributes as represented by the phoenix. In royal terms, the dragon and phoenix that represent heaven and earth symbolize the emperor and empress. The dragon-phoenix combination appears often in 20th-century production in dynamic multicolored rugs (Fig. 1). This is not the case in the earlier 19th century examples in this collection, which are more closely based on the Chinese Ningxia-style rugs from which they are derived.

Fig. 2  Ningxia dragon rug. Photo by Arthur Kan.

Fig. 3  Ningxia pillar rug. Photo by Arthur Kan.

Tibetan monasteries and temples are noted for their bright and rather exotic decorations. Kuløy noted that in the case of “political” Tibet ruled by the Dalai Lama, decorations were mostly in the form of wall and pillar paintings as well as hanging banners made of textiles. The Tibetan Buddhist monasteries and temples located in the Tibetan cultural areas of western China and Mongolia were often decorated with pillar rugs and wall hangings produced in the rug-weaving areas of northwestern China and Mongolia. Tibetan rugs of this type are relatively rare compared with their Ningxia counterparts (Figs. 2, 3). Similarly, Ningxia dragon-design seating and throne back rugs (Fig. 4) for high-ranking monks are fairly common but Tibetan examples such as those in this collection are relatively rare. The selection here also features what might be called “Tibetan dragon rugs in Chinese format.” These are conventional three-medallion khaden size rugs, which feature particularly exuberant field and border design. The Tibetan examples are clearly derived from Chinese types, which is a further indication of the influence of Chinese rug iconography on Tibetan production. In conclusion, Tibetan 19th-century dragon rugs demonstrate close affinities with their Ningxia counterparts. They probably had similar usage in temples and monasteries and are not particularly common. This is in contrast with later, lively 20thcentury pieces produced more likely for their commercial appeal.

Fig. 4  Ningxia seat and throneback. Photo by Arthur Kan.

dragons 81

31 DRAGON RUG

19th century Acquired: November 1991

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warp: 

4-ply cotton

weft: 

2 sheds ivory wool

colors

(10):  dark blue, light blue, pale yellow, khaki green, blue/green, ginger brown, brown, pale rose, red, ivory

knots: 

3-, 4-ply wool

knot count: 

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125.7 cm × 77.7 cm (49.5 in × 30.6 in)

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125.7 cm (49.5 in)

size: 

9 h × 6 v = 54 kpsi

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77.7 cm (30.6 in)

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Tibetan versions of Ningxia wall hangings where a flying dragon is depicted chasing flaming pearls surrounded by cloud motifs and Buddhist symbols.

32 DRAGON RUG

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19th century Acquired: January 1992

182.9 cm (72 in)

182.9 cm × 79.4 cm (72 in × 31.25 in )

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size: 

79.4 cm (31.25 in)

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Similar to Plate 31, this piece features a pair of dragons amongst cloud patterns.

warp: 

3-ply cotton

weft: 

2 sheds ivory, grey and brown wool

colors

(10):  dark blue, medium blue, light blue, red, light rose, pale yellow, ginger brown, burgundy (faded), light red (faded), ivory

knots: 

3-, 4-ply wool

knot count: 

82 sacred & secular

9 h × 6 v = 54 kpsi

dragons 83

Medallions

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other examples are clearly monastic, such as the early example in plate 40 with crossed vajras in all three medallions. Other examples are rare such as plate 41 with eternal knot in square format.

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Medallion-design khaden are woven for both monastic and domestic use. The following selection includes more typical pieces featuring a variety of field and border treatments, while

1.  See Hallvard K. Kuløy, Tibetan Rugs (Bangkok: Orchid Press, 1982) p 64.

92 sacred & secular

I have included here a set of plates of what I call “minimalist medallions,” which are medallion rugs but with empty fields and restrained design and color. This small group of rugs highlight the contrast between a relatively conventional border treatment with typical medallions and essentially empty fields. In my view, these rugs are excellent examples of the creative achievements of the weavers. Using few design tools and limited colors along with empty fields, conventional medallions, and corner and border designs, they have created pleasing examples.

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This section groups the medallion rugs in khaden format. Medallions are the most common design motif in Tibetan rugs. Kuløy believes medallions have been used on nearly half of all Tibetan rugs.1 The designs are of Central Asian as well as Chinese origin and provide the weaver with a wide range of creative opportunities. The creative ability of the weavers is apparent in the wide range of medallion design as well as the varied treatment of the borders and field. I have collected a range of examples that illustrate the level of creative design demonstrated by the weavers.

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Plate 40–69

plate highlights

Crossed vajra: Plate 40 Square medallion: Plate 41 Arrow border: Plate 42 Rosette border: Plate 43 Single medallion: Plates 44–50 Two medallion: Plate 51 Three medallion: Plate 52–62 Five medallion: Plate 63 Minimalist medallion: Plates 65–69

medallions 93

40 MEDALLION RUG

Early 19th century Acquired: May 1995

129.6 cm × 73.7 cm (51 in × 29 in)

warp: 

Z2S brown/tan wool

weft: 

2 sheds brown/tan wool

colors

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size: 

73.7 cm (29 in)

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This outstanding rug is distinguished by the crossed vajra appearing in all three medallions, an exceptionally rare design. The deeply-saturated red field combined with the simple border design indicate an early 19thcentury date.

(7):  dark blue, light blue, mottled blue, red, green, tan, brown overdyed blue

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5 h × 4 v = 20 kpsi

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knot count: 

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6-ply wool

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knots: 

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129.6 cm (51 in)

41 MEDALLION RUG

19th century Acquired: August 1994 Exhibited: ACOR 4 Denver, 1998 Catalogued: Liske, Denver, 1998

The well-drawn single medallion in this rug is a unique example of the eternal knot design.

75.6 cm (29.75 in)

148.6 cm (58.5 in)

size: 

148.6 cm × 75.6 cm (58.5 in × 29.75 in)

warp: 

Z2S brown wool

weft: 

2 sheds medium brown wool, light brown wool

colors

(5):  dark blue, medium blue, light blue, red, ivory

knots: 

6-, 7-, 8-ply wool

knot count: 

5 h × 3 v = 15 kpsi

medallions 95

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geometrics

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Plate 81–101

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Geometrics, in the main in “checkerboard” patterns, are among the most popular and sought-after designs. Decorators love them because they are able to use them in almost any décor. These geometric designs also challenge Tibetan weavers to use their creative instincts to weave unusual examples.

plate highlights

140

Room-size checker: Plate 81 Regular checker: Plates 82–86 Enhanced checker: Plates 87, 88 Diamond pattern: Plate 89 Rounded-end checker: Plate 90 Check border: Plate 91 Mini-checker: Plate 92 Stepped-diamond: Plates 93–98 Cushion stripes: Plates 99 sacred & secular Cushion checks: Plates 100, 101

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The selection here contains a number of typical checkerboard rugs woven in a variety of colors, some with visual enhancements, such as borders and diamonds. Also here is a rare example of a large floor carpet, typically used for sitting or sleeping.

geometrics 141

82 checkerboard RUG

Circa 1900 Acquired: March 1998

The use of green as a primary design color is unusual.

size:

157.5 cm x 82.6 cm ( 62 in x 32.5 in )

warp:

Z2S tan wool

weft:

2 shed brown and grey wool, some blue wool

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82.6cm (32.5 in)

colors knots:

2, 3 ply wool

knot count:

8 h x 4 v = 32 kpsi

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157.5 cm (62 in)

(3): Tan, dark green, medium Green

81 checkerboard RUG

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Circa 1900 Acquired: September 1996

A rare room-size checkerboard pattern woven with a notch, presumably for a post. In a dwelling, rugs of this size are exceptionally rare and were intended for a wealthy family.

196.8 cm (77.5 in)

size:

238.8 cm x 196.8 cm ( 94 in x 77.5 in )

warp:

Z2S

weft:

2 shed ivory wool

colors

238.8 cm (94 in)

142 sacred & secular

knots:

ivory wool

(5): dark blue, medium blue, tan

3, 4,5 ply wool

knot count:

7 h x 4.5 v = 31.5 kpsi geometrics 143

Textile patterns

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Tibetan rug weavers are very adept at transforming textile patterns, usually Chinese, into woven rugs. These range from representations of Chinese lattice and brocade silk textiles to Tibetan tie-dyed patterns. Some of the examples here are based on reproduction of an imported textile design, and are good examples of the Tibetan weaver’s ability to deal with foreign design.

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Plate 110–119

plate highlights

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The lattice pattern examples are particularly attractive and occasionally are so tightly woven as to appear a flat weave. The well-known tigma pattern often seen in tie-dyed textiles is a classic example of Tibetan weavers producing a rug in the design of a domestic cloth textile. The pieces here are not from nomadic production, but rather from sedentary workshops.

Lattice pattern: Plates 110, 111 Tigma tie-dyed: Plates 112, 113 Swastika: Plate 114 Brocade textile: Plates 115–119

176 sacred & secular

textile patterns 177

110 textile-patterned RUG

19th Century Acquired: January 1990

An example of translating a complex Chinese lattice pattern textile into a woven rug.

163.8 cm x 85.1 cm ( 64.5 in x 33.5 in )

warp:

Z2S ivory wool

weft:

2 sheds ivory wool

colors knots:

(2): red, golden brown

3 ply wool

knot count:

8 h x 5 v = 40 kpsi

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163.8 cm (64.5 in)

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size:

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85.1cm (33.5 in)

111 textile-patterned RUG

In this example, the lattice pattern has been produced in an exceptionally fine weave.

57.9cm (22.8 in)

size:

76.7 cm x 57.9 cm ( 30.2 in x 22.8 in )

warp:

Z2S ivory wool

weft: two sheds ivory wool

76.7 cm (30.2 in)

colors knots:

(2): aubergine, rose red

4 ply wool

knot count:

178 sacred & secular

Circa 1900 Acquired: September 1991

10 h x 9 v = 90 kpsi

textile patterns 179

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visual glossary tigers dragons medallions buddhist symbols geometrics other designs

Medallions

visual glossary floral patterns

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geometric and endless knot patterns


Sacred & Secular: The Piccus Collection of Tibetan Rugs