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DANIEL FRANK SEDWICK, LLC presents MAIL-BID

TREASURE AUCTION #4 closing Thursday, November 6, 2008, at 5:00 p.m. EST

Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC P.O. Box 1964 Winter Park, FL 32790 U.S.A. (407) 975-3325 • Fax (407) 975-3327

www.SedwickCoins.com Special email bidding address:

treasurebids@gmail.com Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC staff: Dan Sedwick, Augi García, Patty Sedwick and Cori Sedwick Downing (special thanks to Alan Workman for his assistance)

Daniel Frank Sedwick, licensed Florida auctioneer #AU3635, AB2592 © Copyright Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC, 2008. All rights reserved. 1

TERMS AND CONDITIONS 1)

This is a traditional “mail bid” auction, meaning that all items will be sold to the highest bidder and bids will be accepted up to the closing date and time. Bids may be submitted by mail, phone, fax, email, or in person. We cannot be responsible for errors in your bidding or the loss or delay of any bids that do not reach us by the closing date and time. All bids submitted will be considered in U.S. dollars.

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All bids submitted are considered MINIMUM bids, and bidders are advised to provide allowable percentage increases to indicate MAXIMUM bids. In the case of tie MAXIMUM bids, we award the lot to the bidder with the highest MINIMUM bid. If there is no tie, then the high bidder will win the lot at his MINIMUM bid OR at the next increment above the second-highest MAXIMUM bid. Note that bids will NOT be reduced below a bidder’s MINIMUM bid.

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A winning bid is considered a formal contract between the buyer and the consignor. By submitting his bid, the winning bidder agrees to purchase the lot(s) he/she has won and further agrees to pay the Buyer’s Premium and any shipping, sales tax, customs duties, or other surcharges involved in delivering the lot(s) to the buyer. Winning bidders will be notified immediately after the sale with an invoice reflecting the total amount due and shall remit payment within two weeks of notification. We reserve the right to re-open the lots to second- and third- (etc.) highest bidders if we have not received paymentafter two weeks. Title to each lot does not pass until the item has been paid for in full. Any late payments (one month past invoice date) will be assessed an accrued interest charge of 1½% per month.

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All lots will be sent to winning bidders via U.S. Mail when the invoice has been paid in full unless other arrangements are made. All domestic shipments will carry full insurance, but foreign shipments are sent at the buyer’s risk (insurance available in some cases).

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A Buyer’s Premium of 19% will be added to the winning bid for the total purchase price before any applicable tax or surcharges. Winning bidders who pay by cash, check, money order, wire transfer or direct deposit are eligible for a reduction of the Buyer’s Premium by 4% (net 15%). Winning bidders who pay by credit card (not through PayPal) are eligible for a reduction of the Buyer’s Premium by 1% (net 18%).

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Acceptable forms of payment are cash, check, money order, wire transfer, direct deposit, PayPal, Visa/MC (payments by American Express and Discover can be made via PayPal). All payments by check or money order should be made payable to Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC. Payments by direct deposit or wire transfer should be made to the Daniel Frank Sedwick LLC Operating Account, Bank of America account #898013725092, ABA #026009593, SWIFT code BOFAUS6S. Payments by PayPal should be made to auction@sedwickcoins.com. All payments shall be in U.S. dollars drawn on a U.S. bank.

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New bidders who do not have established credit with us must supply references and/or a 25% deposit. Credit cards are acceptable in lieu of a deposit. Your deposit will be refunded if your bids are unsuccessful, but if you are a winning bidder, your deposit will be applied to your purchase. Any bidders with an overdue balance with Daniel Frank Sedwick or Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC must complete payment of their previous balance before their bids will be accepted.

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You may opt for “either/or” bids and/or total budgets on your bid sheet. “Either/or” bids are used when you want just one (or whatever number you specify) of two or more lots but it does not matter which of those lots you get.

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Total-budget bids are used when you are bidding on more lots than you expect to win and do not wish to spend more than a specified amount. Mail-bid sales are uniquely flexible for these situations. 9)

Most lots are unreserved, but some lots do have a reserve or minimum bid assigned by the consignor. Any reserve will be at or below the stated low estimate. All estimates are given in U.S. dollars.

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Even when there is not a reserve, bidders are advised that Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC is an active dealer in this material and will buy any and all items at a wholesale level; therefore, any bids below reasonable wholesale will not be considered. Furthermore we reserve the right to reject any bids that we have reason to believe are not submitted in good faith.

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All items are guaranteed genuine and as described. Returns will NOT be accepted UNLESS there was an error in the listing. (Note that grading and estimation of corrosion are subjective and differences of opinion cannot be considered errors.) Any returns must be agreed upon BEFORE shipment back to us, and any applicable refunds will be made immediately upon receipt of the returned item(s). We must receive all returns in unaltered condition no later than one month after the sale. Any refunds for returns paid for by credit card will be subject to a 3% return fee.

12)

Lots may be inspected at our private office in Winter Park by appointment only during our office hours of Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. High-quality photos of all items are viewable on our website 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

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Florida sales tax (6% to 7.5%, depending on your county) will be added to all purchases of items that are NOT coins or bullion. Coins and bullion are also taxed if the total coin and/or bullion purchase is less than $500.

14)

The winning bidder pays for all costs of shipping or delivery of his/her lots. In some cases special delivery must be arranged between the consignor and the winning bidder. There are no surcharges for packing or handling in this sale.

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ORDER OF SALE closing Thursday, November 6, 2008, at 5:00 p.m. EST Section Lots Pages Biography ............................................................................................................................ 6 Shipwreck histories............................................................................................................. 7-19 Gold cobs by mint ....................................................................................... 1-34 ............... 20-23 World gold coins by country ...................................................................... 35-113 ........... 24-34 Shipwreck ingots and other bullion .......................................................... 114-170 ......... 35-56 Shipwreck silver coins ................................................................................ 171-625 ......... 57-126 Medals pertaining to ships and shipwrecks ............................................. 626-634 ......... 126-128 Silver cobs (Mexico, Lima and Potosí) ...................................................... 635-769 ......... 129-143 Other silver cobs ......................................................................................... 770-805 ......... 143-148 World silver coins by country .................................................................... 806-847 ......... 149-155 Artifacts (shipwreck) .................................................................................. 848-1003 ....... 156-180 Artifacts (non-shipwreck) .......................................................................... 1004-1065 ..... 181-193 Media (documents, fine art, books and catalogs) .................................... 1066-1163 ..... 193-206 A note about the order: As the world’s leading purveyors of New World cobs and shipwreck coins, we have always separated and highlighted our cob and shipwreck offerings from the rest of what we sell. To cater to our established clientele, we have preserved that arrangement in our auctions as well, with the usual cobs presented in order of establishment of each mint (the rare and unusual mints at the end) and the shipwreck coins, ingots and artifacts presented in chronological order by wreck.

REFERENCES CITED In the description for each lot we supply one or more numbers in reference to acknowledged publications in the field where possible. References used in this catalog include the following: Cay = Cayón’s Las monedas españolas del tremis al euro del 411 a nuestros días (2005). CT = Calicó’s Numismática española (2008), formerly by Calicó and Trigo (9 previous editions). DM = Delmonte’s The Silver Benelux (1967). FR = Friedberg’s Gold Coins of the World, 7th edition (2003). FS = Frank Sedwick’s Gold Coinage of Gran Colombia (1991). KM = Krause-Mishler’s Standard Catalog of World Coins, various editions, including Spain, Portugal and the New World. N = Nesmith’s The Coinage of the First Mint of the Americas at Mexico City 1536-1572 ( 1955). RL = Restrepo’s and Lasser’s books on Colombian cobs, including Macuquinas de Colombia (1998), The Cob Coinage of Colombia (2000), and Monedas de Colombia (2006). S = Sedwick’s The Practical Book of Cobs, 4th edition (2007). Sp = Spink’s (formerly Seaby’s) Coins of England and the United Kingdom, 41st edition (2006). A NOTE ABOUT PHOTOS Coin photos in this catalog are generally shown at actual size, with the exception of large lots, which are typically reduced, as are most artifacts and media.

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DANIEL FRANK SEDWICK, LLC presents

TREASURE AUCTION #4 A Mail-Bid Sale, closing November 6, 2008 We are proud to offer the world’s ONLY auctions dedicated exclusively to TREASURE! And the timing could not be better. In a world where the economy is more vague than ever, there is no longer a good “feel” for what the dollar should be worth, what a gallon of gas should cost, even what the value of an ounce of gold should be. The stock market is more volatile than ever, and even the once “safe” investment of real estate is iffy at best. Collectibles, however, are on fire, posting record prices at even the most recent auctions around the world, mostly because collectibles are valued by quality and scarcity rather than anything speculative. Within the collectibles field, there is nothing hotter right now than treasure items like shipwreck coins, silver and gold ingots and artifacts from shipwrecks, even miscellaneous coins and antiques from colonial days or later. Longtime collectors are parting with some of the best material we’ve ever seen. Naturally even the most anxious sellers want to get top dollar, and they know the best way is to consign to specialized auctions with high-quality catalogs and maximum online visibility. Our dedicated treasure auctions are finally filling this long-neglected niche. We receive consignments daily and even have a backlog for our spring 2009 auction already. Our consignors know that we expertly research every lot and present the lots in fully illustrated catalogs and on a dynamic website whose traffic rankings are increasing daily. Our newest addition is secure online bidding through Sixbid.com. We still offer the personal touch and are happy to assist any and all callers, but many bidders prefer to send their bids quietly and confidentially via email or fax. Because of the Sixbid format, we have had to modify our “min/max” bidding system, so now you must give a starting bid and tell us what percent increase (if any) you will allow to reach your top bid. We still give precedence to the highest starting bids (not order received) and only offer bid-reduction from your maximum allowance. This current sale features several important, not-to-be-missed offerings: • The “Golden Fleece wreck” (ca. 1550) Research Collection of Mexican Charles-Joanna coins (including a specimen of the famous 3 reales), plus the largest selection of gold “finger” bars and silver “splash” ingots ever offered from this wreck • A NEW and exclusive wreck: The “Wild Horse River wreck” (ca. 1620) from the Río de la Plata off Uruguay (silver cobs and artifacts, including gemstone rings) • A substantial offering of rare countermarked Brazilian coins and some artifacts from the Sacramento (1668) • Certified shipwreck Dutch gold ducats in some of the highest grades we have ever seen • The “Fort Capron treasure” of U.S. gold coins lost at sea off Florida in 1857, plus a gold bar and nuggets and dust and several gold and silver coins from other popular U.S. wrecks like the S.S. Central America (1857) and the S.S. Republic (1865) • A collection of Spanish colonial bust-type 8 escudos from the late 1700s and early 1800s, probably the fastestrising coins on the market today • A huge cincuentín (50 reales)—the largest Spanish coin ever minted—struck in Segovia, Spain • No less than THREE specimens of the very rare and highly sought 1732 Mexican pillar dollar, long considered the first official “dollar” of the United States • Large selections from the most popular treasure wrecks like Atocha (1622), Consolación (1681), 1715 Fleet and Rooswijk (1739), including many choice 1715-Fleet gold cobs • A significant offering of important documents and ephemera, plus the Tom Sebring collection of treasure books This sale is poised to be our best ever by far, and we look forward to your participation to make that possible!

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GRADING and DESCRIPTIVE TERMS Coins From best to worst, UNC is Uncirculated, AU is Almost Uncirculated, XF is Extra Fine, VF is Very Fine, F is Fine, VG is Very Good, and G is Good, with Fair and Poor below that. (“About” or “A” means the coin is just shy of the indicated grade. “Mint State” refers to lustrous, choice UNC coins.) We do not always assign numismatic grades to sea-salvage and land-burial coins, which were usually Uncirculated (or close to it) before the effects of corrosion and/or cleaning. Corrosion is usually assessed, from least to most, as follows: none, minimal, light, moderate, and heavy. Also note that we sometimes use the abbreviations E for escudos and R for reales in the listings for Spanish and Spanish colonial items.

Books We use several standard terms in our book descriptions, as follows: HC = Hard cover DJ = Dust jacket pp = Pages

SC = Soft cover Ed = Edition ex lib = Ex-library (with stampings and/or card-holders pasted in)

Our book grading is very similar to the coin grades above, with top condition indicated as “mint” or “new,” then “Very Fine” (VF) for not new but unread (or very slightly read) condition, then “Fine” (F) for slightly used, “Very Good” (VG) for moderately used, and “Good” (G) for well-used condition. Any significant damage is separately noted, as opposed to including it in the grade.

BIOGRAPHY The Tom Sebring Treasure Library In this auction we are proud to present Part I of the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Parts II and III will be auctioned in our 2009 sales. Tom is a longtime collector of shipwreck coins and artifacts and the books relating to them. This interest was stimulated in 1968 with the purchase of a silver eight-reales cob from the 1715 Fleet wrecks and a copy of Kip Wagner’s book Pieces of Eight. Over a period of many years, Tom assembled a comprehensive collection of coins from over eighty different wrecks, and in the process he avidly sought out relevant books and auction catalogs. He is proud of the fact that there is not a single book in his collection that he has not read from cover to cover! Using the research from these books, Tom has written over seventy articles for various numismatic publications, and in 1987 he authored one of the most highly regarded books in the field of shipwreck collecting: Treasure Tales—Shipwrecks and Salvage. Tom’s collection of shipwreck coins and artifacts was sold in January of 2004. Tom is now putting his collection of books and auction catalogs up for auction in the hopes that other collectors will enjoy them as much as he has.

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SHIPWRECK (AND HOARD) HISTORIES Throughout this catalog we offer coins and artifacts from dozens of different shipwrecks and hoards—“treasure” in the truest sense. While we did not want to break up the flow of the catalog in the listings, we do want to offer a bit of history behind each wreck concerned, so we present the histories on the next several pages in chronological order. Note that this time there are a number of “unidentified” wrecks in the catalog for which we simply have no further information. Please feel free to contact us for more information about any of these wrecks or about shipwrecks or treasure in general.

Flor do Mar, sunk in 1511 off Sumatra, Indonesia

“Golden Fleece wreck,” sunk ca. 1550 in the northern Caribbean

In 1511 the Portuguese Viceroy Afonso de Albuquerque was sent to the strategic town of Malacca (in modern-day Malaysia) to claim it for Portugal—which he did—but on the return voyage to India, his ship Flor do Mar was wrecked in a storm, sending spoils from the victory (including a reported 60 tons of gold) to the seabed. Modern searches for the wreck (which sank to a depth of over 100 feet) have been unsuccessful, with the exception of some finds by Robert Marx, like the jade artifacts in this sale.

This wreck was nicknamed for a royal stamping (“Golden Fleece”) on several of the gold “finger” bars (ingots) it yielded. Except for a handful of extremely rare Santo Domingo pieces, all the coins from this wreck were Mexican Carlos-Juana silver coins (all assayers prior to S), including several rarities, the most important being three specimens of the Rincón “Early Series” 8 reales of 1538, the very first 8 reales ever struck in the New World (the best of which achieved a record in 2006 for the highest amount ever paid at auction for a Spanish colonial coin: $373,750!). To date the finders of the wreck have not identified the wreck or disclosed its exact location, but they have gone on record stating it was in international waters in the northern Caribbean. Though it was a relatively small find (a few thousand coins at most), it has been the primary source for Mexican Carlos-Juana coins on the market since the mid-1990s. Perhaps more impressive than the coins from this wreck are the few dozen gold and silver ingots it has yielded, all of which have entered the market exclusively through Daniel Frank Sedwick. The varying purities of these bars are reminiscent of the “tumbaga” bars (see above), although the later gold ingots seem to have been cast in somewhat standard shapes (“fingers”) and sizes. The silver ingots from this wreck, popularly known as “splashes,” were simply poured onto the ground, leaving a round, flat mound of silver that was subsequently stamped with a tax stamp (in the form of a crowned C for King Charles I) and/or a fineness in the usual block Roman numerals in parts per 2400, much like the karat system we use today. The gold ingots also show a fineness marking (but no tax stamps or other markings) in parts per 24, with a dot being a quarter karat. Silver or gold, many of the ingots from this wreck were cut into two or more parts, presumably to divide into separate accounts. We believe these “Golden Fleece wreck” ingots are the only known examples made in the colonies between the “tumbaga” period of the 1520s and the specimens found on the 1554 Fleet at Padre Island, Texas. (Note: the few gold bars recovered from the Texas wrecks were marked with the same punches as some of the gold bars from this slightly later wreck.)

“Tumbaga wreck,” sunk ca. 1528 off Grand Bahama Island Before there were coins, before there were Spanish Treasure Fleets, and even before there were any kind of colonies on the Spanish Main, the conquistador Hernán Cortés and his men discovered treasure in the form of Native-American gold and silver artifacts. While it is a shame these artifacts no longer exist, at least their one-time presence is confirmed by what have become known as “tumbaga” bars: a group of more than 200 silver and gold ingots discovered in the remains of an unidentified ca.-1528 shipwreck off Grand Bahama Island. The artifacts that comprised these bars were apparently lumped together in two piles—one for gold-colored artifacts and the other for silver-colored artifacts—with great amounts of impurities (predominantly copper) in each pile. The piles were then melted as much as possible (not thoroughly) and poured into crude molds that in some cases were no more than depressions in the sand. The resulting ingots, called “tumbaga” bars, were then stamped with four types of markings: 1. Assayer, most in the form of BV with “~” over the B and “o” over the V, but others include MS and INo /DeCBA, whose names are still unknown (also note that some bars that do not bear any of these assayer markings may have assayer-marks incorporated into their fineness or serial marks). 2. Fineness, marked in Roman numerals (but in various forms) as a percentage of 2400. 3. Serial number, usually in the form of the letter R followed by Roman numerals (some possibly incorporated into the fineness markings, as for assayers above). 4. Tax stamp, part of a circular seal whose legend (pieced together) reads CAROLVS QVINTVS IMPERATOR for Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire. Each bar is described in detail in the 1993 book Tumbaga Silver for Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire, by Douglas Armstrong, a professional conservator hired by the salvage company to clean and preserve all the silver “tumbaga” bars. A new publication in the works by Agustín García-Barneche should soon shed more light on the history and manufacture of these ingots.

Spanish 1554 Fleet sunk off Padre Island, Texas The 1554 Fleet consisted of four caravels, the San Andrés, the Santa María de Yciar, the San Estéban, and the Espíritu Santo, all but the first of which foundered off what is now Padre Island in a violent storm. There were many immediate survivors, but natives killed nearly all of them. Much of the treasure was salvaged soon afterward by the Spanish. In the 1960s two of the ships were rediscovered and salvaged by an out-of-state company, causing

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controversy by removing what Texans thought should belong to their State. (The third wreck-site was apparently obliterated by a dredging operation in the late 1940s on what is known as the Mansfield Cut, a manmade inlet.) The State of Texas conducted its own excavations on the two sites in the 1970s. The 1554 Fleet wrecks have yielded almost exclusively Mexican coinage of CarlosJuana (up to and including assayer S), some of which still washes up on the beaches of Padre Island. Even when found on the beach, these coins are illegal to own in Texas, which has declared them all to be the property of the State, but they do trade freely elsewhere. Uncleaned specimens (mostly beach finds) are distinctively rusty in color and therefore are usually distinguishable from coins from the “Golden Fleece wreck” above.

pattern of corrosion, the coins from this wreck can pass for Atocha (1622) coins, which is how many of them were successfully sold with fraudulent Atocha certificates in the 1990s.

“Rill Cove wreck,” sunk ca. 1618 off Cornwall, England The name and nationality of the ship are unknown and even the date of sinking is not certain—all we know is that records of its local salvage began in 1618. After re-discovery of the wreck by Ken Simpson and Mike Hall in 1975, eventually some 3,000 coins were recovered and sold, all silver cobs, mostly Mexican, but also from Potosí and Spain. Most of the coins are thin from corrosion but with dark toning on fields to enhance details.

“Wild Horse River wreck,” sunk ca. 1620 in the Río de la Plata off Colonia, Uruguay

Unidentified ca.-1554 wreck in the northern Caribbean As mentioned above, one ship escaped the 1554-Fleet disaster, the San Andrés, but it was damaged and only barely made it into Havana harbor. Its treasure was safely offloaded onto other vessels for the journey through the Bahama Channel and up the Straits of Florida and back to Spain, but archival records in Spain indicate that not all of the treasure from the San Andrés made it there. In addition to a documented loss off Portugal, there is some evidence that these ships were hit by another storm and lost somewhere in the northern Caribbean, at least one of them hitting the east coast of Florida and being salvaged by the Ais Indians. A few coins found on the east coast of Florida (particularly in the vicinity of Cape Canaveral) in recent decades seem to confirm this. Archival records also indicate that some of the treasure from the San Andrés was brought to and left at Puerto Rico to be retrieved later in the 1550s. The material we are seeing on the market today (coins, ingots and some artifacts like plates with markings) is identical to what was found off Texas, so it MUST have come from the same 1554 shipment originally, and is therefore most likely the part that was offloaded from the San Andrés in Havana. Because the salvagers say the source is somewhere off the Dominican Republic, it may have more to do with the part that was left in Puerto Rico than with the losses in the Bahama Channel.

Somewhere in the River Plate opposite Buenos Aires is a remote beach where beautiful wild horses run free next to untold treasures just past the river bank. Quietly, local fisherman and salvagers over the years have brought up some of these treasures, which appear to be from a Spanish ship that sank without a trace. The River Plate (a literal translation of the Spanish name) was known to Europeans since 1516 and was even visited by Sir Francis Drake in 1578 early in his circumnavigation of the globe. Not long after that, in 1580, the colony of Buenos Aires took hold on the south side of the River Plate, and colonization slowly increased as Spain sought to limit Portugal’s expansion of Brazil’s frontiers to the north. Eventually the area that we now call Uruguay on the north side of the river became a zone of contention between the rival colonial empires. In fact the city of Colonia (whose full name is Colonia del Sacramento) was originally a Portuguese fort (built in 1680). Trade between the rival colonies was forbidden until 1602, when for a period of six years the Spanish crown authorized trade with Brazil, but only in commodities like food and clothing—no precious metals or slaves. Of course the Spanish colonists took advantage of the contact with the Portuguese and soon began to buy and trade slaves to resell in Potosí (overland via Cordoba to the northwest). All evidence indicates that this “Wild Horse River Wreck” is from this early period of unofficial commerce in the River Plate (no earlier than about 1605, but possibly as late as 1620). So far it has yielded only a few silver coins, gemstone rings and mostly small iron artifacts, all in incredibly well-preserved condition due to lack of salinity and the muddy composition of the riverbed. But metal detector readings indicate massive metallic deposits at the bottom of crevices in the mud, just out of reach for now. What will be found? Slave shackles? Chests of gold and silver? Only time will tell.

Santiago, sunk in 1585 on the Bassas da India atoll between Mozambique and Madagascar (east of Africa) This relatively obscure wreck sank on a reef at night due to pilot error, following which the captain and crew absconded with the one useable lifeboat, leaving some 400 or more passengers to perish on the wreck. The Santiago was found again and salvaged in the late 1970s by Ernest Erich Klaar and eventually yielded thousands of silver cobs (marketed in the 1980s) of both Spain and Spanish America (particularly the mints of Seville and Mexico). This shipwreck is also numismatically notable as one of only two wrecks (along with the Atocha of 1622) to have produced the extremely rare cobs of the Panama mint.

Unidentified (presumably Spanish) wreck of ca. 1590 off the Yucatán peninsula of Mexico Salvaged surreptitiously by Florida divers, this wreck yielded Philip II cobs of Mexico, Lima and Potosí, some in remarkably good condition. Many of this wreck’s coins are recognizable by their jagged, truncated edges (from corrosion) with pristine interior details. Without consideration of that characteristic

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Santa Margarita, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida From the same hurricane-stricken 1622 Fleet as the Atocha (above), the Santa Margarita sank on a reef within sight of the Atocha and was found in 1626 by Spanish salvagers, who recovered only roughly half its treasure. The other half was found by Mel Fisher and company in 1980. Margarita’s treasures were similar to those found on the Atocha, yet with fewer coins in comparatively worse condition overall (yet not as harshly cleaned). As with Atocha coins, original Fisher certificates are critical to the premium value for these coins, which is on par with Atocha coins.

“Dry Tortugas wreck,” sunk ca. 1622 off the Dry Tortugas, west of Key West, Florida

Atocha, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida

Presumably a sister-ship to the Atocha and Santa Margarita of the 1622 Fleet (above), discovered in 1989 and reworked in 1991 by Seahawk Deep Ocean Technology, among whose finds were numerous gold bars (but no silver bars) and about 1,200 heavily eroded silver cobs (similar in composition to the Atocha finds), all picked from the ocean floor by a robot. Cannons and other artifacts expected on a typical galleon, however, were suspiciously absent. The bulk of the treasure was eventually sold to a store/museum in Key West that later went bankrupt. Years later, by order of a bankruptcy court, it all turned up at auction, where nearly all of the treasure was re-purchased by some of the former principals of Seahawk for a new museum.

Arguably the most famous of all Spanish galleons salvaged in our time, the Atocha was the almiranta (the Admiral’s ship, effectively the rear guard of any Spanish convoy) of the 1622 Fleet, which left Havana several weeks late and ran afoul of a hurricane. Eight of the 28-ship fleet were lost, wrecked on the reefs between the Dry Tortugas and the Florida Keys or sunk in deeper water. Five people survived the sinking of the Atocha and were rescued by another vessel, but the wreck itself was scattered after another hurricane hit the site exactly one month later. The Spanish were never able to salvage what was one of the richest galleons ever to sail. The cargo of the Atocha did not see light again until 1971, when the first coins were found by the now-famous salvager Mel Fisher and his divers, who recovered the bulk of the treasure in 1985 and thereby unleashed the largest supply of silver cobs and ingots the market has ever seen. Well over 100,000 shield-type cobs were found in all denominations above the half real, the great majority of them from Potosí, as were also the approximately 1,000 silver ingots (most the size of bread loaves). A handful of gold cobs (1 and 2 escudos only) were also recovered, mostly from mainland Spanish mints, but also a few from Colombia—officially the first gold coins ever struck in the New World. The Atocha was also the source for most (if not all) of the first silver cobs struck in Colombia, as well as a few early coins from Mexico, Lima, Spain and even Panama. Even more significant were the many gold ingots, jewelry items, emeralds and other artifacts. Because of Mel Fisher’s huge publicity and because much of the treasure was distributed to investors at high ratios compared to their investment amounts, the coins from the Atocha have always sold for much more—anywhere from 2 times to 10 times—than their non-salvage counterparts, even in the numismatic market. (The “glamour market” in tourist areas, by contrast, elevates these coins to as much as twenty times their base numismatic value!) Individually numbered certificates with photos of each coin are critical to the retention of an Atocha coin’s enhanced value. Accompanying barcode tags with the coins also make it possible to replace lost certificates through a database system at the Fisher operation in Key West. Each certificate (with some exceptions) also specifies the coin’s Grade, from 1 (highest) to 4 (lowest), a highly subjective evaluation of corrosive damage and overall quality. Most Atocha silver coins are also recognizable by their shiny brightness, the result of a somewhat controversial cleaning and polishing process catering more to jewelry demand than to serious numismatists.

Campen, sunk in 1627 off the Isle of Wight, England The East Indiaman Campen was part of a seven-ship fleet that encountered a heavy storm off the Isle of Wight in October of 1627. Seeking safety in the Solent north of the island, four of the ships attempted to navigate through the Needles rocks at the island’s westernmost tip and two of them—the Campen and the Vliegende Draecke (“Flying Dragon”)—sank nearby. Soon after, all of the latter ship’s cargo was saved, but only a couple thousand silver coins were recovered from the Campen, leaving about 8,000 coins to be found in our time. Most of these silver coins, recovered by divers beginning in June of 1979, were Dutch “lion” daalders, but they also included a few cobs, which are very rarely seen on the market today.

“Lucayan Beach wreck,” sunk ca. 1628 off Grand Bahama Island Since the accidental discovery in 1964 of around 10,000 silver cobs (dated up to and including 1628) in 10 feet of water just 1,300 yards from the Lucayan Beach Hotel, the mystery of identifying the lost vessel has never been solved. Because of the date, popular opinion associates the wreck with the taking of the Spanish 1628 Fleet in Matanzas Bay, Cuba, by the Dutch pirate and national hero Piet Heyn, who reported losing two of the vessels on the way back to Europe. Three names proposed for the ship(s) by various sellers over the years were the Van Lynden, the Santa Gertrude (or Gertrudis) and the Romario, with scant evidence to support any of the attributions. Spanish archival research uncovered a new name—Nuestra Señora de los Remedios, sunk in that general area in 1624, but a quick check of auction catalogs confirms that some of the recovered coins were clearly dated later than that. A more recent (1990s) recovery off the Lucayan Beach turned up similar material, but no further clues as to the ship’s (or ships’) identity. Practically all of the coins have been Mexican 8 and 4

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reales of the assayer-D period, some in quite nice condition and a few with clear dates, which of course are rare. Expect to pay a modest premium for specimens in white clamshell boxes produced by Spink & Son (London) in the 1960s for a promotion that capped off years of disagreements between the salvagers, their backers and the Bahamian government.

“Panama hoard,” lost ca. 1629 in Porto Bello, Panama In the early 1990s the numismatic market began to hear about a massive find of 4,500 early Potosí cobs (practically all 8 and 4 reales) in fabulous condition—in fact, totally uncorroded but with telltale orange clay on what were otherwise Mint State (or nearly so) surfaces. Soon this hoard took on many different names as the stories emerged: “Panama hoard,” “Camino Real Trail hoard,” and, curiously, “Mule Train hoard” (based on a rumor that the hoard was lost when a mule that was carrying the treasure fell over a cliff). The most believable story we have heard (albeit the least romantic) is that the hoard was found stashed in the wall of a house that was torn down in 1977. The political atmosphere under General Noriega kept most of the coins in hiding until the 1990s. The latest date on the coins in this hoard is 1629, but in order to allow enough time for the coins to travel from Potosí to Porto Bello the date of the hoard is sometimes given as 1630.

Concepción, sunk in 1641 off the northeast coast of Hispaniola The Concepción was one of the most significant Spanish wrecks of all time, serving the Spanish with a loss of over 100 tons of silver and gold treasure. The almiranta of a 21-ship fleet, the Concepción was already in poor repair when the Europe-bound fleet encountered a storm in September, leaving her disabled and navigating under makeshift sails amid disagreement among its pilots about their location. Weeks later, she grounded on a reef in an area now named the Silver Shoals, just east of another shoal known as the Abrojos, which the pilots were trying to avoid. After another storm hit the wrecked ship and the admiral and officers left in the ship’s only longboat, the remaining crew resorted to building rafts from the ship’s timbers. Survivors’ accounts pointed to drowning, starvation and even sharks for the approximately 300 casualties. In the fallout that ensued, none of the survivors could report the wreck’s location with accuracy, so it sat undisturbed until New England’s William Phipps found it in 1687 and brought home tons of silver and some gold, to the delight of his English backers. The Concepción was found again in 1978 by Burt Webber, Jr., whose divers recovered some 60,000 silver cobs, mostly

Mexican 8 and 4 reales, but also some Potosí and rare Colombian cobs (including more from the Cartagena mint than had been found on any other shipwreck). Unlike the Maravillas of just 15 years later, the Concepción did not yield any gold cobs in our time, and any significant artifacts found were retained by the government of the Dominican Republic, who oversaw the salvage. The bulk of the silver cobs found on the Concepción were heavily promoted, even in department stores. The site is still worked from time to time with limited success.

Capitana (Jesús María de la Limpia Concepción), sunk in 1654 off Chanduy, Ecuador This wreck was the largest loss ever experienced by the Spanish South Seas (Pacific) Fleet, of which the Jesus María de la Limpia Concepción was the capitana (“captain’s ship” or lead vessel) in 1654. Official records reported the loss of 3 million pesos of silver (2,212 ingots, 216 chests of coins, and 22 boxes of wrought silver), augmented to a total of as much as 10 million pesos when contraband and private consignments were taken into account. By comparison, the entire annual silver production in Peru at that time was only about 6-7 million pesos! Obviously overloaded, technically the Capitana sank due to pilot error, which drove the ship onto the reefs south of the peninsula known as Punta Santa Elena, a geographic feature the pilot thought he had cleared. Twenty people died in the disaster. For eight years afterward, Spanish salvagers officially recovered over 3 million pesos of coins and bullion (with probably much more recovered off the record), leaving only an unreachable lower section for divers to find in our time. Ironically, the main salvager of the Capitana in the 1650s and early 1660s was none other than the ship’s silvermaster, Bernardo de Campos, whose fault it was that the ship was overloaded with contraband in the first place. The wreck was rediscovered in the mid-1990s and salvaged (completely, according to some) in 1997. After a 50-50 split with the Ecuadorian government in 1998, investors placed most of their half of the more than 5,000 coins recovered up for sale at auction in 1999. Almost exclusively Potosí 8 and 4 reales, the coins were a healthy mix of countermarked issues of 1649-1652, transitional issues of 1652, and post-transitional pillars-and-waves cobs of 16531654, many in excellent condition and expertly conserved. As an interesting footnote, the very coins salvaged from the Capitana by the Spanish in 1654 were lost again on the Maravillas wreck of 1656 (see next), and some of those coins salvaged from the Maravillas were lost again in the wreck of the salvage vessel Madama do Brasil off Gorda Cay (Bahamas) in 1657. Furthering Spain’s woes was the destruction of another treasure fleet in 1657 by English marauders (fresh from a victory in the Bay of Cádiz) off Santa Cruz on the island of Tenerife in the Canary Islands.

Maravillas, sunk in 1656 off Grand Bahama Island As the almiranta of the homebound Spanish fleet in January of 1656, the Nuestra Señora de las Maravillas was officially filled with over five million pesos of treasure (and probably much more in contraband, as was usually the case). That treasure included much of the silver salvaged from the South Seas Fleet’s Capitana of 1654 that wrecked on Chanduy Reef off Ecuador (see above). The ill-fated treasure sank once again when the Maravillas unexpectedly ran into shallow water and was subsequently rammed by one of the other ships of its fleet, forcing the captain to try to

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ground the Maravillas on a nearby reef on Little Bahama Bank off Grand Bahama Island. In the ensuing chaos, exacerbated by strong winds, most of the 650 people on board died in the night, and the wreckage scattered. Spanish salvagers soon recovered almost half a million pesos of treasure, followed by more recoveries over the next several decades, yet with over half of the official cargo still unfound. The first re-discovery of the Maravillas in the twentieth century was by Robert Marx and his company Seafinders in 1972, whose finds were featured in an auction by Schulman in New York in 1974. Included among the coins in this sale were some previously unknown Cartagena silver cobs of 1655 and countermarked Potosí coinage of 1649-1651 and 1652 transitionals, in addition to many Mexican silver cobs and a few Bogotá cob 2 escudos. The second big salvage effort on the Maravillas was by Herbert Humphreys and his company Marex in the late 1980s and early 1990s, resulting in two big sales by Christie’s (London) in 1992 and 1993, featuring many Bogotá cob 2 escudos, in addition to more Mexico and Potosí silver cobs and several important artifacts. The most recent sale of Maravillas finds, presumably from one of the many salvage efforts from the 1970s and 1980s, took place in California in 2005, again with a good quantity of Bogotá cob 2 escudos. The wreck area is still being searched today, but officially the Bahamian government has not granted any leases on the site since the early 1990s. It is possible the bulk of the treasure is still to be found.

Vergulde Draeck (“Gilt Dragon”), sunk in 1656 off Western Australia Much has been written about the loss and salvage of this Dutch East India Company trading vessel (known as an East Indiaman), which some consider to be Australia’s counterpart to Florida’s 1715 Fleet in terms of availability of reasonably priced cobs for collectors. In contrast to the Spanish treasure wrecks, however, the Vergulde Draeck carried only a modest amount of just silver cobs (eight chests totaling 45,950 coins), mostly Mexican but also some cobs from Potosí and Spain as well as some Colombian rarities. The ship was on its way from the Netherlands to Batavia (modern-day Jakarta, Indonesia) when suddenly it found itself wrecked on a reef some three miles from land in the early morning hours of April 28, 1656. Only 75 of the 193 people on board were able to reach the shore, and seven of them soon left in the ship’s pinnace to seek help in Batavia. When authorities there learned of the wreck, several attempts were made to rescue the other survivors and, more important, the eight chests of treasure, but no sign of the wreck or survivors was ever found. The wreck remained undiscovered until 1963 when spear-fishermen stumbled upon it and began to recover coins and artifacts. Salvage efforts to date, mostly under the supervision of the Western Australian Museum, whose certificates often accompany the coins (and carry a small premium), have yielded only about half of the total coins officially recorded to be on board this ship.

San Miguel el Arcángel (“Jupiter wreck”), sunk in 1659 off Jupiter Inlet, east coast of Florida As well known as this wreck has become among the Florida treasure community and shipwreck collectors around the world, surprisingly little has been written about it, and not one major auction has been dedicated to its finds. The San Miguel was not a big treasure galleon in a huge

convoy; rather, she was a lone aviso, a smaller ship for carrying letters and other communications quickly back to Spain. But unlike most avisos, the San Miguel did end up carrying some important treasure, as it was in the right time and place to take on samples of the unauthorized “Star of Lima” coinage of 1659 for the King to see. In October the San Miguel encountered a hurricane off the southeast coast of Florida, grounded on a sandbar, and broke apart rapidly, leaving only 34 survivors among the 121 people originally on board. Those survivors were all quickly captured by natives (Ais) and therefore had no opportunity to salvage the scattered wreck. Today only parts of the wreck of the San Miguel have been found, discovered by lifeguard Peter Leo in 1987, in about 10 to 20 feet of water and under as much as 20 feet of sand. Salvage is ongoing. Besides a couple of gold ingots and one large silver ingot, the yield to date has been modest, mostly low-end silver cobs of Mexico and Potosí, plus a good amount of the rare 1659 “Star of Lima” silver coinage, but also a couple Bogotá gold cobs and some rare Cartagena silver cobs, all sold through various dealers and private transactions. If the hull of the ship is ever found, as the salvagers think it will be, the market may finally see some of the gold cobs of the “Star of Lima” issue of 1659.

Sacramento, sunk in 1668 off Bay of All Saints, Bahia, Brazil The lead vessel of a 50-ship annual convoy between Lisbon, Portugal, and Bahia, Brazil, the Sacramento hit a sandbar at night and sank in a squall on May 5, 1668, sending some 400 people to their grave. Official Brazilian government salvage on the wreck took place beginning in 1976, at some point involving the famed salvager Robert Marx. Because it was chiefly a military vessel and coming from Portugal to Brazil, the Sacramento was carrying just a few consumer goods (like textiles) and not any significant amount of coins. Nevertheless, what little from the salvaging of this ship has reached collectors has been almost exclusively Portuguese silver coins with Brazilian countermarks from 1663, but a few Spanish colonial cobs (also countermarked) have surfaced as well, in addition to a few small artifacts.

Unidentified wreck of ca. 1671 sunk in Seville Harbor, Spain The city of Seville is situated on the Guadalquivir River, about 50 miles inland from the ocean port of Cádiz, where treasure from the New World arrived on sea-going galleons. From there the treasure went on to Seville, up the river by boat. Sometime in 1671 it is believed one of these boats outside Seville sank, or at least its treasure was lost there somehow in the river, for in the mid-1990s a large hoard of obviously salvaged silver cob 8 and 4 reales of Potosí, none dated later than 1671, and mostly in decent condition, began to emerge from markets in Spain without provenance but reportedly found in Seville Harbor during the installation of a fiberoptic cable across the river. It should be noted that the same type of coins (with characteristics identical to those from the Seville wreck) have been sold in recent years as having come from the so-called “Señorita de Santa Cristina” of 1672 off Cádiz, but we can find no record of this ship or its salvage.

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Consolación (“Isla de Muerto shipwreck”), sunk in 1681 off Santa Clara Island, Ecuador When salvage first began on this wreck in 1997, it was initially believed to be the Santa Cruz and later called El Salvador y San José, sunk in August of 1680; but research by Robert Marx after the main find in subsequent years confirmed its proper name and illuminated its fascinating history. Intended to be part of the Spanish “South Seas Fleet” of 1681, which left Lima’s port of Callao in April, the Consolación apparently was delayed and ended up traveling alone. At the Gulf of Guayaquil, off modern-day Ecuador, the Consolación encountered English pirates, led by Bartholomew Sharpe, who forced the Spanish galleon to sink on a reef off Santa Clara Island (later nicknamed “Isla de Muerto,” or Dead Man’s Island). Before the pirates could get to the ship, the crew set fire to her and tried to escape to the nearby island without success. Angered by their inability to seize the valuable cargo of the Consolación, Sharpe’s men killed the Spaniards and tried in vain to recover the treasure through the efforts of local fishermen. Spanish attempts after that were also fruitless, so the treasure of the Consolación sat undisturbed until our time. When vast amounts of silver coins were found in the area starting in the 1990s, eventually under agreement between local entrepreneurs Roberto Aguirre and Carlos Saavedra (“ROBCAR”) and the government of Ecuador in 1997, the exact name and history of the wreck were unknown, and about 8,000 of the coins (all Potosí silver cobs) were subsequently sold at auction by Spink New York in December 2001 as simply “Treasures from the ‘Isla de Muerto.’” Most of the coins offered were of low quality and poorly preserved but came with individually numbered photo-certificates. Later, after the provenance had been properly researched, and using better conservation methods, a Florida syndicate arranged to have ongoing finds from this wreck permanently encapsulated in hard-plastic holders by the authentication and grading firm ANACS, with the wreck provenance clearly stated inside the “slab”; more recent offerings have bypassed this encapsulation. Ongoing salvage efforts have good reason to be hopeful, as the manifest of the Consolación stated the value of her registered cargo as 146,000 pesos in silver coins in addition to silver and gold ingots, plus an even higher sum in contraband, according to custom.

“Porto Bello wreck,” sunk in 1681 off Porto Bello, Panama According to Robert Marx, a storm in 1681 sank three ships of the Spanish Caribbean Fleet: Chaperón (sunk in the mouth of the Chagres River), Boticaria (sunk off Isla de Naranjas), and an unidentified galleon (sunk off Punta de Brujas). Other reference articles, probably in error, give the date of the disaster as 1682. Despite these attributions, there is still some confusion about which wrecksite belongs to which ship of the Fleet, and as a result, the sources of finds from these wrecks tend to be referred to by location (like “Porto Bello wreck”) or simply as “1681 Fleet.”

Joanna, sunk in 1682 off South Africa An English East Indiaman on her way to Surat on the west coast of India, the Joanna separated from her convoy and sank in rough seas on a reef off the southernmost tip of South Africa on June 8, 1682, sending 10 people to their death. Eventually, 104 survivors reached the Dutch colony of Cape Town, from which a

salvage party was soon dispatched. The Joanna’s cargo consisted of 70 chests of silver coins, of which the salvage party reported having recovered only about 28,000 guilders’ worth. In 1982 the wreck was re-discovered by a group of South African divers led by Gavin Clackworthy, who brought up silver ingots (discs) and more than 23,000 silver cobs, most of them Mexican 4 and 8 reales of Charles II in generally low grade, but a few showing bold, formerly very rare dates 1679-1681. Over the past two decades, these cobs have entered the market from both private dealers and auctions, but always in relatively small quantities at a time. Almost all the coins are in very worn condition, usually thin and nearly featureless, but without the heavy encrustation and pitting that characterize Caribbean finds.

Sunken city of Port Royal, Jamaica (submerged by earthquake in 1694) As a notorious pirate hangout in the 17th century, Port Royal’s famous bars and brothels became repositories for much of the looted treasure of the Caribbean. But in 1692 an earthquake sent most of the city plunging into the sea, and it never fully recovered. What was left of Port Royal became a British Naval station for years afterward and it was continually racked by hurricanes (in 1721, 1726, 1744, and 1951), fires (in 1703 and 1815), and even another earthquake (in 1907). In the period of 1965 to 1968, the famous salvager Robert Marx dove the sunken city and recovered more than two million small artifacts (many lost AFTER 1692), some of which have appeared in the treasure market from time to time.

“Pasay hoard,” lost circa 1700 in the Philippines In February of 2005, while digging a hole for a septic tank at a residence in Pasay City, workers uncovered a Chinese stoneware jar at a depth of about five feet. Inside the jar were 400500 silver cob coins, mostly Mexican 8 reales of Charles II, all in very high grade and dating to the very late 1600s. These coins are recognizable for very odd shapes but with sharp points and brightwhite surfaces, their crude design details belying the fact that they were technically uncirculated.

Merestein, sunk in 1702 off South Africa This Dutch East Indiaman was outbound when she tried to put into Saldanha Bay to alleviate rampant scurvy on board the ship. On April 3, 1702, she hit reefs on the southwest point of Jutten Island and within hours was smashed to pieces. Only 99 of the 200 people aboard the Merestein survived. On board the Merestein were several chests of silver coins for trade in the East Indies, for which immediate salvage plans were undertaken. But Jutten Island is no easy dive, and all attempts were abandoned until modern times. The wreck was re-found and salvaged in the early 1970s, yielding almost exclusively Dutch silver ducatoons from the 1600s. The number of coins found in the 1970s was around 15,000 and is believed to be nowhere near all of the treasure that was lost.

Association, sunk in 1707 off the Scilly Isles, southwest of England The sinking of this ship and four others in a fleet of 21 returning from the Mediterranean was one of the worst British naval disasters of all time. The Association sank on October 22 under

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stormy conditions after what can only be described as guesswork navigation that led the ships straight onto the rocks of the Scilly Isles, where as many as 2,000 sailors lost their lives as a result. The admiral of the fleet, Sir Cloudisley Shovell, whose ten chests of personal wealth (in addition to several others) were rumored to be aboard the Association, was one of the casualties of the sinking, although legend has it he reached shore alive, only to be murdered there by a local woman for a ring on his finger. The wrecksite was located in 1967 by British Navy divers, touching off a frenzy of activity on the site for years to come. Cannons and a few coins were raised in the 1960s, but it was not till 1973 that a significant amount of coins were found (8,000 in that year alone). These coins, mostly British silver and gold but also many Spanish and Spanish-American silver cobs, were sold at auction beginning in 1969 and into the early 1970s. The cobs presented an eclectic mix, mostly 8 reales from the 1650s forward (even a “Royal” presentation issue from 1676), but from nearly all mints (especially Lima and Potosí), some even left in as-found conglomerate form combined with British coins. It is interesting to note that parts of this wreck, like others in the area, were flattened hard to the muddy sea floor by huge boulders that still roll around with the currents, making for dangerous and difficult salvage.

Feversham, sunk in 1711 off Nova Scotia, Canada The Feversham was on its way north with three other ships from New York to Quebec with provisions and cash to assist a British campaign against the French when all four ships sank on and around Scatarie Island off Cape Breton in a storm on October 7, 1711. About 100 people died in the disaster, while the remaining 49 survivors were able to bribe a passing French fisherman to take them to New York for 200 pounds. Apparently no one—British or French—was able to salvage anything from the wreck in its time. In 1968 the wrecksite of the Feversham was rediscovered by a group of divers led by famous Canadian salvager Alex Storm, whose recoveries were sold privately to a “highly-reputable Canadian institution” in 1972. In the mid-1980s the Feversham was salvaged again by a new group of divers. The Feversham’s numismatic yield was small (in comparison with Spanish galleon treasures), but quite important as a cross-section of coinage in circulation in New York at the time. Mostly it was Spanish American silver cobs and Massachusetts Bay Colony shillings, many of the former with rare, weight-adjustment plugs to bring them up to standard. A small group of gold cobs—almost entirely Bogotá 2 escudos, virtually identical to those from the Spanish 1715 Fleet— was found in later salvage efforts. An abundance of auctions offered these coins from 1989 through 1999.

DeLiefde, sunk in 1711 off the Shetland Islands, north of Scotland During the War of Spanish Succession it was deemed safer to take the northern route around Scotland than to skirt French coasts in the English Channel, but in so doing the Dutch East Indiaman DeLiefde wrecked on a reef in the Out Skerries due to faulty navigation under overcast skies, leaving only one survivor to tell the tale. Prompt salvage attempts by the VOC to recover the cargo of silver and gold coins turned up nothing—looting by locals was greatly suspected. Modern expeditions in the 1960s, however, located the ship and yielded upwards of 4000 coins (mostly silver “rider” ducatoons and gold ducats) in 1966-1968, many of which were sold at auction by Glendining (London) in 1969.

1715 Fleet, east coast of Florida The Spanish 1715-Fleet disaster was probably the greatest to befall any of the Spanish treasure fleets in terms of casualties and money, with reports of a loss of 14 million pesos (plus an equal or greater amount in contraband) and as many as 1,000 or more lives. The modern salvage of this fleet, begun in the early 1960s and ongoing today, has been the largest single source of gold cobs ever in the numismatic market, turning former rarities and unknown issues into collectible and popular (albeit still expensive) commodities. In typical fashion, the 1715 Fleet was a case of overloaded Spanish galleons foundering in a hurricane after delayed departure, but on a larger scale than anything before. The principal elements of the fleet, known as the Nueva España (New Spain, i.e., Mexico) Fleet, had gone to Veracruz in Mexico to deliver mercury (an essential substance in the refining of silver cobs), sell merchandise, and pick up quantities of Mexican-minted bars and cobs. An unfortunate series of complications kept the fleet in Veracruz for two whole years before it could rendezvous in Havana with the vessels of the Tierra Firme (Mainland) Fleet, bearing the Peruvian and Colombian treasure brought from Panama and Cartagena. After still more delays in Havana, what was ultimately a 12- or 13-ship convoy (depending on which account you prefer) did not manage to depart for Spain until July 24, 1715, well into hurricane season. The trip back to Spain was to be routine: up the coast of Florida on the Gulf Stream, which gradually turns outward into and across the Atlantic at about the location where the fleet was lost. On the thirtieth of July, the fleet encountered a hurricane, driving the ships shoreward. Some of the ships sank in deep water, some broke up in shallower water, and others ran aground close to the beach, while a lone vessel, the tag-along French ship Grifón, sailed onward without incident. Hundreds of the crew and passengers lost their lives while other hundreds of survivors improvised a camp on shore to await aid from the Spanish fort at St. Augustine, to which a party was sent. Ultimately news of the disaster reached Havana, whence salvage ships were dispatched to the scene. The Spaniards undertook salvage operations for several years with the help of Indians and recovered nearly half of the vast treasure (at least the registered part) from the holds of ships whose remains rested in water sufficiently shallow for breath-holding divers. Gradually the salvagers enlarged their encampment and built a storehouse on the spit of dune land just behind the beach that bordered a jungle. In 1716, a flotilla of British freebooters under Henry Jennings appeared on the scene, raided the storehouse, and carried off some 350,000 pesos of the treasure to Jamaica. The

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Spaniards, however, resumed operations until they could salvage no more and quit in 1719. The rest of the treasure remained on the ocean floor until our time. Modern salvage on the 1715 Fleet began in the late 1950s, when local resident Kip Wagner found a piece of eight on the beach after a hurricane and decided to pursue the source. With the help of a 1774 chart and an army-surplus metal detector, he located the original Spanish salvage camp and unearthed coins and artifacts. Then using a rented airplane to spot the underwater wrecksite from the air and check the location again by boat, Kip found the source of the coins and soon formed a team of divers and associates backed by a salvage permit from the State of Florida. All of this took place over a period of years before it evolved into the Real Eight Company, the origin of whose name is obvious. To salvage the wreck, the Real Eight divers originally used a dredge and suction apparatus; only later did they adopt the use of a propwash-blower (known as a “mailbox”) developed by their subcontractor, Mel Fisher. Eventually they found gold jewels, Chinese porcelain, silverware, gold and silver ingots, and as many as 10,000 gold cobs of the Mexico, Peru and Colombia mints; and, mostly in encrusted clusters, well over 100,000 silver cobs of all denominations. The salvaged coins were all cobs, both gold (Mexico, Bogotá, Lima, and Cuzco) and silver (mostly Mexico but also some Lima and Potosí), minted primarily between 1711 and 1715, although numerous earlier dates were represented too, some of the dates extending well back into the 1600s. Many of the dates and types of the 1700-1715 period had been either rare or unknown prior to the salvage of the 1715 Fleet. The gold coins, as can be expected, have been generally pristine, as have been some of the silver coins, but most silver cobs from the 1715 Fleet are at least somewhat corroded, some no more than thin, featureless slivers. Every denomination of cob made in silver and gold, with the exception of the quarter real (which was not minted past the very early 1600s), has been found on the 1715 Fleet, as well as several different denominations of round “Royal” presentation issues. Promotions of the coins by Real Eight and others have spanned the decades, in addition to auctions by Henry Christensen (1964); ParkeBernet Galleries (1967) and Sotheby Parke Bernet (1973); the Schulman Coin and Mint (1972 and 1974); Bowers and Ruddy Galleries (1977); and even the U.S. Customs Service (2003). The demand for these coins over the years has steadily risen while the supply of new finds has dwindled. As the salvage operation on the 1715 Fleet reached diminishing returns, some associates (like Mel Fisher) headed for Key West and other areas to search for new wrecks. Do not believe, however, that the 1715-Fleet search is over. Since as many as five or six of the twelve or thirteen galleons remain undiscovered, search areas are still leased from the state, and even the old wreck sites continue to relinquish a few coins to an insatiable numismatic market. Even the beaches themselves yield fabulous finds (one gold “Royal” 8 escudos—a six-figure bonanza in our day—was found on the beach by a metal detectorist in 1989), especially after directhit hurricanes like Frances and Jeanne, which devastated the treasure beaches in rapid succession in the summer of 2004. Much of the finds stays in the hands of locals throughout the State of Florida— divers, beachcombers, and old-time collectors who love their cobs and sell only when they must. The one collector who never sells is also the one with the largest collection of them all, the museum of the State of Florida. Spain lost it all to America, whence it came.

Despite a wealth of publications pertaining to the 1715 Fleet with names of the ships and the known locations of some of the wrecks, there is no universal agreement as to the identity of the vessel at each wrecksite. In many cases, in fact, it is possible that separate wrecksites represent different parts of the same ship. As a result, salvagers over the decades have resorted to nicknames for the sites based on landmarks, local individuals, and even features from the wrecks themselves, such as (from north to south): “Pines” (Sebastian), “Cabin” (Wabasso), “Cannon” (Wabasso), “Corrigans” (Vero Beach), “Rio Mar” (Vero Beach), “Sandy Point” (Vero Beach), “Wedge” (Fort Pierce), and “Colored Beach” (Fort Pierce). (Case in point: In this very catalog you will see items alternately certified as from the “Corrigans site” and the “Regla site,” which are one and the same.) Traditionally the range of sites extends from south of Fort Pierce up to just south of Melbourne in the north, but rumors of 1715-Fleet finds as far north as Cape Canaveral, New Smyrna Beach and even Fernandina Beach (near Jacksonville) may have merit. Regardless of the exact site of origin, a great majority of the coins are sold simply as “1715 Fleet.”

Slot ter Hooge, sunk in 1724 off Porto Santo, Madeira Islands This East Indiaman, whose Dutch name means “Castle of Hooge” (a place in modern-day Belgium), was outbound to Batavia (Jakarta) with a load of three tons of silver ingots (15 chests) plus four chests of silver coins, three of which contained nothing but Mexican cobs. Blown off course by a storm, the Slot ter Hooge wrecked on November 19 off Porto Santo Island in the Madeira Islands (northwest of Africa), to the demise of some 221 people on board (only 33 survived). More than half the treasure was salvaged over the next ten years by the famous English inventor John Lethbridge, but the rest was forgotten until our time. In 1974 the wreck was rediscovered by the well-known salvager Robert Sténuit, who recovered many silver ingots and coins, mostly Dutch ducatoons but also some Mexican 8-reales cobs.

Akerendam, sunk in 1725 off the coast of Norway Separated from her two companion vessels in a heavy storm, the East Indiaman Akerendam foundered off the northern point of Runde Island off the west coast of Norway on March 8, with no survivors among the 200 people on board. Throughout the next several months, five of the 19 chests of coins aboard the Akerendam were recovered, and one of those five had opened up, scattering coins over the wrecksite. No more was found, and the site was forgotten until Norwegian amateur divers rediscovered it in 1972 and brought up almost 40,000 gold and silver coins, with another 16,000 or so found the next year. Ultimately the coins were split between the divers and the Norwegian and Dutch governments, and the divers’ portion was offered as a whole at auction in 1978, following which the coins were largely assembled into leather-bound promotional sets (each consisting of up to 23 silver coins and one gold coin). In total, over 10,000 New World silver cobs were found (no gold), nearly all Mexican, in average condition (but typically crude strikes).

Chameau, sunk in 1725 off Nova Scotia, Canada This French man-of-war was attempting to reach Louisburg harbor with a consignment of troops and coins for the French colony when a storm sent her onto the rocks of Cape Breton

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instead, killing all on board. The main wrecksite was never found until 1961, when Alex Storm spotted cannons on the seabed and led a successful salvage expedition on the site in 1965, yielding many French silver ecus and gold Louis d’ors.

1733 Fleet, Florida Keys Much like the 1715-Fleet disaster mentioned above, the 1733 Fleet was another entire Spanish convoy (except for one ship) lost in a hurricane off Florida. However, the lesser severity of the 1733 hurricane (which struck the fleet on July 15) and the shallowness of the wrecksites in the Keys made for many survivors and even left four ships in good enough condition to be re-floated and sent back to Havana. A highly successful salvage effort by the Spanish soon commenced, bringing up even more than the 12 million pesos of precious cargo listed on the Fleet’s manifest (thanks to the usual contraband). The wrecks themselves are spread across 80 miles, from north of Key Largo down to south of Duck Key, and include the following galleons (note there is not universal agreement as to which wrecksite pertains to each galleon, and each name is a contemporaneous abbreviation or nickname): El Pópulo, El Infante, San José, El Rubí (the capitana), Chávez, Herrera, Tres Puentes, San Pedro, El Terri (also spelled Lerri or Herri), San Francisco, El Gallo Indiano (the almiranta), Las Angustias, El Sueco de Arizón, San Fernando, and San Ignacio. This last ship, San Ignacio, is believed to be the source of many silver coins (and even some gold coins) found in a reef area off Deer Key known as “Coffins Patch,” the south westernmost of all the 1733-Fleet wrecksites. In addition, many other related sites are known, mostly the wrecks of tag-along ships that accompanied the fleet proper. The first and arguably most famous of the wrecks of the 1733 Fleet to be located in modern times was the capitana El Rubí, which was discovered in 1948 and salvaged principally in the 1950s by Art McKee, whose Sunken Treasure Museum on Plantation Key housed his finds for all to see. Throughout the next several decades, however, the wrecksites in the Keys became a virtual free-for-all, with many disputes and confrontations, until the government created the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary in 1990. The removal of artifacts from any of the sites is prohibited today. In contrast to the 1715 Fleet, and because of the extensive Spanish salvage in the 1730s, the finds by modern divers have been modest, especially in gold coins, of which there are far more fakes on the market than genuine specimens. Nevertheless, the 1733 Fleet has been a significant source for some of the rare Mexican milled “pillar dollars” of 1732-1733 as well as the transitional “klippe”type coins of 1733.

Vliegenthart, sunk in 1735 off Zeeland, the Netherlands The East Indiaman Vliegenthart (“Flying Hart” in Dutch) had just departed Rammekens for the East Indies when the deadly combination of a northeast gale, a spring tide and pilot error sent her into a sand bank behind her sister-ship Anna Catharina. The latter ship broke apart in the storm while the Vliegenthart, damaged and firing her cannons in distress, slipped off the bank and sank in 10 fathoms of water. All hands on both ships were lost. Contemporaneous salvage under contract with the Dutch East India Company was unsuccessful, but it did provide a piece of evidence—a secret map—that did not emerge from obscurity until

1977. Stemming from that, divers employed by the former London attorney Rex Cowan discovered the wreck in 1981, and in 1983 they found their first coins, one of three chests of Mexican silver and Dutch gold coins (totaling 67,000 guilders or dollar-sized units) for the East India trade aboard the Vliegenthart. The second chest was smashed on the seabed and its contents partially salvaged, while the third chest, intact like the first, came up in 1992. The divers also recovered several smaller boxes of large Dutch silver coins known as “ducatoons,” illegally exported and therefore contraband. Among the silver coins found were thousands of Mexican cobs, predominantly 8 reales, many with clear dates in the early 1730s and in excellent condition.

Rooswijk, sunk in 1739 off southeast England Off the southeastern tip of England, just north of the Straits of Dover, the sea hides a most unusual feature known as the Goodwin Sands, where sandbanks appear and disappear unpredictably and move with the tides. Many ships over the centuries have sunk here and silted over, and occasionally one of the wrecks will surface and be discovered. Such is the case with the Rooswijk, a Dutch East Indiaman that foundered on the Goodwin Sands in a storm on December 19, 1739, with all hands and 30 chests of treasure, virtually gone without a trace. By chance in December 2004, the sands that had swallowed the wreck of the Rooswijk parted and allowed diver Ken Welling to retrieve two complete chests and hundreds of silver bars. Operating in secrecy, salvage continued in 2005 under the direction of Rex Cowan (in agreement with the Dutch and British governments) and is ongoing today. So far, several hundred Mexican silver cobs of the 1720s and early 1730s and transitional “klippes” of 1733-1734, as well as many more hundreds of “pillar dollars” and a smattering of cobs from other mints, have hit the market from this wreck, mostly through auction.

Princess Louisa, sunk in 1743 off the Cape Verde Islands, west of Africa Laden with 20 chests (69,760 ounces) of Spanish silver, the East Indiaman Princess Louisa fell victim to surprise currents and inaccurate charts and struck a reef and sank off Isla de Maio in the early morning hours of April 18. Forty-two of the 116 people aboard floated to safety on the nearby island, but nothing on the ship could be saved. Contemporaneous salvage never came to fruition. In 1998 and 1999 the wrecksite was located and salvaged

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by the Arqueonautas firm, whose finds from this wreck have been largely marketed by a Houston coin and jewelry dealer ever since, though some coins were also sold at auction in 2000-2001. Most of the coins were New World silver cobs from all the mints that were operating in the early 1700s (including rare Bogotá cobs), predominantly minors (smaller than 8 reales), in average condition, with quite a few preserved in as-found multiple-coin clusters.

Nuestra Señora de los Milagros, sunk in 1741 off the Yucatán peninsula of Mexico This merchant nao, whose nickname was El Matancero (due to the fact that she was built at Matanzas, Cuba), hit rocks and was smashed to pieces in minutes on February 22, 1741, near Acumal, Quintana Roo. The Milagros was not a treasure wreck but did yield some 200,000 small artifacts to divers with CEDAM (Mexican Underwater Exploration Society) and Robert Marx in the late 1950s.

Hollandia, sunk in 1743 off the Scilly Isles, southwest of England Blown off course on her way to the East Indies, the Hollandia struck Gunner Rock and sank in about 110 feet of water about 1½ miles east of it on July 13, 1743. There were no survivors. The first sign of the wreck came in 1971, when divers under Rex Cowan located the wrecksite and within a couple years salvaged more than 35,000 silver coins among the nearly 130,000 guilders (dollar-sized units) recorded to be on board the Hollandia. A great majority of the coins were Mexican “pillar dollars,” but there were also some silver cobs, including the scarce Mexican transitional “klippes” of 1733-1734 and a few Guatemala cobs, in mixed condition.

Reijgersdaal, sunk in 1747 off South Africa More popularly known in the U.S. as Reygersdahl, this typical East Indiaman was carrying eight chests of silver coins (nearly 30,000 coins) when she sank on October 25, 1747, between Robben and Dassen Islands. After four-and-a-half months at sea, the crew had anchored there to fetch rock rabbits (“dassies,” for which Dassen Island was named) and other fresh food to relieve massive illness on board the ship, on which some 125 had died and 83 were incapacitated out of 297 people; but in the face of a gale, the anchor-line snapped and the ship foundered on the rocks. Only 20 survived the sinking, and only one incomplete chest of coins was recovered. The area was deemed too dangerous to attempt contemporaneous salvage. Beginning in 1979, modern salvage divers on the wrecksite recovered thousands of coins (as many as 15,000 by the early 1980s, when protective legislation was enacted in South Africa), mostly in near pristine condition, which have been sold in various auctions and private offerings ever since. A great majority of the coins from this wreck are Mexican pillar dollars (in excellent condition), but it also yielded a few hundred New World silver cobs, including Guatemala cobs, which are rarely seen from shipwrecks.

“Ronson wreck,” sunk(?) ca. 1750 off Manhattan (New York City) This unidentified ship was discovered at 197 Water Street (two blocks from the East River) in lower Manhattan (New York City) and named for the owner of the site, Howard Ronson (also

known as the “Water Street wreck”). Its excavation for the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1982 showed that the ship was a mid-eighteenth-century British frigate—in fact, the only known British trading vessel from that era ever to be salvaged in North America. With three masts, about 100 feet long and 25 feet wide and at least 200 tons, this ship was probably built in Virginia or the Carolinas between 1710 and 1720 and used in the tobacco trade between the Chesapeake and England in the early 1700s before being buried in Manhattan for reasons unknown around 1750. Only the bow of the ship was preserved and can now be seen at the Mariner’s Museum in Newport News, Virginia. For more information, we recommend this website: http://ina.tamu.edu/ waterstreet/waterstreet.htm

Nuestra Señora de la Luz, sunk in 1752 off Montevideo, Uruguay Like the Capitana (1654) and 1733 Fleet, this wreck is a case for modern salvage of Spanish wrecks where all or most of the registered cargo was found in its own time, for contraband was always a factor and was generally abandoned if the ship did not make its destination. The Luz left Buenos Aires in the summer of 1752 with a load of money bound for Spain and had just stopped in Montevideo for provisioning when a strong storm swept her into the coastline, spreading wreckage over a wide area and killing all on board. While over 90% of the treasure on board was recovered soon afterward, the powder-hold was never found, and as it turns out, that is where some 200,000 pesos (according to later reports) of contraband had been stored. In April 1992, divers working under Rubén Collado began to recover gold coins on a wrecksite in the Río de la Plata, and soon it became clear the wreck in question had to be from 1751 or 1752, as none of the coins was dated later than 1751. The finds, which were split with the Uruguayan government and then sold at auction in New York and Montevideo, consisted of mostly milled (bust-type) 8 escudos from the new mint at Santiago, Chile. Also in these auctions were 95 gold cobs and 353 silver cobs, the former mostly Lima 8 and 4 escudos (but also some Bogotá 2 escudos), and the latter mostly 8 and 4 reales from Potosí (with several more gold and silver cob sold privately). The gold, of course, is pristine, but the silver coins all show at least moderate corrosion.

Geldermalsen (“Nanking Cargo”), sunk in 1752 in the South China Sea The Geldermalsen was a Dutch East India Company ship returning to Amsterdam with a cargo of over 160,000 porcelains and 145 gold ingots (in addition to tea and textiles) when she hit a reef and sank on January 3, 1752. In 1985 the wreck was found by Michael Hatcher, and the salvaged material was sold at auction by Christie’s Amsterdam in 1986 as the famous “Nanking Cargo.”

Bredenhof, sunk in 1753 off Mozambique The Bredenhof was a Dutch East Indiaman headed to India with 14 barrels of copper “duits” (penny-like coins), 29 chests of silver bars, and one chest of gold ducats. On June 6, 1753, about 13 miles from the eastern coast of Africa and 120 miles south of the Portuguese settlement of Mozambique, the Bredenhof found herself in difficult currents and struck a reef. Amazingly, among the first items jettisoned to try to raise the ship off the reef were some of the chests of silver bars! The gold was taken by the ship’s

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officers, some of whom survived the trip to Mozambique, but the silver bars and copper coins were lost until modern times, despite salvage attempts in the 1750s. In 1986 divers found the wreck, which yielded hundreds of silver ingots and thousands of copper coins, all sold at auction by Christie’s Amsterdam that same year.

Dodington, sunk in 1755 off Port Elizabeth, South Africa (also “Clive of India treasure”) This shipwreck presents an amazing tale of survival and buried treasure, with a modern twist. Following the customary East India route, the Dodington outpaced her consorts and therefore was alone when her pilot followed an erroneous chart too closely and in the middle of the night she suddenly struck rocks and sank off present-day Bird Island off the east coast of South Africa. Of 270 people on board, 23 made it to the island, where they subsisted mostly on seagull eggs for over seven months while the ship’s carpenter crafted a rescue vessel. Meanwhile, at least a couple of the 10 chests of silver coins and the one chest of wrought silver on board the ship were recovered and buried, and the fate of each of those chests is not thoroughly known. There was also a chest of gold coins on behalf of the English military hero Lord Clive— more about that later. The survivors set off for Delagoa (Mozambique) and left behind an island that later became known for treasure-hunters and ghost stories. In the summer of 1977 the wreck of the Dodington was discovered by South African divers, who proceeded to bring up cannon and coins but no gold. In the early to mid-1990s the wreck was revisited by another set of divers and yielded more silver coins and a smattering of gold, but nowhere near the 653+ ounces recorded to be in the chest when it was loaded onto the Dodington in 1755. What is believed to be the actual Clive’s gold (by composition and total weight) was supposedly recovered a few years later in a different area entirely, reportedly in the wreckage of a pirate ship somewhat further along the East India route. Nobody knows why Clive’s chest of gold was not on the Dodington site. Either it was found by the survivors and buried on Bird Island to be picked up or absconded with later, or it was salvaged and taken away later in the eighteenth century. Because the link could not be proven entirely, and due to a protracted legal battle with the government of South Africa, this last group of gold coins was sold at auction in 2000 as simply the “Clive of India Treasure.” The composition of the silver-coin finds from the Dodington was mostly Mexican “pillar dollars” but with a good amount of Potosí and Lima cobs (predominantly smaller denominations) as well, mostly sea-worn and at least moderately corroded, sold through dealers and smaller auctions in the U.S. and Australia. The gold was all Portuguese/Brazilian.

Auguste, sunk in 1761 off Nova Scotia, Canada After the end of the Seven Years’ War between England and France in 1759, French officers and aristocrats in Canada were sent from Quebec back to France in ships such as the Auguste. In stormy conditions and damaged by fire, the Auguste struck a sand bar on November 15 and subsequently sank in Aspy Bay off Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. Only 7 of the 121 on board survived, and the wealth of the passengers was lost until our time. To date, well over a thousand coins of various nationalities have been found, along with many important artifacts.

Royal George, sunk in 1782 off Spithead, England Flagship of the British Royal Navy, the Royal George was the largest ship in the world when she was first launched in 1756. Among other distinctions, this ship took part in the American Revolutionary War. In 1782, while anchored at Spithead and heeled over slightly for repairs before sailing again, the Royal George suddenly flooded and sank in 65 feet of water, drowning hundreds of people on board, a national disaster of epic proportion. Salvage began right away, but only fifteen cannons were saved. Twenty-eight more cannons were hauled up in 1834. A more extensive salvage operation in 1839-1843 brought up the rest of the guns and even recovered most of the ship’s timbers. The bronze guns and timbers were then used to make small “relics” (replica cannons and small books with wooden covers, among other items), which are valuable souvenirs today.

Cazador, sunk in 1784 off New Orleans, Louisiana The Cazador was a Spanish brig of war headed from Vera Cruz, Mexico, to New Orleans under the direction of Captain Gabriel de Campos y Piñeda. Her cargo of some 450,000 pesos of newly minted silver coins was meant to stabilize the fragile economy in the Spanish possession of Louisiana, which had suffered from the use of French paper currency. The fact that the coins never arrived probably hastened the decision to cede the colony to Napoleon in 1800, soon after which Louisiana was sold to the fledgling United States of America for $15 million. Nobody knows how the Cazador was lost, and no evidence of the ship was found until 1993, when a fishing crew led by Captain Jerry Murphy snagged their net on something about 50 miles south of New Orleans in the Gulf of Mexico. When the net was brought up, it spilled out hundreds of silver coins onto the deck of Jerry’s boat, aptly named Mistake. Shortly thereafter, the fishermen obtained the rights to the find and began recoveries under the name of Grumpy Inc.

Faithful Steward, sunk in 1785 off Delaware The Faithful Steward was traveling from Ireland to Philadelphia with wealthy passengers and their belongings when suddenly, near Indian River inlet, she found herself in shallow water at night and in high seas, a deadly combination. She was run aground, dismasted, and by the next night had broken to pieces. Those who could not swim to shore (only 100 yards away) were killed, some 68 people in all. Local residents flocked to the beach to loot dead bodies and whatever valuables they could find. Even though the Faithful Steward was not a treasure ship per se, there were some 400 barrels of copper and gold coins on board, and those coins have been turning up on the beach for centuries now, hence the local nickname of “Coin Beach” for the 1-mile stretch north of the Indian River inlet.

Halsewell, sunk in 1786 near St. Albans Head, Dorset, England A British East Indiaman outbound to India, the Halsewell hit bad weather in the English Channel and was blown onto the cliffs on the Dorset coast. She was battered to pieces as minority survivors scrambled into caves and up the cliffs. Local dive teams have salvaged coins and small artifacts from the Halsewell in recent years, but not in any significant quantities.

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Hartwell, sunk in 1787 off the Cape Verde Islands, west of Africa

“Pitch Barrel wreck,” sunk off Bermuda in the early 1800s

On her maiden voyage to China, the British East Indiaman Hartwell was heavily laden with silver when mutiny broke out on board. After quelling the fight, the captain headed to the Cape Verde Islands to offload the mutineers. Exhausted from the mutiny, the weary sailors ran the ship into a reef off the Island of Boavista, losing the ship entirely. Fortunately all hands were saved. Salvage by the British East India Company 1788-1791 yielded nearly half of the approximately 200,000 ounces of silver cargo on board the Hartwell. Pirates at the time recovered another 40,000 coins. The wrecksite was found again and salvaged by Afrimar in 1994-1996 and Arqueonautas in 1996-1999, providing the market with Spanish colonial bust-type 8 reales in generally poor condition.

One of the most tantalizing treasure stories told by famous salvager Art McKee relates how he was approached by a man who knew of a wreck and offered Art cash if he would salvage the wreck without recording its location or identity. Art agreed and soon found himself working a coral-encrusted wreck full of cannons. The only treasure yielded up by this unidentified wreck, however, was a barrel-shaped mass of coral filled with black pitch and over 1600 doubloons (bust-type 8 escudos). The finder gave Art a handful of the coins for his museum but melted the rest, thereby making “Pitch Barrel wreck” 8 escudos (with official McKee certificates) some of the rarest shipwreck gold coins ever. The latest date we have seen on these coins is 1808, and as early as 1784.

Piedmont (“Lyme Bay wreck”), sunk in 1795 in Lyme Bay, south of England One of a huge fleet of 300 ships on their way to the West Indies to suppress a French uprising, the Piedmont was forced into Lyme Bay during a hurricane on November 18, 1795, that scattered and sank the ships of the fleet all along the Dorset coast. The Piedmont and five other ships (Aeolus, Catherine, Golden Grove, Thomas and Venus) broke apart on Chesil Beach and came to be known collectively as the “Lyme Bay wrecks.” An estimated 1,000 men lost their lives in the disaster, including well over a hundred from the Piedmont alone. In the early 1980s, the wrecks were salvaged by divers Selwyn Williams and Les and Julia C. Kent, who discovered many silver cobs of the late 1600s on the wrecksite of the Piedmont. It is presumed that the coins had been captured or recovered from a seventeenth-century wreck and stored in the vaults of the Bank of England for about a century before being transported and subsequently lost again. These coins are usually recognizable by their uniformly dark-gray color, a bit sea-worn but not overly corroded. A significant group of extremely rare Colombian silver cobs from the Piedmont (but not identified as such) was offered at auction in 1995.

Leocadia, sunk in 1800 off Punta Santa Elena, Ecuador This wreck, salvaged periodically in the late twentieth century, typically yielded portrait (bust) 8 reales from Lima, Peru, but more recent work in 2001 brought up a handful of small silver cobs of the mid- to late 1700s mostly from the Potosí mint. These were probably from a small, private purse and not part of the more than 2 million pesos of registered silver and gold cargo aboard the Leocadia when she departed Paita, Peru, bound for Panama in a convoy of merchant vessels. On November 16, 1800, the Leocadia struck a shoal and broke apart 100 yards from the beach at Punta Santa Elena, with a loss of over 140 lives in the disaster. Within the next year the Spanish salvaged about 90 percent of the registered treasure, leaving more than 200,000 pesos (not to mention the expected contraband) behind to tempt divers in our time. Judging from the paucity of coins from this ship on the open market, we may assume that many more are still to be found.

Athenienne, sunk in 1806 off Sicily The British Naval ship Athenienne was traveling from Gibraltar to Malta when she suddenly struck the fabled “Esquerques” reef some 80 miles from Sicily (Italy) and sank on October 20, 1806. Over a hundred survivors made it to Sicily in longboats, but many more hundreds perished in the wreck. Modern salvage of the Athenienne in the 1970s produced about 4,000 Spanish colonial silver bust-type 8 reales (about 10 percent of the total believed to be on board), of which only about 500 were more than just featureless slivers.

Lady Burgess, sunk in 1806 off the Cape Verde Islands, west of Africa An outbound British East Indiaman with a cargo of general merchandise, the Lady Burgess found herself separated from her fleet and hit a reef in the Cape Verde Islands on April 20, 1806. In the ensuing chaos, 52 of the 180 people on board the ship perished. Inasmuch as she was not a treasure ship, the Lady Burgess was not salvaged in her own time and was therefore untouched when the salvage company Arqueonautas located her remains in 1999 and recovered a modicum of Spanish silver bust-type 8 reales and British gold guineas that had been among private specie on board the ship.

Admiral Gardner, sunk in 1809 off the southeast coast of England Along with her sister-ship Britannia, the English East Indiaman Admiral Gardner was outbound with an immense cargo (48 tons!) of copper coins for circulation in India when both ships sank in a storm on the Goodwin Sands on January 24, 1809. Ten lives were lost, as was all the cargo. The coins were recovered in modern times, literally a million of them packed in wax inside wooden barrels.

Cabalva, sunk in 1818 near Mauritius in the Indian Ocean A 1200-ton British East Indiaman on her way to India, the Cabalva struck on a reef in the Cargados Carajos (also known as the Shoals of St. Brandon) and quickly broke apart. After hauling themselves up on the dry reefs and islets, the officers and crew of the ship began plundering the cargo and even established a temporary “Beer Island,” where the ample rations of rescued alcohol were being consumed at a great rate over the course of three weeks, much to the horror of the other survivors. Upon their eventual rescue,

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the crew expressed regret in having to leave Beer Island, where plenty of stockpiled booze had to be left behind. In 1985 divers located the site of the Cabalva and recovered many Spanish busttype 8 reales.

Spring of Whitby, sunk in 1824 off Wabasso, Florida This wreck has been and probably will always be shrouded in mystery, as we have definite proof of her sinking near Vero Beach (the evidence being a bronze bell with her name and 1801 date of manufacture recovered in 1965), yet admiralty records show she plied the Baltic trade in the extreme northern Atlantic at least until 1826. The material from the wrecksite, on the other hand, being Spanish silver bust-type coins, indicates a date of sinking of 1824. Could piracy have been involved?

S.S. Folcon, sunk in 1851off Newfoundland, Canada The Folcon was carrying recalled coins from St. John’s, Newfoundland, to Halifax, Nova Scotia, when she sank en route in the spring of 1851. The wrecksite was located in 1971 by salvager Marcel Robillard, who recovered some 7,976 coins.

Santo Andre, sunk in 1856 off the Cape Verde Islands, west of Africa The Santo Andre was a Spanish “galera” that sank on July 25, 1856, on Rifona Reef off Boavista Island in the Cape Verde Islands. The wrecksite was salvaged in our time beginning in 1993 and ending in 1996, yielding many Spanish and French silver coins and small artifacts.

S.S. Central America, sunk in 1857 in deep water off North Carolina Sunk in a hurricane on September 12, 1857, the mail steamer Central America took with her more than 400 lives and over three tons of gold. The wreck lay undisturbed until 1986, when Tommy Thompson and his Columbus-America Discovery Group located the ship in 8500 feet of water. After 10 years of legal struggles, the salvagers were awarded about 92 percent of the treasure, with most of the rest going to insurance companies who had paid the claim when the ship sank. Widely touted as the greatest treasure ever found, the gold from the Central America has been very heavily promoted and cleverly marketed.

“Fort Capron treasure,” lost in the surf near Ft. Pierce, Florida, in 1857 During the Third Seminole Indian War in Florida, Major Jeremiah Dashiell was sent from Charleston by ship to pay federal troops at Fort Capron (present-day Ft. Pierce). Foolishly ignoring warnings about heavy seas but concerned about troop morale if he

did not deliver the money as promised, Dashiell placed his pistol and the $23,000 payroll in silver and gold coins into a dinghy to carry it to shore but soon watched the small boat capsize, sending it all down to the sea floor. The coins were not seen again until 1963, when two young boys by the name of Gordy and Ashley were lobster-fishing in the area and stumbled upon the treasure (they even found Dashiell’s pistol). Such a find of dozens of gold coins could not be kept secret, and soon the State of Florida tracked them down and seized the coins. After nine years of litigation, the coins were finally returned to Gordy and Ashley, who proceeded to sell them through local dealers along with their amazing story.

S.S. Republic, sunk in 1865 in deep water off Savannah, Georgia Originally christened the Tennessee (which is how she was identified in our time), the sidewheel steamer Republic was carrying some $400,000 in specie from New York to New Orleans when she sank in a hurricane about 100 miles offshore on October 25, 1865. One of many deep targets located by the salvage company Odyssey, the site of the Republic was salvaged by submersible craft beginning in 2003. In addition to gold and silver coins of the Civil War-era United States, Odyssey found the ship’s bell with part of the name Tennessee, confirming the ship’s identity and launching a massive, ongoing promotional campaign for coins and artifacts from the wreck.

General Abbatucci, sunk in 1869 off Corsica Traveling from Marseilles, France, to Civitavecchia, Italy, with high dignitaries and papal guards, the General Abbatucci was laden with specie and lavish birthday gifts for Pope Pius IX when she collided with the Norwegian barquentine Edward Hwidt and sank within two hours off the island of Corsica, southeast of France. There were only 54 survivors. In 1996 the wrecksite was located and worked remotely by Blue Water Recoveries at a depth of about 8,000 feet. Even though the main cargo of the ship was not found, the salvage did yield jewelry and coins in addition to some small artifacts, all sold at auction by Christie’s (London) in 1997.

Douro, sunk in 1882 off Cape Finisterre, Spain The British Royal Mail Steamer Douro was en route to England from Portugal when she collided with the Spanish steamship Yrurac Bat and sank in the early morning hours of April 2, 1882, in deep water off the northwest coast of Spain. All but six people on board survived, but the ship and its cargo of tens of thousands of gold coins were a total loss. The wreck was found and salvaged in 1995 by Sverker Hallstrom and Nigel Pickford using a remote-operated vehicle (ROV) at a depth of 1,500 feet. The cargo of gold coins, mostly British sovereigns was sold at auction by Spink (London) in 1996.

S.S. Florizel, sunk in 1918 off Newfoundland, Canada Caught in a snowstorm, the luxury liner Florizel ran aground off Horn’s Head and sank on February 27, 1918. Over the course of three days, 93 people died as rescue attempts failed. In 1973 salvager Marcel Robillard located the wrecksite and brought up several artifacts and many silver and copper coins.

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GOLD COBS Mexico City, Mexico

1. 8 escudos, (17)13J. S-M30. KM-57.1. 27.1 grams. Full but slightly doubled shield, date also doubled, full cross with one flat spot, AXF. From the 1715 Fleet, with Mel Fisher/Walt Holzworth certificate, and from the famous “carpet of gold” of 1964 pictured in Weller’s book Dreamweaver. Estimate: $7,500 - $11,000

4. 8 escudos, 1714J. S-M30. KM-57.2. 26.9 grams. Very bold full cross, choice full crown and date, full oMJ, nearly full shield, Mint State. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $8,000 - $12,000

2. 8 escudos, (1)713J. S-M30. KM-57.1. 26.8 grams. Bold full shield and oXMJ (slightly doubled), full but off-center cross, clear bottom half of date, AU or better. From the 1715 Fleet, with Sedwick photo-certificate from 2001. Estimate: $7,000 - $10,000

5. 8 escudos, 1715J. S-M30. KM-57.2. 26.9 grams. Bold full crown, shield, oMJ, and denomination, plus very clear bottom half of date, full but slightly weak cross, lightly polished XF+. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000

3. 8 escudos, 1714J. S-M30. KM-57.2. 26.7 grams. Choice bold date and crown, full shield and cross but some flatness, otherwise at least XF. From the 1715 Fleet, with Fisher tag and photocertificate #4293, plus original Cobb Coin Co. plastic tag dated 1987. Estimate: $9,000 - $13,500

6. 8 escudos, (1715)J. S-M30. KM-57.2. 26.9 grams. Choice Mint State, excellent full shield and cross, nice yellow color and well centered. From the 1715 Fleet, with Sedwick photo-certificate from 2004. Estimate: $6,000 - $9,000

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Lima, Peru

7. 4 escudos, 1713J, encapsulated PCGS AU-55. S-M30. KM55.1. Unquestionably Mint State, with 100 percent full and bold date (rare thus) and oXM mintmark, nearly full cross, some peripheral flatness with file marks as made, the struck-up parts as bold as they come, lovely gold color. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $6,000 - $9,000

8. 2 escudos, 17(14)J. S-M30. KM-53.2. 6.7 grams. Interesting oblong shape, choice cross, Mint State. With 2006 Sedwick photocertificate. Estimate: $2,500 - $3,750 9. 2 escudos, (1715)(J). S-M30. KM-53.2. 6.7 grams. Choice full cross, off-center shield side enabling most of crown and part of king’s name to be visible, Mint State. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $2,500 - $3,750

10. 1 escudo, (1712)J. S-M30. KM-51.2. 3.3 grams. Full cross (style of 1711-13), full oMJ (which pinpoints it to 1712, the only year prior to 1714 that oM was used instead of oM), nearly AU. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250 11. 1 escudo, (1713?)(J). S-M30. KM-51.1. 3.3 grams. Lustrous Mint State, off-center cross (style of 1711-13), most of shield with full denomination I (vertically) to right. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $1,350 - $2,000

12. 8 escudos, 1710H. S-L25a. KM-38.2. 26.8 grams. Choice full cross and pillars (both well centered), lots of legend including king’s name, plus small bits of white coral here and there, AU, better date. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $9,000 - $13,500

13. 8 escudos, 1711M. S-L28. KM-38.2. 26.9 grams. Choice full cross and pillars (especially bold waves), much legend (full king’s name), AU with bits of gray and white coral all over. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $8,000 - $12,000

14. 8 escudos, 1712M. S-L28. KM-38.2. 27.0 grams. Lustrous Mint State, choice full cross and pillars, bold full second date in legend, one the best specimens possible. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $9,500 - $13,500

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15. 8 escudos, 1712M. S-L28. KM-38.2. 26.8 grams. Lightly polished VF with small parts of edge affected by former mounting, but nice strike (full inner details with no doubling and most of legends visible), lemon-yellow color. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $7,000 - $10,000

20. 2 escudos, 1655R. S-B21. KM-4.1. 6.7 grams. Crude planchet but with clear date and assayer, nearly full cross and shield, bold king’s name PHIL-, AU with sediment in crevices. From the Maravillas (1656). Estimate: $2,000 - $2,500 21. 2 escudos, Charles II, assayer not visible. CT-Type 38. KM14.1. 6.7 grams. Round flan, full cross, AXF with peripheral flatness, earlier style than most. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $1,500 $2,250

16. 4 escudos, 1750R. S-L31. KM-A47. 13.4 grams. Choice Mint State with traces of luster, full cross and pillars, two mintmarks and two dates, king’s ordinal VI in legend. From the Nuestra Señora de la Luz (1752). Estimate: $9,000 - $13,500

22. 2 escudos, 1704, no assayer. S-B24. KM-14.2. 6.7 grams. Big, octagonal planchet with bold full date (very rare thus), choice full cross, nearly full shield, Mint State. From the 1715 Fleet, with generic certificate. Estimate: $2,500 - $3,750

17. 2 escudos, 1700H. S-L25. KM-29. 6.7 grams. Mint State, choice full cross and pillars, bold date, much legend, attractive orange color, rare. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $7,000 - $10,000

23. 2 escudos, 1712, no assayer. S-B24. KM-14.2. 6.7 grams. Full date enhanced by large area of white coral on top of dark staining, unusually full crown above shield, AU with sharp edges. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $2,800 - $3,900

18. 2 escudos, 1711M, encapsulated PCGS AU-58. S-L28. KM36. Well centered on a round planchet, the inner details (crosslions-castles and pillars-and-waves) perfectly struck and fully Mint State, most of the legends visible, small patch of tan encrustation near edge, just a super piece all around, worthy of the best collections. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $7,500 - $11,000

24. 2 escudos, 1714, no assayer. S-B24. KM-14.2. 6.8 grams. Rare with bold full date, full cross, well-centered shield (oversized as usual), lustrous Mint State. From the 1715 Fleet, with Sedwick photo-certificate from 1998 and photocopied Real Eight Co. certificate. Estimate: $2,800 - $3,900

Bogotá, Colombia 19. 2 escudos, 1635A. S-B20. KM-4.1. 6.7 grams. Full 5 of date, bold full king’s ordinal IIII, full shield and cross, part of edge crude, close to Mint State. From the ca.-1636 “Mesuno hoard” in Colombia, with 2004 Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

25. 2 escudos, posthumous Charles II, no assayer. S-B24. KM14.2. 6.8 grams. Very choice full cross and most of shield on a small, thick planchet, very lustrous Mint State. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $2,500 - $3,500

22

Seville, Spain

26. 2 escudos, posthumous Charles II, no assayer. S-B24. KM14.2. 6.7 grams. Choice full cross, nicely detailed shield, lustrous Mint State. From the 1715 Fleet, with generic certificate. Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000 27. 2 escudos, 1734M. S-B26. KM-17.2. 6.7 grams. Broad flan with full (small cross), very bold full date (rare thus), full shield with F to left and M to right, AXF with frosty fields. Estimate: $2,500 - $3,750

31. 4 escudos, Philip IV, assayer R (1640s?). CT-Type 26. CayType 126. 13.6 grams. Bold full cross and shield, bold denomination •IIII• to right and tiny S-R to left, AU with sediment in crevices. Estimate: $2,500 - $3,750

32. 2 escudos, 1619, assayer not visible (D or G). CT-48. CayType 81. 6.7 grams. Most of date visible, full cross and crown, bold denomination II (horizontal), crudely struck from rusty dies, technically AU, with sediment in crevices, possibly salvaged (same type as from the Atocha!). Estimate: $1,300 - $2,000 28. 2 escudos, 1740/39M. S-B26. KM-17.2. 6.8 grams. Bold 0/9 of date (scarce overdate), broad flan with full cross, choice full shield with bold F to left, weak but certain M to right, toned XF+. Estimate: $1,800 - $2,700 29. 1 escudo, 1735?(M). S-B26. KM-unlisted (cf. 22). 3.4 grams. Choice Mint State with clear 73 of date (first digit non-existent and last digit weak, rare no matter what it is), full shield, tiny full cross, much legend for the type, bits of sediment in crevices (hence possibly salvaged). Estimate: $1,750 - $2,500

Barcelona, Spain

30. 1 escudo, 1672, no assayer, Cayón Plate Coin. CT-171. CayType 63 (this coin). 3.3 grams. Full date (rare), full cross and shield, king’s name CAR- in legend, AXF but with edge damaged from mounting. Plate Coin in Cayón, which oddly does not list this date for this mint (a simple omission). Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

33. 2 escudos, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible, mounted in 18K necklace bezel with diamonds and gold chain. 36.2 grams with chain. Full shield, full but off-center cross, VF, nice yellow color, the mounting a cut above the norm. Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800

34. 1 escudo, 1623, assayer not visible (C or D). CT-Type 46. Cay-Type 120. 3.4 grams. Big flan with full cross and shield (the latter off-center), much legend (most of PHILIPPVS), clear date (rare), AU. Estimate: $1,400 - $2,100

23

WORLD GOLD COINS Brazil

35. 4000 reis, Peter II, 1700. KM-98. FR-21. 8.0 grams. Crowned shield on obverse, cross on reverse, lustrous AXF with patch of red-orange toning, briefly minted and popular type, not a rare coin but unique as from this wreck (only one recovered). From the R.M.S. Douro (1882), with Spink catalog and original Spink lot card (lot #1) as well as unique certificate and European format video about the wreck. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

38. Santiago, 8 escudos, Charles IV (bust of Charles III), 1792DA. CT-151. KM-54. 26.8 grams. VF+, weak bust, slightly crude rim, lemon-yellow color. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

Chile Colonial bust-type

39. Santiago, 8 escudos, Charles IV (bust of Charles III), 1795DA. CT-154. KM-54. 26.9 grams. Lightly cleaned XF with some original luster, a few stray marks, weak centers, crude edge. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500 36. Santiago, 8 escudos, Charles III, 1788DA. CT-248. KM-27. 27.0 grams. Slightly off-center AXF with a modicum of minor (natural) planchet flaws, pretty red toning. Estimate: $1,000 $1,500

40. Santiago, 8 escudos, Charles IV (bust of Charles III), 1796DA. CT-155. KM-54. 26.9 grams. Crude edge and weak centers, otherwise nice VF+. Estimate: $900 - $1,350 37. Santiago, 8 escudos, Charles IV transitional (bust of Charles III, ordinal IV), 1790DA. CT-147. KM-42. 26.8 grams. Nice AXF with minor rim-ding and planchet lamination on wreath, attractively toned but some fields lightly cleaned. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

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41. Santiago, 8 escudos, Charles IV (bust of Charles III), 1798DA. CT-157. KM-54. 26.8 grams. Nicely toned VF+, no problems. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

44. Santiago, 8 escudos, Charles IV (bust of Charles III), 1804FJ. CT-166. KM-54. 26.7 grams. Lustrous XF with laminations on shield, slightly crude rim. Estimate: $900 - $1,350

42. Santiago, 8 escudos, Charles IV (bust of Charles III), 1800JA. CT-160. KM-54. 26.8 grams. Lightly toned VF+ with old scratches on face and shield. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

45. Santiago, 8 escudos, Charles IV (bust of Charles III), 1807FJ. CT-171. KM-54. 26.9 grams. Lightly cleaned XF on obverse, lustrous AU reverse. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

43. Santiago, 8 escudos, Charles IV (bust of Charles III), 1802JJ. CT-163. KM-54. 24.9 grams. AXF with lots of sediment in crevices on reverse, the obverse fields lightly cleaned, attractive toning, slightly underweight, possibly from light filing around edge (to make it perfectly round for a bezel) but with the milled edge expertly reapplied. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

46. Santiago, 8 escudos, Ferdinand VII transitional (“Admiral’s bust”), 1809FJ. CT-113. KM-72. 26.9 grams. Off-center but attractively lustrous XF with odd engrailing on bust (reverse impression of a rim?), possibly a rare error. Estimate: $1,500 $2,250

25

47. Santiago, 8 escudos, Ferdinand VII (bust of Charles IV), 1812FJ. CT-118. KM-78. 27.1 grams. Lustrous AU, slightly offcenter, with minor laminations on reverse. Estimate: $1,200 $1,800

50. Santiago, 8 escudos, Ferdinand VII (bust of Charles IV), 1817FJ. CT-127. KM-78. 26.9 grams. Bold XF with weak centers, nice toning. Estimate: $900 - $1,350

Republic

48. Santiago, 8 escudos, Ferdinand VII (bust of Charles IV), 1813/2FJ. CT-119. KM-78. 26.6 grams. Attractively toned and lustrous AXF with lamination on top of head, minor adjustment marks on crown. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

51. Santiago, 8 escudos, 1851LA. KM-105. FR-41. 27.0 grams. AXF with minor contact marks and small lamination to left of CHILE. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

Colombia Colonial bust-type

49. Santiago, 8 escudos, Ferdinand VII (bust of Charles IV), 1816FJ. CT-124. KM-78. 26.9 grams. Off-center obverse with scratch in field, minor natural flaws on reverse, lightly toned XF. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

52. Popayรกn, 8 escudos, Charles III, 1773JS. CT-124. KM-50.2. 26.9 grams. Lustrous XF with multiple scratches and weak strike, orange staining on reverse (possibly salvaged). Estimate: $800 $1,200

26

53. Popayán, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1791SF. CT-69. KM-62.2. 27.0 grams. Lustrous and attractive XF+, lightly cleaned, curiously with white coral-like encrustation in crevices so perhaps it is salvaged. Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800

56. Bogotá, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1796JJ. CT-126. KM-62.1. 26.6 grams. Gorgeous AU, very lustrous and starting to tone. Estimate: $1,350 - $2,000

54. Popayán, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1793JF. CT-71. KM-62.2. 26.9 grams. Nice AXF with slightly weak centers, attractively toned legends. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

57. Popayán, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1798JF. CT-77. KM-62.2. 26.9 grams. Nice red toning on reverse, off-center obverse, XF. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

55. Popayán, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1795JF. CT-74. KM-62.2. 26.8 grams. VF with sediment in crevices, just a little crude (as made). Estimate: $900 - $1,350

58. Popayán, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1800JF. CT-79. KM-62.2. 27.0 grams. Lustrous XF+ with good rims, no problems, sediment in crevices that could indicate salvage. Estimate: $1,100 - $1,650

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59. Popayán, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1802JF. CT-81. KM-62.2. 26.9 grams. Choice, lustrous reverse, slightly crude obverse (a few minor laminations), net XF+. Estimate: $900 - $1,350

62. Popayán, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1806JF. CT-87. KM-62.2. 26.6 grams. Curiously out of round but nice rims, toned XF+, slightly weak across the middle. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

60. Popayán, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1803JF. CT-82. KM-62.2. 26.9 grams. XF with weak centers, nice red toning in legends. Estimate: $900 - $1,350

63. Popayán, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1807JF. CT-90. KM-62.2. 26.9 grams. Choice XF, nicely toned, no problems. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

61. Popayán, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1805JT. CT-86. KM-62.2. 27.0 grams. AU- with scratches on obverse, subtle rosy toning. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

64. Popayán, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1808JF. CT-91. KM-62.2. 26.7 grams. Deeply toned around letters, AXF, small lamination on reverse. Estimate: $900 - $1,350

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65. Popayán, 8 escudos, Ferdinand VII (bust of Charles IV), 1809JF. CT-65. KM-66.2 26.7 grams. Beautifully toned XF with weak bust and outside shield, nice obverse rim but reverse offcenter and with small ding. Estimate: $900 - $1,350

68. Popayán, 8 escudos, Ferdinand VII (bust of Charles IV), 1818FM. CT-81. KM-66.2 26.8 grams. Lustrous XF+, weak bust, slightly out of round. Estimate: $900 - $1,350

66. Popayán, 8 escudos, Ferdinand VII (bust of Charles IV), 1811JF. CT-69. KM-66.2 27.0 grams. Highly lustrous AU+ (very close to Mint State) with central adjustment marks, subtle toning, a very flashy and attractive specimen. Estimate: $1,350 - $2,000

69. Popayán, 8 escudos, Ferdinand VII (bust of Charles IV), 1819FM. CT-82. KM-66.2 27.1 grams. Bold XF+ with lustrous reverse, natural flaws in hair. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

67. Popayán, 8 escudos, Ferdinand VII (bust of Charles IV), 1812JF. CT-71. KM-66.2 26.8 grams. Choice XF with beautiful red toning. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

70. Bogotá, 8 escudos, 1833RS. KM-82.1. FS-6. 27.0 grams. Lustrous XF, nicely struck and attractively toned. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

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71. Bogotá, 16 pesos, 1838RS. KM-94.1. FS-18. 26.7 grams. Nice VF+ with subtle toning, minor planchet flaw on G of BOGOTÁ. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

74. London, England, sovereign, 1855. SP-3852C. KM-736.1. 7.9 grams. XF obverse, lustrous AU reverse, no problems, desirable provenance. From the R.M.S. Douro (1882), with Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $375 - $550

Great Britain

India (Portuguese)

72. London, England, “rose” guinea, 1764. SP-3726. KM-598. 8.2 grams. Very rare provenance and scarce date, sea-worn AVF with part of shield weak, good bust, slightly shaved around edge, but all details clear (the “rose” designation referring to the shape of the shield, as distinguished from the later “spade” type under the same king). From the Faithful Steward (1785). Estimate: $500 $750

75. Cochim, 1 pardau São Tome (360 reais), João III (15211557). FR-551. 3.2 grams. Very rare early product of the Portuguese influence in India and especially so as from a shipwreck, with obvious evidence of salvage (sea-worn details, a few small bends and scratches), but with bold denomination oI to left and C mintmark to right of shield, S-T flanking the St. Thomas on the reverse, full crown, VF for actual wear. From an unidentified 1500s Portuguese wreck in the Indian Ocean. Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

Mexico Colonial bust-type

73. Promotional set of two shipwreck sovereigns (1852 and 1876) and one modern (1997). SP-3852C, 3856A and 4271. KM-736.1, 752 and 943. Nice set with examples of each of the different sovereign designs that dominated the finds from this wreck: the 1852 with crowned arms in wreath and the 1876 with mounted St. Michael slaying the dragon on the reverse. Both coins are choice XF and lustrous. The 1997 specimen is a Proof, with the same reverse design as the 1876 but of course with Elizabeth II instead of Victoria on the obverse. From the R.M.S. Douro (1882), in a limited (#19/200) promotional leatherette box marked “Sovereigns of the Sea,” with small booklet. Estimate: $750 - $1,100

76. Mexico City, 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1805TH. CT-60. KM159. 26.9 grams. Choice XF+, very boldly struck and lightly toned, no problems Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

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Netherlands (United)

80. Utrecht, ducat, 1724, encapsulated NGC MS-63. KM-7. FR285. Exceptional grade, highly lustrous, but knight’s head flat (typically a weak area on these coins) and with scratches below his foot. From the Akerendam (1725). Estimate: $900 - $1,350 77. Mexico City, 8 escudos, Ferdinand VII transitional (“armored” bust), 1811/0HJ. CT-47. KM-160. 26.9 grams. Choice XF with gorgeous red toning all over. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

81. Utrecht, ducat, 1724, encapsulated NGC MS-63. KM-7. FR285. Exceptional grade, good strike except for knight’s head. From the Akerendam (1725). Estimate: $900 - $1,350

Republic

82. Utrecht, ducat, 1724, encapsulated NGC MS-62. KM-7. FR285. Choice high grade, perfect detail on head, off-center obverse, slight wrinkle in flan. From the Akerendam (1725). Estimate: $800 - $1,200 78. Mexico City, “hand on book” 8 escudos, 1824JM. KM-383.9. FR-64. 26.9 grams. AXF with faint adjustment marks in center, some luster. Estimate: $1,350 - $2,000

83. Utrecht, ducat, 1724, encapsulated NGC MS-62. KM-7. FR285. Choice grade (smooth fields), knight’s head flat, weak area near edge, subtle red toning. From the Akerendam (1725). Estimate: $800 - $1,200

84. Utrecht, ducat, 1724, encapsulated ICG MS-62. KM-7. FR285. Choice grade, very lustrous, nice yellow color, knight’s head decent. From the Akerendam (1725). Estimate: $800 - $1,200 79. Guanajuato, “hand on book” 8 escudos, 1850PF. KM-383.7. FR-72. 26.9 grams. XF/AU, very flashy and lustrous. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

85. Utrecht, ducat, 1724, encapsulated NGC MS-61. KM-7. FR285. Lustrous high grade, fully detailed head, weak spot near edge. From the Akerendam (1725). Estimate: $700 - $1,000

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86. Utrecht, ducat, 1724, encapsulated NGC MS-61. KM-7. FR285. Very lustrous high grade, full detail on head, part of edge weak. From the Akerendam (1725). Estimate: $700 - $1,000 87. Utrecht, ducat, 1724, encapsulated NGC MS-61. KM-7. FR285. Not as choice as most, knight’s head and other areas very weak, subtle red toning. From the Akerendam (1725). Estimate: $700 - $1,000

92. Utrecht, ducat, 1729, encapsulated ICG AU-50. KM-7. FR285. Choice high grade with frosty luster, full knight’s head, minor weak spots near center that slabber mistook for wear. From the Vliegenthart (1735). Estimate: $600 - $900 93. Westfriesland, ducat, 1729, encapsulated NGC MS-64. KM93. FR-295. Extreme high grade and typically very flashy and prooflike, also well struck for this mint (no flat spots), possibly the best we have ever seen. From the Vliegenthart (1735). Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

88. Utrecht, ducat, 1729, encapsulated NGC MS-64. KM-7. FR285. Extreme high grade with incredible luster, fully detailed head, probably the best specimen we have ever seen. From the Vliegenthart (1735). Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

94. Westfriesland, ducat, 1729, encapsulated NGC MS-64. KM93. FR-295. Extreme high grade, highly lustrous and prooflike, nice strike. From the Vliegenthart (1735). Estimate: $1,000 $1,500

89. Utrecht, ducat, 1729, encapsulated NGC MS-63. KM-7. FR285. Exceptional grade with lots of luster, knight’s head not fully detailed, otherwise choice. From the Vliegenthart (1735). Estimate: $900 - $1,350

95. Westfriesland, ducat, 1729, encapsulated NGC MS-63. KM93. FR-295. Same condition and quality as last but lower number in slab. From the Vliegenthart (1735). Estimate: $900 - $1,350

90. Utrecht, ducat, 1729, encapsulated NGC MS-62. KM-7. FR285. Choice high grade with nice, lustrous fields, decent knight’s head. From the Vliegenthart (1735). Estimate: $800 - $1,200

96. Westfriesland, ducat, 1729, Mint State. KM-93. FR-295. Same condition and quality as last but housed in removable custom display case (not from a third-party grader). From the Vliegenthart (1735), with attractive hard-plastic display case printed with “THE SUNKEN TREASURE FROM THE VLIEGENTHART” above and “This gold ducat was recovered from the wreck of the Dutch East Indiaman VLIEGENTHART which sank off the coast of Zeeland on the third of February 1735” below the coin. Estimate: $700 $1,000

91. Utrecht, ducat, 1729, encapsulated NGC MS-62. KM-7. FR285. Much more muted luster, knight’s head flat. From the Vliegenthart (1735). Estimate: $800 - $1,200

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Peru Colonial bust-type

97. Lima, bust 8 escudos, Charles III, 1784MI. CT-41. KM-82.1. 26.8 grams. AXF with lots of minor marks and laminations, rosy toning here and there, scarce and desirable shipwreck provenance. From the “Pitch Barrel wreck,” with hand-signed Karen McKee photo-certificate. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

100. Seville, 8 escudos, 1712M (M at top right). CT-172. Cay9936. 26.3 grams. Rare shipwreck provenance, crudely sea-worn (lots of minor nicks) but with all details visible, basically the same design as for cobs but on a full, round, milled planchet, slightly off-center, VF or so for actual wear. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

101. Cádiz, bust 2 escudos, Ferdinand VII, 1813CJ. CT-151. Cay-16229. 6.7 grams. Scarce mint, VF+ with large (old) scratch on shield. Estimate: $200 - $300 98. Lima, bust 8 escudos, Charles IV, 1794IJ. CT-11. KM-101. 26.8 grams. Lustrous AU with slightly crude edge, nice yellow color, desirable shipwreck provenance. From the “Pitch Barrel wreck,” with hand-signed Karen McKee photo-certificate. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

Spain 102. Seville, bust ½ escudo, Ferdinand VI, 1753PJ, encapsulated NGC XF-40 “Eliasberg.” CT-266. Cay-10670. Pedigreed to the Eliasberg collection, with photo-grade certificate #1839009-013. Estimate: $325 - $500

99. Seville, double excelente, Ferdinand-Isabel, eight-pointed star at top, S with dots above and below at bottom. CT-69. FR129. 7.0 grams. XF with nice portraits and shield, bold legends, subtle toning. Estimate: $1,850 - $2,750

103. Madrid, bust ½ escudo, Charles III, 1787DV. CT-779. Cay12199. 1.8 grams. Lustrous AU-, starting to tone. Estimate: $250 - $375 104. Madrid, bust ½ escudo, Charles III, 1788M. CT-781. Cay12202. 1.7 grams. Choice AU, lustrous and problem-free. Estimate: $250 - $375

33

United States of America

105. San Francisco, $20, 1855-S. KM-74.1. 33.4 grams. At least AU details with nick on cheek and “saltwater effect” (microscopically porous surfaces), some luster remaining, scarce and desirable provenance (far rarer than the S.S. Central America [1857] or S.S. Republic [1865]). From the “Fort Capron treasure” of 1857 (AKA “Gordy-Ashley gold”), with Indian River Coin Co. letter of authenticity. Estimate: $3,250 - $5,000

108. Philadelphia, $10, 1879. KM-102. 16.7 grams. XF details but very pronounced “shipwreck effect” (pitted and polished from the sand and sea), interesting provenance that could be linked to a specific wreck with proper research. Found on the beach near Sandy Hook, NJ. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

109. Philadelphia, $5, 1847. KM-69. 8.4 grams. Toned AU with some staining and a large patch of white coral encrustation, rare provenance. From the “Fort Capron treasure” of 1857 (AKA “Gordy-Ashley gold”), with Indian River Coin Co. letter of authenticity. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500 106. Philadelphia, $10, 1850, large date. KM-66.2. 16.6 grams. Lustrous AU with subtle rainbow toning, very nicely preserved for its (rare) provenance. From the “Fort Capron treasure” of 1857 (AKA “Gordy-Ashley gold”), with Indian River Coin Co. letter of authenticity. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

107. Philadelphia, $10, 1854, encapsulated NGC AU-55. KM66.2. Lustrous UNC with several small marks (net AU), desirable provenance and packaging. From the S.S. Republic (1865), with mahogany promotional box, booklet, DVD and certificate #5055497-011. Estimate: $3,000 - $4,500

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110. Philadelphia, $2½, 1852. KM-72. 4.2 grams. Lustrous AU+ with subtle toning, rare provenance. From the “Fort Capron treasure” of 1857 (AKA “Gordy-Ashley gold”), with Indian River Coin Co. letter of authenticity. Estimate: $600 - $900

111. Philadelphia, $1, 1853. KM-73. 1.7 grams. Lustrous Mint State, very nicely preserved, rare provenance. From the “Fort Capron treasure” of 1857 (AKA “Gordy-Ashley gold”), with Indian River Coin Co. letter of authenticity. Estimate: $500 - $750 112. Philadelphia, $1, 1854. KM-73. 1.7 grams. Nice AU, rare provenance. From the “Fort Capron treasure” of 1857 (AKA “Gordy-Ashley gold”), with Indian River Coin Co. letter of authenticity. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500 113. Philadelphia, $1, 1856, slanted 5. KM-86. 1.6 grams. Nice AU, rare provenance. From the “Fort Capron treasure” of 1857 (AKA “Gordy-Ashley gold”), with Indian River Coin Co. letter of authenticity. Estimate: $500 - $750

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SHIPWRECK INGOTS AND OTHER BULLION GOLD “Golden Fleece wreck,” sunk ca. 1550 in the northern Caribbean

114. Long, flat bar #46, 17¼K, cut at one end. 1039 grams, 8¼” x 1¼” x ½”. While most people refer to these ingots as “finger” bars, to distinguish them from rectangular bricks that most people associate with ingots, this particular piece is hardly finger-like at all, as it is broad and flat and long. It bears fineness markings XVII• in three places, mostly covered with white, wormy coral but also with some rusty orange sediment, otherwise bright, lustrous gold, very straight and even, one end round but the other end broken (not chiseled at all), with coral in the crevices. Estimate: $38,500 - $57,500

115. Long bar #37, 16¼K, cut at one end. 716 grams, 7-3/4" x 1" x 3/4". A bit more finger-like, this bar is still rather long but more typical in width, with vast amounts of white and brown coral covering the surface (lustrous gold color where exposed) and obscuring what we guess to be three fineness markings XVI•, one end round and the other end half chiseled, half broken. Estimate: $25,000 $37,500

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116. Wide bar #45, 17¼K, cut at one end. 670 grams, 6" x 1¼” x ½”. A shorter bar, just as wide and flat as #46 two lots up, same fineness marked as XVII• in three places (closer together), about half the surface covered in white coral and some coppery stains, one end round and the other crudely broken (not chiseled), very yellow in color. (We know what you are thinking, but we checked and it is NOT the other half of bar #46, even though they are the same shape and fineness. In fact, none of the cut ingots from this wreck have matched up with others, which is to be expected because cutting and dividing them was necessary to put them into DIFFERENT shipments.) Estimate: $25,000 - $37,500

117. Long bar #36, 16¼K, cut at one end. 641 grams, 7" x 1" x ½”. A long, fat “finger” with somewhat unevenly rounded bottom with three fineness markings XV•, that side mostly clean but the flat side mostly covered with white coral, one end round and the other end crudely broken (only slightly chiseled). Estimate: $22,000 - $33,000

“Wild Horse River wreck,” sunk ca. 1620 off Uruguay 118. Lot of five natural gold nuggets. 18.0 grams total. These are all more or less typical placer nuggets found in the early days of colonial regime, the biggest of the lot somewhat football shaped, with lots of crevices containing dark sediment, the others of more irregular (generally elongated) shape, one even with the appearance of having been “pinched” off the end of a small bar. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $750 - $1,100

Found in a colonial area of Panama (early 1600s) 119. Natural gold nugget. 4.3 grams. Odd-shaped placer nugget with lots of crevices. Estimate: $200 - $300 120. Natural gold nugget. 3.2 grams. Odd shape, but most of surface smooth. Estimate: $150 - $225 121. Natural gold nugget. 2.8 grams. Fairly compact, with most of surface smooth, some crevices. Estimate: $125 - $185

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Atocha, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida 122. Long bar #61, 21¼K, owner “EN RADA” (Peña-Randa), cut at one end. 26.8 oz (troy), 7½” x 1¼” x 3/8". This is the most beautiful gold bar we have ever seen! All the markings are very full and well detailed, including fineness XXI• three times, four tax stamps, and, best and boldest of all, the famous “EN RADA” mark twice, which was recently shown to stand for the name Peña-Randa, a well-known family in Colombia that was involved in gold production. In its original “EN RADA” interpretation, this mark was popularized by treasure writer Ernie Richards, whose publishing house En Rada Publications has released many useful treasure texts over the years. As Spanish gold ingots go, this one is very wide and flat, and it is typically cut at one end, the other end with tiny, pinchedoff “bite” where the Spanish assayer excised his sample for testing. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-GB61. Estimate: $40,000 $60,000

1715 Fleet, east coast of Florida 123. Small “finger” bar marked with fineness XX: (20½K) and tally mark(?) VII. 116.0 grams, about 3½” x ½” x 3/8". Cute little ingot, smooth and well-formed, very small but well-marked (just no tax stamps, so possibly contraband), approximately equivalent to four 8 escudos and one 2 escudos in about the same fineness as the coins. From the June, 2003, US Treasury sale, with photocertificate, auction catalog, promotional flyer (in which this very bar is pictured) and news articles. Estimate: $7,000 - $10,000

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S.S. Central America, sunk in 1857 off North Carolina

124. California Gold Rush assay ingot #701, Kellogg & Humbert, .911 fine. 43.39 oz, about 3-3/4" x 1-3/4" x 5/8". When it comes to shipwreck ingots, our specialty is Spanish bars, but to most U.S. numismatists the assay ingots from the California Gold Rush are far more valuable. Each of the bars from this wreck is pictured in Q. David Bowers’ book A California Gold Rush History (2002), which shows this particular bar on page 433 as having some orange staining that was later removed by a conservation professional, leaving the bar bright and beautiful as it is now. The markings on it read “No 701 / KELLOGG & HUMBERT ASSAYERS / 43.39 Oz / 911 FINE / $817.12”, with “701” stamped on the back as well, two small assay cuts in opposite corners. (Kellogg & Humbert were well-known and highly regarded assayers in San Francisco who were responsible for the production of millions of dollars’ worth of gold coins and untold millions in gold bars like this one, which were regularly shipped from California to New York and London by way of Panama.) A neatly rectangular ingot, rare as one of just over 400 bars recovered, each of them an ephemeral piece of American history that probably would have been melted down in its own time, had it not been lost on one of the most financially disastrous U.S. shipwrecks of all time. Housed in a custom Plexiglas case with a small promotional “treasure chest” box and special, oversized edition of Bowers’ book. Estimate: $125,000 - $175,000

125. Lot of natural gold flakes and dust in original auction packaging. 31.4 grams. A healthy serving of gold dust and small flakes straight from the gold-rush days, one of the few lots from the Sotheby’s auction that did not go to promoters who encapsulated them in 1.5-gram increments. With Sotheby’s auction-lot sticker #577 and blue-cloth drawstring pouch. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

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126. Lot of natural gold flakes and dust in original auction packaging. 30.3 grams. As above but larger flakes, slightly less weight overall. With Sotheby’s auction-lot sticker #321. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500 127. Lot of natural gold nuggets, flakes and dust in original auction packaging. 20.3 grams. In addition to the flakes and ample dust like in the above lots, this lot also has at least three good-sized nuggets, which were singled out by promoters to sell at higher prices (hence a higher estimate for this lot). With Sotheby’s auction-lot sticker #279. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250 128. Pinch of gold dust in Collectors Universe capsule. 1.5 grams. As mentioned above, the big lots of dust in the original Sotheby’s auction were largely bought up by promoters who separated out the nuggets and divided the small flakes and dust into 1.5-gram “pinches” like this one to market in wooden boxes with certificates and snazzy promotional dressings. This lot has bigger flakes than most, but the original box was not retained. With certificate and display materials from promotion, the capsule (#4541) printed with “California Gold Rush / Pinch 1.5 grams / S.S. Central America 1857.” Estimate: $300 - $450

130. Small natural nuggets in Collectors Universe capsule and promotional wooden box. 0.5 gram. Same promotional packaging as the above but instead of flakes or dust this is six distinct (but tiny) natural nuggets. With promotional box printed with DESTINATION: NEW YORK and housing a certificate and display materials, the capsule (#5788) printed with “California Gold Rush / Nuggets .5 grams [sic] / S.S. Central America 1857.” Estimate: $150 - $225

131. Single natural nugget in Collectors Universe capsule and promotional wooden box. 0.5 gram. Same as above (same promotional packaging too) but rare as a single, larger nugget. With promotional box printed with DESTINATION: NEW YORK and housing a certificate and display materials, the capsule (#1544) printed with “California Gold Rush / Nuggets .5 grams [sic] / S.S. Central America 1857,” even including the gold foil seal for the outside (scarce complete package). Estimate: $150 - $225

Any questions? Please email us at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

129. Pinch of gold dust in Collectors Universe capsule and promotional wooden box. 1.5 grams. As above but no flakes, just dust. With promotional box printed with DESTINATION: NEW YORK and housing a certificate and display materials, the capsule (#4709) printed with “California Gold Rush / Pinch 1.5 grams / S.S. Central America 1857,” even including the gold foil seal for the outside (scarce complete package). Estimate: $300 - $450

Please visit our website at www.SedwickCoins.com!

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SILVER “Tumbaga wreck,” sunk ca. 1528 off Grand Bahama Island 132. Bar #M-143, 1430/2400 fine, two tax stamps, serial RC and assayer B~Vo. 15.62 lb (av.), 11.5 x 28 x 3 cm. A large and very neatly formed rectangular ingot with very clear RC, B~Vo, and fineness IVCCCCXXX, the tax stamps small but certain, the texture of the marked side like the surface of a basketball, the other side striated and a little bubbly as made. With Sedwick photo-certificate M-143 and Armstrong book Tumbaga Silver for Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire. Estimate: $6,000 - $9,000 133. Bar #M-18, 970/2400 fine, two tax stamps, serial RCXXX and assayer B~Vo. 5.19 lb (av.), about 8 x 18 x 2 cm. Popular small “half brick” with two clear tax stamps (each about half visible) to left of assayer and above serial number RCXXX and fineness 9CCCCLXX (which is abnormally low and is not reflected in the color of the bar), the other side actually more interesting with very bubbly surface that shows a flake of pure copper inside one of the bubbles! Accompanied by the Armstrong book mentioned above and a copy of the Frank Sedwick Price List of November-December 1995, in which these bars were first offered. Estimate: $6,000 - $9,000 134. Bar #M-49, 720/2400 fine, serial number RCXXX. 5.01 lb (av.), about 8 x 18 x 2 cm. Small “half brick” like the above but with much weaker markings due to corrosion, nice gold color all over (indicative of its low fineness?). With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $3,000 - $4,500

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135. Bar #M-57, 1550/2400 fine, one tax stamp. 3.28 lb (av.), 6 x 23 x 1 cm. Oddly narrow, small bar with bold IV@L (fineness) in center with S’s above and below, very noticeable diagonal “bite” in corner, somewhat crude, both as made and from moderate corrosion, relatively high fineness for a “tumbaga” bar. With Sedwick photo-certificate and accompanied by the Armstrong book mentioned above. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

“Golden Fleece wreck,” sunk ca. 1550 in the northern Caribbean 136. Thick disk #AC, two tax stamps, fineness IIUCCCLX (2360/2400). 1276 grams, 5½” in diameter and up to 1½” thick. One of the best-marked ingots we have ever seen from this wreck, with the fineness in four parts very deeply impressed, the two tax stamps less so but still clear, mostly smooth and thin but with portion near edge raised and knobby, no corrosion but some natural bubbles from original casting. Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800 137. Thick, irregular disk #AI, two tax stamps, bold fineness IIUCCCXL (2340/2400). 1028 grams, 5" in diameter and up to 1" thick. Very bold fineness markings in four parts as on last lot, with two nearly complete tax stamps above and below, a fairly compact (thick) disk with irregular surfaces (but not corroded) and pieces of edge sliced off (assayer’s bites?). Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800

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138. Irregular disk #AG, two tax stamps, two fineness markings IIUCCCLX (2360/2400). 1004 grams, 5" in diameter and ½” thick. Another very well-marked ingot but the fineness markings smaller, less deep, and arranged in pairs on either side of center, the ingot therefore pre-designed to be cut in half, the bold finenesses in four parts above circular tax stamps, minimal corrosion, fairly smooth and even as these ingots go, and with a small slice in the edge (assayer’s bite?). Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800

139. Thick disk #AE, partial second pour, four partial tax stamps. 1696 grams, 6" in diameter and 3/4" thick. A very heavy disk with several layers on the bottom (from several pourings?), one nearly complete tax stamp on top and three partials (one over top of another), no fineness, light corrosion only. Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800

140. Thin disk #AB, two tax stamps, one full. 1065 grams, 7" in diameter and ¼” thick. A very broad, round, thin ingot with mostly smooth surfaces (just a few raised knobs), one tax stamp complete and the other full but weak, light corrosion only. Estimate: $1,000 $1,500

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141. Thick disk #AA, two partial tax stamps. 1727 grams, 6" in diameter and up to 1½” thick. Very thick and heavy ingot with large knob on top, the tax stamps only partially visible, minimal corrosion but some rusty deposits. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

142. Irregular disk #AD, two partial tax stamps. 1581 grams, 5½” in diameter and up to 3/4" thick. Irregular in shape but mostly smooth top (knobs in one area near edge), the two tax stamps faint but certain, minimally corroded. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

143. Thin disk with notch #AH, two full tax stamps and fineness IIUCCCL (2350/2400). 815 grams, 6" in diameter and ¼” thick. A very well-marked ingot with fineness in three parts near center, the two tax stamps (one very bold and beautiful) near the edge, with square-cut notch chiseled from edge (too much to be an assayer’s bite), smooth surfaces with only two small knobs, minimal corrosion. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

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144. Thin disk #AF, two tax stamps. 753 grams, 6" in diameter and ¼” thick. Broad, round, thin ingot with smooth surfaces (six very small knobs), one tax stamp full, the other partial, minimal corrosion. Estimate: $750 - $1,100

145. Small, round disk #AK, two tax stamps. 439 grams, 3¼” in diameter and 3/8" thick. Smaller than all the above but very even and smooth (no knobs but one small sprue on edge) and attractive, both tax stamps clear (one almost full) near edge. Estimate: $750 $1,100

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146. Cut half of large disk #AJ, two tax stamps. 892 grams, roughly 7¼” x 2½” x ½” Half of a large, thin disk, its cut edge halfway chiseled and broken from there, with bent edge, one nearly full tax stamp and part of another, not much corrosion but many stress fractures from the bending and breaking. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

147. Small, irregular cut of thin disk #AL, one full tax stamp and part of another, fineness IIUCCC(?) (23??/2400). 263 grams, roughly 3" in diameter and ¼” thick. This is a curious piece, as it is highly irregular in shape (but evenly thin) and one of the edge-cuts has bisected a tax stamp, the other stamp quite full and clear next to the fineness in four parts, light corrosion only. Estimate: $600 $900

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148. Small, triangular cut from thin disk #AM, one tax stamp, fineness IIUCCCL (2350/2400). 279 grams, roughly 3¼” x 3" x ¼”. A neater cut than the above and with only one tax stamp (full) partially overstamped by the fineness in three parts, minimal corrosion, two cuts and one break, evenly thin. Estimate: $600 - $900

Unidentified ca.-1554 wreck in the northern Caribbean 149. Coin-like cut from a “splash” ingot (“plata corriente”). 43 grams, roughly 1" x 1½” x ¼”. Very irregular broken-off piece, no markings but no corrosion, very coin-like in size and weight. Estimate: $350 - $525 1 5 0 . Coinlike cut from a “splash” ingot (“plata corriente”). 42 grams, roughly 1½” square and ¼” thick. L-shaped edge piece, broken off around a bubble (hence the shape), also with a bubble inside the edge, coin-like in size and weight, no corrosion. Estimate: $350 - $525

153. Lot of two medium, coin-like cuts from “splash” ingots (“plata corriente”). 25 grams and 18 grams. Like the last lot except that neither piece is quite the right weight for an 8 reales, very irregular in thickness (almost look like shiny meteorites), not much corrosion. Estimate: $250 $375

151. Lot of six small, coin-like cuts from “splash” ingots (“plata corriente”). 7 to 18 grams each. Small and very coin-like brokenoff pieces that must have been used as 2- and 4-reales coins (why else would anyone make such small pieces?), one thick but the others thin, lightly corroded. Estimate: $250 - $375 152. Lot of two medium, coin-like cuts from “splash” ingots (“plata corriente”). 28 grams and 27 grams. These two pieces are sure to be a hit because each one is almost precisely the weight of an 8 reales, which is no doubt what they were broken off to make, one clearly the outer edge of a thin, round “splash” but the other one very irregular in thickness and edge, minimal corrosion. Estimate: $250 - $375

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Atocha, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida 154. Huge “quinto” bar #799, fineness 2300/2400, Class Factor 1.0 (choice), listed on ship’s manifest (bar #346). 76 lb 3.84 oz (troy), 35 x 12.8 x 8.2 cm. This is one of the most impressive Atocha bars we have ever seen, with many, many clear markings and some great additional history. To start with, you can easily see four of the Philip IV tax seals with king’s name and ordinal in legend and S outside the lions and castles, but in addition there are two other seals in the form of a Philip monogram, one with a legend that shows POTOSI and the other without legend. As usual, there is also a very deeply impressed manifest number CCCXLVI (346) and fineness IIUCCC with large box to the right of it that has the mark of assayer “Mexia,” whose double-scoop “bite” is quite prominent in the center. Perhaps the most mysterious mark is a double-triangle cipher near the edge. Best of all, however, is the clear 1622 date with oP before it, which along with a big A elsewhere on the bar indicates that it was cast in 1622 in Potosí specifically for the crown, one of a shipment of 133 such bars representing the king’s fifth (“quinto”) going back to Spain. Imagine owning something that once belonged to the King of Spain! Clearly one of the best bars found, this piece deserves to hit a premium price-level. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-S799 with lab datasheet and 5x7 black and white photo of the bar (same shot as the reduced one used for the certificate), plus September 26, 1987, auction brochure from when the bar was exhibited at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas, and finally with a 27-page translation and explanation of the manifest listing of this bar by Homer Lyon, Jr. Estimate: $25,000 - $35,000

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155. Small bar #842, fineness 2230/2400, Class Factor 1.0 (choice), listed on ship’s manifest (bar #3541). 19 lb, 10.08 oz (troy), 33.5 x 10.6 x 3 cm. This is a rare “flat” bar, about the same width as the typical loaves but only about 1" tall, and it has a wealth of markings: at least four tax stamps, manifest number IIIUDXLI (3541), fineness IIUCCXXX (2330), and partial assayer-mark (also a small “bite” in the center), plus a 1621 date and a huge, incuse R (meaning unknown) cut over an old, small D. Light corrosion only, worth a premium not only for its great markings but also for its compact size. With Fisher hologram certificate #85A-S842. Estimate: $8,000 - $10,000 156. Small bar #950, fineness 2380/2400, Class Factor 0.6. 16 lb. 6.4 oz (troy), 34.7 x 6.5 x 3.3 cm. Another rare, small bar from this wreck, only this one is not flat but rectangular in cross section, with clear fineness and incuse “fence” and V marks but no manifest number or tax stamps or date (hence the low Class Factor), still worth a premium for its compactness. With Fisher certificate #85A-950 (photo missing). Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

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157. Small bar #846, fineness 2380/2400, Class Factor 0.6. 18 lb, 5.44 oz, 35.5 x 7 x 3.9 cm. Same as last but without the “fence” mark and slightly more corroded. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-S846 plus original 1986 division printout and letter, and copy of signature page from 1985 contract. Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

1715 Fleet, east coast of Florida 158. Disc-shaped “splash” with cross marking. 376 grams, about 3¼” in diameter and 3/8" thick in center. This is a most intriguing object. It bears no stamps (so it is almost certainly contraband), but on one high point there appears a cross and part of a lion, as if a Mexican cob 2 reales was only partially melted right in that spot, leading us to believe this whole ingot was made from melted-down coins. It has a lot of gold color, however, so we suspect it is not the same purity as the coins. From our source it appears it was brought up in the Real Eight days. Estimate: $750 - $1,100

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159. Unmarked contraband “wedge” ingot. 951.2 grams, roughly 2½” in diameter (extrapolated) and 2" tall. This lot and the next seven are eight slices of a entire “cake” of contraband ingots that were smuggled in the bottom of a cask (so the story goes), each one now dark and uncleaned (gunmetal gray in color) with its weight marked on top in black ink, and each one slightly different in exact weight and shape and texture (hence cast separately), presented here in order of decreasing weights. With Sinclair certificate #20. Estimate: $600 - $900 160. Unmarked contraband “wedge” ingot. 831.3 grams, roughly 2½” in diameter (extrapolated) and 2" tall. As above. With Sinclair certificate #17. Estimate: $600 - $900 161. Unmarked contraband “wedge” ingot. 814.6 grams, roughly 2½” in diameter (extrapolated) and 2" tall. As above. With Sinclair certificate #18. Estimate: $600 - $900 162. Unmarked contraband “wedge” ingot. 813.3 grams, roughly 2½” in diameter (extrapolated) and 2" tall. As above. With Sinclair certificate #22. Estimate: $600 - $900 163. Unmarked contraband “wedge” ingot. 782.8 grams, roughly 2½” in diameter (extrapolated) and 2" tall. As above. With Sinclair certificate #24. Estimate: $600 - $900 164. Unmarked contraband “wedge” ingot. 780.6 grams, roughly 2½” in diameter (extrapolated) and 2" tall. As above. With Sinclair certificate #19. Estimate: $600 - $900 165. Unmarked contraband “wedge” ingot. 770.0 grams, roughly 2½” in diameter (extrapolated) and 2" tall. As above. With Sinclair certificate #23. Estimate: $600 - $900 166. Unmarked contraband “wedge” ingot. 747.5 grams, roughly 2½” in diameter (extrapolated) and 2" tall. As above. With Sinclair certificate #21. Estimate: $600 - $900

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Rooswijk, sunk in 1739 southeast of England 167. Neatly formed bar, marked with A (Amsterdam) and VOC (Dutch East India Co.) and billy goat (assayer/foundry mark), plugged in bottom. 75 oz (troy), 6¼” x 1½” x 1¼”. Silver ingots from the Dutch East India Co. (VOC) are some of the most wellexecuted bars, each one almost perfectly rectangular and meticulously marked. Because they were so evenly formed, they fit snugly into treasure chests, which probably had advantages in their own time but for us translated into less space for air and water to intrude and corrode them on shipwreck sites. These Rooswijk bars (this lot and next) are among the best we have seen, both completely corrosionfree (unlike most of the others on the market) and with all the markings 100 percent bold and not off the edge. Those markings are as follows: A for Amsterdam (the VOC chamber that owned this ship); VOC monogram; and a beautifully detailed billy goat in a cartouche, which stood for the foundry or assayer (as yet unidentified) who made or assayed the bar. The billy goat mark is so well defined that you can even see its eyes and the blades of grass below its hooves. This particular specimen is additionally fascinating for the fact that it shows a weight-adjusting plug in the usual depression at one end of the bar. With original certificate from the divers. Estimate: $3,500 - $4,750 168. Neatly formed bar, marked with A (Amsterdam) and VOC (Dutch East India Co.) and billy goat (assayer/foundry mark). 75 oz (troy), 6¼” x 1½” x 1¼”. As above (same choice markings and condition) but without plug at end, that end clipped and its depression filled with orange sediment instead. Note that while the above lot needed extra silver to bring it up to 75 oz (which appeared to be the standard), this ingot needed to have excess silver removed. With original certificate from the divers. Estimate: $3,500 - $4,750

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COPPER

Carnbrea Castle, sunk in 1829 off the Isle of Wight, England 169. Tile ingot, heavily patinated. 14 lb, 12" x 9" x ½”. This copper tile is the only item we have ever seen recovered from this English East Indiaman wreck sunk in Chale Bay, Isle of Wight, England, on July 5, 1829. About 80 percent of its cargo of some 5700+ pieces of copper was recovered in 1834, but apparently it was forgotten until modern times, when several more pieces of copper were found at the site. Most of the copper was being shipped in “tile” form, like this one, weighing 14, 28 and even 56 pounds each. These tiles are all perfect rectangles, very flat and even, this one with lots of “flow lines” as made, but also beautifully covered with light green patination and even some patches of orange sediment. There do not appear to be any markings, although each tile is supposed to have a B on each side. With photo-certificate. Estimate: $250 - $375

Benamain, sunk in 1890 off Wales 170. Well-formed ingot. 16 lb, roughly 11½” x 2½” x 2½”. It is hard to describe the shape of this well-formed ingot: More or less oblong but technically eight-sided and sloping from the flat top (showing metal flow) down to the marked side with two demi-cylindrical indentations running laterally. The markings (raised) are “V&S” (standing for the manufacturer Vivian & Son) and “A” (not sure what that stands for). The whole ingot is in great shape, a lovely muted copper color and uncorroded. It is the first ingot we have offered from this wreck (though others have been on the market), which sank in 1890 off the coast of Wales and was salvaged 100 years later. With 1993 certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $300 - $450

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SHIPWRECK COINS (all silver except where noted) Unidentified ca.-240 BC Phoenician wreck off the coast of Lebanon Ancient Egypt

171. Tetradrachm, Ptolemy II (285-246 BC), Sidon mint (struck ca. 266-265 BC). 13.43 grams. Typically thick and chunky planchet, full eagle and off-center portrait of previous ruler Ptolemy I, lightly toned AXF. Estimate: $200 - $300 172. Tetradrachm, Ptolemy II (285-246 BC), Sidon mint (struck ca. 266-265 BC). 13.36 grams. Same as last lot but with small piece of edge broken off and repaired, slightly better portrait. Estimate: $100 - $150

Unidentified Tang Dynasty wreck (ca. 221 BC) China 173. Bronze “knife” coin, Warring States period (475-221 BC). 27.0 grams. Rare with six Chinese characters on one side (most have only three to five), clear details behind lovely patina. With Bob Marx certificate. Estimate: $50 - $75 174. Lot of 3 bronze coins, 1 “spade” type and 2 round, holed “cash” type, Warring States period (475221 BC). Spade: 23.0 grams; cash: 5 to 8 grams each. All three coins with Chinese characters on one side peeking through dense but attractive green and tan patina, very solid and obviously salvaged. With Bob Marx certificate. Estimate: $50 - $75 175. Lot of 3 bronze coins, 1 “spade” type and 2 round, holed “cash” type, Warring States period (475221 BC). Spade: 23.0 grams; cash: 5 to 8 grams each. As above, same condition and types. With Bob Marx certificate. Estimate: $50 - $75

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Unidentified ca.-1405 wreck China 176. Two cast bronze cash coins, one in a silver necklace. Coin and chain 12.0 grams; single coin 3.0 grams. Simple bronze coins with Chinese characters on one side, square hole through middle, dating to the Sung Dynasty (960-1279) but lost on a Ming Dynasty wreck, both coins dark and lightly corroded, one of them custom mounted as a pendant with a 24" sterling silver chain. With small promo-certificate. Estimate: $35 - $50

“Golden Fleece wreck,” sunk ca. 1550 in the northern Caribbean Special Research Collection of Charles-Joanna silver coins of Mexico

177. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer R (Gothic). S-M1. KM-16. 13.6 grams. Superb, uncorroded AXF with lovely rich toning, full legends, all details clear, a perfect study coin for the expert (unlisted in Nesmith). From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $5,000 - $7,500

179. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer R (Latin), “PLVS” in rhomboid panel. S-M1. KM-16. 13.5 grams. Uncorroded VF, slightly crude but full legends, toned fields, Nesmith 6d. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

178. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer R (Latin), “PLVS” in oval panel. S-M1. KM-16. 13.6 grams. Bold and uncorroded XF-AU with near-perfect details all over (full legends), nicely toned, like Nesmith 6a but lions WITH tongues and IOhANA in legend, a stunning specimen. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $4,000 $6,000

180. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer R (Latin), with “LVSV” in oval panel. S-M1. KM-16. 13.4 grams. Perfect pillars side, excellent shield side with a touch of corrosion on part of edge, AU details with nice toning, variant of Nesmith 6c with no P in motto (possibly unique), also with the assayer-mark R crafted out of a P punch with separate diagonal leg. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

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181. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer R (Latin), “PLVSV” in oval panel. S-M1. KM-16. 12.3 grams. Incredible Mint State specimen, with toned and lustrous surfaces (no corrosion), perfect full legends, Nesmith 6, an innocuous edgesplit its only flaw. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

182. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P over partially erased R below pillars, oval panel. S-M4. KM-16. 13.4 grams. Choice AU details all over with full legends and inner designs, 100 percent corrosion-free and beautiful. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

183. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P over erased R below pillars, “PLVSV” in oval panel. S-M4. KM-16. 13.3 grams. Choice full shield and pillars, most of legends, small spots of corrosion and flatness in periphery only, toned around details. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

184. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P below pillars, “PLVS” in rhomboid panel. S-M4. KM-16. 13.2 grams. Nice full shield and pillars, much legend, very minor corrosion and dark toning. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

185. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P to left, dotted circles, panel leaning left. S-M4. KM-17. 12.8 grams. Full planchet with great details and full legends, touch of corrosion around edge only, nicely toned, Nesmith 21 (“no example known”). From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

186. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P to left, dotted circles, panel leaning left. S-M4. KM-17. 12.6 grams. Same as above but slightly cruder (a bit more corrosion and some flat spots). From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $3,000 - $4,500

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187. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P to right, plain circles, panel leaning left. S-M4. KM-17. 13.3 grams. Choice coin with AU details, no corrosion (some appended silver), full legends, nice toning, variant with small, open circles for ornaments except inside the panel, which has single dotted circles flanking the motto, also interesting error with G in REG punched over an X (faint but certain—see next lot for a clearer example). From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $2,500 - $3,750

190. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P to right, plain circles (all open), panel leaning right. S-M4. KM-17. 13.4 grams. Beautiful XF details with nice toning, full legends, no corrosion, unlisted obverse but reverse is Nesmith 26a. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $2,500 - $3,750

191. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer F/P to right. S-M3. KM-17. 13.6 grams. Superb specimen with full legends and inner details, uncorroded AU, nicely toned, and a very rare assayer (clearly punched over P), Nesmith 16. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $5,000 - $7,500

188. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P to right, plain circles, panel leaning left. S-M4. KM-17. 13.6 grams. As above except that circles in corners of panel are dotted as well, uncorroded XF details, nearly full legends, nice toning, same G/X error in REG as on last lot (very clear on this example, and oddly not the same die). From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

192. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer F to left. S-M3. KM-unlisted. 13.5 grams. Full details (legends and interior) with a trace of corrosion and flatness, toned all over, near AU, very rare with assayer to left (unlisted in all references, including KM). From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $5,000 - $7,500

189. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P to right, plain circles (all open), panel leaning left. S-M4. KM-17. 13.3 grams. Richly toned with XF details, nearly full legends, just a touch of corrosion above pillars. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $2,000 $3,000

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193. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer G below pillars, M/F to right. S-M2. KM-16. 13.3 grams. Beautiful XF details, full legends and interiors, no corrosion, nicely toned, Nesmith 11, rare and curious issue with mintmark M punched over assayer F. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

194. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Early Series,” assayer G below pillars, choice. S-M2. KM-16. 13.6 grams. Choice, uncorroded XF+ with rich toning all over, some weak areas (but not flat), obverse unlisted but reverse is Nesmith 11. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $3,000 - $4,500

195. Charles-Joanna, 3 reales, “Early Series,” assayer R, waves below pillars, Latin M’s. S-M1. KM-unlisted. 8.7 grams. One of the utmost classic rarities of colonial numismatics, this odd denomination was an early and very brief experiment before the minting of 4 reales, which it greatly resembles. This particular specimen is even rarer by virtue of the fact that below the pillars appeared a series of waves (like on the “Late Series” that began in 1542), although this coin is corroded in just that spot (yet confirmed by the unique design of the central panel, featuring an attempt at a three-dimensional “ribbon” effect, per Nesmith 5). There is also a spot of corrosion at top-left on the shield side (Nesmith 5a variant with single-dot stops in legend), but the rest of the coin is well struck and well detailed, also nicely toned. This is probably the first 3 reales we have ever offered and only the second one with waves that we have ever seen. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000

196. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Early Series,” assayer R (Gothic). S-M1. KM-10. 7.1 grams. Choice XF details all over, full legends, no corrosion or flatness (just a small edge-split), beautiful rich toning, exceptional specimen of a very rare issue. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

197. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Early Series,” assayer R (Gothic). S-M1. KM-10. 5.3 grams. Darkly toned all over (uncleaned) but with practically no corrosion, XF details, most of legends visible, very rare. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

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198. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Early Series,” assayer R (Latin). S-M1. KM-10. 6.6 grams. Choice XF details all over, minor doubling, no corrosion, nearly full legends, nicely toned, extremely rare. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

199. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P to left, dotted circles. S-M4 KM-11. 6.7 grams. Bold details (uncorroded XF), deeply toned, full legends, Nesmith 20. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

200. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P to right, plain circles inside panel leaning left. S-M4 KM-11. 6.6 grams. Richly brown-toned XF, no corrosion, full legends, choice and beautiful, Nesmith 25b but with lions and castles in proper quadrants. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

201. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P to right, diamonds inside panel leaning right. S-M4 KM-11. 6.6 grams. Choice AU details all over, no corrosion, full legends, toned fields, some minor doubling. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

202. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Early Series,” assayer F to right. S-M3. KM-11. 6.7 grams. Full legends, choice inner details (XF), no corrosion, rich toning, choice specimen of a rare assayer (Nesmith 15). From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

203. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Early Series,” assayer G below pillars. S-M2. KM-10. 6.5 grams. Choice bold pillars side, very minor corrosion on shield side, full legends, rich brown toning, variant of Nesmith 10c with diamonds for stops in legend. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

204. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Late Series,” no mintmark or assayer (G). S-M5. KM-18. 13.6 grams. Very rare error with empty spaces flanking shield, no corrosion (XF details) but some minor flat spots, full legends, deep toning. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $7,000 - $10,000

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205. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Late Series,” oMo to left, oGo to right, king’s name as CHAROLVS. S-M5. KM-18. 13.3 grams. Typically large flan with much legend, no corrosion but some flat spots, XF details, nicely toned. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $600 - $900

208. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Late Series,” M to left, A to right. S-M6. KM-18. 12.9 grams. Superb bold AU details, full legends, no corrosion, nice toning, top-notch specimen of a scarce assayer. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

206. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Late Series,” R to left, M to right. S-M7. KM-18. 13.3 grams. Choice full flan with bold legends and perfect inner details, pillars side off-center, deeply toned, no corrosion, XF details, rare assayer. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

209. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Late Series,” A to left, M to right. S-M6. KM-18. 13.2 grams. Choice specimen with full legends and inner details (uncorroded XF), rich toning, scarce assayer. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

207. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Late Series,” M to left, R to right. S-M7. KM-18. 13.6 grams. Bold full details on both sides, no corrosion, nice toning, slightly doubled pillars, AU details, rare assayer. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

210. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Late Series,” M to left, “I” (L) to right. S-M9. KM-18. 12.9 grams. Superb specimen with full XF details all over, no corrosion, beautiful dark toning, rare “error” that is really just a broken letter-punch. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

Please send your bids to our special email bidding address: treasurebids@gmail.com

Any questions? Please email us at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325. 63

211. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Late Series,” “I” (L) to left, M to right. S-M9. KM-18. 13.7 grams. Full legends and inner details, no corrosion, spots of orange sediment, broken letter-punch as above (rare). From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $600 - $900

212. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Late Series,” M to left, upsidedown G to right. S-M5. KM-unlisted (cf. 12). 6.6 grams. Big, round planchet with full legends, no corrosion but some weak areas, deeply toned, rare assayer error. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $600 - $900

213. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Late Series,” M to left, G to right, cross-topped circle ornaments. S-M5. KM-12. 6.7 grams. Exceptional quality with 100 percent full details (legends and interiors), no corrosion, beautifully toned, with unique ornaments in legends. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $500 - $750

214. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Late Series,” G to left, oM to right. S-M5. KM-12. 6.5 grams. Choice specimen with full XF details all over, no corrosion, deeply toned. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $350 - $525

215. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Late Series,” oM to left, G to right. S-M5. KM-12. 6.7 grams. Broad planchet, full legends, AU details, no corrosion but some flat spots, nice toning. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $350 - $525

216. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Late Series,” M to left, R to right. S-M7. KM-12. 6.9 grams. Nice inner details (XF), most of legends, no corrosion, darkly toned, rare assayer. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $600 - $900

217. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Late Series,” A to left, M to right. S-M6. KM-12. 6.6 grams. Choice bold details (AU), no corrosion, full legends, scarce assayer. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

218. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Late Series,” M to left, A to right. S-M6. KM-12. 6.7 grams. Darkly toned Mint State (no corrosion), choice full details, scarce assayer, but with hairline edgesplit. From the “Golden Fleece wreck” Research Collection, with special certificate. Estimate: $500 - $750

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1554 Fleet, Padre Island, Texas

Santiago, sunk in 1585 east of Africa

Mexico City, Mexico

Mexico City, Mexico

219. Charles-Joanna, 2 reales, “Early Series,” assayer P to right. S-M4. KM-11. 4.0 grams. Lightly corroded and with traces of rusty oxidation that characterizes coins from this wreck, full legends and inner details. Estimate: $350 - $525

222. Cob 4 reales, Philip II, assayer O (oMO to right). S-M11. KM-36. 12.5 grams. Full shield and cross, much legend, darkly toned fields, light corrosion here and there. With photocopy of an old account of the wreck “Loss of the Portuguese Vessel St. James” (Remarkable Shipwrecks, by R. Thomas [1836]). Estimate: $200 - $300

Unidentified ca.-1590 wreck off the Yucatán peninsula of Mexico Mexico City, Mexico

220. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Late Series,” M to left, G to right, king’s name as CHAROLVS. S-M5. KM-18. 10.3 grams. Full details despite some pits from corrosion, dark toning, nice full legends. Estimate: $300 - $450

221. Charles-Joanna, 4 reales, “Late Series,” M to left, A to right. S-M6. KM-18. 11.1 grams. Choice specimen with full details (XF), minimal corrosion, nice light toning, scarce assayer. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

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223. Cob 8 reales, Philip II, assayer O (oMO to left). S-M11. KM-43. 25.8 grams. Solid specimen with full shield and cross, full oMO and denomination 8, uncorroded except for pitting in legends, scarce early 8 reales that was once regarded as that mint’s first “dollar” coin. Estimate: $500 - $750

224. Cob 4 reales, Philip II, assayer F. S-M12. KM-43. 13.1 grams. Full cross and shield, high grade but distractingly toned, corroded only in periphery. Estimate: $150 - $225

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Lima, Peru

225. Cob 4 reales, Philip II, assayer oD (P-4 to left, *-oD to right). S-L4. KM-11. 12.4 grams. Broad, round planchet with full details (nice full shield and cross and crown), mostly toned, no corrosion. Estimate: $200 - $300

228. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer F. S-M15. KM-44.1. 19.1 grams. Bold cross and shield, full oMF and 8, toned and lightly corroded all over. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $225

Lima, Peru

Potosí, Bolivia

226. Cob 8 reales, Philip II, assayer B (2nd period “Great Module”). S-P6. KM-5.1. 24.2 grams. Huge flan with full shield and cross, much legend, clear assayer, but lightly corroded all over and a little silvery from cleaning. Estimate: $250 - $375

229. Cob 8 reales, Philip II, assayer oD (*-8 to left, P-oD to right). S-L4. KM-14.1. 16.5 grams. Discernible details against dark backgrounds, moderately corroded. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $225

“Wild Horse River wreck,” sunk ca. 1620 off “Rill Cove wreck,” sunk ca. 1618 off Uruguay Cornwall, England Potosí, Bolivia

Mexico City, Mexico

227. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer F. S-M15. KM-44.1. 25.4 grams. Choice full cross, full but lightly corroded shield, nicely toned. Estimate: $200 - $300

230. Cob 8 reales, Philip II, assayer B (5th period), borders of x’s. S-P14. KM-5.1. 27.1 grams. Full cross and shield, bold P-B, clear borders of x’s, 100 percent corrosion-free (VF), with hints of golden toning. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $250 $375

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Atocha, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida Mexico City, Mexico

231. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer curved-leg R. S-P15. KM10. 26.6 grams. Beautiful full cross and shield, 100 percent corrosion-free (VF+), choice golden toning, slightly crude edge. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $200 - $300

236. Cob 8 reales, 1610F, Grade 1 (estimated). S-M17. KM44.3. 24.4 grams. Very rare with bottom half of date visible, bold full oMF and choice full shield and cross (large planchet), minimal corrosion, nicely toned, certificate missing but replaceable. With Fisher insert-card #262645. Estimate: $500 - $750

232. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer not visible (curved-leg R). S-P15. KM-10. 26.9 grams. Lustrous AU with no corrosion at all, full cross and shield and crown, weak assayer, silvery. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $175 - $275

237. Cob 8 reales, 1621D, Grade 1. S-M18. KM-44.3. 26.7 grams. Exceptionally bold details (date, oMD, 8, shield and cross, all full), no corrosion, typically silvery surfaces, lightly toned. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-147575. Estimate: $2,200 - $3,300

233. Cob 1 real, Philip II, assayer not visible (style of 4th-period B). S-P12. KM-2.2. 3.2 grams. Good full cross and shield, nicely toned, no corrosion (VF). With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150 234. Cob 1 real, Philip II or III, assayer not visible (style of 5th-period B). 3.3 grams. Full cross and shield, no corrosion but some flat spots (Fine), traces of gold toning in crevices. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

Spain 235. Cob 1 real, 1597, assayer not visible (B). CT-676. Cay3566. 3.3 grams. Rare with clear date above nice full cross, no corrosion (Fine+), full crown above off-center shield. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $150 - $225

238. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer D/F?, Grade 3. S-M18. KM-44.3. 19.8 grams. Smallish flan but with nice clear oMD (the D possibly over an F, which would make it 1618) and shield and 8 and cross, light to moderate corrosion all over but also nicely toned. With Fisher photo-certificate #105218. Estimate: $200 - $300

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239. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer D, Grade 1. S-M18 or M18a. 26.1 grams. Typical barrel-shaped planchet of uneven thickness, choice full shield and cross, no corrosion, weak but certain assayer. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-156177. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

240. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer D, Grade 3. S-M18 or M18a. 23.5 grams. Thick but odd-shaped flan with weak but discernible oMD, good cross, light to moderate corrosion. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-134943. Estimate: $150 - $225

242. Cob 4 reales, Philip II, assayer F, Grade 1. S-M12. KM-36. 13.5 grams. Choice, uncorroded specimen with full shield and cross, much bold legend, typically highly polished. With Fisher photocertificate #ML-291871. Estimate: $750 - $1,100

243. Cob 4 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer D, Grade 2. S-M18 or M18a. 10.6 grams. Odd shape from worn-away edges, clear oM, good cross and shield. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-221799. Estimate: $300 - $450

244. Cob 2 reales, Philip II or III, assayer F, Grade 1. 6.8 grams. Choice full cross and shield, clear oMF, no corrosion but flat spot near edge. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-117731. Estimate: $600 - $900 241. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible, no Grade on certificate (Grade-2 or 3 quality). 24.4 grams. Large, thick flan with nearly full shield and cross, light to moderate corrosion, possible partial date. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-105003. Estimate: $200 - $300

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245. Cob 1 real, Philip II, assayer not visible, Grade 3. KM-26. 1.7 grams. Extremely rare denomination for this wreck, on a large round planchet but with about a quarter missing from corrosion, still with most of shield and cross, very silvery. With Fisher photocertificate #95A-0392-1. Estimate: $300 - $450

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246. Cob 1 real, Philip III, assayer not visible, Grade 1. KM27.1. 3.3 grams. Extremely rare denomination for this wreck, also nice with full shield and cross, no corrosion, slightly odd shape. With Fisher photo-certificate #95A-1091. Estimate: $1,200 $1,800

PotosĂ­, Bolivia

249. Cob 8 reales, Philip II, assayer RL, Grade 1. S-P13. KM5.1. 24.3 grams. Large, round flan with great bold details (full shield and cross, clear mintmark-assayer), lightly corroded and highly polished but nicely toned. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A208072. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

247. Cob 8 reales, Philip II, assayer B (4th period), Grade 1. SP12. KM-5.1. 26.6 grams. Huge flan with choice details (full shield and cross and P-B), minimal corrosion, no toning. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-267005. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

250. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer B (5th period), Grade 2 (Grade-1 quality). S-P14. KM-10. 26.5 grams. Very rare issue with king’s ordinal III visible, full P-B, good but partially flat shield and cross, light corrosion. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A161811. Estimate: $275 - $425

248. Cob 8 reales, Philip II, assayer B/S/L?, Grade 1. S-P6. KM5.1. 26.1 grams. Thick, round planchet with choice full details, corroded near part of edge, dull silver color from cleaning, probably from the ca.-1590 wreck off the Yucatan but with counterfeit Fisher Atocha certificate. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-215377. Estimate: $200 - $300

251. Cob 8 reales, Philip II or III, assayer not visible (style of 5th-period B), Grade 2 (Grade-1 quality). 26.7 grams. Full shield and cross, no corrosion (hence under-graded) but slightly crude strike. With Fisher photo-certificate #86A-134320. Estimate: $200 - $300

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252. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer R (curved leg), Grade 2 (choice Grade-1 quality). S-P15. KM-10. 26.0 grams. Very choice full cross and shield, clear P-R, king’s ordinal III, no corrosion, the epitome of a Grade-1 coin yet inexplicably given a 2 on the certificate. With Fisher photo-certificate #CH4-82-4142. Estimate: $275 - $425

253. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer R (curved leg), Grade 2. S-P15. KM-10. 24.4 grams. Broad flan with full shield and cross, clear assayer, king’s ordinal III, light corrosion, crude edge. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-125470. Estimate: $200 - $300

254. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer C, Grade 2 (Grade-3 quality). S-P16. KM-10. 24.0 grams. Crude specimen (corroded, oblong planchet) but with reasonably clear assayer (rare) below bold mintmark. With old Fisher certificate #SR-1161. Estimate: $200 - $300

255. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer Q, Grade 2. S-P17. KM10. 21.7 grams. Bold full assayer and cross, crude edge due to corrosion. With Fisher certificate #H1317. Estimate: $300 - $450

256. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer M, no Grade on certificate (Grade-1 quality). S-P18. KM-10. 23.6 grams. Choice full cross, bold P-M, light corrosion near edge only. With Fisher photocertificate #85A-103639. Estimate: $350 - $525

257. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer M, Grade 2. S-P18. KM10. 24.0 grams. Large flan with full cross and crown and shield, light corrosion, toned. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-161105. Estimate: $225 - $350

258. Cob 8 reales, 1618PAL, Grade 1. S-P20. KM-10. 25.6 grams. Rare one-year assayer, bold bottom half of date, choice full shield, full but doubled (and lightly corroded) cross, much legend, typically polished but nicely toned. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A163127. Estimate: $1,350 - $2,000

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259. Cob 8 reales, (1618)PAL, Grade 1. S-P20. KM-10. 26.6 grams. Rare assayer (very full and bold), choice full shield and cross, no corrosion, polished but toned. With Fisher photocertificate #85A-231314. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

260. Cob 8 reales, (1)61(8)T/PAL, Grade 2. S-P21. KM-10. 23.2 grams. Very rare over-assayer (100 percent full on this coin), good full shield and cross, slightly corroded edge, squarish planchet. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-237536. Estimate: $600 - $900

261. Cob 8 reales, 1618, assayer not visible, Grade 2. S-P20 or P21. KM-10. 24.8 grams. Round coin with clear bottom half of date, full cross, full but weak shield, some corrosion. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-117046. Estimate: $275 - $425

263. Cob 8 reales, 1619T, Grade 2. S-P21. KM-10. 25.2 grams. Full date but very crude planchet with much flatness and an edgesplit. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-153602. Estimate: $275 - $425

264. Cob 8 reales, (1)61(?)T, upper half of shield transposed, no Grade on certificate (Grade-2 quality). S-P21. KM-10. 24.1 grams. Scarce error, full shield and P-T, good full cross, some corrosion but nice toning. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A245010. Estimate: $225 - $350

265. Cob 8 reales, 1620T, Grade 2. S-P21. KM-10. 26.1 grams. Bold full date at 5 o’clock in the legend (rare), good full shield and cross, very light corrosion only. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-201533. Estimate: $600 - $900

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262. Cob 8 reales, (161)9T, Grade 1. S-P21. KM-10. 26.8 grams. Full 9 of date, great full cross and shield, light corrosion only, silvery. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-214874. Estimate: $400 - $600

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266. Cob 8 reales, 1(6)20T, upper half of shield transposed, Grade 2. S-P21. KM-10. 22.7 grams. Bold bottom half of 20 of date, full but corroded cross and shield, crude strike. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-187129. Estimate: $275 - $425

269. Cob 8 reales, (1)621T, upper half of shield transposed, quadrants of cross transposed, Grade 1. S-P21 or P21a. 26.6 grams. Full 62 of date with certain final digit 1, full but doubled shield, off-center cross, light corrosion only. With Fisher photocertificate #85A-105739. Estimate: $400 - $600

267. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, (162)0T, mintmark “q”, quadrants of cross transposed, Grade 1. S-P21. KM-10. 26.5 grams. Choice full shield and cross, bold 0 of date (erroneously called 1618 on the certificate), no corrosion, rather nice all over. With Fisher photocertificate #H-1060. Estimate: $750 - $1,100

270. Cob 8 reales, 1621T, quadrants of cross transposed, Grade 2. S-P21 or P21a. 22.2 grams. Full but weak date and shield and cross due to moderate corrosion all over. With Fisher photocertificate #86A-192563. Estimate: $250 - $375

268. Cob 8 reales, 16(??)T, quadrants of cross transposed, Grade 1. S-P21 or P21a. 26.9 grams. Bold 6 of date, full shield and cross, minimal corrosion. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A116643. Estimate: $350 - $525

271. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer T, mintmark “q”, Grade 1. S-P21 or P21a. 26.5 grams. Exceptional specimen with full and uncorroded cross and shield. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-267618. Estimate: $600 - $900

Any questions? Please email us at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

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275. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible, Grade 2 (estimated). 23.9 grams. Decent full shield and cross despite light corrosion, no certificate or insert-card. Estimate: $100 - $150 272. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer T?, rare error with king’s name and ordinal on reverse, Grade 2. S-P21 or P21a. 26.1 grams. Very crude, large planchet with full but doubled shield and cross, periphery shows king’s name and ordinal (probably due to a flipover double-strike). With Fisher photo-certificate #85A113743. Estimate: $300 - $450

276. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible, no Grade on certificate (Grade-4 quality). 12.4 grams. Good full shield despite heavy corrosion, valuable for its certificate. With old (original signatures) Fisher photo-certificate #2544. Estimate: $400 - $600 273. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, 16(??)T, quadrants of cross transposed, Grade 2. S-P21 or P21a. 24.7 grams. First two digits of date visible at about 8 o’clock, full shield and cross, light corrosion only. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-180938. Estimate: $225 - $350

277. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible, no Grade on certificate (Grade-4 quality). 12.6 grams. Heavily corroded but with barely recognizable shield and cross (darkly toned), valuable for its certificate. With old (original signatures) Fisher photo-certificate #3766. Estimate: $300 - $450 274. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible, Grade 1 (estimated). 26.0 grams. Good full shield and cross (both slightly doubled), minimal corrosion, certificate missing but replaceable. With Fisher insert-card #210522. Estimate: $250 - $375

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278. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible, no Grade on certificate (Grade-4 quality). 13.4 grams. Heavily corroded but with barely recognizable shield and cross (darkly toned), valuable for its certificate. With old (original signatures) Fisher photo-certificate #3539. Estimate: $300 - $450

279. Cob 4 reales, Philip II, assayer L/B, Research Collection PLATE COIN #56. S-P9. KM-4.2. 13.4 grams. Very choice specimen of a scarce early issue, but perhaps most valuable for being one of only 64 coins in the famous Research Collection (237 coins in all) to have been photographed in the catalog (first Plate Coin we have seen on the market in many years). Typically large, round flan with full inner details and legends, no corrosion at all, particularly choice shield and crown, but cross full and nice as well. With special Fisher photo-certificate #236096 and a personal letter from original owner of the Research Collection, Marisha Wagner Moran, plus a copy of the 1988 Christie’s (New York) catalog of the Research Collection. Estimate: $2,000 $3,000

280. Cob 4 reales, Philip II, assayer RL, Grade 1, choice. SP13. KM-4.2. 12.5 grams. Large flan with choice full shield and cross, clear assayer, no corrosion, polished but nicely toned. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-189906. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

281. Cob 4 reales, Philip III, assayer M/Q, Grade 1. S-P18. KM9. 12.3 grams. Very bold M/Q (scarce over-assayer), nice full shield and cross, no corrosion, nicely toned. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-118711. Estimate: $400 - $600

282. Cob 4 reales, Philip III, assayer not visible, Grade 1. KM9. 12.4 grams. Good full shield, slightly weak full cross, peripheries flat, minimal corrosion. With Fisher photo-certificate #118579. Estimate: $350 - $525

283. Cob 4 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer T, struck from 2reales die, Grade 3 (Grade-2 quality). S-P21 or P21a. 13.0 grams. Unique error with clear denomination “z” (two) to right of full shield, bold P-T to left, full but lightly corroded cross. With Fisher photo-certificate #264280. Estimate: $400 - $600

284. Cob 4 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible, no Grade on certificate (Grade-4 quality). 6.0 grams. Dark and heavily corroded, barely recognizable, valuable for its certificate. With old (original signatures) Fisher photo-certificate #2225. Estimate: $300 - $450

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285. Cob 2 reales, Philip II, assayer B (1st period, “Lima style”), Grade 1. S-P4. KM-3.2. 6.1 grams. Typically large, round planchet with fine details, minimal corrosion but well worn. With Fisher photo-certificate #94A-3581. Estimate: $650 - $975

286. Cob 2 reales, Philip II, assayer not visible (style of 4thperiod B), Grade 2. S-P12. KM-3.2. 6.3 grams. Big planchet with no corrosion at all but very worn, some nice details. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-128051. Estimate: $350 - $475

287. Cob 2 reales, Philip II, assayer not visible (style of 5thperiod B), Grade 3 (Grade-1 quality). S-P14. KM-3.2. 6.4 grams. Good full cross, no corrosion, darkly toned around edge, inexplicably under-graded. With Fisher certificate #127347 (insertcard missing). Estimate: $350 - $525

289. Cob 2 reales, 1617PAL (mule), Grade 3. S-P20. KM-8. 4.7 grams. Very rare (but known) muling of 1617 reverse with 1618 obverse, the “ANO 1617” and assayer PAL weak but full and certain, also full cross and shield, lightly corroded all over. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-144172. Estimate: $350 - $525

290. Uncleaned clump of two coins (8 reales and 2 reales). 27.7 grams. The 8 reales is attributable to Potosí but the 2 reales is not attributable, both coins covered in thick encrustation and oxidation that is mostly black but also contains pretty green and white elements, very rare as nearly all Atocha coins are cleaned and separated in the Fisher process. With Fisher photo-certificate #CH04-CL-024. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

Cartagena, Colombia

291. Cob 8 reales, 1622A, Grade 2 (Grade-1 quality). S-C2. KM-3.2. 24.1 grams. Nice specimen of a very rare issue, the assayer bold and the date discernible (bottoms of all four digits), also good full shield and cross (the latter slightly doubled, XF details), very little corrosion (only around the edge), so the Grade on the certificate in inexplicable. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-237444. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

288. Cob 2 reales, Philip III, assayer R (curved leg), Grade 2 (Grade-1 quality). S-P15. KM-8. 6.3 grams. Choice detail (excellent full cross and shield), crude edge (as made), no corrosion, nicely toned. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-127631 (insertcard missing). Estimate: $350 - $525

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292. Cob 4 reales, (1622A), Grade 3. S-C2. KM-2.3. 10.4 grams. Very rare issue, the RN mintmark clear to left of full shield (assayer A to right not visible), full cross, lightly to moderately corroded all over (hence the Grade). With Fisher photo-certificate #86A-109123. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

295. Cob 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible, quadrants of cross transposed, Grade 3. 18.5 grams. Choice full cross-lionscastles but shield side heavily corroded, lightly toned. With original Fisher photo-certificate #9103. Estimate: $150 - $225

Santa Margarita, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida Mexico City, Mexico

293. Cob 2 reales, 1617/6F, Grade 4 (estimated). S-M17. KMunlisted (cf. 32.2). 1.1 grams. Awful coin (corroded so thin that it is permeated with tiny holes all over) but remarkably with FULL date 1617 that even shows a clear overdate 7/6 (very rare, as even the clean 1617 is unlisted in all references), the whole cross there too, plus some of the shield and oMF, but regrettably the insertcard and Fisher certificate are missing. Estimate: $75 - $110

Potosí, Bolivia

294. Cob 8 reales, Philip II, assayer B (1st period, “Lima style”), Grade 1. S-P4. KM-3.2. 27.2 grams. Very choice specimen (probably the best 8 reales we have ever seen from this wreck, and also an interesting early issue), huge planchet with full legends and crown and perfect inner data (especially well-detailed shield and cross), and not a lick of corrosion, in fact hard to believe it is even sea-salvage! With Fisher photo-certificate #8680. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

296. Cob 2 reales, Philip III, assayer not visible, Grade 1. KM8. 5.4 grams. Good full cross, full shield with some corrosion (one large pit), full PHILIPPVS III in legend, nice dark toning, certificate missing but replaceable. With Fisher insert-card #5802. Estimate: $350 - $525

“Dry Tortugas wreck,” sunk ca. 1622 off the Dry Tortugas, west of Key West, Florida Mexico City, Mexico

297. Cob 4 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer D. S-M18 or M18a. 10.8 grams. Worn but not too corroded (one of the better specimens from this wreck), with clear oMD, most of shield and cross. With Seahawk certificate #2507.0063. Estimate: $200 - $300

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Campen, sunk in 1627 off the Isle of Wight, England Netherlands (United)

301. Zeeland, “lion” daalder (leeuwendaalder), 1627. DMunlisted. 26.7 grams. High grade but crude (lots of stress marks in planchet plus some salvage marks), full date, lustrous, rare date (unlisted). With certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150 298. Westfriesland, “lion” daalder (leeuwendaalder), 1615. DM836. 25.1 grams. Nice specimen with clear date, full lion and knight, minimal corrosion. With certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185

302. Holland mint, “lion” daalder (leeuwendaalder), undated type. DM-829. 26.4 grams. Worn (VG or so) but not corroded, clear details, a bit scarcer and desirable as the first official coinage of the independent Netherlands. Estimate: $90 - $135 299. Utrecht, “lion” daalder (leeuwendaalder), 1617. DM-843. 26.8 grams. Very high grade and lustrous (would be Mint State except for scratches from salvage), full inner details, part of legend a bit weak (like the mintmark), but full and bold date. With certificate. Estimate: $200 - $300

303. Utrecht, “lion” daalder (leeuwendaalder), date not visible. 17.3 grams. Corroded but with nice lion, most of legend. With certificate. Estimate: $75 - $110

300. Utrecht, “lion” daalder (leeuwendaalder), 1626. DM-843. 24.8 grams. Bold full legends and date, good inner details, just a little corroded all over, lightly toned. With original certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $150 - $225

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304. Uncertain mint, half “lion” daalder (leeuwendaalder), 1616. 13.1 grams. Choice high grade with nice lion, lustrous, full date, no corrosion (some marks), full date but mintmark indecipherable, rare denomination. With certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185

307. Cob 4 reales, Philip IV, assayer D. S-M18a. KM-38. 11.2 grams. Round flan with clear oMD, most of cross and shield, lightly pitted all over. With Sedwick/Howard certificate from 1992. Estimate: $125 - $185

Concepción, sunk in 1641 off Hispaniola Mexico City, Mexico

305. Utrecht, half “lion” daalder (leeuwendaalder), 1626. DM878. 12.9 grams. Excellent detail, full date, most of legend (mintmark weak), slight wavy flan with a few marks, lightly toned, rare denomination. With certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185

“Lucayan Beach wreck,” sunk ca. 1628 off Grand Bahama Island

308. Cob 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer not visible (P). S-M19. KM45. 23.5 grams. Curious shape (leaning barrel), full shield and cross, minimal corrosion but peripheral flatness, nicely toned. With handsigned Burt Webber certificate. Estimate: $150 - $225

Mexico City, Mexico

309. Cob 4 reales, Philip IV, assayer P. S-M19. KM-45. 13.0 grams. Choice full cross, full shield on a squarish flan, nicely toned, no corrosion. With Blanchard wallet-type certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185

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306. Cob 4 reales, Philip IV, assayer D. S-M18a. KM-38. 13.0 grams. Nice full cross, off-center shield, no corrosion but very crude edge (as made) with flat part upturned, nicely toned, scarce with classic promotional box. With small certificate and white clamshell box from 1960s Spink promotion. Estimate: $150 - $225

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Potosí, Bolivia

310. Cob 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer TR (1630s). S-P27. KM19a. 23.6 grams. Weak but certain P-TR, choice full shield and cross, no corrosion, crude edge with split. With original insertcard #55850 and certificate hand-signed by Burt Webber (1981). Estimate: $150 - $225

313. Cob 8 reales, 1654E, rotated 4 in date. S-P37a. KM-21. 21.6 grams. Unique error (very striking and obvious) visible below full motto PLV-SVL-TRA on a rather decent pillars side, the cross side full but corroded, all nicely toned. Estimate: $300 - $450

Maravillas, sunk in 1656 off Grand Bahama Island Mexico City, Mexico

311. Cob 2 reales, Philip IV, assayer not visible. KM-17b. 7.0 grams. Choice full cross, nearly full shield, minimal corrosion (oddly overweight), darkly toned. With Blanchard wallet-type certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185

Capitana, sunk in 1654 off Chanduy, Ecuador Potosí, Bolivia

312. Cob 4 reales, (1651-2)E, unidentified crowned countermark on cross. S-P36. KM-17b. 7.3 grams. Thin coin with lots of good detail, just not the date or the countermark, particularly good cross, king’s ordinal IIII in legend, nicely toned. With Atlantic Treasure Coins photo-certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185

314. Cob 8 reales, 1655(P). S-M19. KM-45. 22.7 grams. Bold full date (some encrustation on final digit), good full cross and shield, peripheries corroded. With MAREX certificate #91-8R-801. Estimate: $300 - $450

315. Cob 8 reales, (1)655P. S-M19. KM-45. 19.7 grams. Moderately corroded all over but with clear date and oMP, shield and cross. With MAREX certificate #91-8R-4359. Estimate: $150 - $225

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316. Cob 4 reales, Philip IV, assayer P. S-M19. KM-38. 13.1 grams. Choice, uncorroded specimen with bold oMP, nearly full shield and cross, well centered on a compact flan, nicely toned. Estimate: $100 - $150

319. Cob 8 reales, 1653E, •PH• above pillars, four-digit date below cross. S-P37a. KM-21. 22.5 grams. Scarce early datevariant, good full cross and pillars, not too much corrosion, two clear dates and mintmarks and assayers. Pedigreed to the Craig Whitford auction of April 1995, with cut-out lot information and photo from the catalog and with ANAAB photo-certificate #AB2425. Estimate: $150 - $225

317. Cob 1 real, Philip IV, assayer P. S-M19. KM-28. 1.9 grams. Very rare denomination from this wreck, with most of cross and shield in evidence to confirm it, albeit somewhat corroded and flat. With MAREX insert-card and certificate #90-2R-0037, which both refer to this coin in error as a 2 reales. Estimate: $200 - $300

Potosí, Bolivia

320. Cob 8 reales, 1653E, •PH• above pillars. S-P37a. KM-21. 22.6 grams. Good full cross, full pillars-and-waves, three bold mintmarks, two assayers, weak date, minimal corrosion, nicely toned. Estimate: $150 - $225

Cartagena, Colombia

318. Cob 8 reales, (1)650(O), with crowned-L countermark. SP35. KM-19b. 19.8 grams. Decent cross side with clear date and full countermark, pretty red toning, but shield side completely corroded and thin. With MAREX sticker #91-8R-1315, but certificate missing. Estimate: $75 - $110 321. Cob 8 reales, (1655)S, Plate Coin in The Practical Book of Cobs (3rd edition). S-C4. KM-7.2. 15.5 grams. Very rare one-year issue (very few specimens known, almost all from shipwrecks), this with full and bold mintmark-assayer C-S to right and denomination VIII (vertically) to left of nearly full shield, the pillars side heavily corroded, all nicely brown-toned. With special Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $1,500 $2,250

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322. Cob 4 reales, 1655(S). S-C4. KM-10.2. 13.1 grams. Choice specimen of an extremely rare one-year issue, with bold full pillars and PLVS VLTRA (the TR of which is clearly punched over an old LT), full but doubled shield, clear 16 and bottoms of 55 of date in legend, minimal corrosion, nicely toned. With Lou Ullian certificate. Estimate: $3,000 - $4,500

Bogotá, Colombia

323. Cob 4 reales, (1650s), assayer not visible. S-B7. KM-10.1. 4.0 grams. Nice full shield with full denomination IIII to right, corroded pillars side (the pillars themselves oddly prominent, however), thin, richly toned, rare issue. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $200 - $300

325. Cob 8 reales, 1653P. S-M19. KM-45. 25.8 grams. Full bold date and oMP, good full cross, nearly full crown and shield, no corrosion, spots of toning. With Downie (Australia) auction-lot tag. Estimate: $200 - $300

326. Cob 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer P (1650s). S-M19. KM-45. 23.0 grams. Full oMP and denomination 8, nearly full cross and shield, some flatness and heavy corrosion here and there but mostly solid, toned. With photocopy of data on the wreck. Estimate: $125 - $185

Vergulde Draeck (“Gilt Dragon”), sunk in Potosí, Bolivia 1656 off Western Australia Mexico City, Mexico

324. Cob 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer not visible (1620s). KM45. 26.2 grams. Scarce early type for this wreck, with clear mintmark oM and full shield, most of cross, no corrosion but much flatness, richly toned all over, valuable certificate. With Western Australian Museum certificate and tag #10252. Estimate: $150 $225

327. Cob 8 reales, 1652E (post-transitional). S-P37a. KM-21. 23.2 grams. Well detailed (three dates, 1•PH•6, bold pillars and waves, full cross) and nicely toned on an odd-shaped planchet with light corrosion. With Downie (Australia) auction-lot tag. Estimate: $200 - $300

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Potosí, Bolivia Seville, Spain

328. Cob 8 reales, 1597B, with “Golden Fleece” countermark of Brabant, Spanish Netherlands (1652-1672). CT-254. CayType 69. 25.1 grams. A very rare coin on many levels: First of all, dated Spanish cobs of Philip II are rare and valuable, and it is very unusual (if not unique) to see one with the Brabant countermark (value of 48 pattars); but perhaps the most unusual thing of all is that this coin found its way onto a ship and was subsequently lost at sea and found in our time! The quality is also rather nice, as it shows a full shield, full cross, full countermark, bold S-VIII and weak B to left and full date 1597 to right, plus lots of legend (including the king’s ordinal II), but there is some corrosion and one large edge-split, still nicely toned. While the Vergulde Draeck provenance makes sense, there is no supporting documentation from the Western Australian Museum, which could scarcely have missed a unique piece like this. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

San Miguel el Arcangel (“Jupiter wreck”), sunk in 1659 off Jupiter, Florida Mexico City, Mexico

330. Cob 8 reales, 1658E. S-P37a. KM-21. 26.9 grams. Very choice specimen with full cross and pillars, three dates, two mintmarks and assayers, choice full crown, king’s ordinal IIII, nicely toned and practically corrosion-free. Estimate: $300 - $450

Sacramento, sunk in 1668 off Bay of All Saints, Bahia, Brazil Mexico City, Mexico

331. Cob 8 reales, 1654P, with crowned “600” (600 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. S-M19. KM-45. 20.9 grams. Bold full countermark on full cross, full shield with bold oMP, weak date, toned, light corrosion only, rare. Estimate: $250 - $375

Potosí, Bolivia

329. Cob 8 reales, 1657P. S-M19. KM-45. 26.2 grams. Rare with clear date, full oMP, full shield and cross, no bad corrosion but some wear, odd-shaped flan, lightly toned all over. With small Sedwick certificate from 2001. Estimate: $250 - $375

332. Cob 8 reales, 1660E, with crowned “600” (600 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. S-P37a. KM-21. 22.2 grams. Choice full countermark, good cross with date below, pillars side heavily corroded, nicely toned, rare. Estimate: $250 - $375

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333. Cob 8 reales, 1664E, with crowned “600” (600 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. S-P37a. KM-21. 21.0 grams. Nice cross side with full countermark, bold king’s ordinal IIII, also full pillars and waves and crown, two dates, lightly corroded and toned, rare. Estimate: $300 - $450

336. 400 reis, Lisbon, John IV, with crowned “500” (500 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. 13.5 grams. Choice full countermark, bold full cross and shield, nice large flan, attractively toned, minimal corrosion, denomination flat. Estimate: $300 - $450

Segovia, Spain

334. Milled 8 reales, Philip IV, date not visible, assayer R or BR, with crowned “600” (600 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. CT-Type 124. Cay-Type 108. 14.9 grams. Very rare combination, the countermark weak due to corrosion, which also obliterated the date and assayer, but the cross and shield and crown are all still decent and nicely toned. Estimate: $250 - $375

337. 400 reis, Lisbon, John IV, with crowned “S00” (500 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. 17.5 grams. Bold full countermark, good cross and shield and crown, full denomination, much legend, thin from corrosion, nicely toned. Estimate: $300 $450

Portugal

338. 400 reis, Porto, John IV, with crowned “S00” (500 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. 15.8 grams. Scarce mint (P’s in quadrants of cross), choice full details and countermark, minimal corrosion, nicely toned. Estimate: $350 - $525

335. 400 reis, Evora, John IV, with crowned “S00” (500 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. 13.5 grams. Rare mint (E’s in quadrants of cross) and choice specimen from this wreck, with all details clear, nicely toned, minimal corrosion. Estimate: $600 - $900

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339. 200 reis, Evora, John IV, with crowned “2S0” (250 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. 7.3 grams. Rare mint (E’s in quadrants of cross), choice bold cross and full countermark, shield side full but a little corroded, nicely toned. Estimate: $200 - $300

342. 200 reis, Porto, John IV, with crowned “2S0” (250 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. 7.9 grams. Scarce mint (P’s in quadrants of cross), very deep and bold countermark, full cross and crown and shield, some corrosion, nice toning. Estimate: $150 - $225

Unidentified ca.-1671 wreck in Seville Harbor, Spain Potosí, Bolivia 340. 200 reis, Lisbon, John IV, with crowned “250” (250 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. 7.6 grams. Choice full countermark, bold cross, full shield and crown, light corrosion, good toning. Estimate: $150 - $225

343. Cob 4 reales, 1670(E). S-P37b. KM-25. 13.0 grams. Nice full cross, good pillars, two dates, three mintmarks, minimal corrosion, toned. Estimate: $150 - $225

341. 200 reis, Lisbon, John IV, with crowned “2S0” (250 reis, 1663) countermark of Brazil on cross. 7.1 grams. Very deep countermark on a good full cross, doubled shield and crown, minimal corrosion, nicely toned. Estimate: $150 - $225

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344. Cob 4 reales, 1670E. S-P37b. KM-25. 10.0 grams. Darkly toned, with decent pillars and cross, bold date and mintmark, large edge-crack. Estimate: $135 - $200

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Consolaci贸n, sunk in 1681 off Santa Clara Island, Ecuador Potos铆, Bolivia

345. Cob 8 reales, 1664E. S-P37a. KM-21. 25.3 grams. Bold waves, three mintmarks, three partial dates, crude strike (flatness) and some wear, partially toned. Estimate: $100 - $150

346. Cob 8 reales, 1671E. S-P37b. KM-26. 25.6 grams. Two bold mintmarks, nearly full cross, crude pillars, not much corrosion but some flatness, partially toned. Estimate: $100 - $150

347. Cob 8 reales, 1672E. S-P37b. KM-26. 20.3 grams. Two dates, decent cross and pillars (the latter slightly doubled), moderately sea-worn, brown-toned. Estimate: $90 - $135

348. Cob 8 reales, 1674E. S-P37b. KM-26. 21.4 grams. Big flan with good full cross and crown, corroded pillars, silvery. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7023. Estimate: $75 - $110

349. Cob 8 reales, 1674E. S-P37b. KM-26. 20.1 grams. Two clear dates and mintmarks, most of cross and pillars, silvery and corroded. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7022. Estimate: $90 - $135

350. Cob 8 reales, 1675E. S-P37b. KM-26. 21.8 grams. Big flan with one full date and parts of two others, full cross and pillarsand-waves, toned and lightly corroded, edge-split. Estimate: $80 - $120

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351. Cob 8 reales, 1675E. S-P37b. KM-26. 18.6 grams. Full cross, bold date between pillars, moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7024. Estimate: $100 - $150

352. Cob 8 reales, 1676E. S-P37b. KM-26. 14.2 grams. Good full pillars with bold date, crude cross, thin and worn from corrosion, toned. Estimate: $100 - $150

355. Cob 8 reales, 1677E. S-P37b. KM-26. 19.3 grams. Full but off-center cross, bold waves, moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7030. Estimate: $90 - $135

356. Cob 8 reales, 1677E. S-P37b. KM-26. 20.9 grams. Good but off-center cross, two bold assayers, moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate# 7028. Estimate: $80 - $120

353. Cob 8 reales, 1677E. S-P37b. KM-26. 19.6 grams. Big flan with choice full pillars, full but crude cross, moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7026. Estimate: $100 - $150

357. Cob 8 reales, 1677E. S-P37b. KM-26. 17.5 grams. Full 1677 date in legend, double struck and very sea-worn with edge-split. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7029. Estimate: $75 - $110

354. Cob 8 reales, 1677E. S-P37b. KM-26. 20.7 grams. Good but off-center pillars-and-waves, nearly full cross, two assayers, moderately corroded. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7027. Estimate: $90 - $135

358. Cob 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-26. 21.3 grams. Nice full cross with bold date below, clear date between pillars also, three assayers, some corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7036. Estimate: $135 - $200

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359. Cob 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-26. 16.0 grams. Two dates, full but crude pillars, off-center cross, moderate corrosion, toned. Estimate: $110 - $165

363. Cob 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-26. 16.3 grams. Good cross, bold denomination and mintmark, sea-worn. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7037. Estimate: $90 - $135

360. Cob 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-26. 17.2 grams. Two dates and assayers, good full cross, moderate corrosion, large edge-split. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7038. Estimate: $110 - $165

364. Cob 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-26. 20.6 grams. Two pillars-side dates, bold denomination, good but off-center cross, corroded and sea-worn. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7127. Estimate: $90 - $135

361. Cob 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-26. 19.6 grams. Bold date in legend, crude strike with lots of flatness, some sea-wear, toned, edge-split. Estimate: $110 - $165

365. Cob 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-26. 20.9 grams. Clear E78-P above waves, one bold pillar, full but weak cross, corroded and sea-worn, with spots of toning. Estimate: $90 - $135

362. Cob 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-26. 16.8 grams. Bold date below full cross, king’s name in legend, pillars side corroded. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7031. Estimate: $100 - $150

366. Cob 8 reales, 1678(E). S-P37b. KM-26. 15.1 grams. Bold date and waves, two mintmarks, heavily sea-worn, richly toned. Estimate: $90 - $135

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367. Cob 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38. KM-26. 19.6 grams. Bold pillarsand-waves with clear date, second date below cross, C to right, light corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7045. Estimate: $135 - $200

368. Cob 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38. KM-26. 15.6 grams. Bold pillars with two mintmarks and assayers, clear date, full cross with third assayer to right, rather sea-worn but richly toned. Estimate: $110 - $165

369. Cob 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38. KM-26. 19.2 grams. Nice but off-center cross, full pillars, three mintmarks, two assayers, moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7048. Estimate: $110 - $165

370. Cob 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38. KM-26. 20.7 grams. Two assayers, bold cross and pillars-and-waves, two dates, moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7040. Estimate: $110 - $165

371. Cob 8 reales, 1679V/C. S-P39. KM-26. 21.1 grams. Scarce over-assayer (clear on pillars side), bold waves, full but off-center cross, two bold mintmarks, moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7047. Estimate: $120 - $180

372. Cob 8 reales, 1679V/C. S-P39. KM-26. 18.2 grams. Big flan with bold over-assayer on both sides (scarce), bold mintmark, moderate corrosion, two edge-splits. With ROBCAR photocertificate #7051. Estimate: $120 - $180

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373. Cob 8 reales, 1679V, mintmark and assayer transposed. SP39. KM-26. 20.9 grams. Very rare error with V at upper left and bottom right, good full waves, much corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7042. Estimate: $135 - $200

374. Cob 8 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-26. 20.4 grams. Much bold detail including date below cross, doubled pillars, some corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7135. Estimate: $135 - $200

375. Cob 8 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-26. 19.8 grams. Full but off-center cross with king’s name in legend, bold full pillars-andwaves, two dates, moderate corrosion and edge-split. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7052. Estimate: $120 - $180

376. Cob 8 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-26. 14.4 grams. Good but off-center cross, bold pillars, two assayers, sea-worn and corroded. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7046. Estimate: $110 - $165

377. Cob 8 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-26. 20.5 grams. Big flan with bold full cross and pillars despite corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7044. Estimate: $110 - $165

378. Cob 8 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-26. 19.1 grams. Full cross, full but corroded pillars, two assayers. With ROBCAR photocertificate #7043. Estimate: $100 - $150

379. Cob 8 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-26. 18.3 grams. Full cross and pillars but heavily sea-worn, nicely toned. Estimate: $100 $150

380. Cob 8 reales, 1679, assayer not visible. S-P38 or P39. KM26. 20.8 grams. Good full cross and pillars, bold date but assayer too weak to discern, sea-worn but nicely toned. Estimate: $150 $225

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381. Cob 8 reales, 1680V. S-P39. KM-26. 18.1 grams. Big flan with nice full cross and pillars-and-waves, bold king’s name CAR, corroded but well detailed. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7054. Estimate: $135 - $200

384. Encrusted cob 8 reales. 22.5 grams. Most of cross visible underneath a veneer of brown-gray encrustation, the coin itself still solid. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7055. Estimate: $90 - $135

382. Cob 8 reales, 1680V. S-P39. KM-26. 22.1 grams. Large planchet with nearly full pillars detail, full cross, CAR- of king’s name in legend, sea-worn but nicely toned. Estimate: $135 - $200

385. Encrusted cob 8 reales. 19.8 grams. Thin coin with sandy tan encrustation all over, one black spot. With ROBCAR photocertificate #7057. Estimate: $75 - $110

383. Encrusted cob 8 reales. 25.9 grams. Cross side heavily encrusted with small bits of brownish shell (very attractive), pillars side more exposed but still uncleaned, solid coin inside. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7056. Estimate: $100 - $150 386. Encrusted clump of three cobs, two 8 reales and one 1 real. 64 grams. Two big coins practically side by side, the 1 real hidden within encrustation of white and green shell bits covering all, the coin surfaces dark and crystallized. With ROBCAR photocertificate #7150. Estimate: $200 - $300 387. Clump of three cobs, one 8 reales and two 1 reales. 34 grams. One big 8 reales with two small 1 reales peeking from behind, the face of the 8 reales cleaned and with pillars and waves and 1674 date clear, the backsides all encrusted (dark gray), one small pebble and part of a shell. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7151. Estimate: $200 - $300

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388. Cob 4 reales, 1677E, with denomination 4 in retrograde. S-P37b. KM-25. 7.3 grams. Rare error, the “backwards” 4 above the (full) cross only, good pillars-and-waves, weak date, sea-worn, edge-split. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #3219. Estimate: $110 - $165

389. Cob 4 reales, 1677E. S-P37b. KM-25. 9.1 grams. One full pillar, good but off-center cross with full 4 (normal) above, much flatness but little corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7058. Estimate: $110 - $165

392. Cob 4 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-25. 7.9 grams. Full pillars with bold date, bold cross, thin from corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7059. Estimate: $100 - $150

393. Cob 4 reales, 1678(E). S-P37b. KM-25. 8.9 grams. One bold pillar plus bold waves, cross, mintmark and denomination, otherwise sea-worn or flat. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7060. Estimate: $100 - $150

390. Cob 4 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-25. 12.2 grams. Unusually thick flan with full cross and pillars, bold 8 of date, no corrosion but some flatness, nicely toned. Estimate: $110 - $165

394. Cob 4 reales, 1679C. S-P38. KM-25. 9.3 grams. Crude planchet but with full assayer (rare), two dates, full cross, moderate corrosion, edge-split. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7066. Estimate: $120 - $180

391. Cob 4 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-25. 10.3 grams. Full cross with bold E to right and 4 above, crude pillars with bold date, corroded, with blue-green sediment in crevices. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7061. Estimate: $100 - $150

395. Cob 4 reales, 1679C. S-P38. KM-25. 8.4 grams. Round flan with clear date and assayer (rare), good but off-center cross, bold waves, king’s name (CA)ROL(VS) in legend, sea-worn, nicely toned. Estimate: $100 - $150

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396. Cob 4 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-25. 11.0 grams. Choice pillars-side details (bold date and assayer), good cross, light corrosion with green-blue sediment in crevices. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7068. Estimate: $115 - $175

397. Cob 4 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-25. 8.5 grams. Good cross and pillars, two assayers, sea-worn, with green-blue sediment in crevices. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7073. Estimate: $110 - $165

398. Cob 4 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-25. 11.4 grams. Big flan with full cross and pillars, moderate corrosion, odd edge-split. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7067. Estimate: $100 - $150

399. Cob 4 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-25. 8.9 grams. Good full cross, smoothly sea-worn around edge. With ROBCAR photocertificate #7071. Estimate: $100 - $150

400. Cob 4 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-25. 7.7 grams. Choice full pillars and waves, good cross, but thin from corrosion and wear. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7064. Estimate: $100 - $150

401. Cob 4 reales, 1679V. S-P39. KM-25. 9.1 grams. Full pillars, good cross, typically sea-worn but not bad. With ROBCAR photocertificate #7062. Estimate: $100 - $150

402. Cob 4 reales, 1679, assayer not visible. S-P38 or P39. KM25. 7.0 grams. Bold cross and mintmark, full pillars-and-waves but thin and sea-worn. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7065. Estimate: $90 - $135

403. Cob 4 reales, 1680V. S-P39. KM-25. 8.5 grams. Very large, thin flan with choice full details (100 percent full and finely detailed waves), full cross, full 1680 in legend, crude edge, corroded. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7074. Estimate: $115 - $175

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404. Cob 2 reales, 1664E. S-P37a. KM-24. 4.5 grams. Full cross, bold pillars and waves, lightly corroded with blue-green sediment in crevices. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7077. Estimate: $80 - $120 405. Cob 2 reales, 1670E. S-P37b. KM-24. 4.2 grams. Nice full cross and pillars, brown toning in crevices, edge-split. Estimate: $80 - $120 406. Cob 2 reales, 1673E. S-P37b. KM-24. 4.5 grams. Two dates, good pillars, POTOSI in legend, thin from corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7078. Estimate: $60 - $90

407. Cob 2 reales, 1674E. S-P37b. KM-24. 4.2 grams. Good cross and pillars, thin from corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7079. Estimate: $70 - $100 408. Cob 2 reales, 1675E. S-P37b. KM-24. 4.6 grams. Two assayers, decent cross, nice pillars, minimal corrosion, green-blue sediment in crevices. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7081. Estimate: $80 - $120 409. Cob 2 reales, 1675E. S-P37b. KM-24. 5.0 grams. Full 1675 date in legend, bold pillars, not much corrosion but some flatness. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7080. Estimate: $70 - $100

410. Cob 2 reales, 1677E. S-P37b. KM-24. 4.4 grams. Two clear dates, bold mintmark, full but doubled cross, crude edge, green-blue sediment in crevices. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7082. Estimate: $80 - $120 411. Cob 2 reales, 1678E. S-P37b. KM-24. 7.6 grams. Bold date between pillars, bold waves, bold assayer to right of cross, crude edge with flat periphery, not much corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7084. Estimate: $80 - $120 412. Cob 2 reales, 1679C. S-P38. KM-24. 4.7 grams. Bold date and assayer and denomination, some flatness but not much corrosion, scarce. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7086. Estimate: $75 - $110

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413. Cob 2 reales, 1679C. S-P38. KM-24. 3.6 grams. Broad flan, scarce, with bold date and mintmark, two assayers, some flatness and thinning. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7085. Estimate: $75 - $110 414. Lot of one 2 reales and one 1 real, Philip IV. 2.5 and 2.1 grams. Two worn and only partially attributable cobs, the 2R pillars-andwaves assayer E, the 1R shield-type 1640s. Estimate: $60 - $90 415. Cob 1 real, (1651-2)E. S-P36. KM-12b. 2.2 grams. Choice details (cross and shield), odd shape, toned, minimal corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7088. Estimate: $50 - $75

416. Cob 1 real, 1655E. S-P37a. KM-13. 3.6 grams. Good cross, off-center pillars-and-waves with clear date, no corrosion but some flatness. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7109. Estimate: $50 - $75 417. Cob 1 real, 1659E. S-P37a. KM-13. 2.5 grams. Nice central details with peripheral flatness, good crown, no corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7110. Estimate: $50 - $75 418. Cob 1 real, 1661E. S-P37a. KM-13. 3.0 grams. Choice full details on a large flan, off-center pillars, full PHILIPPVS, no corrosion, nice toning. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7089. Estimate: $60 - $90 419. Cob 1 real, 1662E. S-P37a. KM-13. 3.4 grams. Nice full cross, bold waves, two dates and assayers, minimal corrosion, blue-green sediment in crevices. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7090. Estimate: $50 - $75

420. Cob 1 real, 1663E. S-P37a. KM-13. 4.1 grams. Choice full pillars side, cross corroded, two dates. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7091. Estimate: $50 - $75 421. Cob 1 real, 1665E. S-P37a. KM-13. 1.8 grams. Full pillars and cross, thin from corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7092. Estimate: $50 - $75 422. Cob 1 real, 1666E. S-P37a. KM-13. 2.7 grams. Cute teardrop shape with full cross above clear date, king’s ordinal IIII, one full pillar, light corrosion, nice detail. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7093. Estimate: $50 - $75 423. Cob 1 real, 1668E. S-P37b. KM-23. 1.9 grams. Nice cross, choice pillars with bold date and two assayers, thin but with good detail and rainbow toning on fields. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7112. Estimate: $50 - $75

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424. Cob 1 real, 1669E. S-P37b. KM-23. 2.2 grams. Good cross, one bold pillar, no corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7094. Estimate: $50 - $75

431. Cob 1 real, 1673E. S-P37b. KM-23. 2.4 grams. Good cross and date between pillars, light corrosion and peripheral flatness. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7100. Estimate: $50 - $75

425. Cob 1 real, 1669E. S-P37b. KM-23. 3.2 grams. Awesome bold date between pillars, crude cross, no corrosion but peripheral flatness. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7114. Estimate: $50 $75

432. Cob 1 real, 1674E. S-P37b. KM-23. 27 grams. Off-center pillars with bold date, nice but incomplete cross with pretty crown at top, no corrosion but part of edge flat. With ROBCAR photocertificate #7102. Estimate: $50 - $75

426. Cob 1 real, 1669E. S-P37b. KM-23. 2.7 grams. Good centers, some corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7113. Estimate: $50 - $75

433. Cob 1 real, 1674E. S-P37b. KM-23. 3.2 grams. Good cross, nice pillars with bold date, light corrosion, blue-green sediment in crevices. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7103. Estimate: $50 $75

427. Cob 1 real, 1670E. S-P37b. KM-23. 2.9 grams. Good full pillars, good cross, curiously oversized denomination I (probably taken from the letter punches for 2R legends), light corrosion only. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7096. Estimate: $60 - $90

428. Cob 1 real, 1670E. S-P37b. KM-23. 1.7 grams. Two dates, good centers, thin from sea-wear. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7095. Estimate: $50 - $75 429. Cob 1 real, 1672E. S-P37b. KM-23. 2.4 grams. Choice full date between pillars, second date below good cross, no corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7098. Estimate: $60 - $90

430. Cob 1 real, 1673(E). S-P37b. KM-23. 3.0 grams. Attractive turnip shape with good cross and one pillar, two dates, no corrosion but flat spots near edge. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7099. Estimate: $60 - $90

434. Cob 1 real, 1674E. S-P37b. KM-23. 3.9 grams. Choice pillars side (perfectly centered and well detailed), full but corroded cross, two dates and mintmarks and assayers. With ROBCAR photocertificate #7115. Estimate: $50 - $75

435. Cob 1 real, 1674E. S-P37b. KM-23. 3.6 grams. Good detail on both sides despite one-third flatness near edge, three mintmarks, no corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7101. Estimate: $50 - $75 436. Cob 1 real, 1676E. S-P37b. KM-23. 2.9 grams. Bold pillars and centers, particularly choice date and assayer, no corrosion but some peripheral flatness. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7104. Estimate: $50 - $75

437. Cob 1 real, 1677E. S-P37b. KM-23. 3.7 grams. Two dates, bold waves, doubled pillars, crude cross, light corrosion. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7106. Estimate: $50 - $75

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Merestein, sunk in 1702 off South Africa Netherlands (Habsburg)

438. Cob 1 real, 1679C. S-P38. KM-23. 2.7 grams. Choice but off-center cross, one bold pillar with bold date and assayer, slightly crude edge with flat spot, no corrosion, scarce. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7107. Estimate: $60 - $90 439. Cob 1 real, 1679C. S-P38. KM-23. 1.8 grams. Full pillars with bold date, clear assayer, two mintmarks, no corrosion, scarce. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #7117. Estimate: $60 - $90

442. Zwolle, schelling, 1600s. 4.1 grams. Small, thin coin (attribution incomplete) with crowned arms on obverse, two-headed eagle on reverse, some legend visible, mostly darkly toned and worn but no corrosion. With Pearson photo-certificate #08418. Estimate: $100 - $150

Netherlands (United)

440. Large clump with iron object and 1 real cob. 255 grams. At first glance this appears to be a pretty but low-value “EO” (encrusted object), but upon closer examination you can see a fully encrusted cob clinging to an extremity of the odd-shaped artifact, lots of shells and pebbles appended, mostly orange but one greenish protrusion that could indicate cuprous contents. With ROBCAR photocertificate #7152. Estimate: $200 - $300

Joanna, sunk in 1682 off South Africa Potosí, Bolivia

441. Cob 8 reales, 1664(E). S-P37a. KM-21. 23.3 grams. Big flan with full cross and pillars, two dates (1664 in legend) but all somewhat corroded and with patchy toning, scarce early specimen from this wreck. With generic certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185

443. Westfriesland, schelling, 1600s. 3.8 grams. Bold details, especially the legends, nicely contrasting toning, no corrosion, different design than the above lot (attribution incomplete). With Pearson photo-certificate #08417. Estimate: $100 - $150

Association, sunk in 1707 off the Scilly Isles, southwest of England Lima, Peru

444. Cob 8 reales, 1695R. S-L12. KM-24. 25.9 grams. Good full cross with date below, full but lightly corroded pillars-side detail (second date, full mintmark and assayer), solid coin, attractively rainbow-toned. With World Treasure Books (Martin Pritchard) photo-certificate. Estimate: $275 - $425

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Great Britain

445. Clump of four British silver coins: One crown, one halfcrown and two sixpences. 57 grams. Beautiful clump with vivid orange encrustation around the coins, which are arranged in two offset stacks and have been judiciously cleaned to expose just enough details to show that the crown is Charles II, the halfcrown is William III, the two sixpences with partial dates, minimal corrosion. Estimate: $300 - $450

Multiple mints

448. Clump of two coins: Lima, Peru, cob 8 reales 1685 and Great Britain half crown of William III. 44 grams. Just a twocoin stack, but with lots of impacted dark-brown mud between the coins and rare as a mix of two totally different coins, both of them in rather decent condition, the 8 reales in fact with bold date and assayer (rather valuable in its own right), a small but interesting display. Estimate: $350 - $525

Feversham, sunk in 1711 off Nova Scotia, Canada Mexico City, Mexico

446. Lot of two English coins of William III (1694-1702): London, crown, 169?; Exeter, sixpence, 1697. 24.7 and 2.8 grams. The crown is corroded and sea-worn and silvery but at least somewhat recognizable; the sixpence is relatively uncorroded but worn and wrinkled, with mostly readable details and toned. Estimate: $75 - $110

449. Cob 8 reales, Philip III, assayer F. KM-44.1. 24.5 grams. Thick and solid with surface corrosion only, bold full shield, full but weak cross, well centered, no toning, one of the nicer specimens from this tough wreck. With photocopy of history of wreck from Christie’s auction. Estimate: $175 - $275

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447. York, England, sixpence, William III, 1697. SP-3536. KM484.17. 2.9 grams. Bold king’s bust with mintmark Y below, lightly toned, some wear but not much corrosion. With Terry Hiron photocertificate. Estimate: $50 - $75

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DeLiefde, sunk in 1711 off the Shetland 1715 Fleet, east coast of Florida Islands, north of Scotland Netherlands (United)

Mexico City, Mexico

450. Gelderland, “rider” ducatoon, 1674. DM-1009. 27.9 grams. Large coin but with significant surface corrosion, dark spots near center, date barely visible at top of reverse. With generic Ponterio certificate from 1993. Estimate: $75 - $110

453. Cob 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer not visible (ca. 1650). SM19. KM-45. 14.2 grams. Very early coin for this wreck, and not in the best shape in the world (heavily corroded and with upturned edge), yet with nearly full cross and shield, richly toned. With Real Eight Co. certificate signed by Bob Johnson. Estimate: $60 - $90

451. Zwolle, “rider” ducatoon, 1682. DM-1042. 31.9 grams. Solid coin with full legends, full but worn inner details (knight on horse, arms), lightly toned, no corrosion, rare date in reference books. With generic Ponterio certificate from 1993. Estimate: $90 - $135

452. Utrecht, “rider” ducatoon, 1711. DM-1031. 32.2 grams. Very choice specimen with full and bold details all over, minute traces of corrosion, lightly toned. With generic Ponterio certificate from 1993. Estimate: $200 - $300

454. Cob 8 reales, Charles II. KM-46. 26.9 grams. Curious coin with large bubble-hole in metal (as made), bold shield, full cross, no corrosion but quite worn. Reportedly from the “Cabin wreck” site. Estimate: $100 - $150

455. Cob 8 reales, (1)711(J). S-M22. KM-47. 17.8 grams. Clear date (scarce), full oMJ and shield and cross but all quite sea-worn, lightly toned, part of edge crude. With Cobb Coin Co. (Fisher) photo-certificate #CB81-017. Estimate: $125 - $185

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456. Cob 8 reales, 1711?(J). S-M22. KM-47. 24.8 grams. Bottom half of date only (not certain), good cross, patchy toning and encrustation but no corrosion. Estimate: $90 - $135 459. Cob 8 reales, 1714J. S-M22. KM-47. 24.3 grams. Bold date but with last digit incomplete and not 100 percent certain, also full oMJ, not much corrosion but significant flatness (cross nearly blank), nicely toned. With hand-signed Frank Sedwick letter of authenticity from 1994 (a collectible in its own right!). Estimate: $150 - $225

457. Cob 8 reales, 1713?(J), encrusted. S-M22. KM-47. 25.9 grams. Loaded with green, white and brown encrustation and shell bits, but judiciously cleaned off where the date appears, showing a clear 171 and possibly the bottom of a 3, rare like this. Estimate: $125 - $185

460. Cob 8 reales, (17)14?J. S-M22. KM-47. 24.5 grams. Partial date (uncertain, possibly earlier), choice full cross and crown, full oMJ and shield, minimal corrosion. Estimate: $125 - $185

458. Cob 8 reales, 1714(J). S-M22. KM-47. 21.6 grams. Bold date (scarce), some cross and crown and shield but mostly corroded, silvery, interesting shape. Estimate: $200 - $300

Any questions? Please email us at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

461. Cob 8 reales, 1715(J). S-M22. KM-47. 26.1 grams. Very desirable coin with 100 percent full and bold date (rare thus), bold oM, great cross, no corrosion at all, nicely toned. Estimate: $500 - $750

99

462. Cob 8 reales, 171(4 or 5)J. S-M22. KM-47. 26.8 grams. Solid but mostly flat coin with clear partial date, neater style begun in 1714, no corrosion, some toning. Estimate: $90 - $135

463. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer J, with Real Eight pedigree and extensive paperwork. S-M22. KM-47. 26.9 grams. Good specimen with bold oMJ, nearly full shield, minimal corrosion but some flatness and wear, some toning, desirable for the paperwork from Kip Wagner and the Real Eight Co. that has accompanied it since it was found in the 1960s. With hand-written and hand-signed letter on Real Eight stationery dated 1962 from Kip Wagner, stating “I personally chose this coin for you…,” plus a hand-written letter from 1967 by the coin’s former owner (written in Mexico), plus two “boilerplate” letters from Harry Cannon of Real Eight and Robert Nesmith of Foul Anchor Archives that discuss how and when the coins of the 1715 Fleet were made. Estimate: $200 - $300

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464. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible. KM-47. 26.8 grams. Thick and solid coin, dark and uncleaned, with mintmark oM and most of shield visible, nearly full cross, no corrosion but deep nick where date would be. With curious original cardboard holder with handwriting as follows: “Found by Kip Wagner, Sebastian, Florida / Found 1966 from Spanish Treasure Ships sunk 1715 / Minted 1692 [sic] OMJ Mexico 8 reales.” Estimate: $75 $110

465. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer J. S-M22. KM-47. 25.1 grams. Bold oM and choice full shield of a smaller variety than usual, good full cross, toned and only partially corroded on part of edge. Estimate: $100 - $150

466. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer J. S-M22. KM-47. 25.4 grams. Same small-shield variant as above (fully visible), full but weak J, good full cross, darkly toned all over, no corrosion. Estimate: $125 - $185

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467. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible (J). S-M22. KM47. 26.5 grams. Same small-shield variant as above (nearly full) on an elongated flan with nearly full shield, full denomination •8•, full cross, darkly toned, no corrosion but one patch of green encrustation near edge. With original Real Eight Co. sales receipt from the 1960s. Estimate: $150 - $225

468. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, oMJ. S-M22. KM-47. 22.2 grams. Long rectangular flan with bold oMJ, most of shield and cross, light to moderate corrosion, nice packaging. In large, blue leatherette folio (diploma style) with small booklet and certificate stating its origin as Nuestra Señora del Carmen y San Antonio signed by Roger Miklos of Nomad Treasure Seekers. Estimate: $150 - $225

469. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible. KM-47. 26.7 grams. Totally corrosion-free (see pedigree) but with much peripheral flatness, good cross, most of shield, nicely toned, rectangular flan. From John Durham’s “Bulldozer Bonanza,” with West Bay Trading Co. certificate and letter from John Durham explaining his find. Estimate: $200 - $300

470. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible. KM-47. 25.7 grams. Very thick, solid planchet with most of cross and shield, no corrosion but lots of peripheral flatness, nice packaging. In large, blue leatherette folio (diploma style) with small booklet and certificate stating its origin as Nuestra Señora del Carmen y San Antonio signed by Roger Miklos of Nomad Treasure Seekers. Estimate: $150 - $225

471. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible. KM-47. 26.9 grams. Choice full shield of a cruder, earlier type (possibly assayer L instead of the usual J), bold denomination 8, solid and uncorroded and with nicely contrasting toning but cross oddly doubled (somewhat scarce for this issue). With Real Eight Co. certificate #M5143. Estimate: $125 - $185

472. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible. KM-47. 24.0 grams. Rectangular flan with full shield and cross, light corrosion, darkly toned. With small certificate hand-signed by Mel Fisher and Rupe Gates. Estimate: $100 - $150

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473. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible. KM-47. 25.4 grams. Interestingly rhomboid-shaped flan with decent cross, most of shield, minimal corrosion but typically worn and darkly toned. Estimate: $90 - $135 476. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible, with shells appended. KM-47. 26.7 grams. Rectangular coin with significant bands (on both sides) of pieces of shells encrusted onto the dark surfaces, something you rarely see these days as most found coins are totally cleaned. Estimate: $150 - $225

474. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible, with crystallized cloth appended. KM-47. 27.1 grams. Large, round coin with most of cross visible on one side, the shield side almost completely covered with the original tan canvas bag that held these coins, now crystallized and solid, a rare and highly desirable relic. With Sedwick certificate from 2002. Estimate: $200 - $300

477. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible, thickly encrusted. KM-47. 29.3 grams. Long flan with decent cross peeking out from behind a “mountain� of white coral encrustation, an even larger mound on the other side, scarce thus. Estimate: $150 - $225

475. Cob 8 reales, Philip V?, assayer not visible, encrusted. 25.2 grams. Most of cross visible underneath a veneer of brown and green encrustation with tiny shell bits, scarce and desirable. With small, hand-signed Mel Fisher certificate from 1967. Estimate: $200 - $300

Please send your bids to our special email bidding address: treasurebids@gmail.com

478. Cob 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible, with thick encrustation KM-47. 27.8 grams. Sandy white encrustation graces the rim of this coin on both sides, the coin itself with clear shield and cross (very solid), scarce to see them uncleaned like this. With Sedwick certificate from 2003. Estimate: $150 - $225

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479. Clump of two cobs, one 8 reales and one 4 reales. 42.2 grams. Two solid and well-detailed cobs sandwiched together with shield-sides out, their dark surfaces in stark contrast with the surrounding bright-white coral encrustation that binds them, quite a nice display and rare to see in today’s market. With Sedwick certificate from 2002. Estimate: $300 - $450

483. Cob 4 reales, Philip V?, assayer not visible, thickly encrusted. 22.0 grams. The barrel-shape of the coin is recognizable but there are no visible details because it is totally uncleaned, with dark-orange, tan and white encrustation over the whole surface (but thick toward one end), a nice display that is rare to see today. Estimate: $150 - $225

480. Cob 4 reales, (1)713(J). S-M22. KM-40. 12.8 grams. Choice, uncorroded specimen on an elongated flan with bold date, good full cross, richly toned, scarce and very desirable in this condition. With 2001 Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $250 - $375

481. Cob 4 reales, (17)14(J). S-M22. KM-40. 10.8 grams. Very bold full 14 of date but rest of coin flat and corroded, no toning. Pedigreed to an unspecified Richard Long auction. Estimate: $125 - $185

484. Lot of three cob 4 reales, all Philip V, assayer J where visible. S-M22. KM-40. 12.1, 11.9 and 11.5 grams. Three corroded but solid specimens (uncleaned), one a very rusty brown, one with natural hole in center, decent details on each. Estimate: $100 $150

485. Cob 1 real, (1)657(P). S-M19. KM-unlisted. 1.4 grams. Extremely rare unlisted date (very clear on this piece), good full cross, nice top-left corner of shield, a little thin from corrosion but nicely toned, very early for the Fleet. With Pearson certificate #062072. Estimate: $75 - $110 482. Cob 4 reales, Philip V, assayer J. S-M22. KM-40. 12.9 grams. Choice, uncorroded specimen (see pedigree) with bold full assayer, good but off-center shield and cross, beautifully toned, curiously blunted points. From John Durham’s “Bulldozer Bonanza,” with letter from John Durham explaining his find. Estimate: $175 $275

486. Cob 1 real, Philip V, assayer J. S-M22. KM-30. 3.2 grams. Bold details (nearly full shield, oMJ, off-center cross) despite very dark color with brownish encrustation in crevices, solid and corrosion-free. Estimate: $50 - $75

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487. Cob 1 real, Philip V, assayer not visible, mounted in silver-wire bezel for pendant. KM-30. 3.7 grams. Decent but corroded coin (most of cross and shield) inside simple bezel, ready to wear. Estimate: $75 - $110 488. Lot of four cob 1 reales, all Philip V, assayer not visible. KM-30. 3.1, 3.0, 2.1 and 1.8 grams. One rectangular and corrosion-free with nice details, one lightly corroded with full cross, and the other two somewhat corroded and encrusted, nice lot for cleaning and putting into jewelry. Estimate: $100 - $150 489. Cob ½ real, (16)91(L). S-M21. KM-unlisted. 2.1 grams. Very clear date that is extremely rare (unlisted) to left of full crown, crude cross with flatness but no corrosion, interesting barrel-shaped flan, darkly toned. Estimate: $200 - $300 490. Cob ½ real, 1709J. S-M22. KM-24. 1.7 grams. Rare with full date, bold oM, most of monogram and cross, lightly corroded. From the “Corrigans” site. Estimate: $125 - $185 491. Cob ½ real, Philip V, assayer not visible. KM-24. 1.7 grams. Nice full cross, nearly full monogram, large teardrop-shaped flan, darkly toned, no corrosion. Estimate: $50 - $75 492. Cob ½ real, Philip V?, assayer not visible. 0.5 gram. Good cross despite heavy corrosion that obliterated the monogram side and made the coin thin. With Real Eight Co. certificate #M9463. Estimate: $50 - $75

493. Cob denomination set of 8-4-2-1 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible, in classic wooden box. 25.1, 12.8, 6.5 and 3.1 grams. Four decent coins (the 4 reales choice but with crude edge as made) with nearly full crosses and shields, but best part is the burgundy velvetlined hinged box with clasp and a plaque on top that shows a ship and says “Original Silver Cob Coins Recovered From The Spanish Treasure Fleet Sunk During A Hurricane In 1715 Off Florida’s East Coast,” a promotional item of unknown vintage that we have seen a few times but always at a premium. With promotional wooden box and plaque, also each coin with a Sedwick certificate from 2001. Estimate: $350 - $525

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Potosí, Bolivia

497. Cob 8 reales, 1701F, posthumous Charles II. S-P42. KM26. 26.1 grams. Very choice specimen with two dates (possible 1/0 between pillars, which would be unique), full POTOSI in legend, three mintmarks, 1½ assayers, interesting shape, no corrosion, hairline edge-split, full cross and pillars-and-waves, even with part of king’s name in legend, really exceptional quality for both the issue (which is scarce) and the provenance. Estimate: $300 - $450

494. Cob denomination set of 8-4-2-1-½ reales, Philip V, assayer J where visible. 25.9, 13.1, 2.9, 2.8 and 1.6 grams. A complete set, nicely matched in terms of quality, each coin with minor corrosion if any, the ½R with oMJ visible, the 1R, 2R and 8R with denomination visible, the 1R with king’s name visible, and all five with good crosses, especially the 4R and ½R, an increasingly hard set to put together these days. Estimate: $350 - $525

Lima, Peru

498. Cob 8 reales, Philip V?, completely cocooned in coral. 25.6 grams. A really cool artifact, the coin totally cover with whitish coral with pink and green highlights, with just enough of the pillars side peeking through to identify the mint and part of the date (early 1700s), could be cleaned to show details but then you would lose the unique encrustation. Estimate: $200 - $300

495. Cob 8 reales, 1700H. S-L15. KM-24. 18.7 grams. Moderately to heavily corroded but with full waves and one pillar, clear date and mintmark, good but very off-center cross with assayer to right. Estimate: $100 - $150 496. Cob 1 real, 1706R. S-L16. KM-31. 3.0 grams. Nice full cross with part of king’s name in legend, excellent full pillars and crown, two assayers, no corrosion but some dark staining, scarce. With Sedwick certificate from 2004. Estimate: $75 - $110

499. Cob 2 reales, 1708Y. S-P43a. KM-29. 6.2 grams. Full cross and pillars, two dates, clear assayer, solid coin with some surface corrosion and encrustation, patchy toning, slightly warped flan. With generic Cobb Coin Co. (Fisher) certificate. Estimate: $75 - $110 500. Cob 1 real, 1658E, scarce from this wreck. S-P37a. KM13. 2.1 grams. Nice full pillars-and-waves, full cross, all three dates and mintmarks and assayers, lightly corroded (crystallized), no toning, scarce early specimen from this wreck. Estimate: $50 $75

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Bogotá, Colombia

501. Cob ¼ real, Philip IV, assayer P (late 1620s). S-B4. KM-unlisted. 0.7 gram. Probably the rarest silver cob ever found on the Fleet, this small, early coin is one of only a small handful of Colombian ¼R cobs in existence (this particular one, with assayer P, is unique), and is literally the only ¼R cob of any mint we have seen from the Fleet! The assayer P to the right of the full castle is bold, and the lion on the other side is full but slightly off-center, all lightly corroded but well detailed for such a small coin. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

Uncertain mints

502. Large clump of coral and coins. 271 grams. This item and the next two are something you just DO NOT see any more: original, rocky, shell-encrusted clumps from the Real Eight days! This first one is massive, with at least six coins cocooned in a white, brown and green matrix that shows a lot of wormy pits and at least one big shell piece. Back in the 1960s when the coins were not so valuable, these clumps were more highly prized as “sea art,” but these days the temptation to tear them apart and possibly find a rare date or type makes clumps like this quite rare. Estimate: $750 - $1,100 503. Large clump of coral and coins. 173 grams. As above, with at least six coins and lots of rocky matrix. Estimate: $600 - $900 504. Large clump of coral and coins. 179 grams. This clump (like the above) shows at least two coins (but who knows what else lurks inside the matrix!) and the reverse impression of a coin on the outside. Estimate: $600 - $900

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Slot ter Hooge, sunk in 1724 off the Madeira 1733 Fleet, Florida Keys Islands Mexico City, Mexico

Netherlands (United)

505. Utrecht, “lion” daalder (leeuwendaalder), 1617. DM-843. 26.1 grams. Very choice, lustrous, high grade specimen with bold full date, good lion, much legend, light corrosion here and there, some toning, rare provenance. With 1983 certificate signed by Robert Sténuit. Estimate: $250 - $375

507. Cob 8 reales, (173)0G/R. S-M25. KM-47a. 22.7 grams. Bold oMG/R (scarce over-assayer), nice partial shield, full but corroded cross, thick and solid coin, nicely toned. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #58. Estimate: $200 - $300

Chameau, sunk in 1725 off Nova Scotia, Canada France

508. Cob 8 reales, 1731F. S-M26. KM-47a. 20.1 grams. Full and bold date and mintmark, full but corroded cross, oblong-shaped flan, moderate corrosion all over, good toning. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #176. Estimate: $200 - $300

506. Mint uncertain, ecu, 1725. 17.0 grams. Typical specimen from this wreck with heavily corroded obverse (where the mintmark would appear, below the bust of the king) but decent reverse with bold date, uncleaned and encrusted, lots of pretty green and white color. With Frank and Daniel Sedwick certificate from 1993. Estimate: $60 - $90 509. Cob 8 reales, 1731F. S-M26. KM-47a. 22.2 grams. Full 731 of date with pitting on the 3 that makes it look a lot like a G, most of cross, moderate corrosion, nicely toned. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #97. Estimate: $200 - $300 510. Cob 8 reales, (1)732/1F. S-M26. KM-47a. 20.4 grams. Bold date with clear 2/1 overdate, full oMF, good full cross, most of shield, some corrosion, nicely toned. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #124. Estimate: $225 - $350

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511. Cob 8 reales, 1732/1F. S-M26. KM-47a. 20.0 grams. Full date with clear overdate, odd elongated shape, good cross (nearly full), some corrosion, well toned. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #79. Estimate: $200 - $300

512. Cob 8 reales, 1732F. S-M26. KM-47a. 25.9 grams. Very choice full date, good cross, very solid and uncorroded, lightly toned. With Fisher/Sinclair photo-certificate #95A-6616 from 1985. Estimate: $250 - $375

513. Cob 8 reales, 1732F. S-M26. KM-47a. 20.3 grams. Very bold full date, good but incomplete cross and shield, light corrosion only, well toned. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #61. Estimate: $250 - $375

514. Cob 8 reales, 1732F. S-M26. KM-47a. 19.1 grams. Good full date, full oMF, most of cross and shield, some corrosion, nicely toned, attractive rhomboid shape. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #63. Estimate: $200 - $300

515. Cob 8 reales, 1732F. S-M26. KM-47a. 22.3 grams. Nice full date, weak but uncorroded shield, cross side heavily corroded, some toning. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #56. Estimate: $150 - $225

516. Cob 8 reales, 1733F. S-M26. KM-47a. 20.2 grams. Virtually full date (probably 3/2) and oMF, good but off-center cross, corroded only around the edge, compact flan (thick), nicely toned, scarce final year of Mexican cobs. With Frank Sedwick letter of authenticity from 1995. Estimate: $250 - $375

517. Cob 8 reales, 173?F. S-M26. KM-47a. 20.6 grams. Nice full cross, full oMF, clear partial date, good but off-center shield, light corrosion only, well toned. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #62. Estimate: $150 - $225

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518. Cob 8 reales, 173?F. S-M26. KM-47a. 24.0 grams. Bold 17 of date, full oMF, nice shield-side surface but cross side totally corroded, lightly toned. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #53. Estimate: $125 - $185

519. Cob 8 reales, 173?F. S-M26. KM-47a. 21.9 grams. Bold full oMF and 173 of date, smallish flan with full but corroded cross, uncorroded shield, toned in crevices. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #54. Estimate: $125 - $185

520. Cob 8 reales, 17(3?)F. S-M26. KM-47a. 23.8 grams. Awesome cross (full and uncorroded), clear oMF despite moderate pitting on shield side, nicely toned. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #70. Estimate: $125 - $185

Any questions? Please email us at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

521. Cob 8 reales, 17(3?)F. S-M26. KM-47a. 20.0 grams. Decent but off-center shield, full but weak cross, lightly corroded all over, toned. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #86. Estimate: $125 - $185

522. Cob 8 reales “blackie” (completely sulfided). 19.0 grams. Just a black, thick lump (with little bits of white shells) that you sometimes see from the 1733 Fleet, no details visible and not much chance of getting any if cleaned, so best left as a unique artifact as found in the ocean. Estimate: $50 - $75

523. Cob 4 reales, 1732F. S-M26. KM-40a. 13.2 grams. Very thick and squarish with bold full date and mintmark, good cross and offcenter shield, no corrosion but some appended “horn silver” (dark spots), desirable for the fact that the obverse and reverse axes are aligned (lending itself well for a pendant). Estimate: $150 - $225

524. Cob 4 reales, 1732F. S-M26. KM-40a. 11.9 grams. Full date and oMF, small and thick, full but lightly corroded cross, some dark spots. From the San José site, with Sedwick certificate from 1996. Estimate: $125 - $185

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525. Klippe 8 reales, 1733F. S-M27. KM-48. 16.8 grams. Early type with single-letter assayer (weak but certain oMF to left), clear date, full 8 to right, nice full crown, most of cross and shield, moderately corroded but quite competent and scarce, richly toned. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #93. Estimate: $300 - $450 526. Pillar 8 reales, Philip V, 1732F. CT-774. KM-103. 18.0 grams. Very corroded and sea-worn, with important details (like date and assayer) barely discernible (but certain), nicely toned, rare first year of pillar dollars. With Tom Gurr certificate #5096. Estimate: $400 - $600

527. Pillar 8 reales, Philip V, 1733F, mintmark oM. CT-775. KM-103. 26.4 grams. Choice Mint State details, practically no corrosion, smooth and satiny surfaces with nice toning, slightly off-center strike, one of the nicest specimens we have seen from this source. Also scarcer single-letter assayer. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #9. Estimate: $2,500 - $3,750 528. Pillar 8 reales, Philip V, 1733F, mintmark oM. CT-775. KM-103. 25.6 grams. Mint State with weak spot in center of shield, virtually no corrosion, slightly uneven toning, another scarce beauty like the above but not quite as choice. From the “Coffins Patch” site, with salvager’s certificate #21. Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

Vliegenthart, sunk in 1735 off Zeeland, the Netherlands Mexico City, Mexico 529. Cob 8 reales, 1731/0F. S-M26. KM-47a. 24.8 grams. Full and choice date with clear overdate, full oMF, good but off-center cross, minimal corrosion, flat around edge. With color certificate from the salvagers and clipped newspaper article. Estimate: $200 - $300

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Rooswijk, sunk in 1739 southeast of England

Netherlands (Spanish)

Mexico City, Mexico

530. Brabant, portrait ducatoon, Philip V, 1703. DM-354b. 32.4 grams. One of the choicest shipwreck silver coins we have ever seen, practically Mint State and 100 percent corrosion-free, nearperfect strike (just some faint adjustment marks on top of shield), attractively toned, and a scarce type, especially from this wreck. Estimate: $500 - $750

532. Cob 8 reales, Charles II, date not visible. KM-46. 26.7 grams. Good cross, most of crown and shield, some flatness but no corrosion, scarce early coin from this wreck. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $100 - $150

Netherlands (United)

533. Cob 8 reales, 1729R. S-M24. KM-47a. 26.3 grams. Choice full date and oMR, nearly full cross, most of shield, no corrosion but some wear (or weak strike), nicely toned. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $225 - $350 531. Gelderland, “rider� ducatoon, 1734. DM-963. 32.1 grams. Totally corrosion-free and with all details perfectly clear and beautiful (XF), no toning except for bits in crevices. With color certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $275 - $425

534. Cob 8 reales, 1729R. S-M24. KM-47a. 25.7 grams. Full date and oMR, nearly full shield and cross, no corrosion but with odd filing marks all over, well toned. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300 535. Cob 8 reales, 1730R. S-M24. KM-47a. 25.9 grams. Bold 100 percent date and oMR, good cross and shield (incomplete), no corrosion or toning. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $225 - $350

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536. Cob 8 reales, 1730R. S-M24. KM-47a. 26.4 grams. Good full cross, full and bold date and oMR, most of shield, no corrosion, a little silvery. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $225 - $350

537. Cob 8 reales, 1730R. S-M24. KM-47a. 26.3 grams. Nice full date and oMR, nearly full cross, much crown and shield, no corrosion, some dark toning. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $225 - $350

538. Cob 8 reales, 1730R. S-M24. KM-47a. 26.6 grams. Nice full cross, full date, bold oMR, most of shield and crown, no corrosion, part of edge crude, nicely toned. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300

539. Cob 8 reales, 1730R. S-M24. KM-47a. 25.8 grams. Interesting shape, nice full cross, full date and oMR, nearly full but doubled shield, no corrosion, lightly toned. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300

540. Cob 8 reales, 1730R. S-M24. KM-47a. 25.1 grams. Very bold full date and oMR, choice full cross, some corrosion around edge, nicely toned. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300

541. Cob 8 reales, 1730R. S-M24. KM-47a. 25.5 grams. Good full cross, most of shield, full but weak date, full oMR, no corrosion, some toning. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300

542. Cob 8 reales, 1730R. S-M24. KM-47a. 25.7 grams. Large and somewhat odd-shaped flan with full date, bold oM, good cross (slightly doubled), nice upper-left quadrant of shield, no corrosion, some toning. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300

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543. Cob 8 reales, (1)730R. S-M24. KM-47a. 26.6 grams. Clear 30 of date, bold oM, nearly full shield and cross on an elongated flan, no corrosion but some dark encrustation. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300

547. Klippe 8 reales, 1733F. S-M27. KM-48. 25.5 grams. Choice full date and oMF (scarce early type with single-letter assayer), well-detailed full shield and off-center cross, slightly crude edge (cob-style flan), no corrosion, beautiful contrasting toning on fields. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $600 - $900

544. Cob 4 reales, 1730R. S-M24. KM-40a. 12.7 grams. Full date, bold oM, good but off-center cross, minor corrosion and expected flatness, thick flan, nicely toned. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $175 - $275 548. Klippe 8 reales, 1733MF. S-M28. KM-48. 26.3 grams. Super specimen with all important details full and bold (date, assayer, mintmark, denomination, even the king’s name in the legend), plus choice full cross, shield and crown, no corrosion, darkly toned fields, just about the best you can get without going into ultra-high grades. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $750 - $1,100

545. Cob 4 reales, 1730R. S-M24. KM-40a. 13.3 grams. Interesting shape, nice full cross, full but weak date and oMR, no corrosion, patchy toning. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $175 - $275

546. Cob 4 reales, 1730R. S-M24. KM-40a. 12.8 grams. Bold cross, full date, weak shield, no corrosion, lightly toned. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $175 - $275

549. Klippe 8 reales, 1734/3MF. S-M28. KM-48. 26.0 grams. Nearly perfectly square, with ALL details full and nice (only the tops of some letters in the legend missing), AU details except for some pre-wreck scuffing (possibly large-scale adjustment marks from the mint), nicely toned, no corrosion, scarce second (and final) year of this ephemeral type. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $750 - $1,100

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550. Pillar 8 reales, Philip V, 1732F. CT-774. KM-103. 26.4 grams. A rather nice example of one of the classics of colonial numismatics, the very rare first year of production of “Spanish milled dollars� and considered by many to be the unofficial first dollar of the United States. This coin shows full details on both sides with practically no corrosion and wear, close to AU (just a small weak spot in the centers) and nicely toned, easily passable for non-salvage. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $6,000 - $9,000 551. Pillar 8 reales, Philip V, 1732F. CT-774. KM-103. 23.9 grams. Another specimen of the very rare first date of pillar dollars, this one with light corrosion over most surfaces and some areas of severe sea-wear but with all details clear, XF details, attractively toned. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

554. Pillar 8 reales, Philip V, 1736MF. CT-780. KM-103. 26.4 grams. AU details, uncorroded shield side with slick satin surfaces, pillars side with hint of corrosion, richly toned, beautiful strike. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300

552. Pillar 8 reales, Philip V, 1733MF. CT-776. KM-103. 25.7 grams. Beautiful specimen of the rare second year of pillar dollars, with just a hint of corrosion all over but very nice contrast from toning, all details clear and high grade (AU details), nice rims, faint adjustment marks on shield. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

553. Pillar 8 reales, Philip V, 1735MF. CT-779. KM-103. 26.1 grams. Choice for salvage, near AU details and nice strike, attractively toned, faint veneer of corrosion. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300

555. Pillar 8 reales, Philip V, 1737MF. CT-781. KM-103. 26.2 grams. Slightly off-center strike but choice details (AU), no corrosion, nice toning. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300

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556. Pillar 4 reales, Philip V, 1735MF. CT-1049. KM-94. 12.5 grams. Scarce coin with choice XF details against a deeply toned background, very light corrosion all over, nice strike. With original but generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $250 - $375

559. Pillar 4 reales, Philip V, 174/30MF. CT-1056. KM-94. 13.3 grams. Choice Mint State details, no corrosion, but regrettably with a few nicks from salvage on the pillars side, lightly toned and lustrous, scarce overdate. With generic Cowan certificate. Estimate: $150 - $225

Hollandia, sunk in 1743 off the Scilly Isles, southwest of England Mexico City, Mexico

560. Pillar 4 reales, Philip V, 174/30MF. CT-1056. KM-94. 8.5 grams. Light to moderate corrosion (and a bit thin) but with nice details (AXF), lightly toned, scarce overdate. With generic certificate from Calhoun’s Collectors Society, Inc. Estimate: $75 - $110

Netherlands (United)

557. Pillar 8 reales, Philip V, 1738MF, mounted in sterling silver bezel for pendant. CT-783. KM-103. 26.0 grams. Typical specimen from this wreck with moderate corrosion and wear but most details discernible (date very weak), mounted in the 1970s with “TREASURE FROM ‘HOLLANDIA’ SUNK 1743 sterling silver” printed around the outside. With generic Cowan certificate with original signatures. Estimate: $150 - $225

561. Gelderland, “rider” ducatoon, 1732. DM-unlisted. 17.1 grams. Scarce early date for this wreck (also rare as unlisted in Delmonte), with full details despite corrosion and wear, attractively toned. Estimate: $75 - $110

558. Pillar 8 reales, Philip V, 1739MF. CT-787. KM- 25.8 grams. Bold XF details despite light corrosion and a plethora of marks from salvage, including one large rim-nick, nicely toned and actually better than most from this wreck. With Professional Numismatists Guild photo-certificate #8860 from 1980 signed by (Dr.) G.W. Vogt. Estimate: $150 - $225

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Uncertain mints

562. Overijssel, “rider” ducatoon, 1742. KM-80. DM-1036. 32.5 grams. Very choice specimen with Mint State details, no corrosion, attractively toned, classic pedigree. With lot envelope from SothebyParke-Bernet (New York) auction of 1972. Estimate: $200 - $300 566. Clump of seven cobs and one pillar dollar. 47.7 grams. Small but beautiful display with coins and many pebbles clustered around a worn pillar dollar, some orange-white coral. With Sedwick/ Arqueonautas certificate #MAI-006/98/CC/109 and custom cardboard box. Estimate: $600 - $900

563. Overijssel, “rider” ducatoon, 1742. KM-80. DM-1036. 32.3 grams. As above, same quality and pedigree, but covered with tiny nicks here and there. With lot envelope from Sotheby-Parke-Bernet (New York) auction of 1972. Estimate: $150 - $225

Princess Louisa, sunk in 1743 off the Cape Verde Islands Lima, Peru

567. Clump of five cobs. 32.0 grams. Small but very attractive cluster that contains coins from several different New World mints (a Mexican 1 real, shield-side out, a Lima 2 reales, cross-side out, and a Potosí 4 reales with 1737 date visible, plus two other cobs too buried to discern) in addition to small pebbles and orange and white encrustation, very impressive and attractive, and very scarce with such a mix of coins. With generic certificate and pedigreed to the Sedwick Treasure Auction #1, with original lot-tag. Estimate: $400 - $600

Unidentified ca.-1744 wreck off Peru Lima, Peru 564. Cob 1 real, 1726M. S-L20b. KM-31. 2.0 grams. Typically crude, small planchet but with clear date and one nice lion, light corrosion, nicely toned. Estimate: $50 - $75 565. Cob 1 real, 1741/0V. S-L22. KM-31a. 2.8 grams. Two clear dates but (rare) overdate only between pillars, one full assayer, off-center cross, light corrosion, nicely toned. Estimate: $75 - $110

568. Cob 1 real, 1743V. S-L22. KM-31a. 2.6 grams. Bold date, clear assayer, nice cross, practically no corrosion, rather good specimen from this “unofficial” wreck. Estimate: $60 - $90

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Reijgersdaal, sunk in 1747 off South Africa

Nuestra SeĂąora de la Luz, sunk in 1752 off Montevideo, Uruguay

Mexico City, Mexico

PotosĂ­, Bolivia

569. Pillar 8 reales, 1739MF. CT-787. KM-103. 25.5 grams. Nice XF details with light corrosion only on part of edge, beautifully toned. With generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $225 - $350

570. Pillar 8 reales, 1742MF. CT-793. KM-103. 25.8 grams. Choice and nearly corrosion-free pillars side, lightly corroded shield side, net XF details, attractively toned. With generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $300 - $450

572. Cob 8 reales, 1750E. S-P51. KM-40. 25.9 grams. One of the nicest specimens ever recovered from this wreck, with very choice, full and bold cross, one full pillar, two dates, three assayers (scarce), nicely toned, no corrosion. With 1999 Collado photo-certificate #310-P. Estimate: $350 - $525

573. Cob 4 reales, 1751q. S-P52. KM-39. 10.3 grams. Good full cross, bold date, well-centered strike, light to moderate corrosion all over, nicely toned. With 1997 Almeida photo-certificate #970039. Estimate: $200 - $300

Bredenhof, sunk in 1753 off Mozambique Dutch East India Company

571. Pillar 8 reales, 1744MF. CT-797. KM-103. 25.5 grams. Choice shield side, very lightly corroded pillars (net XF), pretty toning and nice strike, better date. With generic certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $300 - $450

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574. Clump of five copper duits (1752) and lots of encrustation. 69.0 grams. A lovely display with five coins jutting out at all angles from a rocky black matrix that also shows the reverse impressions of two more coins. One of the coins shows a perfectly full castle, VOC monogram and 1752 date. With 2003 Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $225 - $350

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Bredenhof (1753) and others Dutch and British East India Comapnies

577. Cob 8 reales, 1752q. S-P52. KM-40. 24.5 grams. Choice full pillars with bold date, bold and full but sea-worn cross (as is typical). With original certificate #108 from the salvager (1996). Estimate: $200 - $300

Auguste, sunk in 1761 off Nova Scotia, Canada France

575. Copper coins from three different sources: Dutch East India Co. duit 1752 from the Bredenhof (1753); Dutch East India Co. duit 1790 from the “Galle Harbor treasure”; and English East India Co. XX cash 1808 from the Admiral Gardner. 9.1, 2.9 and 2.6 grams. Three attractive, albeit inexpensive, copper coins from shipwrecks, the two duits with a tiny bit of corrosion but the XX cash nearly pristine. The Bredenhof coin with original certificate from the salvagers and the “Galle Harbor” coin with generic letter. Estimate: $50 - $75 578. Limoges, ecu, 1726-I KM-486.10. 27.8 grams. Nice details but typically weak bust (mostly worn), attractive reverse, black and brown toning, no corrosion. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $200 - $300

Dodington, sunk in 1755 off South Africa Potosí, Bolivia

Cazador, sunk in 1784 off Louisiana Mexico City, Mexico

576. Cob 8 reales, 1751q, mounted in 14K gold bezel for pendant. S-P52. KM-40. 28.9 grams. Crudely worn on cross side and pitted on pillars side, as is typical for this wreck, with bold denomination, two full mintmarks, two partial dates, one choice pillar, richly toned. With 1998(?) photo-certificate from Treasure Island at the Mirage (Las Vegas). Estimate: $250 - $375

579. Bust 8 reales, Charles III, 1783FF. CT-933. KM-106.2. 24.7 grams. Choice specimen with full XF details, no corrosion, part of edge slightly crude (as made), some dark spots on bust. With original Grumpy partnership certificate #17104. Estimate: $150 - $225

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Halsewell, sunk in 1786 off the south of England Potosí, Bolivia

580. Bust 8 reales, Charles III, 1783FF. CT-933. KM-106.2. 24.9 grams. Nice obverse, lightly corroded reverse with toned spot in middle, otherwise whitish. With original Grumpy partnership certificate #16862. Estimate: $100 - $150

Uncertain mints

581. Half-cut of a Spanish colonial bust 8 reales of Charles III. 11.6 grams. Unique item, cut in half before the wreck, this half of the cut unfortunately without date or assayer or mintmark, lightly corroded all over but quite rare and valuable as an example of a true colonial-era “4 bits.” Estimate: $500 - $750

583. Bust 8 reales, Charles III, 1780PR. CT-982. KM-55. 23.0 grams. Nicely detailed (VF or so) despite light to moderate corrosion, very scarce wreck. In custom plastic jewelry box and with salvager’s certificate #8R-030. Estimate: $125 - $185

Piedmont, sunk in 1795 off the south of England Potosí, Bolivia

582. Uncleaned clump of three bust 8 reales. 64 grams. A fallen stack, the three coins offset by no more than ¼”, all sea-worn and with only a few details visible (king’s ordinal III is clear), a fair amount of attractive brown and green encrustation, better than just three plain, generic coins from the half million that were found. With Grumpy Partnership certificate. Estimate: $225 - $350

584. Cob 8 reales, 1673E, 3 dates. S-P37b. KM-26. 24.8 grams. Three clear dates (bold 1673 in legend), rare thus, also good cross and pillars, two assayers, nicely toned, minimal corrosion but some flatness. Estimate: $250 - $375

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Santa Leocadia, sunk in 1800 off Punta Santa Elena, Ecuador Lima, Peru

585. Pillar 2 reales, Charles III, 1766JM. CT-Type 134. KM-62. 3.8 grams. First pillar minor we have heard of from this wreck (so must be very rare), corroded pillars side but shield side beautiful. Estimate: $75 - $110

588. Bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-655. KM-97. 25.8 grams. Choice AU details with bare hint of corrosion, lightly toned. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $135 - $200

589. Bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-655. KM-97. 25.5 grams. Nice AU details, virtually no corrosion, grayish color. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $120 - $180 586. Bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1796IJ. CT-651. KM-97. 22.4 grams. Light corrosion all over (VF details), scarce from this wreck (which heretofore has yielded only 1800s), subtly toned. Estimate: $150 - $225

590. Bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-655. KM-97. 25.1 grams. Trace of corrosion, near AU details, grayish color. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $110 - $165

587. Bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1798I(J). CT-653. KM-97. 25.4 grams. Another scarce date from this wreck, this one also lightly corroded but better (XF) details, with a little toning. Estimate: $150 - $225

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591. Bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-655. KM-97. 25.1 grams. Trace of corrosion, near AU details, grayish color. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $110 - $165

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592. Bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-655. KM-97. 23.9 grams. Light corrosion all over, but all details quite clear (net VF), starting to tone colorfully. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

595. Clump of twenty-nine(+/-) bust 8 reales. 771 grams. One of the biggest and prettiest coin clumps we have ever seen, a fallen stack of eroded coins covered with bright white coral on one side, the other side with all the coins visible and patinated around their edges in contrast with whitish-tan encrustation here and there, very impressive and substantial. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

593. Bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-655. KM-97. 23.6 grams. Off-center strike, light corrosion, weak date, still with decent (VF) details, no toning. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

594. Bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-655. KM-97. 25.9 grams. Dark and crusty as found (uncleaned, colorful), some corrosion (edge not 100 percent intact), probably VF details. Estimate: $100 - $150

596. Choice clump of two bust 8 reales and a snail shell. 82 grams. A curious display that sits well with one partially cleaned coin (well preserved, with full bust and bold date) upright in front, the shell in back, and the second coin (fully encrusted) in between, with lots of pebbles and greenish encrustation all over. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $350 - $525

597. Clump of three bust 8 reales. 82 grams. An offset stack, with the facing side of the offset coin on top fully cleaned and showing a choice reverse, the other two coins probably in slightly worse condition but nicely encrusted with green, white and black colors. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $250 - $375

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598. Clump of two bust 8 reales. 48 grams. Two offset coins, back to back, the top one fully cleaned and only lightly corroded (fully detailed), the bottom one dark and heavily corroded on the bust side but with nice reverse showing behind the better coin. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $175 - $275

601. Clump of two bust 8 reales (uncleaned). 54 grams. Fully encrusted pair of coins at a slight angle, with lots of tiny bits of shell and debris, gray-green color, the coins fairly solid but probably not as well-preserved as some of the above. With Sedwick photocertificate. Estimate: $125 - $185

602. Bust 1 real, Charles III, 1773JM. CT-1490. KM-75. 2.5 grams. Rare early minor from this wreck, moderately corroded all over but all details clear (Fine), lightly toned. Estimate: $50 - $75

599. Clump of two bust 8 reales. 55 grams. An “encrustation sandwich” with two decent coins (only lightly corroded), one cleaned with reverse out, the other uncleaned with obverse out (full date visible), attractive debris including part of a snail shell. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $175 - $275

603. Bust 1 real, Charles IV, 1798IJ. CT-1104. KM-94. 2.0 grams. Moderate corrosion, off-center reverse, all details clear (Fine), rare from this wreck. Estimate: $50 - $75 604. Bust ½ real, Charles IV, 1792IJ. CT-1246. KM-93. 1.3 grams. Choice, well-detailed early bust (style unique to this mint), light corrosion only, rare from this wreck. Estimate: $50 - $75

Potosí, Bolivia

600. Clump of two bust 8 reales. 58 grams. Two coins at a slight angle, the top one fully cleaned (VF details, lightly corroded) and with clear date, the bottom coin fully encrusted with small bits of shells (green and white). With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $175 - $275

605. Bust 2 reales, Charles III, 1785PR. CT-1403. KM-53. 5.8 grams. Rare from this wreck (as a minor, non-Lima, and earlier than 1800), half of reverse and all of obverse lightly corroded but all details clear (Fine), toned fields. Estimate: $75 - $110

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Athenienne, sunk in 1806 off Sicily Mexico City, Mexico

606. Bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1802FT. CT-698. KM-109. 26.9 grams. Beautifully old-toned XF with no corrosion but rim-bruise and old slash across the king’s neck from ear to throat, scarce provenance. Estimate: $225 - $350

609. Lot of ten copper XX cash, 1808, cleaned. KM-321. Average 9 grams per coin. As above but one coin less. Estimate: $200 $300

Lady Burgess, sunk in 1806 off the Cape Verde Islands Seville, Spain

607. Bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1802CN. CT-777. Cay-13938. 26.0 grams. Choice XF details, faint hint of corrosion, nicely toned, scarce issue. NOTE: See lot #1078 in this sale for a handwritten account of the shipwreck by a surviving passenger. Estimate: $100 - $150

610. Lot of ten copper XX cash, 1808, cleaned. KM-321. Average 9 grams per coin. As above. Estimate: $200 - $300

Admiral Gardner, sunk in 1809 southeast of England British East India Company 608. Lot of eleven copper XX cash, 1808, cleaned. KM-321. Average 9 grams per coin. All coins perfect or nearly so (AU-UNC details), whitish copper color, larger and scarcer than the ubiquitous X cash. Estimate: $225 - $350

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611. Lot of three copper XX cash, 1808, toned. KM-321. 9.2, 9.0 and 8.9 grams. Nearly pristine coins (no corrosion, high grade), two a natural copper color but the third actually bluish. Estimate: $100 - $150

614. Lot of ten copper X cash, 1808, cleaned. KM-319. 4.5 to 4.6 grams each. Ten pristine coins (or nearly so), all frosty light copper in color, no corrosion. Estimate: $100 - $150

612. Lot of two copper XX cash, 1808, uncleaned. KM-321. 8.9 and 8.8 grams. Both coins encrusted, one with significant areas of tan sediment and green oxidation, the other one green and rusty brown, both probably uncorroded underneath. Estimate: $75 - $110 615. Presentation set of eight copper X cash, 1808, in wooden display-box. KM-319. Average 4.5 grams per coin. Each coin only partially cleaned (dark and dusty) but without corrosion, housed in plastic capsules inside a hinged wooden box without any kind of printing or plaque (so usable for other coins if desired). Estimate: $80 - $120

613. Stack of ten copper X cash, 1808. KM-319. 50.0 grams. A very tight stack of well-preserved coins held together by sturdy encrustation on one side, some details visible on the end coins. With small Sedwick certificate from 2003. Estimate: $100 - $150

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616. Lot of four copper X cash, 1808, two uncleaned and two partially cleaned. KM-319. 4.4 to 4.7 grams each. The two clean ones are pristine, and one of the encrusted ones appears to be in perfect condition underneath the blue-green and brown (one raised spot is shiny), but the other encrusted one (big patches of raised brown sediment against green surfaces) is slightly bent. Estimate: $50 - $75

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Unidentified 1800s wreck off Africa

S.S. Folcon, sunk in 1851 off Newfoundland, Canada

Uncertain mints

Great Britain

619. London, England, copper half penny, George I, 1723. SP3660. KM-557. 8.1 grams. Quite worn (Good) but negligible corrosion, some dark tone, scarce provenance. With hand-signed Robillard photo-certificate. Estimate: $75 - $110 617. Clump of Spanish or Spanish colonial bust 8 reales of Ferdinand VII. 152 grams. As clusters go, this is an absolutely beautiful specimen, with white and pink coral tinged with green over at least 80 percent of the surfaces, most of the coins well eroded but with FERDIN visible on the top coin, just a shame there is not more known about its provenance. With Sedwick certificate from 2003. Estimate: $250 - $375

Cabalva, sunk in 1818 in the Indian Ocean 620. London, England, copper half penny, George III, 1806. SP-3781. KM-662. 8.8 grams. Nice details despite wear (About Fine) but no corrosion, dark toning, scarce provenance. With handsigned Robillard photo-certificate. Estimate: $75 - $110

Madrid, Spain

S.S. Central America, sunk in 1857 off North Carolina Santiago, Chile 618. Bust 8 reales, Ferdinand VII, 1815GJ. CT-504. Cay-15953. 22.6 grams. Moderate corrosion but all details clear (Fine), scarce issue and provenance. With original certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $100 - $150

621. 50 centavos, 1853, encapsulated PCGS “Certified”. KM128. Eagle on obverse, arms in wreath on reverse, lustrous XF with veneer of corrosion on less than half the surface, highly promoted shipwreck. Estimate: $350 - $525 622. 50 centavos, 1855, encapsulated PCGS “Certified”. KM128. As above, no corrosion but stained VF, popular wreck. Estimate: $350 - $525

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S.S. Republic, sunk in 1865 off Georgia United States of America

MEDALS RELATING TO SHIPWRECKS AND TREASURE 623. New Orleans, 50 cents, 1856-O, encapsulated NGC “shipwreck effect,” with promotional packaging. KM-A68. AU details with small part of surface lustrous but most of it matte (what they call “shipwreck effect”), desirable provenance and packaging. With hinged mahogany display box containing certificate (#1793907-130), booklet and DVD. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

624. New Orleans, 50 cents, 1861-O, encapsulated NGC “shipwreck effect,” with promotional packaging. KM-A68. AU details, some luster but mostly matte (“shipwreck effect”), desirable provenance and packaging. With hinged mahogany display box containing certificate (#1797949-218), booklet and DVD. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

626. Great Britain, silver medal commemorating the salvaging of the Concepción by William Phips in 1687. 55.4 grams, actual size 54.5 mm. A rare and highly sought large medal, presumably made from the very same silver recovered from the Spanish galleon wreck by the famous New Englander William Phips, who later received a knighthood for this service to the crown. Polished VF with commensurate amount of marks (nothing serious), the portraits of James II and Mary particularly bold, with salvage scene on reverse and 1687 date in exergue. Estimate: $500 - $750

S.S. Florizel, sunk in 1918 off Newfoundland, Canada Great Britain

625. London, England, copper half penny, Victoria, 1853. SP3949. KM-726. 9.0 grams. Fine details, no corrosion, very scarce provenance. With hand-signed Robillard photo-certificate. Estimate: $50 - $75

627. Spain, bronze medal commemorating the marriage of King Louis I to Louisa Isabel (daughter of the Duke of Orleans) in 1721. 39.6 grams. Large and beautifully engraved piece with bust of the Duke of Orleans on the obverse, clasped hands above an altar on the reverse, date in Roman numerals in exergue, struck three years before Louis I became king (and died in the same year), chocolate brown, near AU. Pedigreed to Ponterio auction #112 (April, 2001), with lot-tag. Estimate: $200 - $300

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628. Great Britain, bronze “Admiral Vernon” medal (1741), Porto Bello and Cartagena. Betts #303. 12.5 grams. The enmity between the Spanish and the British in the 18th century is the stuff of legend, marking the point in time at which the role of dominant naval power and American overlord switched from one to the other. It was a time of tremendous British pride, and in true form the various victories were commemorated with medals. The copper medals struck for Vernon, like this one, were so popular and abundant that they were literally circulated as coins and heavily worn. This particular piece (a rare type) shows Vernon personally humbling the Spanish Fleet commander at Cartagena, Admiral Don Blas de Leso, on the obverse and six ships attacking Port Bello on the reverse, with legends THE SPANISH PRIDE PULLD DOWN BY ADMIRAL VERNON and WHO TOOK PORTO BELLO WITH SIX SHIPS ONLY, with date NOV 2, 1739 in exergue (referring to the date of the Porto Bello capture). The irony of this particular issue is the fact that Don Blas did not capitulate to Vernon as pictured and in fact escaped, a cowardly act that further riled the British public and (yep, you guessed it!) led to more propaganda in the form of more medals. About Fine, a little grainy, chocolate brown color. Estimate: $150 - $225

629. Mexico, Empire of Iturbide, silver half-dollar-sized proclamation medal, 1822. 16.6 grams. Richly toned obverse with crowned eagle on cactus, reverse showing INAUGURACION DE AGUSTIN. PRIMER LIBERADOR DE MEXICO. JULIO 21 DE 1822, AVF overall, no problems. Estimate: $90 - $135

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630. Great Britain, steel restrike of a German medal commemorating the sinking of the Lusitania in 1916. 76.1 grams. We have had a number of these in our auctions, but each one has gotten more money than the last, so they must be popular. The original medals, depicting on the obverse a skeletal Cunard agent selling tickets and the sinking of the ship on the reverse, were unabashed propaganda by the Germans (who torpedoed and sank the Lusitania) to show the folly of sending hapless passengers to their death in dangerous waters during wartime; but soon afterward the British realized they could portray the Germans as heartless barbarians by striking medals with the very same design! This specimen is in perfect condition save for some small spots of rust. Estimate: $150 - $225

631. Silver 5-oz medal struck from silver recovered from the Atocha (1622) for the 1988 Florida United Numismatists annual coin convention. 2½” in diameter. By 1988 Mel Fisher’s fabulous find was in full promotional mode, and some of the hundreds of silver bars recovered were in such poor condition that it made sense to melt them down and turn them into commemorative medals like this one (the much more insidious replica coins and jewelry came later). These medals were made and marketed by the late coin dealer Brian Beardsley of Worldwide Ventures. The design consists of a picture of the ship above ATOCHA SILVER on the obverse and the State of Florida with an alligator, two dolphins and a flamingo on the reverse, the legends reading FIVE TROY OUNCES / LOST 1622 DISCOVERED 1985 and FLORIDA UNITED NUMISMATISTS / JAN 7-10, 1988. Many of these medals were subsequently melted and therefore they are somewhat scarce today. Gem Proof condition. With wooden box engraved with a ship and TREASURE OF THE ATOCHA / 1622-1985, plus Beardsley certificate #078 (limited to 1000 pieces). Estimate: $125 - $185

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632. Silver 5-oz medal struck from silver recovered from the Atocha (1622) for the 1988 Florida United Numismatists annual coin convention. 2½” in diameter. As above but without the wooden box and certificate, housed in a sized-to-fit plastic capsule. Estimate: $75 - $110

634. Silver 8-oz medal commemorating the 375th anniversary of the sinking of the Atocha in 1622, struck in 1997. 3½” in diameter. Another item made from melted-down ingots from the Atocha, this larger piece shows the ship with “The 375th ANNIVERSARY OF 1622 FLEET” on the obverse and “Nuestra Señora de Atocha / Lost at Sea off of Key West September, 1622 / Treasure Recovered 1975 - 1985 / Struck in 8 troy ounces of silver, this 375th Anniversary Proof combines historic Atocha Silver, recovered from the wreck, with pure .999 fine silver” on the reverse. The edge is marked with the number 005, presumably from a limited issue of 1000 pieces, housed in a sized-to-fit hard-plastic capsule. Gem Proof. Estimate: $150 - $225

633. Set of four gold-layered base-metal medals struck in 1992 to commemorate the 500th anniversary of Columbus’ discovery of the Americas. Each medal 1½” in diameter and 31 grams. Four gilded medals depicting Columbus, Isabella, the Santa María, and three caravels on the obverse (each with crowned-500 logo on reverse), all lustrous Mint State (as protected by plastic capsules, part of the “Official Caravel Collection” authorized by the government of Spain’s Quincentennial Commission in 1992. Housed in a custom wooden display box (desktop or wall-hanging), with small brochure. Estimate: $75 - $110

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SILVER COBS OF MEXICO CITY, MEXICO Charles-Joanna,”Late Series” (waves below pillars)

635. 2 reales, assayer L to left, mintmark M to right. S-M9a. KM-12. 6.4 grams. Full legends and nice inner details but holed near edge, AVF, no toning. Estimate: $90 - $135

639. 1 real, mintmark oM to left, assayer O to right. S-M10, KM-9. 3.3 grams. Bold legends, full shield and pillars, AVF with spots of brown. Estimate: $80 - $120

636. 1 real, mintmark oM to left, assayer oG to right, king’s name as CHAROLVS. S-M5. KM-9. 3.2 grams. Rare with small o’s above mintmark and assayer (Nesmith 36 but with different legend), full legends and good inner details, AVF, nicely toned. Estimate: $125 - $185

640. 1 real, mintmark oM to left, assayer O to right. S-M10, KM-9. 3.4 grams. Parts of legend very bold, interiors doubled, nicely toned VF. Estimate: $70 - $100

637. 1 real, assayer O/L to left, mintmark oM to right. S-M10, KM-9. 3.3 grams. Clear over-assayer (fairly common), much legend and nice crown but some flatness and doubling, Fine with verdigris. Estimate: $80 - $120 641. Lot of three 1 reales of assayers L and O (where visible). KM-9. 3.2, 3.1 and 2.8 grams. Each with good full pillars and shield, one with damaged edge, one polished and holed, none worse than Fine. Estimate: $135 - $200

638. 1 real, assayer O to left, mintmark oM to right. S-M10, KM-9. 3.3 grams. Choice full pillars and shield, some legend, nicely toned VF. Estimate: $90 - $135

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Shield-type

642. 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer D (1630s). S-M18a. KM-45. 26.7 grams. Big, fat, barrel-shaped flan with full but weak shield and cross (whose ends are distinctive for the 1630s), bold and big oM, lightly toned Fine. Estimate: $90 - $135

643. 8 reales, 1652/1/0/49P, with chopmarks as from circulation in the Orient. S-M19. KM-45. 27.6 grams. Scarce overdate with fairly clear digits (the 5/4 more so than the rest), bold full oMP and denomination 8, full but weak shield and cross, at least five chopmarks of different sizes, Fine with brown sediment in crevices. With Frank Sedwick letter of authenticity from 1994. Estimate: $150 - $225

644. 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer P (ca. 1652), with chopmarks as from circulation in the Orient. S-M19. KM-45. 26.7 grams. Big, thick flan with full oMP, 8, cross and shield, just a few small chopmarks, spotty rainbow toning, Fine+. Estimate: $75 - $110

645. 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer not visible (ca. 1652), cut down and chopmarked as from circulation in the Orient. S-M19. KM45. 20.1 grams. Whereas the last two lots received only a few chops, this specimen got hit hard, with each merchant along the way testing the silver by means of partially cutting, enabling pieces to break off over time. About 3/4 of the coin remains, with most of the shield and cross in evidence, darkly toned Fine. Estimate: $60 - $90

646. 8 reales, 165(?)(P), cut down and chopmarked as from circulation in the Orient. S-M19. KM-45. 14.2 grams. As above but with only about half the coin remaining, with partial date and cross, upper half of shield, remarkably high grade (AXF), with green spots. Estimate: $60 - $90

647. 8 reales, Philip IV or Charles II, assayer not visible. 26.6 grams. Most of cross, top of denomination, but typically crude and with lots of flatness around the edge, toned Fine. Estimate: $60 $90

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651. 8 reales, Philip V or Louis I, assayer D. 27.2 grams. Bold assayer, full cross, nearly full shield, very crude About Fine, toned. Estimate: $100 - $150 648. 8 reales, Charles II, assayer not visible. KM-46 26.1 grams. Very curious shape (a long rhombus with distinct points) with most of cross and shield but otherwise flat, whitish in color, could not have seen much circulation but net VF for grade. From the “Pasay hoard� (Philippines). Estimate: $175 - $275

652. 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible, with chopmarks as from circulation in the Orient. KM-47. 26.4 grams. Odd coin with 100 percent full crown and one full lion of atypical design, nicely toned Fine with flat spots. Estimate: $75 - $110

649. 8 reales, 1716?J. S-M22. KM-47. 27.0 grams. Odd shape, with full oMJ and cross, most of shield, very weak date that could be rare, Fine+ with tan sediment in crevices. Estimate: $150 $225

653. 4 reales, Philip IV, assayer P (ca. 1652), with chopmarks and test cuts as from circulation in the Orient. S-M19. KM-38. 12.7 grams. Good full cross, full shield and oMP, crude edge, attractive chops, Fine with toning on fields. Estimate: $60 - $90

650. 8 reales, Louis I?, assayer D/J? (1724?), with unidentified countermarks. S-M23. KM-49. 26.6 grams. Interesting shape, bold oMD with the assayer clearly punched over something that should be J but looks more like G, good full cross with two countermarks (one just a circle and the other with a character inside), nicely toned Fine with flat peripheries, potentially quite rare. Estimate: $75 $110

654. 4 reales, Philip IV, assayer not visible (ca. 1652), with chopmarks and test cuts as from circulation in the Orient. SM19. KM-38. 12.5 grams. Roundish flan with nearly full cross and shield, one test cut rather deep, crude Fine. Estimate: $60 - $90

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655. 4 reales, Philip IV or Charles II, assayer not visible, shield side struck from 8- reales die. 13.9 grams. Partial shield that is obviously oversized in comparison to the cross, crude strike, lightly toned About Fine with green spots. Estimate: $50 - $75

656. Lot of two 4 reales of Philip IV or Charles II, assayers not visible. 10.7 and 10.4 grams. One roundish and thick and the other odd-shaped, both About Fine with nearly full cross and shield. Estimate: $100 - $150

659. 2 reales, 1731/0F. S-M26. KM-35a. 6.8 grams. Full but weak date, bold oM, nearly full crown and cross, toned AVF. Estimate: $60 - $90

660. Lot of two 1 reales of Philip II, assayer O. S-M11. KM-26. 3.5 and 3.2 grams. One with oM to left and O to right (crude VF with nice cross and shield) and one with O to left and oM to right (nice AVF, richly toned). Estimate: $110 - $165

661. ½ real, Philip III, assayer F-oD. S-M14a. KM-unlisted. 1.6 grams. Rare issue with two assayers, F above and to the left of the monogram, oD below (mintmark oM at upper right barely visible), choice full cross, full crown, most of monogram, richly toned VF with slightly crude edge. Estimate: $175 - $275 657. 2 reales, Philip II, assayer O. S-M11. KM-31. 6.9 grams. Typically nice details (full shield and cross, some flatness) on a round, thin planchet with bold assayer, some legend (most of crown), toned VF. Estimate: $120 - $180 662. ½ real, Philip IV, assayer P, partial date. S-M19. KM-22. 1.5 grams. Several digits of date partially visible (not 100 percent decipherable), full oMP, nice full cross, Fine with flat spots. Estimate: $50 - $75

658. 2 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible, with chopmarks as from circulation in the Orient. KM-35. 6.4 grams. Roundish flan with nearly full cross (one nice lion) and shield (well detailed), several tiny chops (scarce on minors), AVF. From the “Fukien Find,” with small certificate. Estimate: $75 - $110

663. ½ real, Charles II, assayer L. S-M21. KM-23. 1.6 grams. Odd shape, full oML, most of monogram, nearly full cross, AVF. Estimate: $50 - $75

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SILVER COBS OF LIMA, PERU Shield-type 664. 1 real, Philip II, assayer Diego de la Torre (*-I to left, P•D to right). S-L4. KM-7. 3.2 grams. Nice VF with full inner details, king’s name in legend, full crown, spots of encrustation. Estimate: $100 - $150 665. 1 real, Philip II, assayer Diego de la Torre (*-I to left, P•D to right). S-L4. KM-7. 3.0 grams. Beautifully rainbow-toned AVF with full inner details). Estimate: $100 - $150 666. 1 real, Philip II, assayer Diego de la Torre (*-I to left, P•D to right). S-L4. KM-7. 3.1 grams. Choice full shield and cross and crown, Fine, but holed near edge. Estimate: $60 - $90 667. 1 real, Philip II, assayer Diego de la Torre (*-I to left). SL4. KM-7. 3.5 grams. Nice full shield with bold *-I to left but flat to right, full but corroded cross, darkly toned Fine+ Estimate: $100 - $150 668. ¼ real, Philip II, assayer Diego de la Torre (P-* flanking castle). S-L4. KM-2. 0.7 gram. Choice XF with nearly full legends, great inner details, nicely toned, but holed near edge. Estimate: $100 - $150 669. ¼ real, Philip II, assayer Diego de la Torre (P to left of castle). S-L4. KM-2. 0.9 gram. Broad flan with much legend, clear inner details despite flatness, otherwise Fine. Estimate: $50 - $75 670. ¼ real, Philip II, assayer Diego de la Torre (*-P flanking castle, * to right of lion). S-L4. KM-2. 0.7 gram. Richly toned AXF, some flatness, smallish flan. Estimate: $50 - $75

“Star of Lima” type 671. ½ real, (1659). S-L5. KMunlisted. 1.5 grams. Distinctive style of monogram and crown (both nearly full), choice full cross, toned VF (possibly salvaged), extremely rare type that was unknown until just a few years ago. Estimate: $350 - $525

Pillars-and-waves type 672. Lot of three 2 reales of the 1740s, assayer V. S-L22. KM30A. 6.1, 5.4 and 5.3 grams. Dates only partially visible, two salvaged (VF details) and one non-salvage (Fine). Estimate: $110 - $165 673. 1 real, 1684V. S-L6. KM-20. 2.4 grams. Two bold mintmarks, good full cross and one full pillars, two weak dates, richly toned VF. Estimate: $50 - $75 674. 1 real, 1689V. S-L8. KM-20. 2.6 grams. Richly toned AVF with flat spots, decent cross, one full pillar, two bold mintmarks. Estimate: $50 - $75 675. 1 real, 1694M. S-L11. KM-20. 3.3 grams. Large, crude planchet with full pillars and cross, lots of legend, three dates and mintmarks, darkly toned. Estimate: $75 - $110

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676. Lot of two 1 reales of Charles II, 1685R and 1686R. S-L7. KM-20. 3.7 and 2.3 grams. The 1685 choice, with full cross and pillars, two dates, three mintmarks and assayers, lightly toned AVF; the 1686 with bold cross and pillars, richly toned AVF with flat peripheries. Estimate: $125 - $185

678. Lot of two ½R of Charles II: 1695 and date not visible. KM-22. 1.5 and 1.4 grams. The 1695 salvaged (Fine+ with good cross and monogram and clear date) and the other coin non-salvage About Fine with nice full cross and monogram, incomplete date. Estimate: $75 - $110

679. ½ real, 1704. S-L15a. KM-30. 1.3 grams. Full monogram and date, decent cross, About Fine. Estimate: $40 - $60 677. Lot of two 1 reales of Philip V, 1718M and 1720M. S-L20. KM-31. 3.0 and 2.9 grams. Both coins richly toned Fine with full crosses, clear dates and mintmarks and assayers, the 1718 with slightly crude edge. Estimate: $80 - $120

680. ½ real, 1714/3. S-L20. KM-30. 1.4 grams. Full monogram, bold date with clear 4/3 (scarce), most of cross, Fine with weak spots. Estimate: $40 - $60

681. ½ real, 1718, holed. S-L20. KM-30. 1.7 grams. Bold full date, nearly full monogram and cross, Fine with dark toning in crevices. Estimate: $40 - $60 682. ½ real, 1735(N). S-L21. KM-30a. 1.2 grams. Salvaged (net Fine details), bold date, most of cross, toned. Estimate: $40 - $60 683. ½ real, 1737N. S-L21. KM-30a. 1.6 grams. Full date and monogram with L to left and N to right, nearly full cross with crude planchet flaw, attractively toned Fine. Estimate: $40 - $60 684. ½ real, 1737N, overweight. S-L21. KM-30a. 2.1 grams. Bold 7 of date, most of monogram and cross, crude Fine, overweight. Estimate: $30 - $45 685. ½ real, 1738N. S-L21. KM-30a. 1.3 grams. Nice but off-center strike with nearly full cross, full monogram with bold N and date, attractively toned VF. Estimate: $40 - $60 686. ½ real, 1745V. S-L22. KM-30a. 1.8 grams. Clear date below and bold V to right of full but flat monogram, nearly full cross with second date below, toned About Fine. Estimate: $40 - $60 687. ½ real, 1746(V). S-L22. KM-30a. 1.2 grams. Full cross and monogram and date, deeply toned Fine. Estimate: $40 - $60 688. Lot of five ½R of Philip V, various dates (where visible). KM-30a. 1.2 to 1.8 grams each. Mostly good crosses and monograms, About Fine to VF+, only one salvaged. Estimate: $100 - $150

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SILVER COBS OF POTOSI, BOLIVIA Shield-type

689. 8 reales, Philip II, assayer B (3rd period). S-P10. KM-5.1. 26.3 grams. Beautiful full shield, full but slightly doubled cross, much legend, lightly toned AVF. Estimate: $150 - $225

692. 8 reales, Philip II, assayer B (4th period). S-P12. KM-5.1. 27.2 grams. Odd shape, bold assayer, good full shield and cross, nicely toned VF. Estimate: $250 - $375

690. 8 reales, Philip II, assayer A. S-P11. KM-5.1. 26.4 grams. Bold full shield and cross, clear assayer and denomination, much legend, VF. Estimate: $200 - $300

693. 8 reales, Philip II, assayer RL. S-P13. KM-5.1. 26.5 grams. Bold full shield and cross, full assayer, oddly whitish (no toning). Estimate: $75 - $110

691. 8 reales, Philip II, assayer A. S-P11. KM-5.1. 26.3 grams. Darkly toned AVF with full shield and cross, bold P-A and denomination. Estimate: $150 - $225

694. 8 reales, 16ZIII (1623), assayer T. S-P22a. KM-19. 26.9 grams. Clear ZIII of date in legend (very rare), full cross and shield, full P+T and denomination oVIII, bold king’s ordinal IIII in legend, non-toned Fine. Estimate: $900 - $1,350

695. 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer •P, denomination as “oIIII”, quadrants of cross transposed. S-P23. 25.8 grams. Good full shield and cross with orange sediment in crevices, full P•P and denomination o-IIII (unique error), VF. From the ca.-1629 “Panama hoard.” Estimate: $200 - $300

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696. 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer T (early 1630s). S-P26. KM19a. 27.5 grams. Good full shield and cross for the era, full P-T, AVF with flat spots. Estimate: $150 - $225

697. 8 reales, 1636TR. S-P27. KM-19a. 27.1 grams. Clear bottoms of 36 of date (rare), weak but certain assayer, bold denomination •8•, otherwise crude and doubled, toned About Fine with flat spots. Estimate: $150 - $225

698. 4 reales, Philip III, assayer R (curved leg). S-P15. KM-9. 13.3 grams. Broad planchet with good full shield and cross, weak assayer, non-toned VF. Estimate: $120 - $180

699. 4 reales, Philip III, assayer Q. S-P17. KM-9. 13.6 grams. Excellent full shield, full but slightly doubled cross, bold assayer, silvery XF (high grade). Estimate: $125 - $185

700. 4 reales, 16ZIII (1623), assayer T, quadrants of cross transposed. S-P22a. KM-unlisted. 13.4 grams. Clear III of date (very rare, especially on this denomination), choice full shield and cross, richly toned VF, with large hole near edge at end of cross. Estimate: $600 - $900

701. 4 reales, Philip IV, assayer T (mid- to late 1620s). KM-17a. 12.9 grams. Choice but off-center shield, very off-center cross, high grade (XF), with orange sediment on fields, full P-T, parts of edge crude. From the ca.-1629 “Panama hoard,” with pamphlet that describes it as the “Porto Bello hoard.” Estimate: $150 - $225

702. 4 reales, Philip IV, assayer not visible (mid- to late 1620s). KM-17a. 13.3 grams. Odd shape, uneven thickness, nice full cross, good but incomplete shield, nicely toned AVF with hole near edge at top of cross. Estimate: $60 - $90

703. 2 reales, Philip III, assayer Q/C. S-P17. KM-8. 6.6 grams. Full P-Q with clear Q/C (scarce), full but weak shield, off-center cross, Fine. Estimate: $125 - $185

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704. Lot of two cobs of Philip IV: one 2 reales assayer T and one 1 real assayer O. 6.8 and 3.4 grams. The 2 reales with very bold denomination “Z,” clear P-T, full but crude cross, AVF with encrustation; the 1 real with nice full cross, P-O to right, Fine. Estimate: $100 - $150

705. 1 real, Philip II, assayer A. S-P11. KM-2.2. 3.1 grams. Cute coin with full and very well-detailed shield and cross, particularly nice borders of dots, AVF. Estimate: $60 - $90

706. Lot of two 1 reales of Philip II: assayer A/B; and assayer not visible (4th-period B?). KM-2.2. 4.4 and 3.1 grams. The A/B very clear and with good cross and legend but abraded; the other coin crude but with most of cross and shield; both Fine. Estimate: $100 - $150

709. 1 real, (16)51E. S-P36. KM-12b. 2.5 grams. Odd shape (thin and broad), with incomplete but beautifully detailed shield and cross, full 51 of date (rare), most of crown, E to right, attractively toned VF with flat spots. Estimate: $100 - $150

710. Lot of three 1 reales, Philip IV, with partial dates (late 1620s-1630s). KM-12a. 3.3, 3.1 and 2.4 grams. Generally good crosses and shields, albeit typically crude, F-VF, two of them toned. Estimate: $90 - $135

711. ½ real, Philip II, assayer M, Plate Coin #37 in Sellschopp. S-P2. KM-1.2. 1.4 grams. Broad, thin flan with weak centers, bold P to left and M below monogram, nearly full legend and crown, crudely toned Fine, scarce assayer, desirable pedigree. From the Sellschopp collection, photographed in his 1971 book Acuñaciones de las cecas de Lima, La Plata y Potosí. Estimate: $100 - $150 712. ½ real, Philip III, assayer Q. S-P17. KM-6.1. 1.5 grams. P to left and Q to right of full monogram below full crown, full but slightly crude cross, Fine with toned fields. Estimate: $50 - $75

707. 1 real, (16)25P, upper half of shield transposed. S-P23. KM-unlisted. 3.3 grams. Extremely rare and possibly unique with full 5 of date and most of the 2 (the 1625 date unconfirmed in any denomination), bold cross, nearly full shield, expectedly crude but bold, toned Fine. Estimate: $200 - $300 708. 1 real, assayer O with no dot (1650-1). S-P35. KM-12b. 2.7 grams. Full cross, off-center shield with full P-O to left, rare (but not unique) without the dot in center, toned AVF. Estimate: $50 $75

713. Lot of two ½ reales of Philip III: assayer M (Plate Coin #386 in Sellschopp) and no assayer. 2.0 and 1.0 grams. The scarce M specimen with bold assayer to left of full monogram (no mintmark) is choice, richly toned VF with great full cross; the other coin is crude from salvage, broad but thin, VG details. Assayer-M specimen pedigreed to the Sellschopp collection, photographed in his 1971 book Acuñaciones de las cecas de Lima, La Plata y Potosí. Estimate: $100 - $150

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714. ¼ real, Philip IV (ca. 1630). KM-unlisted. 0.6 gram. Very rare issue with castle style that began around 1630, thereby making this officially the last cob ¼ real issue of the mint, the castle on this specimen very full and clear, the lion on the other side corroded but distinctively small, salvaged VF (net). Estimate: $50 - $75

1652 transitionals

715. Lot of two 1 reales of different Types. S-P37. 3.3 and 2.2 grams. One coin a McLean Type II (corroded and whitish from salvage, details clear but off-center), the other McLean Type VI (oversized flan cut down and rounded, off-center strike, crude encrustation but good details), both more or less scarce. Estimate: $100 - $150

Pillars-and-waves type

716. 8 reales, 1665E, with “Golden Fleece” countermark of Brabant, Spanish Netherlands (1652-1672). S-P37a. KM-21. 26.7 grams. Very large flan with full cross, full but mostly flat pillarsand-waves, two choice crowns, but best feature is the 100 percent full and clear countermark (AU details), which is scarce, the rest of the coin toned Fine. Pedigreed to the Morris Geiger collection and accompanied by the January, 2002, issue of NI Bulletin (Numismatics International) which features an article by Herman Blanton about this countermark. Estimate: $300 - $450

717. 8 reales, 1669E. S-P37b. KM-26. 25.5 grams. Pillars side curiously off-center so much that you can see how the area past the legend ends (surprisingly non-circular), which also enables you to see a bold date in the legend that inexplicably appears as simply “66,” the rest of coin decent, with bold E to right and 669 date below full cross, bold waves, Fine with patchy toning, minor edgesplit. Estimate: $250 - $375

718. 8 reales, 1691VR, encapsulated NGC VF-30. S-P40. KM26. Choice strike with full pillars-and-waves, full but slightly offcenter cross, two dates, three mintmarks, beautifully toned. Estimate: $600 - $900

719. 8 reales, 1701F, posthumous Charles II. S-P43. KM-26. 26.7 grams. Solid, chunky coin with full cross and pillars, bold denomination, clear date and assayer, VF with flat spots, whitish color, scarce. Estimate: $250 - $375

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720. 8 reales, 1701Y, posthumous Charles II. S-P43. KM-26. 27.0 grams. Choice bold date above very bold waves, nice full cross, toned VF with crude hole near edge. Estimate: $200 - $300

721. 8 reales, 1723Y. S-P43a. KM-31. 25.7 grams. Rare date (clear between pillars), typically very crude planchet (uneven thickness), two assayers, Fine with extensive flatness and patchy toning. Estimate: $200 - $300

722. 8 reales, 1753C/q, encapsulated NGC VF-30. S-P53. KM40. Choice round coin (typically thick and chunky) with bold full cross, full pillars-and-waves, two assayers (one full, with clear overassayer), two dates, three assayers, king’s ordinal VI in legend, exceptional quality for the type. Estimate: $400 - $600

723. 8 reales, 1763/2V-Y. S-P57. KM-unlisted. 26.9 grams. Roundish, chunky flan with bold full cross and pillars, bold date with clear 3/2 overdate (unique and unlisted, first we have ever heard of), full assayer Y, lightly toned AVF. Estimate: $150 - $225

724. 8 reales, 1764V-(Y), with loop for pendant soldered to top. S-P57. KM-45. 27.2 grams. Bold date and denomination between full pillars, good full cross, Fine with flat peripheries, ready to wear but also decent for a collection if you have the mount professionally removed. Estimate: $125 - $185

725. 8 reales, 1770(V)-Y. S-P57. KM-45. 26.1 grams. This poor coin! The denomination and date are bold and speak to its authenticity, but the rest of the coin shows unexplained damage (filing, hammering, bending, etc.), otherwise Fine and nicely toned. Estimate: $100 - $150

726. 8 reales, 1771V-(Y). S-P57. KM-45. 26.5 grams. Bold cross, two full assayers (both V) and bold denomination, typically crude but nicely toned Fine+. Estimate: $125 - $185

727. 2 reales, 1658E. S-P37a. KM-16. 8.6 grams. Choice cross, one full pillar, VF with flat spots and patchy toning, overweight flan. Estimate: $100 - $150

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728. 2 reales, 1664E. S-P37a. KM-16. 6.3 grams. Broad flan with full 1664 date in legend, full pillars-and-waves and cross, Fine with patchy toning and flat spots. Estimate: $175 - $275 729. 2 reales, 1676E, large 6 in date. S-P37b. KM-24. 4.6 grams. Bold full pillars with curious (4R-sized?) 6 in date, one nice castle and bold assayer on cross side, AXF with significant flat area at edge, spot of verdigris, low weight as made. Estimate: $75 - $110 730. 2 reales, 1729M. S-P44. KM-29a. 7.1 grams. Broad flan with good full cross and pillars, two dates and assayers, three mintmarks, a bit worn (Fine) but with contrasting toning on fields. Estimate: $100 - $150

731. 2 reales, 1749q. S-P50a. KM-38. 6.4 grams. Squarish flan with nice full cross, good pillars, two dates and mintmarks, Fine with good contrast. Estimate: $100 - $150 732. 2 reales, 1753C/q. S-P53. KM-38. 6.8 grams. Rare over-assayer (clearest to right of cross, but bits of it visible in other two places as well), nearly full pillars, typically crude and chunky, non-toned Fine. Estimate: $100 - $150 733. 2 reales, 1762(V-Y), cut into pomegranate shape. S-P57. KM-43. 5.4 grams. Curious (but not mint-made) shape with hole at top and obviously worn a lot over the centuries (VG+), bold date and denomination. Estimate: $75 - $110

734. 2 reales, 1767(V-Y). S-P57. KM-43. 5.4 grams. Especially bold denomination, nearly full cross with C of king’s name, nicely toned VF+ but typically crude. Estimate: $100 - $150 735. 2 reales, 1772(V)-Y. S-P57. KM-43. 6.4 grams. Fascinating shape (looks like an “onion” bottle), with lots of detail for the era (full cross, bold denomination), and beautifully rainbow toned, VF for wear. Estimate: $75 - $110 736. 1 real, 1653E, •PH• above pillars. S-P37a. KM-13. 2.9 grams. Excellent detail (full cross and pillars), two dates and assayers, three mintmarks, nicely toned Fine. Estimate: $60 - $90 737. 1 real, 1656E. S-P37a. KM-13. 3.9 grams. Nearly full cross, bold king’s ordinal IIII, two pillars-side dates, Fine with much flatness, toned in crevices. Estimate: $40 - $60 738. 1 real, 1673E. S-P37b. KM-23. 2.7 grams. Curiously offcenter cross with significant area beyond crown, nice full pillars with full 1673 date in legend, richly toned Fine+. Estimate: $50 $75

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739. 1 real, 1681V. S-P39. KM-23. 3.2 grams. Off-center cross with area beyond legend like on the last lot, good pillars-and-waves, nicely toned Fine+. Estimate: $50 - $75 740. 1 real, 1691VR, with El Salvador countermark (Type V, 1869). S-P40. KM-23. 2.1 grams. Very low grade (Good or less, typical of coins with this countermark) but with clear date and richly toned, the countermark itself crudely doubled. Estimate: $50 - $75 741. 1 real, 1696VR. S-P40. KM-23. 2.9 grams. Choice full pillars side with bold date and two assayers, Fine for wear, but cross side nearly flat (Fair), with spots of verdigris, effectively a one-sided coin. Estimate: $50 - $75

742. 1 real, 1697CH. S-P41. KM-23. 3.4 grams. Choice full cross and pillars, bold full CH monogram (rare and highly sought one-year assayer), toned AVF with flat spots and crude hole at edge. Estimate: $75 - $110 743. 1 real, 1700F. S-P42. KM-23. 3.7 grams. Good cross and pillars, crude edge, nicely toned AVF, two partial dates and clear F (scarce). Estimate: $50 - $75 744. 1 real, 1732YA. S-P45. KM-28a. 2.8 grams. Nice full pillars and cross, weak but certain date, one full assayer (scarce) and parts of two others, nicely toned Fine+. Estimate: $50 - $75

745. 1 real, 1733YA. S-P45. KM-28a. 2.9 grams. Full pillars, bold date and assayer (scarce), crude and off-center cross, toned Fine. Estimate: $50 - $75 746. 1 real, 1756q, choice but holed. S-P54. KM-37. 2.3 grams. Very bold strike with choice full cross and full date, curiously rectangular flan (possibly trimmed), holed at top near edge, richly toned Fine+. Estimate: $50 - $75 747. 1 real, 1771/0V-(Y). S-P57. KM-42. 3.1 grams. Clear overdate (scarce) on pillars side, bold but incomplete cross, typically crude VF. Estimate: $60 - $90

748. Lot of three 1 reales of different kings (1658E, 1694VR, 1727Y). 3.6, 2.5 and 1.7 grams. The 1658 with clear date, nearly full cross, crudely toned AVF with much flatness; the 1694 small but with full pillars side (VF), flat cross side (Fair), toned; and the 1727 with two dates but otherwise crude, lightly toned Fine. Estimate: $75 - $110

141

749. ½ real, 1657. S-P37a. KM-B12. 1.4 grams. Full date in legend (rare), nice monogram but flat below, nice borders of dots, toned AVF with flat spots. Estimate: $75 - $110 750. ½ real, 1663. S-P37a. KM-B12. 1.2 grams. Full 663 date (rare) below nearly full monogram, off-center cross, deeply toned VF with flat peripheries, possibly salvaged. Estimate: $35 - $50 751. ½ real, 1673. S-P37b. KM-22. 1.3 grams. Good full monogram and cross, salvaged VF. Estimate: $35 - $50 752. ½ real, 1674. S-P37b. KM-22. 1.2 grams. Odd shape, bold 74 of date below most of monogram, most of cross with POT(OSI) in legend, darkly toned Fine (possibly salvaged). Estimate: $35 - $50 753. ½ real, 1675/4. S-P37b. KM-unlisted. 0.8 gram. Full 675 date with clear 5/4 (rare, unlisted overdate) below about half of offcenter monogram with (CARO)LVS II in legend, choice full cross, thin Fine with toning in crevices. Estimate: $40 - $60 754. ½ real, 1675. S-P37b. KM-22. 0.8 gram. Dark (salvaged) Fine with full 675 date below nearly full monogram, incomplete cross, a little wrinkled. Estimate: $35 - $50 755. ½ real, 1676. S-P37b. KM-22. 0.9 gram. Bold 67 and weak final 6 of date, full monogram, nearly full cross, lightly corroded (salvaged) AVF. Estimate: $35 - $50 756. ½ real, 1678. KM-22. 1.4 grams. Choice full cross, bold 678 date (which is rare), below nearly full monogram, nicely toned AVF. Estimate: $50 - $75 757. ½ real, 1687. S-P40. KM-22. 1.6 grams. Bold monogram and 87 of date, good full cross, big flan with sharp point, salvaged VF. Estimate: $35 - $50 758. Lot of two ½ reales of Charles II: 1690 and 1691?. S-P40. KM-22. 2.1 and 1.8 grams. The 1690 with full date, most of monogram and cross, lightly toned Fine with flat spots; the other coin with choice full monogram but weak (uncertain) date, choice cross, toned VF but crudely holed. Estimate: $60 - $90 759. ½ real, 1692. S-P40. KM-22. 2.0 grams. Big, round flan with full monogram and cross, two bold 92 dates (one below monogram and the other in the cross-side legend), Fine+ with sediment on fields and flat peripheries, scarce date. Estimate: $50 - $75 760. ½ real, 1696. S-P40. KM-22. 2.3 grams. Choice bold monogram, good cross on an elongated planchet, AVF with contrasting toning. Estimate: $35 - $50 761. ½ real, 1697. KM-22. 1.6 grams. Full cross and date, nearly full monogram, VF with part of edge crude. Estimate: $40 - $60 762. ½ real, 1729. S-P44. KM-27a. 1.3 grams. Cute onion-shaped flan with bold 9 of date, nearly full cross and monogram, crude strike and toning, technically AVF. Estimate: $35 - $50

142

763. ½ real, 1731. S-P45. KM-27a. 1.2 grams. Very choice full monogram with bold 73 of date below, also choice full cross, toned VF, crude edge (as made). Estimate: $50 - $75 764. ½ real, 1733. KM-27a. 1.6 grams. Nearly full cross and monogram with clear date, Fine with flat spots. Estimate: $35 - $50 765. ½ real, 1736. S-P46. KM-27a. 1.2 grams. Full and bold date, good cross, monogram flat, otherwise toned AVF. Estimate: $35 $50 766. Lot of two ½ reales of Philip V: 1734/4 and 1737. S-P46. KM-27a. 1.7 and 1.2 grams. The 1734 with bold 44 (new 4 punched over offset old 4), off-center strike, non-toned AVF with much flatness; the 1737 with good monogram and cross and date, lightly toned AVF. Estimate: $60 - $90 767. ½ real, 1749. S-P50a. KM-36. 1.5 grams. Bold D of monogram, clear date, most of cross, typically crude flan, toned AVF with flat spots. Estimate: $35 - $50 768. ½ real, 1753. KM-36. 1.3 grams. Bold 53 of date (scarce), good cross, bold D of monogram, Fine with hole near edge. Estimate: $40 - $60 769. ½ real, 1758. S-P54. KM-36. 1.7 grams. Bold 58 date (scarce), most of cross, monogram flat, otherwise Fine, toned. Estimate: $35 - $50

SILVER (and copper) COBS FROM OTHER MINTS Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic Ferdinand-Isabel

770. Copper 4 maravedís, struck in Seville, Spain. CT-638. Cay2513. 7.9 grams. Rare early issue struck in Spain specifically for use in the New World, with S’s flanking an anchor-shaped crowned F on obverse and crowned Y (for Ysabel) and crowned F (for Ferdinand) on reverse, Gothic legends, dark-toned About Fine. Estimate: $300 - $450 771. Copper 4 maravedís, struck in Seville, Spain. CT-638. Cay2513. 5.2 grams. Rare, as above but with bolder legends and higher grade (AVF) but with pitting and edge-split. Estimate: $200 - $300

772. Copper 2 maravedís, struck in Burgos, Spain. CT-533. Cay2446. 3.0 grams. Rare, as above but smaller denomination and different mint (oBo flanking the F), somewhat encrusted Fine with good legends, edge-split. Estimate: $150 - $225

143

Charles-Joanna

773. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer F to left, denomination oIIII to right. S-SD1. KM-46. 3.2 grams. Darkly toned About Fine with bold F and P, full crowned pillars, full IOHANA in legend, much flatness. From a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $35 - $50

774. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer oF to left, denomination oIIII to right. S-SD1. KM-46. 3.3 grams. Full inner details, dark-toned Fine with flatness. From a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $35 $50 775. Study collection of nine different copper 4 maravedís, all with mintmark S-P, assayer F or oF, denomination oIIII or 4, with rare and useful book on the topic. S-SD1. 2.2 to 4.0 grams each. Average grade of Fine, a couple with splits, but all attributable by Estrella number, none with countermarks, a great way (especially with the book) to start a collection in this fascinating series that will become scarcer as the famous Jamaican hoard of 1973 continues to dwindle. Accompanied by the book Monedas Dominicanas (1979) by Estrella. Estimate: $400 - $600 776. Lot of two copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer F to left, denomination oIIII. S-SD1. KM-46. 4.2 and 2.8 grams. One large and thin and encrusted, the other small and thick and worn (also dark), both with attributable details. Both from a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $50 - $75

777. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer oF to left, denomination oIIII to right, with key countermark on obverse (2 maravedís, 1577). S-SD1. KM-46. 2.8 grams. Full key countermark on obverse (scarce, applied in Santo Domingo to denote a devaluation from 4 maravedís to 2 maravedís), full oF, rest of coin weak from pitting, net grade Fine, with edge-split, nice copper color. Estimate: $75 - $110

144

778. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer (oF) to left, denomination oIIII to right, with key countermark on reverse (2 maravedís, 1577). S-SD1. KM-46. 4.0 grams. Large, cupped flan with some good detail despite pitting and wear, the scarce key countermark fully visible, dark orange Fine with edge-split. From a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

779. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer F to left, denomination 4 to right, with S countermark on obverse (1/11 real, Jamaica, 1581-1582). S-SD1. KM-43. 3.6 grams. Very rare with full and bold S countermark (which stands for Santiago, the original Spanish name for the island of Jamaica, to which the governor brought in coins from Santo Domingo for circulation at the rate of 1/11 real after he had purchased them for 1/25 real each), also with nearly full legends, lightly pitted Fine, nice color. Estimate: $200 - $300

780. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer and denomination not visible, with S countermark on obverse (1/11 real, Jamaica, 1581-1582) and anchor countermark on reverse (1/7 real, Jamaica, 1611-1616). S-SD1. 2.4 grams. Very rare with bold S countermark (as above but smaller) AND full anchor countermark, but rest of coin corroded and nearly devoid of readable details. From a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $150 - $225

781. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer oF to left, denomination oIIII to right, with key (2 maravedís, 1577) and anchor (1/7 real, Jamaica, 1611-1616) countermarks on obverse. S-SD1. KM-46. 3.6 grams. Scarce with full key overstruck by partial anchor, bold oF and P, some legend, dark Fine with edgesplit. From a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $75 - $110

782. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer oF to left, denomination to right not visible, key (2 maravedís, 1577) and anchor (1/7 real, Jamaica, 1611-1616) countermarks on reverse. S-SD1. 3.6 grams. Scarce with full key overstruck by top of anchor, bold P to right of full pillars, dark and slightly cupped Fine with some green encrustation, edge-split. Estimate: $75 - $110

783. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer and denomination not visible, with key (2 maravedís, 1577) and anchor (1/7 real, Jamaica, 1611-1616) countermarks on reverse. S-SD1. 3.4 grams. Scarce with full (but encrusted) key overstruck by top of partial anchor whose flukes warped the coin, bold S, much legend (early Gothic style), Fine or so but mostly encrusted with heavy green patina. From a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $75 - $110

784. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer F to left, denomination 4 to right, with anchor countermark (1/7 real, Jamaica, 1611-1616) on reverse. S-SD1. KM-43. 2.6 grams. Nice specimen with full anchor countermark and full inner details, some legend, lightly pitted Fine, nice copper color, edge-split. From a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

145

Panama City, Panama

785. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer to left (not visible), denomination IIII to right, with anchor countermark (1/7 real, Jamaica, 1611-1616) on obverse. S-SD1. KM-46. 2.6 grams. Choice full anchor, good full pillars, only About Fine but with light sediment in crevices highlighting the details. From a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

788. 4 reales, Philip II, assayer oB to left not visible, with denomination as “III”. S-AP4. KM-unlisted. 3.3 grams. Extremely rare issue, one of only about 50 specimens of any denomination known from this mint, but especially rare denomination and rarer still with error denomination, which is boldly visible below the all-important and equally bold AP mintmark to the right of the full shield below nearly full crown. The cross on the other side is full, too, but double-struck, with some bold legend. Grade is only Fine, with some flatness (particularly where the oB assayer would appear to the left of the shield), but unlike most Panama cobs, this one is non-salvage and very solid, also quite round and thick. Plate Coin #4R.5B in Jorge Proctor’s book The Forgotten Mint of Colonial Panama (2005), the one-and-only reference work on this rare and exciting issue. Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

786. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark S-P, assayer oF to left, denomination oIIII to right, with anchor countermark (1/7 real, Jamaica, 1611-1616) on reverse. S-SD1. KM-46. 3.8 grams. Clear partial countermark, nice inner details (especially clear mintmark and pillars), Fine+ with part of edge crude (as made), nice copper color. Estimate: $75 - $110

Colombia Shield-type

787. Copper 4 maravedís, mintmark not visible, assayer F to left, denomination to right not visible, with anchor countermark (1/7 real, Jamaica, 1611-1616) on obverse. S-SD1. 3.2 grams. Nearly full countermark on large patch of green encrustation, bold legends (early Gothic style), About Fine. From a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $75 $110 789. Bogotá, 8 reales, (1)627, assayer not visible, mintmark NR to left, quadrants of cross transposed. KM-3.3. 26.6 grams. Very rare first date of regular production, the 627 full and clear, nice full shield and crown with clear NR mintmark to left above flat spot where assayer should be, denomination VIII (vertically) to right, full but doubled cross, big thick planchet, AVF but lightly pitted in places. Estimate: $3,000 - $4,500

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146

Guatemala City, Guatemala

790. Cartagena, 8 reales, (16)3(0)E, mintmark RN to left. SC3. KM-3.4. 27.3 grams. Choice, high-grade specimen (lustrous AU) with incredibly bold and well-detailed full shield and cross, also full RNE (which appears to be punched over NER) to left and VIII to right, clear 3 of date but rest determined from style, which against the last lot shows the typical contrast in quality between the two mints, the smaller and somewhat temporary Cartagena mint producing much better coins, rare. Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

795. 8 reales, (17)34 or 44(J), with Guatemala Type II countermark (1839). S-G1. KM-6. 26.4 grams. Choice Fine with nice details and attractive toning, bold 4 of date, but rest of date off the flan, full countermark on globes, two full crowns, holed twice near edges. Estimate: $100 - $150

Spain

Pillars-and-waves type

791. Bogotá, ½ real, (1)662. S-B7. KM-8. 1.8 grams. Good full cross with bold full 2 of date preceded by two clear 6’s, the monogram side messier, Fine with filed edges, rare. Estimate: $125 - $185 792. Bogotá, ¼ real, Philip IV, (1651). S-B7. KM-A7. 0.9 gram. Very rare denomination, its date attributable by style of lion and castle, choice AVF specimen with nice full castle, good but slightly off-center lion, attractively toned. Estimate: $400 - $600

796. Seville, 8 reales, Philip II, assayer C. CT-236. Cay-3947. 26.8 grams. Thick flan with choice full shield and cross, most of crown, bold denomination oVIII to right, clear assayer C (scarce) at about 4 o’clock outside tressure, richly toned VF. Estimate: $150 - $225

793. Bogotá, ¼ real, Philip IV, (1652). S-B7. KM-A7. 1.0 gram. Very rare denomination (as above), with full castle, off-center lion, lightly toned and slightly grainy Fine. Estimate: $400 - $600 794. Bogotá, ¼ real, Philip IV, (1652). S-B7. KM-A7. 0.8 gram. Same as above (very rare), but the castle off-center too and lower grade (About Fine with flatness). Estimate: $300 - $450

797. Seville?, 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer not visible. 27.3 grams. Crude planchet as usual, with most of shield, off-center cross, bold king’s ordinal IIII in legend, toned Fine. Estimate: $60 - $90

798. Seville?, 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer not visible. 26.8 grams. Slightly more regular planchet than usual but crude strike, still with most of shield and cross, and decent grade (AVF) where it isn’t flat, curiously with two small, circular, unidentified countermarks (one on each side) consisting of rays around a central figure. Estimate: $60 - $90

147

799. Seville, 8 reales, Charles II, assayer S (1680). CT-425. Cay7585. 25.7 grams. Typically very crude strike and planchet (with natural bubble-hole as made), but with certain assayer S (rare) to left of shield, one nice lion in full cross, toned Fine or so. Estimate: $90 - $135

802. Toledo, 2 reales, Philip III, assayer C, OMNIVM variety. CT-Type 128. Cay-Type 58. 6.7 grams. Full shield with clear C to left, bold denomination II to right, full but doubled cross with O of OMNIVM in legend (Philip II’s modest way of saying he was king of the whole world), lightly toned and slightly grainy Fine. Estimate: $50 - $75

803. Segovia, 1 real, Philip II, assayer oD to right. CT-651. Cay3507. 3.3 grams. Very broad flan with much legend (bold PHILIP), full crown, especially nice shield and wonderful full cross, assayer oD to right (not to be confused with Diego de la Torre of Lima, Peru), richly toned AVF. Estimate: $100 - $150 804. Seville, ½ real, Philip IV, assayer D (1627). CT-1213. Cay5611. 1.6 grams. Choice full monogram with bold •D• to left and •S• to right, nearly full crown, good but off-center cross, attractively toned AVF. Estimate: $40 - $60 800. Lot of one 8 reales and one 4 reales, probably Seville, Philip IV. 22.6 and 12.8 grams. Both rather crude, VG-AVF but with flat areas, some toning, possible assayer R on the 8 reales. Estimate: $90 - $135

801. Seville, 4 reales, Philip II, assayer B. CT-Type 270. CayType 61. 13.4 grams. Uneven thickness, full crown and shield with faint B to left, good cross with especially nice lions, toned AVF with two small edge-splits. Estimate: $75 - $110

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805. Lot of four copper 4 maravedís, various mints, Philip III and IV, all with mid-1600s countermarks. CT-Type 399. 3.0 to 5.7 grams each. These coins are fascinating and under-studied. In this lot alone you see no fewer than a dozen different countermarks (in the form of dates or denominations and mintmarks) from various monetary reforms in the mid-1600s. Average grade here is Fine, and one is thin from salvage, but most of the countermarks are clear. One with clear 1655 countermark found on Chesil Beach near Abbotsbury, England. Estimate: $100 - $150

148

WORLD SILVER COINS Bolivia Central American Republic

Colonial bust-type

806. Potosí, 4 reales, Charles III, 1778PR. CT-1182. KM-54. 12.8 grams. Richly toned Fine with some weak areas, nice aspect. Estimate: $80 - $120

807. Lot of two Potosí ¼ reales of Charles IV: 1799 and 179?. CT-1415. KM-82. 0.9 and 0.7 gram. Both lightly toned AVF with nice detail, last digit of date too weak to read on one of them. Estimate: $75 - $110

809. Guatemala, 8 reales, 1835M. KM-4. 26.9 grams. Near AU (almost full leaves), choice toning, just a few very minor rim-bumps. Estimate: $400 - $600

Colombia

Republic 810. Lot of two Bogotá ¼ reales of Ferdinand VI, no mintmark or assayer. CT-unlisted. KM-unlisted. 0.9 and 0.8 gram. Scarce type that generally does not appear in references but is attributed by Restrepo to this mint in his book Monedas de Colombia 16192006 by logically matching the castle and lion die-punches to 8 reales of the period (as is done for cob ¼ reales). Both coins show clear details on both sides, toned, Fine to VF. Estimate: $75 - $110

808. Potosí, 8 soles, 1845-R. KM-103. 26.8 grams. Lustrous AU, starting to tone beautifully. Estimate: $150 - $225

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149

Cuba

Great Britain

813. London, England, “long cross” penny (1247-1272), Henry III. 1.6 grams. Particularly choice specimen with well-detailed king’s portrait and full cross, whose design extends all the way to the edge in order to prevent clipping, VF+ with light sediment on fields. With small certificate from Littleton Coin Co. Estimate: $90 - $135

811. Study collection of Spanish bust 2 reales with lattice countermarks (1841), eleven different examples, with rare book on the topic. 5.3 to 5.7 grams each. The lattice countermark of Cuba was applied to Spanish coins that had been brought to Cuba by merchants in the early 1800s, when the fall of other colonial areas to independence resulted in severe coin shortages in Cuba. The problem was that the mainland Spanish coins were of lower value, and the merchants were circulating them for much more than their value in Spain. To alleviate the problem, all the coins were recalled and stamped with this mark to denote a lower value. These coins are not rare, but are interesting to study, and we hope this small collection and the book that accompanies it will be the start of a new collection for someone. Grades range from holed VG to nice Fine, host-coin dates of 1782-1828, Charles III through Ferdinand VII, mints of Cádiz, Madrid and Seville. (NOTE: The often-referenced attribution of these countermarks to Trinidad refers to the province in Cuba, not the island off South America.) Accompanied by the book El Resello de las Pesetas Sevillanas by the Museo Numismático of the Banco Nacional de Cuba (1987). Estimate: $500 - $750

814. London, England, half crown, 1746, with LIMA below bust of George II. SP-3695A. KM-584.3. 14.8 grams. Popular issue made from silver captured by Commodore Anson on a plundering South Seas voyage in 1740-1744, this specimen choice AXF, beautifully toned. Estimate: $300 - $450

815. London, England, half crown, 1746, with LIMA below bust of George II, with engraved memorial on reverse. SP-3695A. KM-584.3. 14.8 grams. As above but lower grade (toned AVF) and with inscription on reverse fields that reads “In Memy of Wm F. Damant Died 22d, / Decr 1822 Aged 22,” also with heavy mount marks on reverse edge as probably worn as a pin. Estimate: $125 - $185

Curaçao

812. Dutch administration (1818), 3 reaal (1/5 cut of a Spanish colonial bust 8 reales). KM-28. 4.4 grams. Cute pie-shaped cut with scalloped edge and very deep and bold countermark (XF), the host coin a nicely toned Fine but without any identifying data, popular as one of the few affordable West Indies “cuts and countermarks.” Estimate: $250 - $375

816. London, England, sixpence, 1746, with LIMA below bust of George II. SP-3710A. KM-582.3. 2.9 grams. As above but two denominations lower, toned AVF, no problems. Estimate: $75 $110

150

Guatemala

817. Guatemala City, 8 reales, Ferdinand VI, 1758J. CT-293. KM-18. 26.9 grams. Richly toned VF+, beautiful strike for this mint, rare and desirable. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

820. Mexico City, lot of four 1 reales of Philip V: 1737MF, 1739MF, 1741MF and 1743M. 3.0 to 3.1 grams each. None worse than Fine and generally well detailed and nicely toned. Estimate: $100 - $150

Mexico Colonial pillar-type 821. Mexico City, 1 real, Ferdinand VI, 1750/49M. CT-unlisted. KM-unlisted. 3.3 grams. Rare overdate (R3 in Gilboy, 11 to 25 pieces known), nicely toned AVF with some old scratches that could be adjustment marks. Estimate: $75 - $110 822. Mexico City, ½ real, Philip V, 1746M. 1871 KM-66. 1.7 grams. Lustrous XF+, o of mintmark re-punched, die-crack across 6 of date that makes it look like an overdate. Estimate: $60 - $90 818. Mexico City, 8 reales, Charles III, 1760MM, with chopmarks as from circulation in the Orient. CT-884. KM-105. 26.9 grams. Lustrous XF, the tiny chopmarks less a distraction so much as additional artwork on an already beautiful design. Estimate: $200 - $300

Colonial bust-type

823. Mexico City, 8 reales, Charles III, 1788FM. CT-942. KM106.2a. 26.8 grams. Non-toned VF with long, old scratch on neck. Estimate: $100 - $150 819. Mexico City, 8 reales, Charles III, 1770FM/F. CT-unlisted. KM-105. 26.7 grams. Very rare over-assayer (R5 in Gilboy, 1-3 known!), XF with some weak areas and part of edge crude. Estimate: $350 - $525

151

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War for Independence

824. Mexico City, 8 reales, Charles IV, 1793FM, encapsulated PCI MS-61 Proof Like. CT-686. KM-109. Very flashy, with frosty bust (hence the “Proof Like”), no toning, one of the highest-grade specimens we have ever offered. Estimate: $300 - $450

829. Oaxaca/SUD, copper 8 reales, 1813, with Morelos countermark. CT-579. KM-265.4. 27.0 grams. Dark and typically crude host (Fine with flatness, last digit of date weak), nearly full Morelos countermark (VF). Estimate: $50 - $75

Republic

825. Mexico City, 8 reales, Charles IV, 1799FM. CT-694. KM109. 26.9 grams. Competent VF with dark toning near rim, slightly weak bust. Estimate: $100 - $150

826. Mexico City, 1 real, Charles III, 1780FF/M. CT-unlisted. KM-78.2. 3.3 grams. Scarce over-assayer, rainbow-toned VF+, very nice. Estimate: $60 - $90

830. “Starter collection” of cap-and-rays ½ reales, 25 different dates/mints. Each coin is housed in a cardboard “flip” with the previous owner’s attributions (dates, mints, assayers and varieties) handwritten on the flip, which we have left intact so that the new owner can do the same with his future additions to the collection, each coin here at least VF (most AU or BU), dated from 1825 to 1868, mostly Mexico City but some other mints (Culiacán, Guadalajara, Guanajuato and Zacatecas), mostly nicely toned and problem-free. Estimate: $250 - $375

Any questions? Please email us at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325. 827. Mexico City, ½ real, Charles IV, 1800FM. CT-1294. KM72. 1.7 grams. Richly toned and somewhat lustrous XF, no problems. Estimate: $30 - $45 828. Mexico City, ½ real, Charles IV, 1801FM. CT-1295. KM72. 1.7 grams. Scarce assayer for date, lustrous (cleaned) XF, starting to tone colorfully. Estimate: $50 - $75

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Netherlands (United)

Peru Colonial bust-type

831. Campen, “lion” daalder (leeuwendaalder), 1664. DM-862. 27.3 grams. Beautifully detailed full lion, some bold legend, very weak date, lightly toned VF. Estimate: $100 - $150

834. Lima, 2 reales, Charles IV, 1802IJ. CT-949. KM-95. 6.1 grams. Toned Fine, competent for grade. Estimate: $35 - $50

Philippines (Spanish)

Netherlands West Indies

832. Utrecht, ¼ gulden, 1794. KM-2. 2.6 grams. Attractive 1real-sized coin with crowned arms, denomination and W (to denote West Indies) on obverse, standing figure on reverse above 1794 date in exergue, nicely toned AXF. Estimate: $125 - $185

Panama

835. Peso, crowned Y•II• countermark (1834-1837) on a Lima, Peru (Republic), 8 reales of 1834. CT-451. KM- 28.6 grams. AVF with lots of contrast, the countermark standing for Isabel II of Spain. Estimate: $60 - $90

Spain

833. Panama City, 25 centésimos, 1904. KM-4. 12.5 grams. Halfdollar-sized coin with Balboa on obverse and arms on reverse, lustrous AU with subtle rainbow toning, nick in field in front of face. It is interesting to note that over a third of the mintage of this coin’s larger cousin, the 50 centésimos, was melted in 1931 to make new 1 Balboa coins at the San Francisco mint. Estimate: $50 - $75

836. Granada, 2 reales, Ferdinand-Isabel, mintmark oGo to right of shield, assayer R and circle on reverse. CT-238. CayType 18. 6.7 grams. Nice full flan with nearly full legends (king’s and queen’s names prominent), choice inner details, toned XF+ with evidence of salvage, hairline edge-split. Estimate: $150 - $225

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837. Toledo, 2 reales, Ferdinand-Isabel, mintmark T to left of shield, assayer M to right of arrows. CT-278. Cay-2787. 6.9 grams. Perfectly round and evenly struck, with full legends and inner details, lightly toned VF+ with edge-split. Estimate: $100 $150 841. Seville, lot of two 1 reales of Ferdinand-Isabel, different varieties. 3.5 and 3.2 grams. Larger one with bold S mintmark to right of arrows, slightly wrinkled and polished AVF with large old scratch; smaller one a choice and lustrous AU with some old marks on shield side and no legends. Estimate: $100 - $150

838. Granada, 1 real, Ferdinand-Isabel, mintmark G below arrows, assayer T-T flanking shield. CT-319. Cay-Type 17. 3.2 grams. Choice full Gothic legends and full crown, nice full shield, reverse a little weaker, overall AVF with light toning. Estimate: $60 - $90

839. Seville, 1 real, Ferdinand-Isabel, mintmark S to left and * below arrows. CT-unlisted. Cay-Type 17. 3.2 grams. Full flan with all details including legends, AVF with minor flat spots, patchy toning. Possibly scarce, considering that myriad varieties are listed in the references yet not this one exactly. Estimate: $100 - $150

842. Toledo, lot of two 1 reales of Ferdinand-Isabel, different varieties. 3.0 and 2.7 grams. One coin toned and slightly doubled, the other slightly lower grade and non-toned, net grade Fine. Estimate: $100 - $150

840. Seville, lot of two 1 reales of Ferdinand-Isabel, different varieties. 3.1 and 1.7 grams. Larger one with full legends, mintmark S to left of arrows, good shield, Fine with chip in edge; smaller one severely clipped, mintmark S above arrows and *’s flanking shield, silvery VF. Estimate: $120 - $180

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843. Segovia, 50 reales cincuentín, Philip IV, 1626, assayer cross-topped A. CT-239. Cay-6584. 170.0 grams. Among the many “trophies” of the long and varied Spanish numismatic series are the massive 50 reales or “cincuentines” (known in their time as “monedas excelentes”), effectively the largest Spanish silver coins ever struck, made in very limited quantities throughout the 1600s. The concept appears to have been initiated (or at least encouraged) by the needs of rich Sevillan merchants who were presenting massive quantities of silver (presumably from Peru) to the mint all at once. To make such huge coins required the state-of-the-art technology of a hydraulic steam-press and special roller dies (cuños de rodillo), invented in Germany in the late 1500s and installed in a special mint in Segovia called the Real Ingenio. Very rare and special in their own time, these 50-reales coins are even more highly regarded today and can sell in the six-figure range. This 1626 specimen is arguably the most common date by virtue of the fact that it had the highest mintage of 300 pieces (of which fewer than 20 are known to exist today), all made for the Marqués de Liche over the course of three weeks, from July 8 to July 28. This specimen is XF, with several old nicks and bumps and a small flaw in the rim, but is nonetheless beautiful, attractively toned, and typically perfectly struck. Estimate: $15,000 - $22,500

844. Barcelona, 2 reales “pistareen,” Charles III Pretender, 1712. CT-28. Cay-7984. 4.3 grams. Nice shield side (AVF) but messy monogram (AVG), still with full and clear date and attractively toned. Estimate: $50 - $75

846. Madrid 2 reales “pistareen,” Philip V, 1721A. CT-1248. Cay-8720. 4.8 grams. Nice AXF, well struck and beautifully toned, but very lightly shaved around edge. Estimate: $65 - $95

Venezuela

845. Madrid, 2 reales “pistareen,” Philip V, 1721A. CT-1248. Cay-8720. 5.5 grams. Attractively toned AXF with upper half of cross weak due to waviness of flan as struck on a roller-press. Estimate: $85 - $125

847. Caracas, 1 real, 1818BS. KM-C5.1. 2.6 grams. Royalist issue during the struggle for independence, its design imitative of Peruvian cobs, this specimen rather choice for the issue (which is rare in this denomination), off-center VF+, nicely toned. Estimate: $500 - $750

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ARTIFACTS FROM SHIPWRECKS Unidentified Tang Dynasty (618-906 AD) Unidentified Song Dynasty wreck (late 1200s) trading junk wreck off Sumatra, Indonesia sunk off Tinghai Lianjiang, Fujian province, China

848. Chinese (Burmese) earthenware green-glaze jarlet. 54.1 grams, about 2½” tall and 1-3/8" in diameter. Very cute little vase with bulbous bottom, narrow neck and flared top, the top two-thirds with lustrous dark-green glaze but the bottom exposed white clay, encrusted with brown and tan sediment, fully intact except for chips in rim under the glaze (not damaged). With Robert Marx photo-certificate. Estimate: $60 - $90

849. Chinese (Burmese) earthenware green-glaze jarlet. 49.5 grams, about 2½” tall and 1-3/8" in diameter. As above, the glaze dripped in two places down to near the bottom, no chips under glaze. With Robert Marx photocertificate. Estimate: $60 - $90

852. Chinese stoneware Temmoku black glaze bowl. 157 grams, about 3-7/8" in diameter and 1-5/8" tall. From the Dongzhang/ Minhou kiln in Fujian province (China), this small tea bowl was one of many being exported to Japan during the Song/Yuan Dynasty, many of which were lost on this unidentified shipwreck. An attractive old artifact, fully intact, with very dark brown glaze on the inside and on the upper half of the outside above light gray bare stoneware that shows small bits of white encrustation. Estimate: $200 - $300

Unidentified Chinese wreck of the 1300s

850. Chinese (Burmese) earthenware green-glaze jarlet. 31.1 grams, about 2½” tall and 1-3/8" in diameter. As above but with a bit more glaze overall, more vivid color, tiny chip in glaze at top. With Robert Marx photocertificate. Estimate: $60 - $90 853. Small, shallow bowl, Yuan Dynasty (1279-1368). 81.4 grams, 4¼” in diameter and 3/4" tall. A very shallow bowl with scalloped rim, no design, dark gray all over with light sediment, very cute and intact. Estimate: $50 - $75

851. Chinese (Burmese) earthenware green-glaze jarlet. 42.7 grams, about 2½” tall and 1-3/ 8" in diameter. As above, the glaze a bit yellower, no chips or flaws. With Robert Marx photo-certificate. Estimate: $60 - $90

Please send your bids to our special email bidding address: treasurebids@gmail.com 156

Unidentified 1400s wreck in the South China Flor do Mar, sunk in 1511 off Sumatra, Sea Indonesia 854. Thai Sawankhalok stoneware jarlet, early 1400s. 134 grams, about 2-3/8" in diameter and 2½” tall. We have sold these before: small, fat, flat-based, two-handled vases in plain, whitish clay with traces of encrustation. This one shows areas of light green (celadon) glaze still on the surface, plus a small oyster on the side, perfectly intact. Estimate: $125 - $185

858. Chinese jade artifact (small vase with mustachioed face), Ming Dynasty. 65.1 grams, about 2-1/8" tall and 23/8" wide. Wide, flat vase with fringed sides and human face with mustache on both sides, dark green with tan highlights. With Robert Marx photocertificate. Estimate: $300 $450 859. Chinese jade artifact (fish), Ming Dynasty. 24.1 grams, about 2-1/8" wide and 1/ 8" thick. An arched fish squirting water toward its tail, its scales and head and dorsal fin all well defined on both sides, very pale green with light encrustation, perfectly intact. With Robert Marx photocertificate. Estimate: $300 $450

855. Thai Sawankhalok stoneware jarlet, early 1400s. 122 grams, about 2½” tall and 2-3/8" in diameter. As above but with more shell encrustation (including a loose shell rattling around inside!) but no celadon remaining, intact except for small chips in base. Estimate: $125 - $185

Unidentified mid- to late-1400s wreck in the Philippines.

860. Chinese jade artifact (robed warrior?), Ming Dynasty. 61.5 grams, about 2-3/8" tall and 1¼” wide. Shape of a seated human (possibly military) with hair pulled into a tail at top, both hands resting on a bar of some sort, robed and smiling, light green in color with some white inclusions. With Robert Marx photo-certificate. Estimate: $300 $450

856. Small, gray bowl, Chinese, Ming Dynasty (1400s). 298 grams, 6½” in diameter and 1½” tall. Perfectly intact but without much design (just three floral areas inside the bowl), glazed only down to about a 3" diameter, bluish gray all over. Estimate: $125 - $185 857. Small, gray bowl, Chinese, Ming Dynasty (1400s). 232 grams, 6¼” in diameter and 1½” tall. As above, same design but the design a little more vivid and the background a good bit whiter, fully intact. Estimate: $125 - $185

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Unidentified Chinese wreck of the early 1600s

861. Chinese jade artifact (swan?), Ming Dynasty. 35.8 grams, about 1-3/4" long and 1½” tall. Very cute, complete bird, almost certainly a swan but with larger eyes and more pronounced beak (like an eagle), pale green color with light sheen of encrustation, perfectly intact. With Robert Marx photo-certificate. Estimate: $300 - $450

862. Chinese jade artifact (dragon’s head?), Ming Dynasty. 91.2 grams, 3¼” long, 7/8" wide. A long, somewhat cylindrical piece with head at one end consisting of a blunted snout, flaring eyes, and long ears, the other end smooth and sloped, pale green color, a few minor flaws as made. With Robert Marx photo-certificate. Estimate: $300 - $450

865. Encrusted blue-on-white porcelain cup, Ming Dynasty, late 1500s/early 1600s. 146 grams, about 4-1/8" in diameter and 1-3/ 4" tall. A big cup with flared rim, very dark blue crude pattern on exterior, single character inside bowl, intact but with very neat patches of mostly white encrustation all over. Estimate: $150 $225

863. Chinese jade artifact (butterfly?), Ming Dynasty. 52.7 grams, about 3-3/8" tall and 2-1/8" wide. Undulating edges (wings?) with triangular shape inside (body?), very pale green in color and with bits of coral encrustation. With Robert Marx photo-certificate. Estimate: $300 - $450

Unidentified wreck sunk ca. 1554 in the northern Caribbean 864. Small, flat pewter plate. 536 grams, 8" in diameter. Nearly intact (small piece missing from rim), about half the surface covered with coral encrustation and mossy sea-grass (not too many artifacts have that!), the rest dark with rust spots, no markings visible (could be some under the coral), quite a neat display. Estimate: $750 $1,100

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“Wild Horse River wreck,” sunk ca. 1620 off Uruguay

866. Gold ring with amethyst. Size 8, the stone about 2.5 carats. Ornate design in very bright, high-grade gold (probably 22K), with rectangular table-cut amethyst (beautiful violet color), in perfect condition and most likely crafted for a very rich nobleman, one of the finest Spanish rings we have ever seen from a shipwreck (just not an emerald or diamond, which of course are worth more for the stones). With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $6,000 - $9,000

867. Gold ring with aquamarine(?). Size 6-3/4, the stone about 2 carats. Possibly meant to match the above, slightly smaller but also ornate in design and high-grade gold (22K), with the gemstone cut in a pointed octagon with twelve facets (similar to the Old European “rose cut” that was popular in the 1500s but very rare today), the color of the stone varying from slightly blue to slightly pink (mostly clear), perfect condition but with some black encrustation near the top. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $5,000 - $7,500

868. Small oval glass/gold reliquary pendant with enameled edge. 0.9 gram, 3/8" to 5/8" in diameter. A very cute little piece with glass (that probably housed a small religious relic at one time) held in place by gold bezel and prongs, the outside rim showing a pattern of circles in alternating relief, the low pits enameled green and the upper ones containing grayish coral or degraded pearls, with cloverleaf designs at top and bottom (coral in crevices) with tiny loops for connecting to chains or jump-rings. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $500 - $750

869. Two-part iron sliding barshot. 6 lb, 13 oz, 9" long, 3" in diameter. While we have handled several iron barshot over the years (the concept being two balls or short cylinders joined by a bar shot out of a cannon to foul opponents’ rigging), this is the first we have ever seen with the bar itself in two separate parts that stay together by means of a ring on one and a flare on the other, such that the shot can spread apart and flex, making it longer and giving it more rotation. Barshot from wrecks are rare enough; this one has to be nearly unique, certainly in such well-preserved condition as this one is, all surfaces black and only lightly corroded, the sliding bars wired together by the salvagers. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

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870. Iron axe-head with armorers’ mark. 2 lb, 13 oz, about 8¼” x 3" x 2". A remarkably well-preserved artifact, perfectly intact except for pitting on surfaces that nevertheless exposes striations from forging to show how it was made in two parts, the thin strap around the handle curved around to meet a separate, presumably more-hardened, blade piece that on this example is still a bit sharp. A large armorers’ mark (unreadable) is impressed right where the two pieces meet. For comparison, a 1715-Fleet axe just like this one (with facsimile handle) sold for over $1000 in our last auction. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $500 - $750

871. Iron cannon pin-ring. 287 grams, 9½” long. This object was hammered into the side of the ship and chained to a cannon to keep it from recoiling across the deck after firing. This particular specimen is in great shape, black in color and only lightly corroded, just enough to show forging striations. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $50 - $75 872. Iron chest lock-strap. 160 grams, about 5-3/4" long and 1" in width. An Lshaped strap with rectangular hole in short end for receiving a loop on the side of a chest through which a padlock could be fastened, the iron in solid condition, black and only lightly pitted. With official photocertificate. Estimate: $50 - $75

873. Lead sounding-weight with iron nails inside. 1024 grams, about 4½” x 2-1/8" x 1½”. We have never seen a sounding-lead quite like this one, as it is shaped like an iron with an apron in the back that has two holes for wire or rope, plus there is a large but shallow hole at the back of the main part and a small hole through the front of it as well—in fact we are not 100 percent sure it is a sounding lead at all, but what else could it be? The most interesting aspect of all is the fact that the lead was cast around several iron nails, whose rusty remains peek through the top. A fascinating object, to be sure, and possibly rare and important. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $150 - $225

874. Miniature lead cannon (map marker/paperweight?). 102 grams, 3" long and about ½” in diameter. A solid scale-model of a cannon, possibly a toy but more likely a marker used by a military commander to plan out his battles on a map, or something like that, as it is relatively heavy (to weigh down the paper) and appears to have seen much use (flattish on top and bottom), now with light encrustation from the water. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $200 - $300

875. Stone stylus (sand pencil). 12.9 grams, 4" long, 3/8" wide. This piece is a bit of a mystery, as it is lightweight but appears to be stone (slate?) and has a high-pitch ring like a lead pencil, which is our best guess as to its use, for writing instructions in sand or on some sort of board, worn from use but intact, dark gray in color, very curious and possibly rare. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

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876. Lot of eight lead spike-caps. 265 grams total, each piece 1" to 1½” in diameter. Spikes are often seen from Spanish wrecks, but we have never seen tops of them coated with lead like this lot displays. The spikes themselves are gone (rusted away), but the tops remain, cocooned in fat round caps of lead. We speculate that these caps were a method to keep the spikes from rusting away while the ship was in use. Each one is lightly encrusted but recognizable for the very rare items that they are. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $200 - $300 877. Lot of two iron spikes, one with original cloth attached. 92.4 grams total, one 4-3/4" long and the other 2½” long. Another surprising “spike by-product” from this wreck, the pieces in this lot both display original cloth or other fibrous material wrapped around the head, which has to be very rare. The shorter piece in this lot shows distinct brown fibers, but the other has just a fossilized mass there, both with somewhat corroded shanks but still pointed. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185

878. Lot of thirteen small, square, iron spikes. 560 grams total, 3½” to 4½” long each. Small but mostly complete spikes with square shanks and flat heads, one curved into a fancy J-shape (the others mostly straight), well preserved (black color). With official photocertificate. Estimate: $300 - $450

880. Lot of five round, iron hull-pin parts. 942 grams total, 2¼” to 5" long each. Small, fat, stubby parts of big round bolts, their heads typically flattened, all black and well preserved. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185

881. Lot of four cuprous spikes. 212 grams total, lengths from 17/8" to 5-3/4". Typical brass or bronze spikes, with square shanks and heads, one long and straight and the others shorter, bent and/or broken, with well-preserved, clean surfaces in brassy or coppery color. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

882. Lot of four iron cannonballs of various sizes. 7 lb, 3 oz total, diameters of about 1" to 4". The largest one, a six pounder(?), is in excellent condition with mostly smooth surfaces, the others a little more pitted but all black and stable, a great representation of the several different kinds of shot used on ships of this period. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $350 - $525

879. Lot of five square iron spikes. 431 grams total, 5¼”-6" long each. Complete, square-shanked spikes with flat heads, all black and well preserved. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $150 - $225 883. Lot of miscellaneous iron parts. 346 grams total. This lot consists of a curved (flat) band, a small ring, a large brad, a short cylinder, the top of a huge spike, and a curved piece of what might have been a breastplate (armor), none of them fully intact but all well preserved (black) and worthy of display. With official photocertificate. Estimate: $60 - $90

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884. Seven lead musket-balls in original mold. 160 grams, 5¼” long, each ball ½” in diameter. Over the years we have sold hundreds of musket-balls, but this is the FIRST TIME we have ever seen them in their original mold with a strip still attached! Looking like seven little peas in a pod, the balls are attached to the strip with a narrow post that was broken off when the balls were finished. The mold strip appears to be intact and of full length, which should be of interest to small-arms researchers who might not have known exactly how these balls were made in the early 1600s. A unique item whose value should extend well beyond the price of seven simple musket-balls. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $350 - $525 888. Lot of three copper “nuggets.” 6.7 grams total, each about 3/8". We are not sure of the purpose of these copper balls, but we are fairly certain they are melted pieces and not actual natural nuggets. Perhaps part of the ship burned, reducing its nails to these little blobs, each one a dark brass color and lightly patinated. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $50 - $75

885. Lot of three lead musketballs with parts of original molds. 71 grams total, each ball ½” in diameter. Like the above, each of these balls is still attached to the original mold strip, two of them joined together and one by itself, all lightly dusted with sediment. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $150 - $225 886. Lot of seven small musket-balls and one large ball. 321 grams total, diameters from 5/8" to 1". All but one of the balls in this lot are the standard musket-balls you see from nearly every colonial-era wreck, but the last one is much bigger (and darker but with white encrustation), with large indentations that could indicate that it was reserved by the ship’s surgeon for use as an erstwhile anesthetic by having his patient literally “bite the bullet” while his leg was amputated (for example). With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

889. Lot of miscellaneous items: Copper knob; copper bar; copper box handle; two pieces of sea-worn glass. 164 grams total. This lot contains three copper pieces (a solid and beautifully encrusted knob/finial/pommel, a thin handle part, and a rectangular bar) and two pieces of glass, none of it fully identifiable but nice for display anyway. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $60 - $90

887. Lot of several small pieces of lead and copper. 315 grams total. In order to reduce the damage from teredo worms, which could eat through a ship remarkably quickly, the wooden hull of the ship was plated with lead, of which the large lead piece in this lot (with square nail hole) was undoubtedly a part. The other pieces of lead might be connected to the musket-ball molds in the above lots, and the copper sheets (with nail holes too) were probably from the outside of wooden chests or the like, as copper was not used to plate ships’ hulls until much later. With official photo-certificate. Estimate: $75 - $110

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Atocha, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida

890. Large silver base, encrusted. 356 grams, 6" in diameter and 2" tall. A cylindrical piece with flaring top and bottom, slits in sides and holes for fastening onto a larger item of unknown identity (possibly a colander or porous serving dish of some sort), the thin metal curiously crystallized and encrusted to a whitish gray in color, with large piece of rim broken off, fragile but rare and desirable as a genuine Atocha artifact. With Fisher photo-certificate #85A-A238 and original plastic tag. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

892. Fisher “space pen” made with Atocha gold, with original box. 14.1 grams and 35/8" long (pen only). In 1985 the highly regarded (Paul) Fisher pen company got together with Mel Fisher and used some of the gold recently recovered from the Atocha to make a few special editions of their famous “space pens,” approved by NASA to be used in space because they can write upside-down and on glossy surfaces or even underwater. This pen is black with a 14K gold ring around the middle engraved with CONTAINS ATOCHA GOLD FROM MEL FISHER, and it rests snugly inside a plastic case (intact but not new) printed with “Fisher / ATOCHA / Actual Gold from the Sunken Treasure of the 1622 Spanish Galleon ATOCHA” and a picture of a ship on top, with folded certificate/refill order form inside. Once common, and originally sold at high retail prices, these Atocha pens are now scarce. Estimate: $50 - $75

891. Raw, high-quality emerald. 2.2 carats (0.43 gram). Perfectly six-sided crystal of beautiful green, not too opaque, one of the better natural emeralds we have seen from the Atocha. With Fisher photocertificate #015/630. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

Santa Margarita, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida

893. Natural pearl, very large. 3.62 carats, about 3/8" in diameter. Late last year divers on the Margarita site made an amazing discovery: a lead box filled with 16,000 tiny pearls! These pearls are slowly entering the market now after division with Fisher investors and divers, and we are very curious to see what prices they will bring. The only other time we have seen pearls like this from a Spanish galleon was when the finds of the ca.-1622 “Dry Tortugas wreck” were auctioned off in California in 2004, but those pearls were all snatched up by the original finders, who reserved them for their museum in Florida. The pearl in this lot is the largest one we have seen on the market so far, with about one half smooth but the other half cleaved, like a coffee bean but white and glossy. With Fisher photo-certificate #8258. Estimate: $350 - $525

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894. Natural pearl, large. 1.27 carats, about ¼” in diameter. As above but shaped like a snowman (two fused balls), nice smooth surfaces, white and shiny. With Fisher photo-certificate #2418. Estimate: $200 - $300

897. Natural pearl, medium. 0.40 carat, about 1/8" in diameter. As above, a small and fairly regular sphere, somewhat pinkish in color and with less luster. With Fisher photo-certificate #2907. Estimate: $175 - $275

895. Natural pearl, large. 1.25 carats, about ¼” in diameter. As above, about half smooth and round but the other side flat and rough, a little reddish in color. With Fisher photo-certificate #2521. Estimate: $200 - $300

898. Natural pearl, small. 0.21 carat, less than 1/8" in diameter. As above, seemingly small but actually about three times the size of most of the other pearls from this find, this one a fairly regular sphere of decent white color, not much luster. With Fisher photocertificate #3602. Estimate: $175 - $275

Unidentified early-1600s wreck in the English Channel

896. Natural pearl, large. 1.10 carats, about ¼” in diameter. As above but rounder, with rougher surfaces, nice bright-white color. With Fisher photo-certificate #8624. Estimate: $200 - $300

899. Bronze pocket “ring” sundial, ca. 1600. 4.8 grams, about 1¼” in diameter and ¼” wide. Prior to the development of watches in the 1600s, tiny sundials like this one were how the casual traveler could tell time via a small, personal device. It consists of a flat ring with markings on the outside and a groove in the center for a thin pointer known as a style (missing in this case), with a loop at top for wearing on a necklace and for holding up to the sun, the same design that has been seen from the Atocha wreck of 1622. Intact and lightly patinated. Estimate: $200 - $300

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Capitana, sunk in 1654 off Chanduy, Ecuador 900. Large iron cannonball. 18 lb, 5" in diameter. A wonderfully intact, minimally preserved (stable) iron cannonball of great size and weight, its surfaces rusty but not too flaky, with a couple spots of light encrustation, first one we have offered from this wreck that was not bronze (which is actually rarer). Estimate: $150 - $225

Sacramento, sunk in 1668 off the Bay of All Saints, Bahia, Brazil 901. Terra cotta statue of San Juan Bautista (St. John the Baptist). 507 grams, about 9-3/4" tall, 3Ÿ� at its widest. Small statues from wrecks are highly prized items, as they add a truly human element. This hollow statue is one of several found on this wreck, crudely molded from brown-orange clay and showing the robed saint with a lamb in his left arm, his right hand with a hole for holding a cross-topped pole (missing in this example), undoubtedly related to a group of Franciscan friars known to be among the 200 passengers aboard what was actually a military vessel. There are holes from poor manufacture in the back and on the right shoulder, in addition to some bubble-voids in the neck and chest area, but nothing that looks like actual damage, just little bits of encrustation here and there. Estimate: $900 - $1,350

902. Large lead seal (English). 19.8 grams, about 1-5/8" in diameter. Even though this was technically a military ship, it was carrying quite a bit of consumer goods like bolts of cloth, on whose corners were impressed two-part coin-like lead disks like this one to show that the material had passed inspection or had been assessed for taxes (for example). This particular lead seal is English and bears the beautiful portrait of an angel, the other half (which would show a coat of arms) missing. Tan in color, with lots of encrustation, a little bent but fully intact. Estimate: $200 - $300

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903. Small lead seal, double-diamond shape (English). 9.9 grams, about 1-5/8" long and 3/4" wide. The design of this textile seal (both sides intact) is that of two diamonds, with the larger diamond showing a crowned English coat-of-arms on one side and a crowned R on the other side, and the smaller diamond showing the number 63 on one side, all fully intact (presumably never removed), brown in color. Estimate: $200 - $300 904. Small lead seal, Portuguese arms/small Brazilian globe with lettering. 14.2 grams, about 7/8" in diameter. Two parts fused together, back to back, one side with the Portuguese arms and the other side with the Brazilian globe below a big S and a Jerusalem cross and bold lettering in the legend, brown in color and fully intact, the two parts crudely offset. Estimate: $150 - $225 905. Medium-sized lead seal, Portuguese arms/large Brazilian globe. 19.3 grams, about 1¼” in diameter. Design as above but a bit larger and without lettering or legends of any kind, also with part of one side folded down, the globe side particularly bold and attractive (brown color). Estimate: $100 $150 906. Lot of five cut pieces of small lead seals with Portuguese/Brazilian arms. Weights from 4.5 grams to 6.4 grams, each one up to ½” in diameter. Same design as above but smaller and interestingly all cut (meaning the textiles to which they were affixed were probably used on the voyage), each one tan or gray, with light encrustation. Estimate: $100 - $150 907. Small lead seal, mostly flat. 7.7 grams, about 3/4" in diameter. Though this piece is technically intact, there is no design visible, just a black background with light encrustation, cute but not attributable. Estimate: $50 - $75

“Porto Bello wreck,” sunk 1681 off Porto Bello, Panama

908. Long steel rapier blade. 12 oz, 43½” long. As mentioned in the accompanying magazine article, this wreck was famous for yielding dozens of these thin steel blades (this lot and next) without handles, probably replacements for broken swords already in use in the colonies. Rusted all over but stabilized and solid, markings within blood-groove almost visible, a scarce item despite the large find from this wreck. With Treasure Quest magazine featuring an article on the salvage of these blades. Estimate: $150 - $225

909. Long steel rapier blade. 10 oz, 41½” long. As above but a bit shorter from broken tip (a typical occurrence even on non-salvage specimens). With Treasure Quest magazine featuring an article on the salvage of these blades. Estimate: $150 - $225

Consolación, sunk in 1681 off Santa Clara Island, Ecuador

910. Bronze church door ornament mounted on wooden plaque. 8½” x 10-3/4" overall. When the divers on this wreck found a group of unusual, somewhat star-shaped bronze objects with 8 ridges and a rounded finial in the middle, they really had no idea what they were; but not long afterward they happened to notice that Catholic church doors throughout colonial Peru were studded with them, each one having a simpler (round) counterpart on the other side of the door. The salvagers decided to pair these parts together and put the sets on wooden plaques for display (either as a wall-hanging or, by means of a dowel in the back, as a stand) along with a photo of a church door and a brief history of the wreck in plastic sleeves. This first example is a plain-edge, rectangular plaque, the ornaments in excellent, preserved condition. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #B0028. Estimate: $150 - $225

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914. Complete bronze hull-pin and part of another. 4 lb, 5 oz total, the large one 23½” long and 5/8" in diameter. This is one of the longest pins we have ever seen, 100 percent straight and intact, with a round cap at one end and the other end slightly flared, its surfaces a lovely green and brown from encrustation, very solid and heavy, along with a much smaller broken piece of another hullpin with similar patina. With ROBCAR photo-certificates #B0024 and #B0025. Estimate: $100 - $150 911. Bronze church door ornament mounted on wooden plaque. 8-3/4" x 11¼” overall. As above but the plaque eight-sided and with beveled edge. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #B0026. Estimate: $150 - $225

912. Uncleaned bronze church door ornament mounted on wooden plaque. 8-3/4" x 11½” overall. As above, more rectangular, with beveled edge, but also with the ornament parts themselves still encrusted with green patina and shell bits. With ROBCAR photocertificate #B0027. Estimate: $150 - $225

915. Mule shoe and nails mounted on wooden plaque (large). 12" x 12" plaque with 5½” x 3-3/4" shoe. In addition to the churchdoor ornaments mentioned above, another surprise find on this wreck were several chests of iron mule-shoes, normally a rare find from a shipwreck, and again the salvagers have decided to mount these shoes on wooden plaques, this one square with a plain edge, with a photo of the chests on site and a brief history of the wreck in plastic sleeves, also with crude nails used to fasten the shoes, the nails and shoe intact, well preserved and coated black. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #I00036. Estimate: $75 - $110

913. Uncleaned bronze church door ornament (no plaque) with encrusted earthenware olive jar neck. 372 grams total, the ornament about 2-7/8" in diameter and the jar neck about 3-3/4" in diameter. Yet another of the door ornaments mentioned above, but this one just the front part (no round backpiece and no finial, and not mounted on a plaque), uncleaned (lovely green encrustation), paired with a broken-off neck of an earthenware olive jar with coral encrustation all over. With ROBCAR photo-certificates #B0028 and #C00042. Estimate: $75 - $110

916. Mule shoe and nails mounted on wooden plaque. 8½” x 11" plaque with 5" x 3½” shoe. As above but smaller, eight-sided plaque with beveled edge and with photo of just the shoes in chestshape before conservation. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #I00034. Estimate: $75 - $110

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Sunken city of Port Royal, Jamaica, submerged by earthquake in 1694

917. Clay pipe set. 13.3 grams, each piece about 2¼” long. Tobacco was big in colonial days, and it was typically smoked in long, thin clay pipes that were designed so that you could break off the tip when you were done and the next user could “start fresh” (and of course they broke on their own often enough). This set comprises a complete bowl and a small section of the tubular pipe, both a bit stained and a little bit encrusted. With Robert Marx certificate. Estimate: $75 - $110

918. Clay pipe set. 15.7 grams, the bowl 3" long and the stem piece 2" long. Same thing as last lot except with more of the pipe attached to the bowl, the stem piece clean and white but the bowl a little glossy and with spots of rusty encrustation, marked with “1263” in ink on the inside. With Robert Marx certificate. Estimate: $75 $110

1715 Fleet, east coast of Florida 919. Solid gold (24K) replica of the famous “dragon whistle” (Captain’s badge of office). 23.2 grams, about 1½” long. In 1962 Rex Stocker and Kip Wagner of the Real Eight Co. found a dragonshaped gold object with an 11-foot gold chain attached on the beach opposite the “Cabin wreck” site just south of Sebastian, and this strange and beautiful object turned out to be Captain-General Ubilla’s badge of office, functional as a whistle and toothpick and earspoon all in one. It was a fabulous piece that sold at auction in 1967 (see lot #21 of the “Treasure of the Spanish Main” auction of February 4, 1967, by Parke-Bernet in New York City) for $50,000, a veritable fortune at the time. This same piece sold recently for six figures (also was offered at auction in 1993 but did not sell). Over the years we have seen a few cast replicas of this whistle, like this one, a perfect reproduction in solid gold, distinguishable from the original by the fact that it is solid and not hollow (and therefore is not functional as a whistle). Normally we do not offer reproductions, but this one was not mass-produced and offers the high bidder the opportunity to put into his collection at least some representation of such a famous artifact. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

920. Gold cufflink, 22K. 3.8 grams, each link about 3/8" in diameter. Cute but simple cufflink consisting of two plain (no design), hemispherical buttons joined by an oval jumpring. From the “Cabin wreck” site, found on the beach after hurricane Jeanne in September of 2004. Estimate: $500 - $750

921. Gold ring with diamond pattern. 1.6 grams, size 3. Small like most, with seven-sided exterior shape on which is engraved a diamond-shaped pattern (common design), fully intact, probably around 14K. From the “North Colored Beach” site, with Fisher photo-certificate #NCB076B. Estimate: $500 - $750

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931. Small, natural emerald. 1.8 carats (0.36 gram). Light green but very clean and a little less opaque than the others, 5/16" long, no encrustation. With small certificate. Estimate: $150 - $225

922. Gold ring, plain. 2.9 grams, size 1¼. Very small ring, but also very thick, no design, brassy color as low fineness. From the “North Colored Beach” site, with Fisher photo-certificate #NCB075. Estimate: $500 - $750 923. Small, natural emerald. 3.8 carats (0.76 gram). Pleasing crystal shape (more or less sixsided), over ¼” in length, good green color but thoroughly opaque, with lightly encrusted surfaces. With small certificate. Estimate: $200 - $300 924. Small, natural emerald. 3.55 carats (0.71 gram). Odd nugget shape, over ½” long, dark green but opaque with light encrustation all over. With small certificate. Estimate: $200 - $300 925. Small, natural emerald. 2.9 carats (0.58 gram). Nice crystal shape, 3/ 8" long, light green in color with whitish surfaces. With small certificate. Estimate: $200 - $300 926. Small, natural emerald. 2.55 carats (0.51 gram). Light jade in color but perfect crystal shape, ¼” long, tan encrustation. With small certificate. Estimate: $175 - $275

932. Small, natural emerald. 1.7 carats (0.34 gram). Long, whitish rock (over 3/ 8") with encrustation. With small certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185 933. Small, natural emerald. 1.6 carats (0.32 gram). Whitish crystal, 3/8" long, lightly encrusted. With small certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185 934. Small, natural emerald. 1.5 carats (0.3 gram). Crystal with one end uneven, 3/8" long, lightly encrusted. With small certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185 935. Small, natural emerald. 1.35 carats (0.27 gram). Crystal-shaped cube, nearly ¼” to a side, dark green but opaque and encrusted. With small certificate. Estimate: $125 - $185

936. Lot of seven small, natural emeralds. 1.55 carats (0.31 gram) total. Three good-sized rocks and four small chips, decent green color and encrustation. With small certificate. Estimate: $200 $300

927. Small, natural emerald. 2.4 carats (0.48 gram). Small green rock, lightly encrusted all over. With small certificate. Estimate: $175 $275 928. Small, natural emerald. 2.35 carats (0.47 gram). Light green color, nicely encrusted, over 3/8" long. With small certificate. Estimate: $175 - $275 929. Small, natural emerald. 2 carats (0.4 gram). Grayish green, a 3/8" rock with encrustation all over. With small certificate. Estimate: $175 - $275 930. Small, natural emerald. 1.9 carats (0.38 gram). Pretty green rock, 3/8" long, nicely encrustation. With small certificate. Estimate: $175 - $275

937. Blue-on-white Chinese (K’ang Hsi) porcelain shard. 219 grams, approx. 7-3/4" x 4¼”. A sizable portion of what must have been a huge bowl or vase, the blue pattern still quite vivid under crackled glaze, otherwise smooth and white. With Fisher photocertificate #46502. Estimate: $150 - $225

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938. Bronze dagger pommel. 47.6 grams, about 1" long and 7/8" in diameter. Grape-shaped and -sized ornament (very solid and heavy) that once graced the end of a dagger, with tanghole on flared end and holes at other end and below the flare that might have held pins for a chain of some sort, brassy in color and a with some pitting that obscures what appears to be ornamental design. With Fisher photo-certificate #5814, on which it is erroneously described as silver. Estimate: $125 - $185

939. Iron knife blade, professionally conserved. 22.2 grams, 5¼” long. A small knife, about half of it the blade and the other half part of the handle (its wooden, bone or ivory parts long since gone), all encrusted but intact in terms of shape, rare to have survived at all. Estimate: $100 - $150

943. Large curved needle. 7.9 grams, 3-3/4" long. This long, curved and very sharp-pointed, 4-sided needle was either surgical or used for sail repair and is remarkably well preserved for iron, with dark surfaces tinged with a hint of rust, one end broken, probably rare. Estimate: $50 - $75 940. Small iron cannonball. 6 lb, 2 oz, 3½” in diameter. Crude from oxidation (now stabilized), with large sections of the surface missing, still heavy and recognizable, and a highly sought artifact. Estimate: $60 - $90

944. Lot of eight curved needles. 26 grams total, each about 3"4" long. Like the last lot but smaller, each of these complete 4sided needles is 100 percent intact, dark and solid, with very sharp points, possibly used for suturing but more likely for repairing sails, must be rare in this condition. Estimate: $200 - $300

941. Small iron cannonball. 6 lb, 3 oz, 4" in diameter. As above but with encrustation on part of the outer surface. Estimate: $60 - $90 942. Brass door keyhole. 11.5 grams, diameter about 1¼” to 1-5/8". Oval-shaped brass plate with square hole for key in center, three holes around it for fastening to the door. Estimate: $75 - $110

945. Lot of six straight needles. 18 grams total, each about 2½”3½” long. Like the last lot but not curved and a little shorter, also well preserved (sharp points) and undoubtedly rare. Estimate: $75 - $110

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946. Lot of two straight “lance”-type needles. 15.6 grams total, 4" and 3¼” long. As above but with square flanges near middle, one more intact (both ends perfectly sharp) and with an uncertain hallmark, both well preserved and undoubtedly rare. Estimate: $75 - $110 947. Lot of four small bronze nails. 3.6 grams total, each about 7/8" long. Tiny nails with round heads and sharp points, very dark but well preserved. Estimate: $50 - $75

952. Lot of lead items (3 small shot and a small piece of sheathing). 23.3 grams total, each ball about 3/8" in diameter. Small lead balls (probably birdshot) and an L-shaped piece of thin sheathing, all with light encrustation and nice certificates. With photo-certificates from the finder. Estimate: $60 - $90

1733 Fleet (Sueco de Arizón), Florida Keys

948. Lot of two small, bronze nails and one iron spike. 150 grams total, the spike about 10" long and each nail about 1¼”. The two small nails are in perfect condition (just some surface patina), but the spike is heavily rusted (never conserved) and fragile, so buy the lot mainly for the vintage certificates. With two small certificates (one for each nail) from the Real Eight Co. describing the wrecks and salvage. Estimate: $50 - $75

953. Clay pipe (broken) and cob coins in a Riker display box. 12-1/8" x 8-1/8" (box). Large glass-topped display with one long, complete pipe that got crushed after salvage and two heavily corroded Mexican silver cob 4 reales (black and nearly devoid of details). With full color certificate from the salvager (2005). Estimate: $200 - $300

949. Lead musket-balls, lot of 18. 239 grams total, each ball about ½” in diameter. Typical small musketballs with a light dusting of sediment, perfect for a display or inexpensive resale. Estimate: $75 - $110

Milagros, sunk in 1741 off the Yucatán peninsula of Mexico

950. Lead musket-balls, lot of 18. 237 grams total, each ball about ½” in diameter. Typical small musket-balls with a light dusting of sediment, perfect for a display or inexpensive resale. Estimate: $75 - $110

951. Lead musket-balls, lot of 18. 255 grams total, each ball about ½” in diameter. Typical small musket-balls with a light dusting of sediment, perfect for a display or inexpensive resale. Estimate: $75 - $110

954. Ornate pewter buckle. 13.8 grams, 1-3/4" x 1½”. Rectangular buckle with highly ornate design, perfectly intact, dark fields with lighter high points and some spots of encrustation, the back of it plain and silver in color. Estimate: $125 - $185

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“Ronson wreck,” sunk(?) ca. 1750 off Unidentified 1700s wreck in the English Manhattan (New York City) Channel 958. Bronze miniature rifle. 12 grams, about 2-3/4" long. This small item is easily recognizable as a gun of some sort, and while it may have been just a toy, it is worth noting that the barrel is hollow and has a touch-hole near the stock end, so it might be functional. Rusty bronze color, not overly corroded. Estimate: $125 - $185 955. Set of two chafing leathers, colonial American, early 1700s. 307 grams total, each about 12" to 14" long and 3" wide. Leather items from shipwrecks are very rare, but then again this was not a wreck found in the water. The two items in this lot are long, straight, folded-over sheets, smooth on the outside and rough on the inside, placed on ropes at contact points to keep them from rubbing through. In fact, one of the pieces has a diagonal “burn” hole where there was too much friction. The sides have a series of holes for securing the leathers with laces. Remarkably intact, dark and preserved, and a great bit of early American history! Estimate: $200 - $300

Unidentified 1700s Dutch East Indiaman wreck

959. Lot of three rectangular ballast bricks. 2 lb, 9 oz total, 3" to 5" each. Unlike the Spanish, who famously used round river rocks for ballast, the Dutch used somewhat stackable bricks, these examples of which range from yellow to orange in color, one with a big patch of white coral still adhering. Estimate: $40 - $60

Unidentified 1700s wreck (unspecified location) 956. Set of four small leather soles, colonial American, early 1700s. 69.5 grams total, each about 4" to 7" long. Our Treasure Auction #2 featured some shoe leathers from this wreck, but those were adult size, whereas three in this current lot are juvenile and one is for an infant! Very rare, as above, intact and preserved, dark in color, another great bit of colonial archeology. Estimate: $100 - $150

Unidentified 1700s Spanish wreck off Memory Rock, Bahamas 957. Iron cargo hook. 551 grams, 6-3/8" long and about 1" in cross-section. A beautifully preserved hook with ring at top and sharp point, all black, nice as recognizable artifact of medium stature, its exact provenance regrettably unclear. Estimate: $75 - $110

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960. Encrusted sounding lead. 3 lb, 13 oz, 5-3/4" tall and 2" in diameter at its widest. Like most sounding leads, this piece is tall, heavy and somewhat conical, with a depression in the bottom for wax (to get a sample of the sand as well), but it is unique in that it is completely covered in gorgeous pinkish coral, a great display despite its nebulous provenance. Estimate: $275 $350

961. Large, iron “canister” shot. 9 lb, 5½” tall and 4¼” in diameter. A cluster of about 40 balls (grapeshot) between two round plates that were shot out of a cannon to disperse and inflict damage over a wide area, all the balls but only one of the plates present in this specimen (the other replaced with a wooden facsimile), the balls a bit corroded but coated black to seal off the rust, used as a bookend. Estimate: $750 - $1,100

965. Chinese blue-on-white porcelain teacup, “pagoda riverscape” pattern. 45.8 grams, 2-7/8" in diameter and 1½” tall. A common design from this wreck, depicting a two-story pagoda on a rocky landscape with trees and shrubs, this specimen 100 percent perfect in every way, not a single blemish in its glazing. With original Christie’s “Nanking Cargo” (1986) auction-lot sticker (lot #5059) and with May and Fismer certificates erroneously stating that the item is a saucer. Estimate: $100 - $150

962. Large lead split-shot. 2 lb, 12 oz, about 2¼” in diameter. By far the largest split-shot we have ever seen (the concept being a round lead bullet that separated into two halves, usually joined by a wire so that the projectile would spin and affect a larger area), each half with a large, tapering groove into the center, both lightly encrusted, undoubtedly rare. Estimate: $250 - $375

Geldermalsen (“Nanking Cargo”), sunk in 1752 in the South China Sea

963. Encrusted Chinese blue-and-white porcelain bowl, Qing Dynasty. 141 grams, 1-3/4" tall and 4¼” in diameter. An older, cruder (and presumably scarcer) design than most from this ship, showing four alternating panels on outside (two with Chinese characters and two with flowers), white on the inside, about one quarter of which is encrusted with tan coral, intact except for some tiny chips in the rim (some under the glaze). Estimate: $125 $185

966. Chinese blue-on-white porcelain saucer, “pagoda riverscape” pattern. 69.5 grams, 4½” in diameter. A match to the above in the “pavilion” pattern, and also 100 percent perfect, with very vivid blue color and pristine glaze, hard to believe such a thin, fragile object could survive a shipwreck! With original Christie’s “Nanking Cargo” (1986) auction-lot sticker (lot #5059), with May and Fismer certificates. Estimate: $100 - $150 967. Chinese blue-on-white porcelain cup, very small. 22 grams, about 1-3/4" in diameter and 1-1/8" tall. A dainty little teacup with crude (older?) pattern in blue on outside, white inside, bits of oysters adhering to bottom, nice glaze, intact except for tiny chip in rim. Estimate: $50 - $75

964. Encrusted Chinese blue-and-white porcelain bowl, Qing Dynasty. 137 grams, 1-3/4" tall and 4¼” in diameter. As above in shape but with different designs inside the panels and only near top, much less encrustation inside but with small oyster shells on the outside, a few chips in the rim. Estimate: $125 - $185

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Aventurero, sunk in 1767 off Uruguay

Dove, sunk in 1773 off St. Augustine, Florida

968. Set of four trade beads. 4.5 grams total, ¼” to ½” in diameter. The Aventurero was a Spanish merchant ship that wrecked in 1767 near the border of Brazil and Uruguay on her way from Spain to Buenos Aires carrying trade goods like these beads, three of which are spherical (one large and pink and the other two small and blue), the last one ovoid but broken in half (black with design in white), composition and value unknown, but sure to be popular as artifacts from a wreck we have never advertised before. Estimate: $50 - $75

Leimuiden, sunk in 1770 off the Cape Verde Islands

971. Iron hammer head, 1700s, professionally conserved. 2 lb, 6½” long and about 1-3/8" to a side. This wreck was a slave ship from Africa that sank in a storm off St. Augustine, Florida, on October 18, 1773. So far the only items recovered from the wreck have been various tools like this one, which may have been used in the shackling of slaves. This lot is a heavy, doubled-headed hammer with elliptical hole for handle, very solid and uncorroded but surfaces conserved anyway, one end clearly flattened from use. Estimate: $75 - $110

Unidentified late-1700s[?] wreck off the Mosquito Coast at the border between Honduras and Guatemala

969. Solid silver fork with hallmarks, Dutch, mid-1700s. 60 grams, 8" long and 1" wide. This lot and next are the first artifacts we have ever offered from the Leimuiden, a Dutch East Indiaman that sank off the Cape Verde Islands on January 25, 1770. This fork is in near pristine condition, the tines all intact and the silver surfaces polished to a shine, with four bold (toned) hallmarks on back that appear to be FRP (silversmith Frederik Rudolf Pregt, Amsterdam, 1744-1787) and K (date-mark) with two others in between. With Terry Hiron photo-certificate. Estimate: $200 - $300

970. Solid silver tablespoon with hallmarks, Dutch, mid-1700s. 59 grams, 8½” long and 1-3/4" wide. Condition and origin as above, another near-pristine artifact in beautifully polished silver (almost looks new) with toned hallmarks on back (same as above). With Terry Hiron photo-certificate. Estimate: $200 - $300

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972. Bronze breech-loading cannon. About 105 lb, 38” long, about 6” in diameter, 3” bore. This cannon was found on a reef by some local fisherman, whom the consignor encountered on his way to find a lost city in the jungle. The consignor originally presented this piece to us as a 1500s cannon, identical in design to one known to have been used in the time of Cortez; but it is also nearly identical to some breech-loading cannons recovered from the wreck of the Cazador of 1784 in Gulf of Mexico (open square hole instead of cascabel at end, plus rectangular slots flanking the open breech, round trunnions). The problem is that it lacks any markings or crests (as made, not because of corrosion or damage, although the surfaces do show some pitting and nicks and cuts), but what is certain is that it is Spanish colonial in usage, and it is very impressive like all cannons, fully intact and probably even usable. Best of all: Inside the barrel are several large patches of pink and white coral! Estimate: $3,000 - $4,500

Royal George, sunk in 1782 off Spithead, England

973. Replica cannon made from bronze recovered from the wreck in 1840. 3 lb, 2 oz, 10" long. Today when we think of promotional replica items from shipwreck salvage, cheap trinkets come to mind; but back in the early 1800s, salvagers made substantial artifacts to sell and fund their operation. In this case, actual bronze from the cannons on the wreck was melted down and cast into small (working) scale models of the original cannons, and these models are valuable collectibles today. This specimen has a lovely aged-bronze color, with inscription on top over the trunnions “Relic of the ROYAL GEORGE, Sunk 1782, Raised 1840.” Estimate: $1,250 - $1,850

974. Book with wooden covers made from the ship’s timbers recovered in 1840. 95 grams, 4-3/8" x 2-3/4" x 5/8". An actual book about the wreck and its salvage (172 pages, seventh edition, probably published in 1843), with RELIC OF THE ROYAL GEORGE on the cloth spine, the wooden covers a little warped and split but intact, a curious promotional item that is scarce today. Estimate: $600 - $900

Unidentified 1780s wreck off the Philippines 975. Large bronze bell marked S.JOSEPH AÑOD1783. At least 200 lb, 21" tall and 16" in diameter. Although this is not technically a “ship’s bell” (considered the most important relic from any given treasure wreck because it proves beyond a doubt the name and date of a wreck), this impressive bell was found ON a wreck, possibly that of a Chinese wreck on its way from the coast of Burma (where the consignor believes the bell was cast in 1783) to Manila, where a Spanish galleon would have carried it to Mexico, thence to the unknown mission it was meant to grace somewhere in the western frontier of North America. Large and beautifully patinated, this massive bell is perfectly intact, with fully readable wording (note it says JOSEPH and not JOSE) and lacking only the steel clapper inside, a facsimile of which could be easily crafted so that you can hear this bell’s lovely sound (quite pleasant... in fact, we have a recording of it that we will share with potential bidders upon request). Estimate: $6,000 - $9,000

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Unidentified late-1700s wreck off Indonesia

Unidentified French ship from Napoleon’s Fleet sunk off Gibraltar in 1805 978. Small bronze button in Riker display box. 6¼” x 5-1/8" (whole box). A rather encrusted and nondescript button presented in a glass-top box with small certificate inside (signed by the salvager) describing the circumstances behind the wreck (which was a French man-o-war sunk by the British) and salvage in 2005. Estimate: $50 - $75

976. Encrusted bronze “lantaka” cannon. 39 lb, about 37" long and 3" in diameter, 1¼” bore. This and the next lot are relatively small, largely ornamental bronze cannons that were typically cast in the Netherlands and traded for spices in the East Indies, where the residents supposedly used them for bridal dowries and other displays of wealth, even though these cannons were fully functional weapons, albeit with very small bores. While many are found on land, passed down through generations, sometimes you see them from shipwrecks throughout Southeast Asia, as is the case here, this particular specimen with generous amounts of brown, green and tan encrustation on all the surfaces except for a small area where it was cleaned off to show the bare metal (dark brown). Unlike most, this cannon has no dolphins (lifting handles), but it does have full trunnions and yoke, tubular cascabel, flared muzzle with front sight, leaf-shaped mark near touch-hole with rear sights, perfectly intact and a wonderful display. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

Spring of Whitby, sunk in 1824 off Wabasso, Florida 979. Silver handle(?) piece. 29.8 grams, roughly 1-3/4" x 1¼”. Small, oval artifact in solid silver that consists of a flat, round knob inside a wide depression with large slit to edge, solid but with minor pitting. With Fisher photocertificate #37706. Estimate: $250 - $375

Unidentified 1800s wrecks in the Caribbean or Atlantic Ocean

Unidentified early-1800s wreck off Cotabato, Mindanao, Philippines

980. Lot of three big, pewter spoons, English, late 1700s-early 1800s. 168 grams total, each about 8¼” long. By the hallmarks on the backs of two of these spoons we can see that they are made of a pewter alloy known as “Britannia metal,” favored for its moresilvery color and smoother surface, the third spoon more ornate but not marked and probably regular pewter, that piece very much encrusted but the others relatively clean (just some staining) and brassy in color. Estimate: $75 - $110

977. Bronze “lantaka” cannon with crocodile motif. 37 lb, about 32" long and 3" in diameter, 1" bore. As above, and also from a shipwreck but without encrustation, just a lovely subtle patina all over, and similar design but WITH the usual “dolphin” lifting handles and with raised crocodile near touch-hole, perfectly intact and beautiful. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

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Any questions? Please email us at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

Unidentified 1800s wreck in the Florida Keys

981. Lot of two broken spoons (bowls only, wooden handles missing), probably American, mid-1800s. 42.8 grams total, each about 4" long and 1-3/8" wide. These are of a different design from the last lot, being just the bowls and short stems to which were attached wooden handles, both stems with touchmarks that we were not able to attribute (WG and S, for example), the metal smooth and brassy (hence possibly “Britannia metal” as mentioned above), both pieces in great condition but uncleaned and encrusted. Estimate: $50 - $75

984. Long bronze hull-pin with washer, probably Spanish. 3 lb, 2 oz, 20" long and 1" in diameter. Complete and nearly straight, with round cap at one end and the other end flared, keeping a freely moving washer from coming off, the whole length of the piece with beautiful green patina and white coral encrustation here and there, a lovely artifact even if the provenance is unknown. Estimate: $75 - $110

985. Bronze hull-pin, probably Spanish. 2 lb, 15 oz, 15" long and 1½” in diameter. Like the above but shorter and with much more encrustation (raised shell bits) and no green color, another nice artifact for display. Estimate: $75 - $110

Unidentified 1800s wreck in the English Channel

986. Bronze marlinspike. 48.5 grams, 4½” long, 5/8" wide. Anyone who has ever had trouble untying a knot can appreciate this tool, which is what sailors used for that very purpose. One end is flat and the other is sharply pointed. Intact and solid, dark brown copper, lightly crystallized surfaces. Estimate: $35 - $50 982. Coral-encrusted iron porthole. 24 lb, 15" in diameter. When iron decomposes under the sea, it slowly accretes the objects around it, as this fascinating piece shows all too well, the various large pieces of coral around the edge fused to the rust, the glass in the center cracked but still translucent, a wonderful mantel-piece for the casual collector. Estimate: $200 - $300 983. Lot of three bronze spikes. 330 grams total, 4" to 9" long each. Three straight, square-shanked spikes with flat heads, bronze or brass in color, the large one nicely encrusted, but their shipwreck provenances unknown (still good for display). Estimate: $50 - $75

987. Lot of ten round, brass military buttons, all artillery design. 30.8 grams total, 5/8" to 7/8" in diameter. While a specialist in militaria could have a field day researching each design in this lot, we prefer to sell them together as shipwreck artifacts and let someone else have the fun! Each button shows one or three cannons, usually beneath a crown, with the exception of one that says simply ROYAL REGT OF ARTILLERY around a King George monogram. Most are in excellent condition, with back-loops intact, some heavily patinated and some brassy in color. Estimate: $100 - $150

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Unidentified mid-1800s wreck off Europe

988. Lot of eleven round, brass military buttons and other designs. 32.3 grams total, 5/8" to 15/16" in diameter. Very similar to last lot except with non-artillery designs, mostly with regiment numbers below crowns, one with an anchor, etc. All in great condition, most with back-loops intact, some encrusted and patinated and others brassy and clean. Another great lot for the militaria researcher. Estimate: $100 - $150 989. Lot of four pewter spoon parts, one with Yates/Birmingham mark (ca. 1870). 129 grams total, the bowl-piece 4½” long, the handles from 3" to 5" long. All whitish gray and somewhat “puffy” (like most salvaged pewter), the bowlpiece damaged and bent, the broken-off handles in better shape, with the back of one cleaned off enough to show a beautiful hallmark that bears a crown above IN° YATES / BIRMm. Estimate: $60 - $90

991. Huge lignum vitae deadeye. 9 lb, 8½” in diameter and 5" thick. This and the next lot are, without a doubt, the most massive deadeyes we have ever seen! An important component of the ship’s rigging, this deadeye (like most) shows three worn “eyes” in the center, through which a lanyard connected it to the outside groove of another deadeye (probably the one in the next lot, as both are from the same source), thereby changing the direction of tensile force and making it easier to lift heavy weights. Very solid and heavy, lightly dusted with orange sediment all over, a most impressive object. Estimate: $250 - $375

990. Lot of five cuprous galley items. 88.9 grams total, largest item about 5" long. This curious assortment of small, cuprous artifacts includes a drawer pull with porcelain knob, a handle fragment, two round-head nails, and a round strainer cap that might be from a large salt-cellar, each item more or less encrusted and/or patinated and recognizable, some possibly valuable beyond their shipwreck interest. Estimate: $50 - $75

992. Huge lignum vitae deadeye. 9 lb, 8½” in diameter and 5" thick. As above in every regard, an exact match. Estimate: $250 $375

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Unidentified mid-1800s wreck in the Atlantic City of Houston, sunk in 1878 off North Carolina

993. Purple floral transfer ware cup-and-saucer set, English, 1834-1854. 235 grams total, the cup about 3-3/4" in diameter and 2-¼” tall, the saucer about 6" in diameter and about 1" tall. This is a beautiful set, both pieces perfectly intact and with vivid purple design (some kind of transfer ware) against a cream background, also both pieces fairly large, the cup without handles, the saucer marked with IRONSTONE above and T. GODWIN (the maker) below MEZIERES (the pattern name), with very light traces of encrustation but the provenance unfortunately vague. Estimate: $250 - $375

996. Base-metal military figurine (soldier on horse). 8.4 grams, about 2-3/8" tall and 1-7/8" wide. The Houston was an American steamship traveling from New York to Galveston (Texas) when she sank off North Carolina at Frying Pan Shoals in the morning of October 23, 1878, in 90 feet of water. This lot and the next two are very interesting items, the likes of which we have never offered before: Each one is a thin, painted figurine (probably pewter or lead) of a soldier, believed to have been used for military planning. The depictions are to scale and accurate, this one of a sword-bearing officer (the ends of his sleeve and epaulettes still with some red paint adhering) mounted on a horse, the surfaces a dark gray, with some light encrustation, the reverse without design and inked with salvage data. The base is stabilized by two thin wings. Undoubtedly rare and possibly of high value to collectors of militaria. With 1989 photocertificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300

Santo Andre, sunk in 1856 off the Cape Verde Islands

997. Base-metal military figurine (soldier). 10.7 grams, about 3" tall, 7/8" wide. As above but this one depicting an infantryman, standing at attention with a rifle to his side. All dark gray except for the red epaulettes, some light encrustation, diamond-shaped base for stability. Undoubtedly rare and possibly of high value to collectors of militaria. With 1989 photocertificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 $300

994. Small silver-plated fork with hallmarks. 22.1 grams, 5½” long. Cute piece, perfectly intact, its surfaces a dark gray and lightly pitted, with hallmarks F D & S T on back of handle. With Wayne Duff/Dick Holt photo-certificate. Estimate: $50 - $75

General Abbatucci, sunk in 1869 off Corsica 995. Set of three small, brass thimbles. 8 grams total, each about 1" tall and 3/4" in diameter. Completely intact and well-detailed little artifacts with thin film of encrustation inside, worn thin in some places, very cute. Each with a small certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $75 - $110

998. Base-metal military figurine (soldier). 6.9 grams, about 3" tall, 7/8" wide. Same as the last lot but with brighter red on the epaulettes and with more facial features visible due to less encrustation. Undoubtedly rare and possibly of high value to collectors of militaria. With 1989 photo-certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $200 - $300

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R.M.S. Republic, sunk in 1909 off Principe de Asturias, sunk in 1916 off Brazil Massachusetts

999. Sterling silver fork, 1st class passenger service. 65 grams, 8½” long. While everyone has heard of the sinking of the R.M.S. Titanic in 1912, most people don’t realize that another White Star passenger ship, the R.M.S. Republic, sank three years before it off Nantucket, Massachusetts, after colliding with an immigrant ship. The wrecksite in 270 feet of water was dived in 1981, yielding a small amount of artifacts (this piece among them) that were subsequently donated to a museum in Delaware. We have to consider these artifacts to be extremely rare. This fork is in perfect condition, like new, without any evidence of salvage or use in its time, with White Star line pennant on the top of the handle and lots of tiny hallmarks on the bottom. Pedigreed to the Treasures of the Sea museum collection, with photo-certificate #REP-243. Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800

1000. Sterling silver spoon, 1st class passenger service. 59 grams, 8-1/8" long. As above in every respect except that it is a spoon instead of a fork. Pedigreed to the Treasures of the Sea museum collection, with photo-certificate #REP-233. Estimate: $1,200 $1,800

1002. Set of pewter fork, spoon and knife (with toothpick in handle). 168 grams total, knife and spoon about 8" long, knife handle 4-3/4" long. The Principe de Asturias was a Spanish steamship that struck a rock and exploded on March 3, 1916, at Pirabura Point, Ilhabela, São Paolo, Brazil. Never before have we seen artifacts for sale from this wreck, but here we have a rather well-preserved dining set of one large fork, one large spoon and one thick knife handle (the steel blade missing), all simple in design, each with smooth surfaces and the fork and spoon with hallmarks on the back of the handles that include “TSJ / MARAVILLA” and “Madrid,” plus the round end of the knife handle has a small knob which hides a small toothpick! With hand-signed photo-certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $150 - $225

Oregon, dismantled in 1942 1003. Small, stamped section of wood from the ship. 25.2 grams, 2" x 1-3/4" x 3/4". The battleship Oregon was an important participant in the Spanish American War at the close of the 19th century, and after a few more years of service and a stint as a museum in the 1920s, she was slated for dismantling in 1942, with small pieces of her wooden parts like this one (with white paint on three sides) stamped with ORIGINAL WOOD / BATTLESHIP / OREGON / 1896-1942 and sold to fund the war effort. Estimate: $25 - $40

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1001. Sterling silver knife, 1st class passenger service. 61 grams, about 8" long and 1¼” wide. Origin and condition as above except that the handle (of ribbed design) does show some minor denting, the White Star logo and hallmarks on the blade near the handle. Pedigreed to the Treasures of the Sea museum collection, with photo-certificate #REP-237. Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800

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Other artifacts (not from shipwrecks)

1004. Bronze dagger, ancient Luristan (Northern Persia, now Iraq), 800-1500 BC. 7 oz, 14" long, 1"-wide blade. Solid and intact dagger (still somewhat sharp!) with nice, crusty patina all over, small hole in handle end (as made?), interesting ancient weapon, considered far superior to the iron weapons that came later. Estimate: $350 - $525

1005. Bronze “leaf” spear-point, ancient Luristan (Northern Persia, now Iraq), 800-1500 BC. 5 oz, 11" long and 2" at its widest. A long, double-edged polearm point with blade still sharp, beautiful brass color on one side with greenish encrustation, three holes near pole end for fastening to the pole, another interesting ancient bronze weapon in great condition. Estimate: $175 - $275

1006. Bronze socket spear-point, ancient Luristan (Northern Persia, now Iraq), 800-1500 BC. 5 oz, 11½” long. A smaller version of the last lot but with long, cylindrical socket for inserting the pole, a bit more encrusted and patinated but still sharp and well preserved. Estimate: $250 - $375

1009. Pre-Columbian terra cotta figurine. 29.1 grams, about 1-3/4" x 1-3/4" x 15/16". Yet a third head with faint facial features, one prominent ear, headdress on top, light gray color. With Carl Fismer certificate (generic). Estimate: $50 - $75

1007. Pre-Columbian terra cotta figurine. 23.1 grams, about 1-5/8" x 1¼” x 1-1/8". A small clay head with distinct facial features and jutting jaw, light tan with dark gray highlights. With Carl Fismer certificate (generic). Estimate: $50 - $75

1008. Pre-Columbian terra cotta figurine. 69.1 grams, about 2" x 1-3/4" x 1¼”. Thick and solid head with prominent ears but no facial features, orange color. With Carl Fismer certificate (generic). Estimate: $50 $75

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1010. Pre-Columbian terra cotta figurine. 25.1 grams, 1½” x 1-7/8" x 1". Bird’s head in profile, with big beak and feathers on back of head, two thick holes with lips for ears, tan with gray highlights. With Carl Fismer certificate (generic). Estimate: $50 $75

1012. Spanish brass coin weight, 1-escudo size. 3.4 grams, ½” square and 1/8" thick. Marked on one side with a Spanish cross-and-tressure within a border of dots, uncertain hallmark on reverse, good brass color, at least XF condition, with typical file marks to get the weight just right. Estimate: $75 - $110

1011. Research set of six types of tajaderas with rare book on the topic. 162 grams total, ranging from 2" x 1-3/4" to 5" x 6". As we revealed in our last auction, the native Americans who preceded the Spanish had a crude currency in the form of thin, flat, axeshaped scrapers known as tajaderas (Mexico) or hachas (Ecuador), both types cast in a copper-arsenic alloy starting around 1300 AD (the arsenic being the reason such thin, cuprous objects could survive burial and immersion for centuries). It is unclear how two unrelated cultures separated by thousands of miles could have developed the same concept at the same time. We feel these items are currently under-studied, under-appreciated and therefore undervalued, so we are making an effort to research them and offer them up for auction with the most accurate information. In this particular lot we have six distinct types, as follows: (1) Axe-shaped hacha, believed to have been made by the Cañari people of Ecuador, rare, with flecks of gold (hence the most valuable type), superb condition; (2) Smaller hacha (also known as an hachuela), same origin, again with flecks of gold and considered the rarest of all, this one VF; (3) Mushroom-shaped tajadera, Xaaga, Oaxaca (southern Mexico), a type specifically mentioned (along with a drawing) in 1548 by Francisco López Tenirio, Regidor de Antequera, to the Presidente del Consejo de Indias in Spain, scarce, XF; (4) Heavy, short-handled tajadera, Zapotec, Oaxaca, XF, common; (5) Long, thin and wavy tajadera, Guerrero-Michoacan (Tarascan), western Mexico, Fine, uncommon in this size; and (6) Smaller wavy tajadera, Guerrero-Michoacan (Tarascan), western Mexico, Fine condition and commonest of all. Accompanied by the book Axe-Monies and Their Relatives, by Hosler, Lechtman and Holm (1990). Estimate: $900 - $1,200

1013. English steel breastplate, late 1500s-early 1600s (Spanish Armada type). 6 lb, roughly 18" x 12" x 9". Original armor piece with no attachments or rivets except for two round posts protruding from the breast, matte black finish all over to arrest rust, very sturdy and intact, scarce and impressive. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500 1014. Late-1500s gauntlet, European. Certainly one of the most visually arresting items in this sale, this right-hand gauntlet was hand-forged and engraved in the 1500s, the engraving being of a bearded nobleman (possibly the original owner), typically used only ceremoniously, with flared cuff, knuckle guard and rope banding that match a pair of gauntlets known to have been made for Philip II of Spain (see page 244 of the Stone book offered in this auction as lot #1150. The index finger is missing but all the others are present (rare to see ANY fingers still attached) and fully articulate despite deterioration of the leather bands and rivets holding the fingers on (which themselves are probably replacements from the late 1800s or early 1900s). Also, some of the metal surfaces of this piece show nickel-plating that was probably applied in the 1920s, and the dark rusty interior probably came about in modern times as well; but all the main steel parts of the gauntlet are original and fairly well preserved considering its age. Gauntlets like this are generally scarce, as they fell out of use upon the advent of easily reloadable firearms in the 1600s. Note: This piece makes an awesome display clutching the dagger in the next lot! Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

1015. Left-handed dagger, Spanish or Spanish colonial, ca. 1570-1600. 12" blade, 17" overall. Any swashbuckler worth his weight in doubloons could tell you that one blade was never enough! Using your rapier in your right (main) hand, you needed a short blade for thrusting or parrying in the left hand, hence the development of the so-called “left-handed” (or main gauche) dagger, a formidable weapon in its own right, fully capable of delivering a fatal blow through chainmail armor. Long after rapiers went out of style, these daggers saw continued use, and therefore intact examples like this one are fairly scarce. This piece is in very fine condition, the pommel, grip, cross guard and doubled-edged blade all tight and original to each other. A small area of the original wire grip has had glue applied to hold it sound, but it was neatly done and does not distract. There is also scattered pitting on the pommel and cross guard, but the steel blade (with blood groove) is smooth with only light peppering. With 1996 letter of authenticity from W. Fagan & Co. Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

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1016. Spanish colonial pike head, ca. 1550-1650. 18" long. An impressively long polearm, with double-sided elegant leaf tip with raised medial atop a long, conical socket with expansion slit for receiving a long hardwood pole known as a haft (not present with this example), perfectly intact except for a few small nicks in the blade and some surface pitting. Pikes like this one were hand forged in the New World and issued as standard armament to outfit conquistador troops. This weapon saw use not only in battle but also for hunting, especially for wild boar, whose thick skin was no match for musket shot! This particular piece was unearthed near Santa Fe, New Mexico, hence possibly associated with Don Juan de Onate’s campaign and settlement in the region during the late 1500’s. While Spanish Colonial pikes were made and used in relatively large quantities, surprisingly few have survived and elude collectors today, especially in such solid and fine condition. Estimate: $500 - $750 1017. Small bronze signal cannon, Spanish colonial, 1600s. 1 lb, 3 oz, 2-5/ 8" tall and 1-5/8" in diameter. An upright, flat-based mortar with touch-hole at bottom and two reinforces below slightly flared rim, used for signaling (like a flare gun) or powder-testing. This example is probably the smallest we have seen, its bore only 3/4" in diameter, and it is in excellent condition, much neater than most, dark gray in color. Found in Peru. Estimate: $175 - $275

1020. Silver whistle, Spanish colonial, early to mid-1600s. 4.1 grams, 1-3/ 8" long and about ½” in diameter. Cute little piece that actually still works, consisting of a vase-shaped main body with slit and round-knob ends, one of which has a hole you blow into, with loop and two jump-rings at top for wearing on a chain, a little dented and scratched but good old silver with nice toning. Found in Peru. Estimate: $250 - $375 1021. Large brass buckle, Spanish colonial, 1600s1700s. 64.8 grams, 3-7/8" x 31/8". Somewhat T-shaped, this is technically only half a buckle, but it must have been a HUGE one! Solid and sturdy with lightly patinated surfaces. Found at Portobello, Panama. Estimate: $50 - $75

1022. Large brass buckle, Spanish colonial, 1600s-1700s. 24.8 grams, 2-5/ 8" x 2-1/8". Complete rectangular buckle, with very thin hasp still attached and functional, cracked in center but otherwise intact, coppery color with light patina. Found at Portobello, Panama. Estimate: $50 - $75

1018. Small bronze signal cannon, Spanish colonial, 1600s. 2 lb, 6 oz, 3" tall and 2" in diameter. Same as above but slightly bigger and cruder (both in how it was made and from use, particularly around the touchhole), nicely patinated and encrusted with light sediment. Found in Peru. Estimate: $175 - $275

1019. Dutch East India Co. (VOC) apothecary bottle, 1600s. 859 grams, 6" tall and 4½” in diameter. A fat, bulbous vase, unusually heavy for its size, with very narrow throat below a doublelipped rim, with VOC monogram in wreath painted on the body in blue under a crackled gray glaze, also with VOC monogram on the bottom, probably rare, very similar to one in our Treasure Auction #3 that sold for $575. Estimate: $350 - $525

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1023. Bronze buckle, Spanish colonial, 1600s-1700s, interesting shape. 6.1 grams, about 1¼” to a side. Curious squarish/rhomboid shape with C-shaped hasp (fully functional) and still-sharp grippoints, the metal thin but intact, a little more interesting than the usual buckle. Found at Portobello, Panama. Estimate: $60 - $90

1024. Bronze religious medallion, Spanish, early 1600s. 2.6 grams, about 7/8" in diameter. Small, round medallion made in 1625 to celebrate the canonization of five Iberian saints: Santa Isabel de Portugal on the front (with S. ELISAB and REG.D.P. in legend), and on the back are Santa Teresa de Ávila, San Felipe Neri, San Ignacio de Loyola, San Francisco Javier, and in the middle San Isidro Labrador, with ROMA (Rome) in exergue (just to reinforce its curative powers!). A bit encrusted and well patinated but with all details clear, with small hole punched near top (loop missing). Rare. Estimate: $75 - $110 1025. Bronze religious medallion, Spanish or Italian, early 1600s. 2.9 grams, about 1" tall and 3/4" wide. The front of this small, oval medal depicts the holy family with legend S.ANNA.MA.MARIA.V. (referring to Santa Ana, mother of the Virgin Mary) above ROMA in exergue, and on the back is a representation of the “Santissimo Sacramento” (Blessed Sacrament). Excellent condition, dark but not very worn, but without the loop at top. Estimate: $75 - $110 1026. Bronze religious medallion, Spanish, mid-1600s. 4.9 grams, about 7/8" in diameter. On the front of this small, round medal is Santa Quiteria, and on the back are her sisters (virgins and martyrs as well) Santa Marciana, Santa Marina and Santa Librada, with SORES in the legend and ROMA (Rome) in exergue for added emphasis. The details are all sharp and not too worn, just a little encrusted, the loop at top intact, but with a small piece of the edge missing. Estimate: $75 - $110

1027. Lot of two bronze religious medallions, Spanish, mid1600s. 3.2 grams, 3/4" x 5/8" (octagonal); 2.1 grams, 11/16" x 5/ 8". One of these small medals is octagonal (known in Spanish as “ochavada”) and shows the image and legend of Jesus of Nazareth on the front and the virgin Nuestra Señora de Gracia de Granada on the back; the other medal is oval and shows Santa Ana (mother of the Virgin Mary) on the front and praying angels on the back. Both medals are in slightly worn but otherwise rather nice condition, with loops at top intact. Estimate: $100 - $150

1028. Bronze religious medallion, Spanish, 1600s. 4.2 grams, about 7/ 8" x 3/4". Small, octagonal medal (known in Spanish as “ochavada”) with portrait of the Virgin Mary on the front and Joseph on the back with baby Jesus in his lap and pulling on his beard. Dark and encrusted, a bit worn but with loop at top intact. Estimate: $75 - $110 1029. Bronze religious medallion, Spanish, 1600s. 2.6 grams, about 7/8" x 13/16". Small, oval medallion depicting the holy family, with San José (Joseph) and baby son Jesus on the front (with SIOS for “S.Jos.” to left) and the Virgin Mary as a baby with her mother Santa Ana on the back. Dark surfaces with whitish sediment, holed near top, loop at top broken off. Estimate: $75 - $110

1030. Large and important bronze religious medallion, Spanish, late 1600s. 20.6 grams, about 1-3/8" x 1¼”. This worn but hefty octagonal medal (known in Spanish as “ochavada”) shows Santa Gertrudis (a 13th-century German saint who was not canonized until 1678) with legend on the front, and on the back it shows God and Jesus as humans with a dove as the Holy Spirit in a representation of the Holy Trinity. Quite worn, but fully intact (loop at top), scarce. Estimate: $125 - $185 1031. Small silver crucifix, Spanish colonial, 1600s-1700s. 6.6 grams, about 1-7/8" tall and 1¼” wide. Made from good old silver, this piece has obviously seen some heavy use over the centuries but is still wearable as a pendant today, with lots of dark toning and patina in crevices, the design somewhat ornate on front (flat back), the Christ figure in relief having received the most wear of course. Found in Peru. Estimate: $200 $300

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1032. Bronze crucifix, Spanish colonial, 1600s-1700s. 13.8 grams, 3" tall, 2" wide. Patinated but well preserved, this crucifix features a separately-molded Christ figure with halo firmly attached to a simple cross whose demi-cylindrical arms show raised dots on the backside, small loop at top for wear. Found in Peru. Estimate: $200 - $300

1033. Bronze religious medallion, Spanish, early 1700s. 6.7 grams, about 1" x 15/16". Scarce Jesuit medal, slightly oval shaped, with St. Aloysius Gonzaga on the front and St. Stanislas Kostka on the back (with respective legends), a little worn but clearly readable, missing the loop at top. Estimate: $75 - $110

1034. Silver trade reliquary pendant with painted portraits inside, Spanish Philippines, 1700s. 15.8 grams, about 1½” x 1¼”. Obviously much used with devotion over the centuries, this oval silver pendant shows vivid portraits under glass on both sides: On the front is Jesus (“ecce homo”) with Philippine facial features, and on the back is the theophanic Philippine Virgin Mary known as “Our Lady of the Rosary” or, more simply, “La Naval.” Her story goes back to 1593, when the Spanish governor in the Philippines commissioned a sculpture of the Virgin Mary to be made, and the Chinese sculptor gave the statue distinctly eastern features. Later, in 1646, when greatly outnumbered Spanish forces in the Philippines miraculously won five bloody naval battles against Dutch protestant interlopers by seeking the intercession of their virgin “La Naval,” the victorious defenders petitioned the Church to sanctify what happened as the workings of the Virgin Mary appearing through her Philippine likeness, much like the story of the Virgin of Guadalupe in Mexico. La Naval is still a strong symbol of Catholic faith in the Philippines today. The portraits on this piece are quite recognizable despite damage to their glass enclosures, which at least shows authenticity and lack of restoration, and the silver casing around the edge is worn and toned in crevices, just like an old silver coin. At the top is a loop and jump-ring, making this rare and important piece still wearable. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

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1035. Small, wooden “arcón” chest, ca. 1680-1700. 5 lb, 8 oz, 14¼” x 8" x 7". One of the more interesting items in our first Treasure Auction last year was a matching pair of Peruvian wooden chests for transporting valuables; and while the pair did not sell, after the auction we negotiated the sale of just the bigger chest, leaving the smaller chest for later consignment, here and now. This smaller chest was ideal for holding the most valuable items (like coins and jewelry), with a wooden sub-compartment inside for the smallest treasures (like rings or bags of gold dust!). The craftsmanship is impeccable, with no less than five dovetails in each corner joint, molding along the bottom, fully operational lock in front with original key, original iron hinges in back. It is in excellent condition, the wood a lovely honey brown in color, obviously well taken care of over the years (with a pedigree to match). Pedigreed to the collection of Raúl Sticks Barrenechea (1897-1960), Peruvian ambassador to Spain. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,250

1040. Brass navigational dividers, mid-1700s, perfect condition. 26.6 grams, 5" long. While we are hardly specialists in navigational antiques, this is certainly the finest set of dividers we have ever offered, its steel points VERY sharp and its brass arms and hinge practically pristine, just the iron hinge-pin at top rusted from age and exposure. Estimate: $350 - $525 1036. Spontoon, European, late 1600s-early 1700s. 8 oz, 9-3/4" long and 4" wide. A dagger-like lance point with leaf-shaped blade above S-shaped crossbar on top of a short, conical socket for the pole, very solid but rusty, with early museum mark faintly visible on the blade. Estimate: $350 - $525

1037. Chinese blue-on-white porcelain teacup (small), Qing Dynasty. 34.7 grams, about 1-3/8" tall and 2" in diameter. Very cute little teacup with floral pattern in blue covering the outside, white inside, perfectly intact. Estimate: $50 - $75 1038. Chinese blue-on-white porcelain spoon, Qing Dynasty. 30.2 grams, roughly 4¼” x 2". A typical porcelain spoon with fluted handle sloping down to a wide, flat bowl, with crude pattern in blue on inside only, perfectly intact. Estimate: $50 - $75

1039. Bronze miniature cannon, ca. 1700. 83 grams, 4" long and ½” in diameter. Scale model of a bronze cannon, possibly used as a foundry sample or powder-tester, with hollow bore and open touch-hole (hence can be fired), trunnions and cascabel intact, nice dark copper color on top, darker on bottom. Estimate: $150 - $225

1041. Ornate wooden stirrups, Spanish colonial, 1600s-1700s. 2 lb, 14 oz total, each about 7" x 5½” x 4". Wooden “clog”-type stirrups with highly ornamental design, the snub-nosed wooden parts wrapped with single metal strips with rectangular loop at top, obviously aged and well used, one with splits in the wood and the other with a small round repair from long ago. Estimate: $200 $300

1042. Plug bayonet, German, late 1600s or early 1700s. 7 oz, 18" long, blade 1" wide. The concept of a bayonet began in the early 1600s, when someone got the idea to ram his dagger into the end of his arquebus and use it as a polearm. By mid-century, blades were being intentionally manufactured with round handles specifically for putting into rifles for closer combat. Later, by the end of the 1600s, fixed bayonets mounted outside the barrel made the plug bayonet obsolete within the next century. This specimen is a real beauty, with brass pommel and cross-guard, dark-brown horn handle, nice clean blade with wide blood-groove, no markings but excellent condition and valuable pedigree. Pedigreed to the R.D.C. Evans collection, plated as #119 in his book The Plug Bayonet (2002), with original tag. Estimate: $600 - $900

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1043. Set of three iron “skeleton” keys (jail), 1700s, European, with ancient Roman ring for holding them. 349 grams total, each key 5" to 7-3/8" long. Keys are a collectible unto themselves, and we have never really checked out that market, but we suspect it is quite active. Typical keys of their time, each of these has an oval ring, long shaft, and odd-shaped hollow end (each one different, of course) for inserting into a warded lock whose central pin would enter the key and allow it to pass. All three keys have a wonderful old look to them but show no damage or encrustation. The ring, however, is much older, made of brass (patinated), and joined anachronistically with the keys just to keep them together. Estimate: $900 - $1,350

1044. Small barrel tap, 1700s. 25 grams, about 4¼” long and ¼” in diameter. A somewhat J-shaped hollow tube with stop-cock missing from upright cylinder near spout end, dark bronze surfaces, nicely patinated, cute and easily recognizable artifact. Found in Central America. Estimate: $100 - $150

1045. Spanish colonial (Mexico) broadsword (espada ancha), 1700s. 1 lb, 11 oz, 31½” long, the blade 1¼” at its widest. A wide (at least compared to a rapier), double-edged sword with D-shaped steel knuckle bow, horn grip (rather worn), and shell guard turned to the same plane as the blade, which itself is complete and well preserved save for some minor nicks, the handle just a little loose but otherwise in fine condition for something that probably saw regular use. Estimate: $1,250 - $1,850

1046. Encrusted terra cotta handled pitcher, 1700s, Spanish colonial. 436 grams, 7" tall and 4" in diameter. A bulbous pitcher with sturdy handle, fully intact, somewhat mauve in color but with gray-white encrustation all over, either from burial or immersion somewhere in South America. Estimate: $275 - $425

1047. Coiled bronze slave bracelet, probably 1700s. 11 lb, 9 oz, 6½” long, 3" wide. In Western African culture, money in the form of bracelets and legbands proliferated as late as the mid-1900s, and slavers from Europe took full advantage, supplying the African chiefs with boatloads of bracelets (usually known as “manillas”) in exchange for slaves. Some manillas, like this piece, were fancier and were more likely produced in Africa, this one probably from Nigeria. It consists of seven loose coils, themselves made from twisted cuprous wire, with flat ends. Loaded with light encrustation and beautiful patina, probably scarce and increasingly in demand as something more than the “usual” trade manilla. Estimate: $300 - $450

188

1048. Bronze buckle, Spanish, 1700s, rare type. 24 grams, about 3" x 1-3/4". Curious figure-eight shape with fleur-tipped ends, identical to those found on the Cazador wreck of 1784 but this one non-salvage, yet with thickly encrusted hasp (fully motile), rounded edges but flat back, brassy color with spots of bluish-green. Estimate: $60 - $90

1049. Spanish colonial machete, late 1700s. 15 oz, 29" long and the blade 1½” wide. With L-shaped wood grip wire around the tang of a crude, curved blade, simple machetes like this one were known to have been used throughout the 1700s in colonial America. This specimen is in decent condition, its clean blade relatively free of nicks (but also looks recently sharpened), nicely aged handle (a little bit loose). Estimate: $350 - $525

1050. French Naval flintlock blunderbuss, 1790s-1800s. 6 lb, 33½” long. A very nice, rare original piece, with round steel barrel with atypical elliptical bore that shows hash marks at the flared muzzle and some engraving near the breech (looks like a tree with an eyeshaped canopy and rays), classic “Empire period” walnut stock with mostly original finish but with minor old repair behind the barrel tang, brass buttplate and trigger guard and ramrod pipes (with original iron ramrod), 1773-type flintlock mechanism with rounded lockplate, reinforced hammer and bridled powder-pan, all surfaces smooth and untouched and in working order, just a couple replaced screws. Estimate: $2,750 - $4,250

189

1051. British octant, ebony with ivory inlay, late 1700s-early 1800s, choice condition. 2 lb, 12 oz, 14" tall and 11" wide. This device was the navigational instrument of choice at the time for measuring latitude from astronomical angles. It is sometimes called a “reflecting quadrant,” as it incorporates the principals of the earlier quadrant (and before that, the full-circle astrolabe) but in more compact form by use of two brass-framed mirrors, both of which are present on this specimen, as are also one glass optic (sun filter) and three glass color shades (green and red), two brass peep sights, plus all corresponding screws and knobs. Three brass legs on the bottom offered horizontal use, the readings made via a rotating brass arm with a window over an ivory board at bottom that shows degrees marked from 0 to 100. One very rare and special feature on this piece (indicating high-end manufacture) is a small ivory cap underneath the arm that covers a deep hole in the center frame strut where a small pencil could be stored (miraculous that the ivory cap was not lost!). In fact, this octant is completely intact except for one small piece of ivory inlay on the back on which the navigator could record his reading with a pencil. The condition is also excellent, with traces of dried old brass cleaner in the crevasses but the brass nicely re-toned over time, everything functional and moveable (some controls a bit tight), no cracks in the ivory and none of the original glass damaged although there is some normal silver loss on the mirrors, as to be expected. For reference, a similar but less complete specimen in our last auction sold for $4600. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,250

1053. Wooden “money box” chest, early 1800s, Spanish Philippines. 27 lb, about 26" x 13" x 13". Over the years we have sold several of the large, iron “armada” chests that were simply too heavy to move when full of treasure; what is much rarer are wooden “money boxes” like this one, which are relatively light in comparison and were used to carry bags of coins on board ships. Like the iron chests, this box has a false lock in the front (with two keyholes), the actual lock also in the front but toward the top and no longer functional (even if the key were still present). Whatever hinges were originally on the back of the lid are also long gone and replaced with thick-gauge wire, the thin handles on the sides also probably not original since to carry a full box would have taken much more heavy-duty handles. On the front are also seven nailed-in studs for decoration (five others apparently missing). The wood itself is beautifully aged but crudely crafted, with minimal dovetailing in the corners, a few old repairs here and there, nice but simple molding on the bottom. In short, this piece is far from pristine, but was obviously well used and probably once contained a veritable fortune in coins. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

1052. British presentation dress sword, early 1800s. 1 lb, 38½” long, blade 3/4" at its widest. A long, narrow single-edged sword with gilt brass D-shaped knuckle bow, pommel and clamshell guard, horn grip, aged but fully intact blade with blood groove, beautifully engraved with the owner’s name, rank and regiment on the guard. Estimate: $400 - $600

190

1054. Large, low-grade silver arm-ring with design, cut to make into a slave bracelet. 283 grams, about 3½” in diameter and ½” in cross-section. Originally we thought this was a fancy “manilla,” the term given to bronze Cshaped bracelets traded for slaves in Africa in the early 1800s; but then we noticed that it was actually once a complete ring, with about 1/5 of it broken off and missing (notice the repeated pattern on one side of the break), and a light polishing revealed that it was actually low-grade silver! Because it was found with a pile of manillas, we believe it was used for that purpose, but not originally. Thick and heavy, with smooth surfaces. Estimate: $75 - $110

1055. Ornate copper slave bracelet. 313 grams, 3-3/4" largest diameter, 3/4" largest thickness. A large, Cshaped armband of more or less oval cross-section, with feathery basket-weave engraving on exterior, nice copper color with old patina, probably a rare design as these things go. Estimate: $75 - $110

1056. Dutch black glass “case gin” bottle, early 1800s. 711 grams, 11" tall and 3½” to a side at its widest. A squaresided bottle with shallow base, slightly tapered shape, 1" applied lip, very glossy and smooth surface, dark-olive/amber color with a few small air-bubbles inside the glass, common artifact but uncommonly nice condition. Estimate: $75 - $110

1057. Gold-filigree enameled pendant, heart-shaped, Pedro II, Portuguese/Brazilian, 1830s-1880s. 10.4 grams, 1-3/4" tall and 1-1/8" wide. An incredibly ornate jewel, shaped just like the “Heart” cobs of the Potosí mint, with crowned P. II (for Pedro II) inside wreath in center enameled in blue, white and green on one side and the Brazilian arms in white and blue on the other side, perfectly intact and wearable. We have not been able to research this piece, but the connection with the king of Brazil is patent. Estimate: $5,000 - $7,500

1058. English leather shot-bag, 1800s. 122 grams, roughly 9" x 3-3/4" x 1". A flat, pear-shaped, brown-leather bag with brass spout for dispensing small lead shot into a rifle, probably for hunting deer and pheasant, both of which are depicted (embossed) on the leather part. The spout is marked with DIXON & SONS / PATENT, a maker in Sheffield, England. Fully functional except for a small seam-split (could be re-stitched). Estimate: $100 - $150 1059. Sterling silver mesh coin purse, probably European, mid- to late 1800s. 25.3 grams, about 3" x 1-3/4". The design of this small purse (rounded, hinged opening at top with ball clasp, mesh-ring bag with ball pendants at bottom) is very close in style to one in gold that we offered in our Treasure Auction #2 from a Brazilian/Portuguese source, but quick research shows they were popular all over Europe in the 1800s. This example is in perfect condition except for the loss of one of the balls at the bottom, with loop and jump-ring at top for carrying on a chain, the silver nicely toned, undamaged and usable. Estimate: $75 - $110

191

1060. Iron “canister” shot, Civil War period. 6 lb, 5" tall and 33/8" in diameter. Among the most effective anti-personnel ammunition during the Civil War was the “canister” shot, a cylindrical stack of about 28 small balls (grapeshot) with metal plates on either end, which, when shot from a cannon, would spread out and hit targets over a wide area (or not). These items are rare today, especially more or less intact like this one, with smooth balls coated black to prevent rusting, also one of the round endplates intact but the other replaced with a wooden facsimile and used as a bookend. Estimate: $750 $1,100

1061. Civil War bullet set in Riker display box. About 6-3/8" x 5¼”. Lead bullets from the Civil War are not rare items, but they are interesting, and these four have been attractively packaged with their exact technical descriptions printed above or below, with “Civil War Bullets / 1861 - 1865” printed at the bottom, all housed in a glass-topped display-case. Estimate: $25 - $40

1062. Victorian-era replica of a medieval jousting helmet. Evoking medieval times of kingly tournaments with battling and jousting knights, this late-1800s replica was well crafted from solid steel (hand-hammered and engraved, unlike the mass-produced, punched-out, cheap modern fakes from China), an acceptable museum alternative to an original, which would be quite rare and expensive indeed. It consists of three movable parts: A fixed collar (with rope banding and ornate detail) rising up to side rivets, to which are attached both an upswept pointed visor (with matching detail among six slots) in the front and a plain skullpiece in the back. Some assorted old dents and other signs of age serve to add character, but everything is solid and sound, with no heavy corrosion. The exterior was once preserved with a clear coat of lacquer(?), now with areas of light surface rust under the coating, all of which can be easily cleaned off and polished if so desired. The interior surfaces are original, with slightly rusty (but stable) patina. On the back at top there are two holes, the higher one for attaching to a stand (not included), and the lower one for securing a bezel to hold large feather plumes, as was the fashion. Wearable over an average-sized head, but probably more useful for display! Estimate: $400 - $600 1063. Knights Templar sword and scabbard (chain missing), late 1800s, unique handle. 2 lb, 36½” long, the blade 1" wide. Anyone who has seen the National Treasure or Indiana Jones movies knows about the Knights Templar, a medieval Christian order known not only for skill in combat but also for banking acumen, funding much of Christendom until the Knights were disbanded in the 1300s. A modern version (begun in the 1700s) with no direct link to the original but incorporating many of the same secret rites and accoutrement is known for charity work. Dating to the late 1800s, this Templar sword probably saw only ceremonial use, and is therefore in excellent condition, with owner’s name C.A. Merrill engraved on narrow, doubled-edged blade, ornate cross-guard, golden hued handle (wood?) with unique tattooed(?) design, pommel in the form of a knight’s helmet with ring to which a chain (missing) attached it to rings on the matching scabbard with similar designs. Excellent condition. Estimate: $250 - $375

192

MEDIA Documents

1064. Cup and saucer set marked “Italia,” same service used on the Andrea Doria. 207 grams total, the cup 1½” tall and 2½” in diameter and the saucer 4-3/4" in diameter and 3/4" tall. This china set is from another ship of the same Italian line as the passenger liner Andrea Doria that famously collided with another vessel and sank off Massachusetts in 1956. It is a second-class service set, with simple blue and gold bands around the rims and marked with ITALIA below a crown, maker’s mark RICHARD GINORI on the bottoms. Actual Andrea Doria china can sell for up to $1000 per piece, so this set makes for a more affordable alternative. Like new. Estimate: $85 - $130

1066. Original Spanish colonial document from Bolivia with translation. 8½” x 12½”. A one page (two-sided) document from official records concerning a public debt, signed by Pedro de Balboa and issued in Cochabamba, Bolivia (Peru at the time) and dated October 14, 1678, with royal stamp at top for the payment of 1 real for the document (a sort of notary tax), excellent condition considering its age. Estimate: $50 - $75

The following eight lots are highly detailed, uncolored woodcut prints on foldout sheets from an unidentified book (or books) published in England in 1800-1802, some with date and/or engraver’s name indicated. These prints are rare and should be very interesting to nautical enthusiasts for the information they reveal about the construction of wooden ships of the 1600s.

1065. Small brass-plated iron cannon replica with wooden carriage. 9 lb, 15" long and 8½” wide (with carriage). A functional scale model, both the tube and the carriage faithful reproductions, the brass plating nearly consumed by underlying surface rust but otherwise in decent condition, with copper tag below the cannon that indicates this as #426 of a limited production of 465 pieces. Accompanying this lot are a small celluloid Mickey Mouse doll (believed to be 1930s vintage) and charred wad that were found inside the barrel, indicating that someone once tried to blast Mickey out the muzzle. Estimate: $300 - $450

1067. Large ship print. 18½” x 11½”. Highly detailed diagram of the portside and stern of “An English Second Rate of the smaller class” of 1670, beautifully done and probably very informative for the advanced researcher, artist’s name stated as “Tomkins,” excellent condition. Estimate: $135 - $200

193

1068. Large ship print. 18¼” x 11½”. As above (same artist and diagram) but of a French Second Rate of 1670, this one with date of 1801 printed above title, excellent condition. Estimate: $135 $200

1071. Large ship print. 11½” x 25½”. As above (same artist and date) but this diagram a cutaway view of the starboard and stern of “The Captain a British Third Rate. 1678.,” excellent condition. Estimate: $135 - $200

1069. Large ship print. 11¼” x 18½”. As above (same artist and date and diagram) but without the name of the type of ship, a few minor stains and wear. Estimate: $100 - $150

1072. Large ship print. 11¼” x 18½”. Like the above but different artist (“Newton”) and a full starboard view of the “Royal Charles built 1673,” with a bank of 50 cannons on the ready, excellent condition. Estimate: $135 - $200

1070. Large ship print. 11½” x 25½”. As above (same artist and date) but showing a full portside view of “The Royal Prince,” the artist’s name given as “Charles Tomkins,” nice condition. Estimate: $135 - $200

1073. Large ship print. 11½” x 25½”. As above (no name or date) but showing a cutaway view of the starboard and stern of “A Fourth Rate of the Second Class 1684,” excellent condition. Estimate: $135 - $200

194

1074. Large ship print. 11½” x 25½”. As above (no date, Tomkins) but showing a cutaway view of the starboard and stern of “A British Fourth Rate in 1684,” excellent condition. Estimate: $135 - $200 1077. Lot of three small ship prints. 8-3/4" x 11". A matched set of three prints like the above but not folded and depicting views of “A Ship belonging to the Spanish Armada,” “A Sixth Rate. 1684. No. 2.” and “A Bomb Ketch. 1692.,” dated 1801 and 1802, two with artist stated as “Tomkins,” all three in excellent condition. Estimate: $125 - $185

1075. Large ship print. 11½” x 24". As above (no name or date) but showing a cutaway view of the starboard side, bow, stern and ribbing of “A Fifth Rate 1684,” Very Fine condition (minor stains). Estimate: $120 - $180

1076. Lot of two medium-sized ship prints. 11½” x 17½”. A matched pair of prints like the above (1802, artist “Grieg”) but showing a cutaway view of the starboard side and stern and body of “A British Fifth Rate, 1684” and “A British Sixth Rate, 1684,” the former in excellent condition but the other a little worn and stained near edge. Estimate: $125 - $185

195

1078. Handwritten account of the sinking of the Lady Burgess in 1806 by a surviving passenger. 7½” x 9¼”. This unique item is the story of the wreck of the Lady Burgess off the Cape Verde Islands in April of 1806 as told by surviving passenger William Rigby Bradshaw, a cadet of the British East India Company, to a newspaper correspondent for the Asiatic Mirror in September of that same year, written on 23 pages (followed by lots of blank pages) in a hardbound notebook whose cover is a little tattered but the inside in excellent condition. A remarkable piece for its age, packed with information about a relatively obscure ship (dearth of easily accessible research materials) from which we have sold many coins and artifacts over the past several years, salvaged by Arqueonautas in 1999-2000. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

1081. 1813 diving pamphlet by Horatio Hough. 5" x 9". The lengthy title of this one-sheet pamphlet (7 pages, uncut) is Diving, or an attempt to describe upon hydraulic and hydrostatic principles, a method of supplying the diver with air under water, published in Hartford, Connecticut. Rare as an early technical discourse, excellent condition for its age. Estimate: $50 - $75

1079. London, England, 1806 framed map of the West Indies by J.S. Barlow. 23½” x 19¼”. As old maps go, what’s important is the area depicted, and the most in demand of all are maps of the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico and surrounding lands, the once and always “Spanish Main” of legend. This example shows some rather interesting regional names, including (roughly counterclockwise from top): “East Florida” and “West Florida,” “New Leon” (Texas), “Mexico or New Spain” (extending all the way down to Nicaragua), “Darien” (Panama), “Terra Firma” (north coast of South America), “Porto Rico” and “Jamacia” [sic] in the very center. Colors are green, yellow and pink and roughly denote political demarcations. The legend near the bottom-left corner says “West Indies from the Best Authorities.” Excellent condition, in a simple, rustic gray-wood frame. Estimate: $250 - $375

1080. 1810 booklet about the Industry shipwreck of 1727. 4-1/ 8" x 7". A small, 28-page pamphlet with hand-colored foldout illustration of natives as frontispiece, the lengthy but descriptive title of the book as follows: Seizure of the ship Industry by a conspiracy, and the consequent sufferings of Capt. James Fox and his companions; their captivity among the Esquimaux Indians in North America; and the miraculous escape of the captain; the disasters which attended the mutineers; interspersed with anecdotes, descriptions, etc. also, the providential escape and sufferings of Captain Boyce, in the Year 1727. Author unknown, published in London, excellent condition for its age except that the first 14 pages after the title page are somehow missing. Estimate: $125 - $185

1082. 1836 handwritten journal by a survivor of the wreck of the ship Quail. 7½” x 9". Handwritten accounts by shipwreck survivors are not only fascinating but also quite rare, and while we had never heard of the Quail, we certainly can find interest in the circumstances behind her sinking and the rescue of the survivors. Twelve pages, string bound, with title Narrative of the Wreck of Her Majesty’s Cutter Quail and “Extracted from the United Service Journal for June 1836” on the cover, fine condition (corners bent and slightly torn). Estimate: $200 - $300

1083. 1867 bill of lading for the ship Hermann. 5-3/4" x 9-3/4". Partially printed and partially handwritten, this small manifest documents a cargo of 234 packages of tobacco consigned to be shipped from Richmond, Virginia, to London, England. In the topleft corner is a picture of a sidewheel steamer, presumably like the Hermann itself. Fine condition, a couple light creases and punch hole near edge. Estimate: $100 - $150

196

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1084. Lot of two items: 1875 passenger list/tracking chart for the White Star Line ship Germanic, and 1912 sheet music Just as the Ship Went Down (referring to the Titanic). 6" x 9" and 10" x 13½”. Two items related to the White Star Line and the sinking of the Titanic: The 1875 document is a folded, printed list of the passengers on board the ship G e r m a n i c , complete with very p e r s o n a l handwritten notes about each person (“a very nice little gent,” “a nice young lady,” “very pleasant people,” “the gossip of the boat,” “always making jokes,” “traveling without her husband and drinks wine and brandy with the gentlemen till after midnight,” etc.) and (on the back) a chart of the ship’s track across the Atlantic Ocean; the 1912 document is a piece of music for piano(?) and voice (by Lessing, Gibson and Adler) about and in tribute to the sinking of the Titanic in 1912. Neither item is in any better than fair condition, but both are fascinating reminiscences! Estimate: $150 - $225

1085. Bonito Gold Mining Company stock (500 shares), 1895. 8¼” x 10-1/8". Gold mine stocks are rare and in great demand today, especially high-value ones like this (500 shares at $1 each), which pertains to a mine in West Virginia. Gray printing and vignettes on green and white background, numbered 34 in red print, hand-signed by treasurer Edward de Lima and president Julius Chambers, red printing on back, excellent condition except for ink damage at very edge. Estimate: $300 - $450

1086. 1904 (dated) dinner invitation acceptance letter by Russian commander Ivanoff with ship vignette. 5¼” x 8½”. A very simple, hand-written note on stationery that shows the Russian Imperial Navy vessel the writer was in command of (the Bodry, meaning “brisk”), with interesting rendering of the date as 1/1 between 19 and 04 (January 1, 1904, so presumably a New Year’s celebration), sure to be in demand as a scarce piece of tsarist Russian history. Estimate: $50 - $75

1087. (1904) dinner invitation acceptance letter by Russian commander Mancovsky with ship vignette. 4½” x 7". Companion piece to the above, an acceptance to the same party (thrown by “His Excellency Admiral Sir Compton and Lady Domvile”), this commander’s Russian Navy vessel named the Bistry (“quick”) and mentioning the date of the soiree as January 5, 1904. Estimate: $40 - $60

1088. Original letter from Bertram Dean, Titanic survivor, dated 1982/1987. 8" x 11". 1982 typewritten autobiographical letter, handsigned at the bottom “Nice to hear from you. Bertram V. Dean. SURVIVOR.,” accompanied by a photocopy of a 1987 newspaper article showing a picture of the writer and the 1987 envelope in which Dean mailed this material from Southampton, England, to Daytona Beach, Florida (Fine condition). Estimate: $200 - $300

197

1089. Framed, original letter from Marjorie Robb, Titanic survivor, dated 1987. 9¼” x 11-3/4". 1987 handwritten letter signed at the bottom below a phone number (Boston area), very terse (six sentences only) and to the point about how she does not believe the ship should be salvaged. Excellent condition, housed in an inexpensive glass frame. Estimate: $200 - $300 1090. Poster for the W.H. Lane & Sons auction of November 23, 1973 (Roland Morris). 30" x 20". As original at it may seem now, our “treasure auction” concept has been done before, most notably by the Cornish auction firm W.H. Lane & Son in the 1970s, capitalizing on the big finds made by their countrymen on old wrecks, particularly the Association (1707) and the Hollandia (1743). Arguably the most famous of their celebrated salvage contacts was Roland Morris, who for many reasons has been called “England’s Mel Fisher.” The sale advertised by this rare poster encompassed the “principal” part of coins and artifacts on display in Morris’ famous Museum of Nautical Art (where the auction was held as well) in Penzance, Cornwall, U.K. Yellow background, print in black, logo in blue, excellent condition. Estimate: $50 - $75 1091. Poster for the W.H. Lane & Sons auction of September 24, 1974 (Association). 30" x 20". As above but for a later sale of only items from the Association wreck of 1707, far rarer than the catalog for this auction (which itself is scarce), yellow background with blue and black printing, good condition with small bit of one corner torn. Estimate: $50 - $75

1092. Lot of eight charts and drawings and posters pertaining to Roland Morris. 7¼” x 12" to 28" x 41". As mentioned two lots up, Roland Morris was England’s Mel Fisher, for he was a colorful character, successful salvager, museum proprietor, and even an accomplished artist. Several of the posters and charts in this lot, in fact, were hand-drawn by Morris and sold in his museum’s gift shop in the early 1970s. Comprising this lot are the following: Undated reproduction of the Gostello map of the Association wrecksite in the Scilly Isles; undated reproduction vignette of the Admiral Benbow Inn; 1969 color poster titled “Naval Shipbuilding Late 17th Century”; three similar but different posters (a bit whimsical) from 1969-1970 showing a map of the Scilly Isles with reefs, rocks and shoals as well as cities, castles and churches; two charts (one very large) from 1977-1979 of sailing ships lost in the Scilly Isles. Most in excellent condition, a fun lot of Scillonian/ Cornish wreck history. Estimate: $150 - $225 1093. Lot of four Real Eight Co. stock certificates (one of each color). 8¼” x 12". Printed by the Columbian Banknote Company with backgrounds in four different colors (red, green, blue and purple), these certificates were for various amounts (from 4 to 200, in this case) of shares of stock in the Real Eight Company (famous for its salvage of the 1715 Fleet off the east coast of Florida), each one dated from 1974-1979 and famously featuring an actual full-date 1715 Mexican 8 reales at the top. Excellent condition. Estimate: $125 - $185

198

Reeves, Rick

Fine art Orlin, Robert

1096. Oil on canvas painting of pirate Bartholomew “Black Bart” Roberts (1994). 24½” x 28½”. “Vivid color and impeccable detail” is the only way we can think of to describe this beautiful portrait by the now-famous Rick Reeves, whose pirate portraits are in high demand. Every single “treasure” you could associate with pirates is present in this beach scene: cannon and cannonballs, flintlock musket and pistols, dagger and rapier, “onion” bottles, clay pipe, treasure chest, just to name a few. A pirate galley is moored in the background, flying the first flag associated with this particular rogue, a Welshman of the early 1700s who is famous for having captured more prizes (over 470) than any other pirate in his time, his death in battle in 1722 marking the end of the Golden Age of Piracy and fulfilling his self-stated mantra: “a merry life and a short one shall be my motto.” The attention to detail in this painting is truly mindboggling in its accuracy and thoroughness. A distressed wood frame in black-and-gold completes the package, and there are even two signed 14" x 11" prints of the same scene to go with it. Estimate: $5,000 - $7,500

1094. Watercolor painting (framed) of a diving helmet (undated, but probably 1980s). 23½” x 19½”. Quaint representation of a Mark V diving helmet in watercolor, signed by the artist, with gray mat rubber-stamped with pictures of hardhat divers, in a simple blue-green wooden frame, some discoloration to the mat from water intrusion near bottom. With curriculum vitae of the artist taped to back, showing his many accomplishments in the field of celebrity portraits. Estimate: $250 - $375

Watkins, Lewis

Curnow, Ralph

1095. Large, signed lithograph print of Mel Fisher/Atocha, limited edition #8 of 75 (1988). 27" x 21". Signed, limited-edition poster-size lithograph print of Mel Fisher in Key West with a salvage scene and the Atocha itself in the background, not to be confused with the mass-produced 11" x 14" prints of the same portrait without signature or serial number. The artist committed suicide in 1994, so his signed prints have become quite valuable. Like new. Estimate: $200 - $300

1097. Signed lithograph print of the Rooswijk shipwreck of 1739, limited edition #81/400 (2006). 12½” x 15½”. Mint condition, full-color print showing the Rooswijk on the high seas, painted by Penzance, Cornwall, artist Ralph Curnow, brother of one of the Rooswijk salvagers, likenew condition. Estimate: $35 - $50

199

Books Allen, Geoffrey and David

Bass, George F.

1098. Lot of two books: The Guns of Sacramento (1978) and Clive’s Lost Treasure (1978). HC, DJ, VF, 81 pp and 103 pp. Two now-classic books about the authors’ experiences diving on some important South African wrecks. Clive’s Lost Treasure tells the story of the search for and salvage of treasure from the Dodington, an East Indiaman, off the coast of South Africa. The gold was never officially found, and this book opens some avenues as to what could have happened to it. The Guns of Sacramento describes the raising of 40 bronze cannons from the Portuguese galleon Sacramento off South Africa. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $50 - $75

1101. Lot of three books: A History of Seafaring Based on Underwater Archaeology (1972, HC, DJ, VG, ex-lib, 320 pp), Ships and Shipwrecks of the Americas (1988, HC, DJ, VF, 272 pp), and Shipwrecks in the Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology (1996, SC, VF, 96 pp). The first two books are large “coffee table”-type books with tons of excellent illustrations and chapters on the history of ships and shipwrecks (particularly in and around American waters), while the third book is much smaller and discusses shipwreck archeology around Turkey (where the Bodrum Museum is located). Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $60 - $90

Anson, Koempfer and Bligh

Bowers, Q. David

1099. A Voyage Round the World (Anson, 1853), bound with An Account of Japan (Koempfer, 1853) and The Mutiny of the Bounty (Bligh) (undated). HC, VG, 261 + 72 pp. Published by Ingram, Cooke, and Co. in London, England, this is a collection of three separate (and previously printed) works on “Voyages [&] Travels” (as printed on the spine) bound together in one volume. The Anson and Bligh narratives are particularly valuable as early editions (the original HMS Bounty book not to be confused with the modern interpretation entitled Mutiny on the Bounty (“on” instead of “of”). Anson’s story chronicles his voyage in 1740-1744 to the Pacific side of South America, where much treasure was looted from the Spanish to become the silver and gold for England’s own coins in 1745-6. While the cover of this book is a little worn and cracked, the inside is in great condition, with several beautifully engraved plates. A fascinating, one-of-a-kind item. Estimate: $150 - $225

1102. American Coin Treasures and Hoards (1997), autographed. HC, mint, 456 pp. This lavishly illustrated (but all black-and-white) large-format book is a collection of stories detailing the history and the discovery of some of the most famous coin hoards in American History. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, with personal inscription from the author to Tom Sebring. Estimate: $75 - $110

Armstrong, Douglas R. 1100. Tumbaga Silver for Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire (1993). SC (comb bound), mint. This book provides a technical analysis and detailed history of the silver bars discovered during the salvage of the “Tumbaga Wreck.” Each bar is illustrated and its details and markings are meticulously described. Scarce item, as the author no longer prints these and sells it on CD instead. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $75 $110

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1103. The Treasure Ship S.S. Brother Jonathan (1999), autographed. HC, mint, 415 pp. Another large-format book like the above but focusing specifically on the history of the California Gold Rush, the coins and currency in circulation during the Gold Rush period, the early California mints, and (most importantly for us) the history of the sinking of the S.S. Brother Jonathan and the salvaging of her treasure. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, with personal inscription to Tom Sebring “Treasure chronicler.” Estimate: $60 - $90

Burgess, Robert F. (and Carl Clausen) 1104. Lot of four books: Sinkings, Salvages, and Shipwrecks (1970, VF, 188 pp); Gold, Galleons & Archeology (with Carl Clausen, 1976, F, ex lib, 195 pp); They Found Treasure (1977, F, ex lib, 243 pp); and Sunken Treasure: Six Who Found Fortunes (1988, VF, 333 pp). All HC, DJ. Four popular, classic books about salvaging shipwreck treasure (particularly off the coasts of Florida), the first two about the wrecks and salvage efforts and the second two focused on the successful salvagers themselves. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $75 $110

200

(Christie’s New York)

Craig, Alan

1105. The Research Coin Collection—A unique representative collection of 237 New World Spanish coins recovered from the wreck of the Nuestra Señora de Atocha (1988), autographed by Marisha Wagner Moran. SC (comb bound), VF, 48 pp + 16 plates. When the big Christie’s Atocha auction took place in 1988, there was a very special lot at the end of the catalog… a so-called “Research Collection” of 237 silver coins offered as one lot with special certificates and a separate catalog of the collection compiled by Sandy McKinney. The lot did not sell, so the owner, Marisha Wagner Moran, a diver and investor with the Fishers, reluctantly sold the coins piecemeal over the years to whoever showed enough interest and wherewithal. The original catalogs are now very rare, so even an older photocopy like this lot has value, especially with Marisha’s original signature on the front. Accompanied by a copy of an article about Marisha Wagner Moran in the AugustSeptember, 1984, issue of Key West Life. Estimate: $100 - $150

1109. Florida Archaeology—Gold Coins of the 1715 Spanish Plate Fleet: A Numismatic Study of the State of Florida Collection (1988), autographed. HC, DJ, mint, 83 pp. A very well-illustrated numismatic study of the gold cobs found on the 1715 Spanish Plate Fleet and placed in the museum of the State of Florida. Now superseded by a second edition, this first edition has become a bit of a collector’s item. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $75 - $110

Clarke, Arthur C. 1106. The Treasure of the Great Reef (1964), autographed. HC, DJ, near mint, 194 pp. This book tells the story of Clarke’s accidental finding of an early 18thcentury wreck off the coast of Sri Lanka and its subsequent salvage. The recent death of the author (a celebrated fiction writer who was perhaps most famous for his book 2001: A Space Odyssey) makes the autograph in this book particularly valuable. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, autographed on a bookplate that says EX LIBRIS ARTHUR C. CLARKE. Estimate: $90 - $135

Clifford, Barry

Craig, Alan and Ernie Richards 1110. Spanish Treasure Bars from New World Shipwrecks (2003), autographed. SC, mint, 213 pp. This book presents data known to date about the ingots recovered from Spanish shipwrecks. The book tells about people who found the bars, the New World regions where they were made, and, through numerous illustrations and drawings, details of their markings. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, autographed by the authors specifically “For Thomas H. Sebring.” Estimate: $40 - $60

Crile, Jane & Barney 1111. Treasure Diving Holidays (scarce 1954 first edition). HC, ex lib, F, 263 pp. The story of the Crile family of Cleveland, Ohio, and their adventures treasure-hunting in the Caribbean during the 1950s and 1960s. The Criles teamed up with Art McKee and Mendel Peterson to salvage the H.M.S. Looe. Estimate: $30 - $45

Diolé, Philippe 1112. 4000 years under the sea (1954). HC, DJ, F, 237 pp. Translated from a 1952 French original, this book tells the story of the author’s research in underwater archaeology with an interpretation of man’s history in the Mediterranean based on treasures excavated from shipwrecks. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $25 - $40

Doak, Wade

1107. Lot of three books: The Pirate Prince (1993, 222 pp), Expedition Whydah (1999, 311 pp) and The Lost Fleet (2002, 287 pp). All HC, DJ, mint. These are the stories about the author’s successful search for and salvage of the pirate ship Whydah of 1717 (first two books) and a fleet of French ships sunk off Venezuela in 1678, written in a refreshingly personal tone that keeps the reader entertained. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $45 - $70

1113. The Elingamite and its Treasure (1969). HC, DJ, VF, 192 pp. The author’s own story about finding and salvaging the Elingamite with Kelly Tarlton. The Elingamite sank in 1902 off the New Zealand coast with a cargo of gold and silver. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, with previous owner’s name and address with 1969 date handwritten in front. Estimate: $75 $110

Conrad, Judy (ed.)

Driscoll, Charles

1108. Story of an American Tragedy—Survivors’ Accounts of the Sinking of the Steamship Central America (1988), autographed by the editor. SC, VF, 82 pp. A series of logs, passenger lists and newspaper reports about the sinking of the S.S. Central America in 1857, with a modicum of illustrations, rather useful to the researcher and interesting to the casual enthusiast. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, with autograph dated “9-29-92.” Estimate: $25 - $40

1114. Doubloons (1930). HC, F, 319 pp. This book tells the story of ten famous lost treasures. Included are stories about the Florencia, an Armada galleon that sank in 1588 in Tobermory Bay off Scotland; the Lutine that sank off Holland in 1799; and the Spanish galleons that were sunk by the British in Vigo Bay, Spain, in 1702. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $35 - $50

201

Edwards, Hugh

Horner, David

1115. Lot of five books: Islands of Angry Ghosts (1966, Fine, ex lib, 207 pp); Wreck on the Half-Moon Reef (1970, VF, 193 pp); Sharks and Shipwrecks (1975, 2nd ed, VG, ex lib, 126 pp); Australian and New Zealand Shipwrecks & Sea Tragedies (1978, VG, ex-lib, 135 pp); and Treasures of the Deep (2000, SC, mint, 279 pp). All HC, DJ except for last, which is SC. Five excellent and very informative narratives by Australia’s premier shipwreck author, the first book covering the Batavia wreck off Western Australia in 1629; the second book about the Zeewyk wreck of 1727 on the same coast; the third book a collection of stories (and some rather graphic photos) concerning dangerous salvages on the Batavia (1629), the Vergulde Draeck (1656), the Zuytdorp (1712), the Elingamite (1902), the Niagara (1940), the Perth (1942), among others; the fourth book about various wrecks off Australia and New Zealand; and the fifth book focusing on Michael Hatcher and his successful salvages of porcelain cargoes in the South China Sea and elsewhere (with lots of photos). Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $80 - $120

1120. Lot of three books: Shipwrecks, Skin Divers and Sunken Gold (1965, 3rd ed, HC, DJ, VF, 241 pp); The Treasure Galleons (1990 reprint of a 1971 original, SC, VF, 259 pp); and Shipwreck (1999, HC, DJ, mint, 295 pp). Three popular and important treasure books by well-known treasure author Dave Horner that provide extensively researched historical backgrounds and stories of salvage efforts of many famous Spanish galleons, including the Atocha, the Capitana and the Maravillas. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $75 - $110

Godard, Philippe

1122. The True Story of the Grosvenor East Indiaman (1960). HC, F, 268 pp with foldout chart at end. This book describes the wreck of the Grosvenor off the coast of South Africa in 1782, the desperate trek of the survivors to civilization, and the various salvage efforts. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $25 - $40

1116. First and Last Voyage of the Batavia (1993). HC, DJ, mint, 332 pp. This large “coffee table”-style book tells the story from beginning to excavation of the V.O.C. ship Batavia, which was wrecked on a reef off Western Australia in 1629. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $100 - $150

Howden Smith, Arthur D. 1121. Porto Bello Gold (1924). HC, VG, 330 pp. A classic pirate yarn, the inspiration for many a pirate enthusiast over the decades. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $35 $50

Kirby, Percival R.

Klare, Normand E.

Goodwin, William B. 1117. The Lure of Gold (1940), autographed. HC, Fine, 215 pp. This classic book covers the voyages of Columbus and the subsequent loss of five ships in the Caribbean. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $75 - $110

Grissim, John 1118. The Lost Treasure of the Concepción (1980), autographed. HC, DJ, VF, 207 pp. This popular book recounts the salvage of the Concepción by William Phips in 1687, and then tells the story of Burt Webber’s search for, recovery, and salvage of this ship in the late 1970s. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, personally inscribed to Tom Sebring by Burt D. Webber, Jr., in 1981. Estimate: $35 - $50

1123. The Final Voyage of the Central America 1857 (1992). HC, DJ, mint, 278 pp. The story of the final voyage of the S.S. Central America (1857), the saga of a Gold Rush steamship, the tragedy of her loss in a hurricane off the North Carolina coast, and the treasure recovered from the wreck. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $25 - $40

Lonsdale and Kaplan 1124. Guide to Sunken Ships in American Waters (1964). HC, DJ, VG, 189 pp. Lengthy lists and brief histories of hundreds of shipwrecks in U.S. waters, one of the classics. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, with former owner’s signature and 1967 date in front. Estimate: $40 - $60

Lyon, Eugene

Groushko, Michael 1119. Lot of two books: Treasure—Lost, Found and Undiscovered (1990), and Lost Treasures of the World (1993). HC, DJ, VF, 128 pp and 192 pp. Two large, lavishly illustrated, coffee-table books that present topics of archaeology, buried treasure and sunken treasure. The shipwrecks covered in these books include the following: 1715 Fleet, H.M.S. Edinburgh, Mary Rose, Spanish Armada shipwrecks, H.M.S. Association, Titanic, Atocha, Concepción, Kronan, Geldermalsen, and Hollandia. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $40 - $60

1125. Lot of two books: The Search for the Atocha (1979, HC, DJ, 246 pp) and Search for the Mother Lode (1989, SC). VF. Both books in this lot tell the story of how good archival research located and identified the sunken Spanish galleon Atocha, salvaged by Mel Fisher in the 1970s and 1980s. The author was the researcher who found the “key” to locating the Atocha wreck site in the archives in Seville, Spain, after Mel had spent 10 years searching the entire length of the Florida Keys without success. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $35 - $50

202

MacGregor, Duncan 1126. The Loss of the Kent East Indiaman (undated, 1800s). HC, VF, 90 pp. A fascinating account of the wrecking of an English East Indiaman in the Bay of Biscay in 1825, related by a survivor whose story is mostly religious (this scarce edition, in fact, published by The Religious Tract Society of London), one engraved plate in the front showing the ship sinking. Estimate: $60 - $80

Mahan, William 1127. Padre Island—Treasure Kingdom of the World (1967). HC, DJ, F, ex lib, 139 pp. Classic book covering the various shipwrecks along the Padre Island coast of Texas, with ample illustrations. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $40 $60

Marsden, Peter 1128. Sealed by Time—The Loss and Recovery of the Mary Rose (2003). HC, VF, 194 pp. This book details the history, the construction, the salvage and the archaeology of the Mary Rose, which sank in Portsmouth harbor in 1545. It is the first book in a series of five books on the archaeology of the Mary Rose. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $25 - $40

Mathers, William 1129. Treasure of the Concepción (1993), autographed. HC, DJ, mint, 164 pp. The finding and salvage of the Manila galleon Nuestra Señora de la Concepción, which sank in 1638 off the coast of Saipan in the Mariana Islands. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, with personal dedication to Tom from the author in 2007. Estimate: $35 - $50

McKee, Alexander 1130. Lot of four books: The Golden Wreck (1962, HC, F, 224 pp); King Henry VIII’s Mary Rose (1974, HC, DJ, VF, 346 pp); How We Found the Mary Rose (1982, HC, DJ, VF, 152 pp); and Tarquin’s Ship (1985, HC, DJ, VF, 216 pp). The first book covers the sinking of the Royal Charter off Wales in 1859; the last book is about an Etruscan shipwreck off Italy; but the two in between discuss the author’s 20-year involvement with the salvage of the Tudorperiod wreck of the Mary Rose in Portsmouth Harbour. All four are well illustrated (particularly the last two) and written by one of England’s best-known salvage authors. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $100 - $150

Morris, Roland 1131. HMS Colossus (1979). HC, DJ, mint, 238 pp. The story of the sinking (1798) and salvage by the author of Nelson’s ship H.M.S. Colossus, which was carrying William Hamilton’s second collection of ancient Greek vases. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $30 - $45

National Museum of the Philippines (Jean-Paul Desroches, ed.) 1132. Treasures of the San Diego (1997). SC, VF, 377 pp. This lavishly illustrated exhibition catalog details the historical background and salvage of the Spanish ship San Diego that sank off the Philippines in 1600 and was discovered in 1991 by Frank Goddio. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $35 - $50

Nesmith and Potter 1133. Lot of two books: Treasure… how and where to find it (1968) and Treasure Hunter’s Guide (1975 reissue of the first book). HC, DJ, VF, 152 pp each. These two books are the same item, just with different titles and published at different times. Lavishly illustrated (black and white only), they offer all types of information on where and how to find treasure: ghost towns, moneydigging, pirate treasures, gold-panning, and more. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $50 - $75

O’Byrne-Pelham and Balcer 1134. The Search for the Atocha Treasure (1989), autographed. HC, DJ, VF, 108 pp. This adolescent book tells the story of Mel Fisher’s quest for the Spanish galleon Atocha, which sank near Key West, Florida, in 1622. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, with personal dedications to Tom from Kim Fisher and James Sinclair. Estimate: $50 - $75

Peterson, Mendel 1135. History under the Sea (1973), autographed. SC, mint, 208 pp. This important classic presents an overview of the underwater archaeology associated with the salvage of the 1733 Fleet wrecks off the Florida Keys. The book is well illustrated with many photos of the coins, artifacts and cannons recovered during the salvage efforts. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, scarce with autograph (author now deceased). Estimate: $50 - $75 1136. The Funnel of Gold (1975). HC, DJ, F, 481 pp. Another important classic, providing a scholarly and detailed history of the Spanish treasure fleets and the Spanish occupation in the Caribbean. Includes discussions on the 1715 and 1733 Fleets. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $60 - $90

Pickford, Nigel 1137. Lot of two books: The Atlas of Shipwrecks and Treasure (1994, VF, 200 pp) and Lost Treasure Ships of the Twentieth Century (1999, mint, 192 pp). HC, DJ. Two large “coffee table”style books that provide overviews on the history and treasures of the more famous ships lost at sea from ancient times through the Twentieth Century. Both well illustrated, the first with many maps. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $45 $70

203

Potter, John S.

Shomette, Donald G.

1138. The Treasure Diver’s Guide, scarce first edition (1960). HC, DJ, VG, 501 pp. Scarce first edition of the first comprehensive listing of treasure wrecks ever written (although some of its data has been shown to be erroneous), this book discusses the Spanish galleons carrying gold and silver from the New World to Spain, the stories of wrecks already salvaged (as of 1960), wreck identification, and underwater archaeology as it was at that time. Autographed by the author at Martha’s Vineyard in 2007. Estimate: $150 - $225

1144. Lot of two books: Shipwrecks on the Chesapeake (1982, mint, 324 pp) and Shipwrecks, Sea Raiders, and Maritime Disasters along the Delmarva Coast 1632-2004 (2007, mint, 435 pp). HC, DJ. Both books offer selected background information and complete lists of wrecks off the coasts in question, the second book with important legal updates on La Galga, Juno, Faithful Steward and DeBraak. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $50 - $75

1139. The Treasure Diver’s Guide, revised edition (to include 1715 Fleet) (1972). HC, DJ, F, 567 pp. As above but revised to include the 1715-Fleet wrecks discovered and salvaged in the 1960s. Autographed by the author at Martha’s Vineyard in 2007. Estimate: $150 - $225 1140. The Treasure Divers of Vigo Bay (1958) HC, DJ, VG, 480 pp. This epic book tells the complete history of the galleons that were sunk at Vigo Bay, Spain, in 1702 and the subsequent salvage attempts. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $40 - $60

Rieseberg, Harry 1141. Lot of four books: Treasure Hunter (1945, HC, F, 260 pp); The Sea of Treasure (1966, HC, DJ, VF, 217 pp); Fell’s Guide to Sunken Treasure Ships of the World (1969, SC, G, 191 pp); and Fell’s Complete Guide to Buried Treasure, Land & Sea (1970, HC, DJ, F, 235 pp). Author Harry Rieseberg was the quintessential “true treasure” story writer of the ’50s and ’60s. This lot is comprised of four of his best-known titles. Each book tells of the author’s adventures in salvaging sunken treasure ships or provides a comprehensive guide for active and potential treasurehunters by including lists of hundreds of sunken treasure ships or lost and abandoned mines by location. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $90 - $135

Rønning, Bjørn R. 1142. Akerendam—The Story of the Runde Treasure (1979). HC, DJ, F, 92 pp. This book details the story of the sinking of the Dutch East Indiaman Akerendam at Runde, Norway, in 1725 and its subsequent salvage of gold and silver coins in 1972-1979. Estimate: $50 - $75

Shaw, Frank H. 1143. Full Fathom Five (1930). HC, VG, 301 pp. Classic text on shipwrecks, including Titanic, Birkenhead, Lusitania, and many others, the covers discolored but the pages all in nice shape. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $50 $75

1145. The Hunt for HMS De Braak (1993). HC, DJ, mint, 444 pp. This scholarly book details the history and successful excavation of the British man-of-war H.M.S. De Braak, which sank off the Delaware coast in 1798. The book includes the ship’s military career in the Dutch and British Navies, the story of her shipwreck and alleged treasure and the accounts of salvage attempts over the years. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $40 $60

Snow, Edward Rowe 1146. Lot of two books: True Tales of Terrible Shipwrecks (1963, VF, 239 pp) and Great Atlantic Adventures (1970, VG, ex lib, 272 pp). HC, DJ. One of the most romantic writers of shipwreck tales, the author presents in these books factual accounts of famous wrecks in U.S. waters and around the world, including S.S. Central America (1857), Dodington (1755), Andrea Doria (1956), just to name a few. The second book also has one whole chapter devoted to salvage around Bermuda by Teddy Tucker and others. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, the first book with previous owner’s plate in front. Estimate: $50 - $75

Stark, Jack 1147. The Sponge Pirates (1956), autographed. HC, VG, 86 pp. Neat old book that includes a story about Art McKee and his hardhat salvage efforts, this special edition sold only at McKee’s “Sunken Treasure Fortress” in the 1950s, rare with autograph, cover discolored but pages in nice condition. Personally dedicated by the author in 1966 “To the greatest diver of them all who is a part of this book—the best part” [Art McKee]. Estimate: $150 - $225

Sténuit, Robert 1148. Treasures of the Armada (1973). HC, DJ, VF, 282 pp. This well-illustrated book explores the history of the Spanish Armada, which sailed against England in 1588. The second part of the book tells the story of the author’s research, discovery, and excavation of the Spanish galleass Girona, which had been wrecked off the coast of Ireland. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, with former owner’s inscription “Too bad we gave up the sport so soon.” Estimate: $50 - $75

204

Stick, David

Wagner, Kip

1149. Graveyard of the Atlantic (1952), autographed. HC, DJ, VG, 276 pp. Classic text, with factual accounts of hundreds of dramatic losses, heroic rescues, and violent adventures off the Outer Banks of North Carolina, along with a complete list of wrecks by date. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, with dedication to former owner from the author and Mark Stick (the author’s son?). Estimate: $35 - $50

1153. Pieces of Eight (2nd printing, 1967), autographed by all original Real Eight Co. members (10 signatures). HC, DJ, F, 221 pp. The story of the finding and partial salvage of the 1715 Fleet of sunken Spanish galleons off Vero Beach, Florida, in the 1960s, as told by the original salvager. Kip Wagner’s story started the underwater treasure hunting craze on Florida’s east coast. Copies with all the signatures of the Real Eight Co. like this one are rare and highly sought. Signed by the author and all eight members of the Real Eight Co. plus Kip’s nephew Rex Stocker. Estimate: $250 - $375

Stone, George Cameron 1150. A Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Armor (1961 reprint of a 1934 original). HC, DJ, VF, 694 pp. The “bible” of arms and armor, with hundreds of photos and diagrams laid out in dictionary form, an extremely useful tome that covers every type of weapon and armor from around the world. Estimate: $60 - $90

Thompson, Tommy

1154. Pieces of Eight (1966 1st ed.), autographed by five members of the original Real Eight Co. HC, DJ, F, 221 pp. As above but signed by the five members of the Real Eight Co. (missing members Kip Kelso, Bob Johnson and Dan Thompson, as well as Rex Stocker and L.B. Taylor, Jr.). Estimate: $150 - $225

1151. America’s Lost Treasure (1998), autographed. HC, DJ, mint, 191 pp. This lavishly illustrated coffee table book presents the gold coins, gold ingots, bullion and artifacts recovered from the gold rush steamer S.S. Central America, which sank in 1857 off the coast of North Carolina. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, with personal dedications to Tom from the author and from conservator Bob Evans. Estimate: $50 - $75

1155. Pieces of Eight (4th printing, 1972). HC, DJ, VF, 221 pp. As above but no signatures, somewhat balanced by its choice condition. Estimate: $40 - $60

Weller, Bob “Frogfoot”

Voynick, Stephen 1152. Lot of two books: In Search of Gold (1982, VF, 199 pp) and The Mid-Atlantic Treasure Coast (1984, mint, 164 pp). HC, DJ. Two classics, the first well illustrated with color photos and dealing with gold hunting throughout the Americas (including from shipwrecks) and the second covering beach finds and treasure salvage along the eastern coast of the U.S. from the Delmarva peninsula to Long Island. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $45 - $70

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1156. Lot of two books: Galleon Hunt (1992, 268 pp) and Galleon Alley (2001, 314 pp), both autographed. HC, DJ, mint. Two books by prolific treasure author and salvager Bob “Frogfoot” Weller, both lavishly illustrated with color photos. The book Galleon Hunt details the life and exploits of the “grandfather” of treasure salvage, Art McKee. Galleon Alley is a detailed accounting of the author’s own salvage efforts on the 1733 Fleet wrecks. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library, the second book personally dedicated to Tom Sebring: “You keep writing, we’ll keep bringing up the treasure!” Estimate: $40 - $60

Wells, Noel 1157. Small Arms of the Spanish Treasure Fleets (2006), autographed. HC, DJ, mint, 172 pp. This book details the handheld weaponry used by the conquistadors in the New World. The book describes how these weapons were built and decorated, and how they were used in practice. It is well illustrated with many photos of artifacts recovered on the Spanish wreck sites in the Americas. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $25 - $40

205

Wells, Tony

Wilkins, Harold

1158. Shipwrecks and Sunken Treasure in South East Asia (1995). SC, mint, 159 pp. This book is a comprehensive reference, organized by country, of 450 shipwrecks in Southeast Asia. Some of the most recognized treasure and ceramic wrecks detailed include the “Hatcher Junk,” the Flor do Mar, the “Vung Tau Cargo,” and the Geldermalsen. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $25 - $40

1159. Lot of two books: Panorama of Treasure Hunting (1940, HC, DJ, F, 582 pp); and Treasure Hunting—The Treasure Hunter’s Own Book of Land Caches and Bullion Wrecks (1989 reprint of a 1939 work, SC, VF, 394 pp). Two classics (one a reprint) about pirates and treasures on land and sea, the first with many interesting photos and maps. Pedigreed to the Tom Sebring Treasure Library. Estimate: $40 - $60

Auction catalogs

Glendining (London) 1160. Catalogue of Central and South American Gold Coins [and] Colombian Gold Ornaments, March 11-12, 1936. SC, Fair, 27 pp + 9 plates. Rare old catalog in which a significant collection of gold cobs (for its time, meaning prior to the salvage of the 1715 Fleet) was presented and sold, the cover fallen off but the pages in good condition, with sheet of shockingly low estimates laid in (a choice Cuzco 2 escudos for £20-£30, for example). Estimate: $50 - $75

END OF SALE Please send your bids to our special email bidding address: treasurebids@gmail.com

W.H. Lane & Sons (Penzance/Plymouth) 1161. Gold & Silver Treasure, November 29-30, 1979. SC, Fine, 62 pp. Scarce and important classic shipwreck catalog featuring coins and artifacts from over a half dozen wrecks, including Association (1707), DeLiefde (1711), Athenienne (1806) and Hollandia (1743), with brief histories on each wreck, page 31/32 (photos of cannon) regrettably torn out but photocopy will be supplied to winning bidder upon request. Estimate: $50 - $75 1162. Sale of Sunken Treasure, September 26, 1975. SC, VF, 108 pp plus photo-plates. Very similar to the above, another scarce and important shipwreck catalog offering coins and artifacts from nine well-known shipwrecks (including the same ones as above) from around the world, with ample histories on the wrecks and even a biography of Robert Sténuit. Estimate: $50 - $75

Sotheby Mak van Waay (Amsterdam) 1163. Dutch auction catalog containing coins and artifacts from the Hollandia (1743), October 28, 1975. SC, Fine, 171 pp. This scarce and important catalog is written entirely in Dutch and covers all kinds of antiques and fine art, but at the end is a large section devoted to the Hollandia wreck, offering many key artifacts in addition to hundreds of silver coins. Estimate: $70 - $100

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Any questions? Please email us at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325. THANK YOU FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION IN OUR TREASURE AUCTION #4 OUR TREASURE AUCTION #5 WILL TAKE PLACE IN SPRING, 2008 (CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: JANUARY 31, 2009)

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Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC November, 2008, Treasure Auction

BID SHEET

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DANIEL FRANK SEDWICK, LLC P.O. Box 1964 Winter Park, FL 32790 USA

For more information, please see our website at:

www.SedwickCoins.com

(407) 975-3325 • Fax (407) 975-3327

Daniel Frank Sedwick, licensed Florida auctioneer #AU3635, AB2592

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HOW TO BID


Treasure and World Coin Auction # 4