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Thanks to You, Our Generous Donors

Four SU Jesuits Celebrate Major Milestones

Get to Know the Alumni Board of Governors

Recipe for Success with Cheese-making Biz

THE MAGAZINE OF SU ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

Seattle University WINTER 2011

WHAT A WORKOUT! NEW FITNESS CENTER FLEXES

WELLNESS MUSCLE

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NIGHT HAWKS SU’s rowing club women’s varsity crew team goes through a practice run on Lake Union on a crisp fall evening. The club consists of male and female crew teams that compete well into spring. PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Seattle University Volume 35 • Issue Number 4 • Winter 2011 S TA F F Editor Tina Potterf Art Director Terry Lundmark, ’82 Brand Director Mary Olson Photographer Chris Joseph Taylor

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Editorial Assistant Maura Beth Pagano, ’12 Contributing Writers Annie Beckmann, Jason Behenna, Diana Chamorro, ’11, Maura Beth Pagano, ’12, and Mike Thee Interim Assistant Vice President/MARCOM Casey Corr Vice President/University Advancement Mary Kay McFadden Assistant Vice President/Alumni Relations Susan Woerdehoff

Seattle University Magazine (ISSN: 15501523) is published quarterly in fall, winter, spring and summer by Marketing Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Periodical postage paid at Seattle, Wash. Distributed without charge to alumni and friends of Seattle University. USPS 487-780. Comments and questions about Seattle University Magazine may be addressed to the editor at (206) 296-6111; the address below; fax: (206) 296-6137; or e-mail: tinap@seattleu.edu. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seattle University Magazine, Print Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Check out the magazine online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services and Equal Opportunity Officer, Gerald V. Huffman, RINA 214, (206) 296-5869 or e-mail huffmaje@seattleu.edu.

Bellarmine Hall dining room, circa 1966. Today’s food options promote health and wellness. See how on page 20.

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• Staying Well | CAPS offers resources for good mental health Alumn m us is a techie • Yoga Guy | Alumnus d y, da y yogi for life byy day,

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Web extras and special features at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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• Nourish the Body | SU’s food options fit with healthy lifestyle

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ON THE COVER The new William F. Eisiminger Fitness Center is a sight to behold, inside and out.

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COVER PHOTO BY LARA SWIMMER

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THE MAGAZINE OF SU ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

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SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 1

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december ANNUAL ALUMNI ADVENT MASS AND CHRISTMAS RECEPTION

Sunday, December 11 4 p.m., Chapel of St. Ignatius Join fellow alumni, family and friends for worship during the holiday season. A reception will immediately follow the Mass in PACCAR Atrium in the Pigott Building. Information and registration: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail alumniRSVP@seattleu.edu.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL VS. SANTA CLARA Tuesday, December 13 7 p.m., Connolly Center Come support the women’s basketball team as it takes on Santa Clara on SU’s North Court at Connolly Center. An alumni pre-game rally will take place before the game starting at 6 p.m. Tickets: (206) 296-2835. Information (pre-game rally): (206) 296-6127.

MEN’S BASKETBALL VS. UTAH STATE Thursday, January 19 7:10 p.m., KeyArena at Seattle Center Come support the men’s basketball team as it takes on Utah State on SU’s home court at KeyArena. An alumni pre-game rally will take place before the game starting at 6 p.m. Tickets: (206) 296-2835. Information (pre-game rally): (206) 296-6127.

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SERVICE IN ACTION SEMINAR, “REFOCUS & REINVEST: CAREER MANAGEMENT IN THE 21ST CENTURY” Friday, January 20 8 a.m. to noon, Casey Commons The Master’s of Public Administration and Executive Master of Nonprofit Leadership programs invite alumni to the next Service in Action Seminar featuring Carol Vecchio of Centerpoint Institute for Life and Career Renewal. Future program dates include Feb. 24, March 16, April 20 and May 25. Information and registration: (206) 296-5440 or e-mail potterd@seattleu.edu.

HONOLULU ALUMNI, PARENTS AND FRIENDS REGIONAL RECEPTION Wednesday, December 14 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Waialae Country Club, Honolulu Reconnect with friends who live on Oahu and get caught up on the happenings at Seattle University. Information: (206) 296-6127.

MEN’S BASKETBALL VS. UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA Wednesday, December 21 7:10 p.m., KeyArena at Seattle Center Come support the men’s basketball team as it takes on Virginia on SU’s home court at KeyArena. An alumni pre-game rally will take place before the game starting at 6 p.m. Tickets: (206) 296-2835. Information (pre-game rally): (206) 296-6127.

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ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS EXECUTIVE SPEAKER SERIES Tuesday, January 24 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Pigott Auditorium Join us for a discussion with John Stanton, founder and former CEO of Western Wireless Corporation and former chairman and CEO of VoiceStream Wireless. The last speaker series event is April 26 featuring Dan Nordstrom of Outdoor Research. Information: (206) 296-5700.

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“AMERICAN GRACE: HOW RELIGION UNITES AND DIVIDES US” Tuesday, January 17 7 to 9 p.m., SU Campus Plan now to attend the second lecture of this year’s Catholic Heritage Lecture series featuring Robert Putnam. Information: E-mail ely@seattleu.edu or visit www.seattleu.edu/missionministry/chl/.

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COME JOIN US

Winter showed itself on campus in a wintry scene from last season.

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ICS# 110641 • Seattle University 2011 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 56pg PAGE 2 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 Gracol • 80# Nature Matte Book

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ANN O’HARA GRAFF LECTURE FEATURING ELISABETH SCHÜSSLER FIORENZA

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Wednesday, February 1 7 to 10 p.m., Campion Ballroom SU’s Theology and Religious Studies program presents its 2012 Ann O’Hara Graff lecture featuring Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, a theologian and professor from Harvard Divinity School. The namesake of the lecture series was a professor in the department at SU and was known for work around issues involving diversity and the role of women in Catholicism. O’Hara Graff was one of the founders of the Women’s Seminar for Constructive Theology in the Catholic Theological Society of America. Information: www.seattleu.edu/ artsci/theology/.

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ALBERS EXECUTIVE SPEAKER SERIES PRESENTS JIM SINEGAL Thursday, Feb. 2 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Pigott Auditorium The Albers School of Business and Economics presents an evening discussion with Jim Sinegal, co-founder of Costco who recently retired as the company’s CEO. The free talk is part of the Albers Executive Speaker Series. Information: (206) 296-5700.

“SEARCH FOR MEANING: PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPIRITUALITY BOOK FESTIVAL” Saturday, February 4 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., SU Campus Meet and hear lectures by more than 40 authors, purchase books and have fellowship with others who are searching for meaning in their lives at this annual book festival. Featured speakers are Mary Oliver, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, and James Martin, S.J., best-selling New York Times author and official chaplain to the Colbert Report. Literary works will focus on issues of spirituality, faith, ethics, churchstate relations, social justice, theology and more. Information: (206) 296-5330 or www.seattleu.edu/stm/.

MEN’S BASKETBALL VS. ARKANSAS STATE Saturday, February 4 7:10 p.m., KeyArena at Seattle Center Come support the men’s basketball team as it takes on Arkansas State on SU’s home court at KeyArena. An alumni pre-game rally will take place before the game starting at 6 p.m. Tickets: (206) 296-2835. Information (pre-game rally): (206) 296-6127.

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UNITED FILIPINO CLUB’S 18TH ANNUAL BARRIO FIESTA Saturday, March 10 Doors open at 5:30 p.m., Campion Ballroom SU students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends are invited to UFC’s annual celebration of the Filipino/ Filipino-American culture and heritage featuring authentic Filipino cuisine, entertainment and live performances. The SU Filipino Alumni Chapter will host alumni tables at the event in support of the student club. Information: (206) 296-6162.

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ALUMNI DAY OF PRAYER Saturday, March 24 8:30 to 4:30 p.m., Chapel of St. Ignatius Alumni are invited to participate in the annual day of prayer sponsored by Magis: Alumni Committed for Mission. Information: (206) 296-2637 or e-mail magis@seattleu.edu.

10TH ANNUAL ALUMNI CRAB FEED Saturday, March 24 5 to 11 p.m., Student Center The Albers Alumni Board and Alumni Relations invite alumni and friends to SU’s 10th annual Crab Feed. Table sponsorships benefit Albers School scholarships. Information: (206) 296-2277 or e-mail bourker@ seattleu.edu.

save the date ALUMNI AND FRIENDS RENEWAL OF VOWS

Sunday, April 15 4:30-7 p.m., Chapel of St. Ignatius and LeRoux Conference Room Alumni and friends of the university who were married at the Chapel of St. Ignatius will have an opportunity to renew their wedding vows at the chapel, which celebrates its 15th anniversary in 2012. President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., and Dave Anderson, S.J., will co-preside. Due to limited space, it is requested that only couples attend the event. Information: E-mail magis@seattleu.edu.

For more information on alumni events, contact Alumni Relations at (206) 296-6127 or visit www.seattleu.edu/alumni/.

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SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 3

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PHOTO BY MIKE THEE

A compilation of fun facts, news bites, events and more connecting you to SU.

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Seattle University is recognized for its impressive— and substantial—art collection. Works by Chuck Close, Jacob Lawrence, Dale Gottlieb, Dale Chihuly and many more are located in buildings and outdoor spaces throughout campus, enriching the educational experience. One of the newest additions to the collection is outside of the A&A Building, home to Alumni Relations and Admissions. The piece, titled Transformations, is the work of Native American glass artist Preston Singletary. The piece is composed of water jet-cut aluminum, powder-coated enamel, water jet-cut flat glass and steel. Singletary’s art “depicts cultural and historical images from his Tlingit ancestry in richly detailed, beautifully hued glass,” according to the biography on his website. Visit the A&A Building to see for yourself and check out more of the artist’s work at www.prestonsingletary.com/.

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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DID YOU KNOW?

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SERVICE IN COMMUNITY Seattle University was recently ranked ninth in the nation for its contributions to the public good in Washington Monthly’s 2011 list of master’s universities. The publication evaluated more than 550 institutions in three categories: recruiting and graduating low-income students; producing cutting-edge scholarship and PhDs; and encouraging students to give something back to their country. “This recognition is particularly meaningful to us as Washington Monthly’s criteria for evaluating institutions are very much in congruence with the values of our university,” says Provost Isiaah Crawford. SU made a strong showing in a number of areas that Washington Monthly considers. The university is second in the nation for a measure that includes staff participation for service activities, incorporating service in academic course work and the availability of scholarships for community service.

Service in the community and for others runs deep at SU, with 3 out of 4 students giving back through community service. Read more about the rankings at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Associate Professor Paul Fontana works with students at the College of Science and Engineering.

Read more about the NSF grants at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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The ranking of SU by U.S. News and World Report’s “Best Colleges 2012” guide for top regional universities and colleges in the West. Read more about the ranking at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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As a sign of the College of Science and Engineering’s growing strength, three faculty members received more than $750,000 in funding from the National Science Foundation. Professor and Chair David Boness and Associate Professor Paul Fontana of the physics department received $581,800 for the new Boscovich Physics Scholars Program, while Associate Professor John Carter of the mathematics department has secured $168,822 for research on waves. The grant for Fontana and Boness is a five-year commitment that provides scholarships of up to $10,000 per year, renewable up to four years, for at least 16 SU students enrolled in physics or physics/engineering courses of study. SU’s program is one of just 80 funded out of the 363 proposals received for the NSF S-STEM (Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) program. In mathematics, Carter is putting his NSF award to work to study the behavior of waves, particularly surface waves propagating on water and waves in shallow water. The research is expected to yield a variety of practical applications. As one example, Carter is seeking to develop a model for “predicting dangerous versus benign tsunamis” based on “the Richter-scale measure of the responsible earthquake and some readily available information about the geology of its location.”

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PRE-SEASON PRAISE FOR MEN’S BASKETBALL AND COACH DOLLAR The Seattle University men’s basketball team has received early accolades for the 2011–12 season from CollegeSportsMadness.com, which recently released its Preseason All-Independent Team. Coach Cameron Dollar, now in his third season with the Redhawks, was named Preseason Independent Coach of the Year.

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Coach Cameron Dollar and the Redhawks will face his former colleague Lorenzo Romar (left) and the UW Huskies on Jan. 10.

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ON CAMPUS

Jubilant Time | By Mike Thee President Sundborg among notable Jesuits marking major milestones this year Four Seattle University Jesuits are celebrating significant milestones this year. Pat O’Leary, S.J., chaplain for faculty and staff, is marking the 50th anniversary of his ordination; Stephen Sundborg, S.J., president, and Pat Howell, S.J., rector, are both celebrating 50 years as Jesuits; and for Dave Anderson, S.J., chaplain for alumni, it is his 25th anniversary of entering the Jesuit Order.

ordained. As for the ordination itself, O’Leary remembers it mainly as one of the hottest days in Spokane history. Sundborg and Howell joined the Jesuits the same year. Sundborg remembers taking a flight from Washington, D.C., and then getting on a Greyhound bus from Portland to the novitiate, which was 50 miles southwest in Sheridan, Ore. The bus left him off at the base of a hill where he was met Collectively, the four have served strong sense of the presence of God nearly 200 years as Jesuits. It’s a stagfrom when I was age 7 onward. It was at by a pickup truck that took him up to the farm on which the novitiate sits. gering statistic, especially when you that time that I thought I would really stop and think about all the lives they be a priest and that never diminished.” Sundborg and another novice jumped in have touched through the years in their The North Dakota native wound up the back of the truck with their suitcases. various ministries. at Gonzaga University, which, he says, “For me it was just a totally different world. I’d never been on a farm,” he Recently, the four jubilarians, as they “was quite a leap when you consider says. “I never will understand how I ever are known, sat down for a conversation we lived 1,100 miles from Spokane.” got on that airplane in Washington, about why they decided to become Father Anderson says he’s a Jesuit D.C., a month after my 18th birthday priests, what they remember about today because of “God’s persistence. and left my family behind. I don’t know the day they entered the Jesuits—or in I always felt a sense of attraction to how I did it.” Father O’Leary’s case, his ordination— being a Jesuit and there was just this Most of the novices, like Sundborg, and what they treasure most about the feeling that God kept calling me. I were fresh out of high school. At 21, lives they’ve chosen. remember my grandmother, when Howell was considered the “old man” of O’Leary’s call to the priesthood I was five or six, looking me in the the group. He remembers getting to the had a lot to do with family, he says. eyes and saying, ‘I want one of my His mother died when he was young grandsons to be a priest.’ I don’t know novitiate and hearing about this fellow and so he moved in with relatives in if she ever said that to anyone else, but that he just had to meet nicknamed “Borg.” It wasn’t long before the future Tacoma. He lived a half a block from I never forgot that.” SU rector would make the acquaintance St. Leo’s parish and went to Bellarmine In high school, Anderson made a of the man who would become the Prep. Search Retreat where he had “a deep “The example of the Jesuits I knew experience of God’s presence and a call university’s 21st president. A quarter century later, Anderson there and the faith of the family I’d to the priesthood that was really clear took a somewhat different route to come from were the seeds of my vocato me.” the Jesuit novitiate. After attending the tion,” he says. O’Leary has vivid memories of 1986 World’s Fair in Vancouver, B.C., he The Jesuits, too, influenced Father his ordination 50 years ago. “You’d and his parents drove down I-5 to the Sundborg. In his case, the Jesuits of think I’d have all kinds of pious and novitiate. “...Once I arrived, there was a Alaska. spiritual thoughts of that day,” he connection with the six of us in our class “I always had this sense that they says, with a laugh. “The night before and the three in the class ahead of us. were already welcoming me (as a the ordination, all of a sudden I get a young person),” he says. knock at my door and it’s one my best There was a lot of laughter and a lot of joy, and I felt that I was really at home.” In high school at Georgetown Prep, friends who was to be ordained with Reflecting on his life as a priest, Howell he found himself identifying particularly me, and he said, ‘I can’t go through says, “I look back now, 50 years after with his young Jesuit teachers who were with it.’ So, I was more concerned entering the Jesuits and think, ‘Wow, what not ordained yet and only about a about what he was going to do than a great decision to have made at 21.‘ I’ve decade his senior. my own ordination.” never had any doubts about my vocation.” Father Howell says, “I had a very In the end, O’Leary’s friend got

6 / On Campus

Read more at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Pat O'Leary, S.J., left, demonstrates a particular gesture he is known for to fellow jubilarians, (left to right) Dave Anderson, S.J., Pat Howell, S.J., and Stephen Sundborg, S.J.

“I look back now, 50 years after entering the Jesuits and think, ‘Wow, what a great decision to have made at 21.’ I’ve never had any doubts about my vocation.” PAT HOWELL, S.J., RECTOR

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SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 7

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School of Theology and Ministry book festival welcomes distinguished authors James Martin, S.J., New York Times bestselling author, blogger and culture editor of America, the national Catholic magazine—and frequent guest on the Colbert Report—will visit Seattle University as a featured speaker of the School of Theology and Ministry’s annual book fest.

“STM is attempting to create an annual gathering place for all people of good will to discuss their values, the ways they create meaning in their lives and the dreams they have for a world of greater kindness, peace and justice.” MARK MARKULY, STM DEAN

BOOKFEST FEATURED AUTHORS AT SU FEB. 4

James Martin, S.J.

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PHOTO BY ROB HOWARD

In a few short years, the Search for Meaning: Pacific Northwest Spirituality Book Festival has evolved into one of the region’s most popular literary festivals celebrating and showcasing authors who have written on topics and issues of spirituality, faith, ethics, church-state relations, social justice and theology. In addition to Father Martin, featured speaker Mary Oliver, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, will read from her latest work at the event, Feb. 4, 2012. Fr. Martin is author of the book, The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything. Festival-goers will have the opportunity to see these and other authors, purchase and get signed books and meet other participants with shared literary interests. The success of the book fest has surpassed expectations and continues to grow with each year, says Dean Mark Markuly of STM. “STM is attempting to create an annual gathering place for all people of good will to discuss their values, the ways they create meaning in their lives and the dreams they have for a world of greater kindness, peace and justice,” he says. “The event … is a good indication of how many of us believe we can have profound differences yet talk and learn from each other, while finding new ways to build a common life for us and our children." The Search for Meaning: Pacific Northwest Spirituality Book Festival is on campus, free and open to alumni and the general public. The event begins at 9 a.m.

PHOTO COURTESY LOYOLA PRESS

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Mary Oliver

For more on the STM Bookfest and these featured authors, visit www.seattleu.edu/stm/.

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Dean Mark Niles talks with Alexis Oliver ’08, policy adviser for Gov. Christine Gregoire (center) and Twyla Carter ’07, an attorney with The Defender Association.

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Building an ARC to Success | By Katherine Hedland Hansen Law school celebrates commitment to access and 25th anniversary of the Academic Resource Center Graduates came from as far as Texas and Hawaii to pay tribute to Seattle University School of Law’s lifechanging Academic Resource Center for its 25th anniversary in early fall. The anniversary celebration recognized the law school’s uninterrupted commitment to access and diversity in the legal profession through the ARC Access Admissions Program and its early-entry predecessor, and honored the more than 700 alumni who have enhanced the profession with their service. This program, one of the few remaining true access programs in the country, is changing the face of the legal profession. “It seems like every time I meet someone who is really doing something in the community, judges and leaders in the legal profession, they are invariably graduates of the ARC

program,” says Dean Mark Niles. President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., spoke at a reception about how proud he is of the university’s commitment to provide access to legal education to people from underrepresented groups. An anonymous donor who also believes in that mission has created an endowment of more than $8 million for ARC scholarships. The Access Admission Program considers an applicant’s life experience and promise in addition to traditional admission criteria, and ARC provides the support necessary for their success. Given access to legal education, ARC alumni enrich the law school and the profession. Although they comprise only 10 percent of the total student population, ARC students are well represented as faculty scholars, Student Bar Association presidents and graduation speakers. Many go on

Learn more about the School of Law ARC program at www.law.seattleu.edu.

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to be leaders in the legal profession, bar associations and their communities. And they continue to serve the law school long after graduation. ARC alumni thrive in all forms of practice. They are state and federal court clerks, partners and associates, prosecutors and defense attorneys, public interest lawyers, attorneys for nonprofit organizations, educators, corporate counsel and judges. During the event, alumni of the program thanked ARC co-founders and Professors Paula Lustbader and David Boerner for their support, skills and encouragement. King County District Court Judge Mark Chow is a 1979 graduate of the law school who was part of the early-entry program. He’s grateful for the opportunity he and many other students from underrepresented groups have had, thanks to the law school. “I was the only person of color to graduate with my class,” he says. “Look where we are now.”

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DAVID GREEN, interim director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, co-authored the article, “Academic development on the margins,” which was published in Studies in Higher Education. The article uses the lens of the “academic migrant" to examine the role and location of faculty developers at the interstices between administration and faculty and between academic disciplines. The leading international academic journal for higher education research, Studies in Higher Education is published by the Society for Research into Higher Education.

NEWS AND NOTES

where Volume One left off, is written for serious music students, especially those in college. The 160-page volume serves as a music theory workbook, a comprehensive improvisation guide and a stylistic chord resource. It also includes a jam CD with more than eight hours of backing tracks.

BILL WEIS, professor of management, and MEENA RISHI, associate professor of economics, of the Albers School of Business and Economics presented papers at the International Association of Jesuit Business Schools 17th annual world forum in Lima, Peru. The theme of the conference was CHRIS PAUL, professor of communica- “Corporate Social Responsibility and tion in the College of Arts & Sciences, Inclusive Business.” has been published in Game Studies, the international journal of computer CAROLYN STENBAK, assistant professor of biology, has received a game research. His article is “Optimizing Play: How Theorycraft $58,000 grant from the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust for her project, “Study Changes Gameplay and Design.” of Packaging Determinants within the SUSAN PALMER, guitar instructor C-terminus of Foamy Virus Polymerase in Fine Arts, has published The Protein.” With her students, Stenbak Guitar Lesson Companion, Volume will study foamy viruses, an ancient Two. The book, which picks up right group of non-pathogenic retroviruses

that are also excellent potential candidates for use in gene therapy. The process of assembly is a critical step in the viral life cycle as well as for the development of gene therapy vectors. Stenbak’s project seeks to better understand how the polymerase protein gets packaged into newly assembling virus particles. KATE KELLY, assistant director of Conference and Event Services, has been named Volunteer of the Year by the Association of Collegiate Conference and Events DirectorsInternational (ACCED-I). The award recognizes an ACCED-I member who makes contributions above and beyond the norm to the association at the regional or national level. APRIL ATWOOD, adjunct faculty, and Professor CARL OBERMILLER of the Albers School of Business and Economics had their article, “In defense of the student as customer metaphor,” accepted for publication in the International Journal of Management Education.

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Designed the scenery for Border Songs, produced by Book-It Repertory Theatre at Seattle Center House Theatre.

JOAQUIN AVILA director / School of Law’s National Voting Rights Advocacy Initiative Received a prestigious award from the Government of Mexico in recognition for his work in the United States and its impact in Mexico.

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KEN ALLAN, assistant professor of fine arts, had his article “City of Degenerate Angels: Wallace Berman, Jazz and Semina in Postwar Los Angeles” published in Art Journal. The article is about the artist Wallace Berman and the influence of Los Angeles bebop jazz musicians on Berman's conception of his underground art and poetry journal, Semina. MICHAEL REID TRICE has joined the School of Theology and Ministry as the new Assistant Dean of Ecumenical and Interreligious Dialogue. Previously, he was the associate executive of ecumenical and interreligious relations for Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. PETER ELY, S.J., and DAVID LEIGH, S.J., made presentations at the 16th Biennial Conference of the Society for the Study of Human Ideas of Ultimate Meaning at the University of Toronto. Father Ely, associate professor of theology and religious studies and vice president for Mission and Ministry,

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QUINTON MORRIS violinist / professor and director, chamber music, Fine Arts One of six individuals given a 2011 Mayor’s Arts Award by Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn. He was selected from a field that included more than 300 nominations from the public, recognizing individuals who have made significant contributions to the arts.

delivered a paper on “Ultimate Reality in Three Novels of Albert Camus.” Father Leigh, professor of English, gave two presentations on Russian Literature—one on “Dostoevsky’s Philosophy and Theology” and another on “The Global Context of Russian Literature.”

Compiled by Mike Thee, online editor of The Commons. For more faculty/staff achievements visit www.seattleu.edu/commons/.

CHRISTIE EPPLER associate professor / pastoral counseling, School of Theology and Ministry Co-authored the book, School Based Group Counseling, which looks at the process of developing, running and evaluating small groups in K–12 with a focus on counseling.

JACQUELINE HELFGOTT professor / chair, Criminal Justice department SU’s Criminal Justice programs, chaired by Helfgott, have been awarded certification by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. SU’s program is the only one in the West with this distinction.

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SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 11

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Newcomers and veterans ready for men’s and women’s basketball action in the World University Games, the second largest international tournament to the Olympics. “I think it brought me a lot of confidence to know I can play with skilled international players. I’m excited to be here with my team, contributing what I learned,” she says. “We are going to have a really good year and everybody is committed and into it. We all believe we can do well this year.” Veterans like Kerfoot will serve an important role as team leaders and mentors to the incoming freshman joining the team. In addition to last season’s offensive leader Kerfoot, SU returns eight letter winners and welcomes its largest group of newcomers since Bonvicini took over

the program, with a mix of seven true freshmen and transfers. The Redhawks also will look to senior Talisa Rhea, who was an All-Pacific 12 performer at Oregon State before transferring to SU last year as a major contributor. After redshirting last season, she has had the opportunity to gel with the coaches and her teammates to better prepare and provide veteran experience to the lineup. As for the men’s team, since the arrival of Dollar as head coach in April 2009, the program has won 28 games, including road victories at Oregon State, Utah and Virginia, as well as wins over Oregon State, Weber State and Fresno State at KeyArena at Seattle Center. Height-wise, Coach Dollar has put together his biggest team for the 2001–12 season, with eight players on the roster that are at least 6’7” tall. Senior Aaron Broussard believes that the new players will

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With the men’s and women’s basketball seasons just getting underway, both teams are readying for a strong campaign ahead. Under the tutelage of third-year head coaches Joan Bonvicini, for the women, and Cameron Dollar, for the men, the teams have added depth to their rosters. They also have the skills of veterans who are readying for an impressive run in Division I action. Coach Bonvicini’s squad will look to the veteran leadership of senior Elle Kerfoot to anchor the lineup. Kerfoot brings a new edge and skill set to her game this season. This past summer she was named to the Canadian Developmental National Team and played

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“We are going to have a really good year and everybody is committed and into it. We all believe we can do well this year.”

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Back in the Game | By Jason Behenna and Diana Chamorro, ’11

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AT H L E T I C S

ELLE KERFOOT, SENIOR

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FOR TICKETS AND SEASON SCHEDULE, VISIT WWW.GOSEATTLEU.COM. make an immediate contribution to the squad. “We have a lot of new guys that bring a lot to the table, with more depth in areas than in the past couple of seasons,” he says. “With the athletic players we have now, we are going to pick up the pace and I think we can make that system work.” Broussard, along with seniors Cervante Burrell and Eric Wallace, a transfer from DePaul, will give the team the leadership and direction it needs to be successful. Juniors Gavin Gilmore and Chad Rasmussen and sophomore Sterling Carter, the other two letter winners from the 2010–11 campaign, are back as well. The team also will benefit from the availability of Clarence Trent and Jarell Flora, who did not play last season, but were able to practice with the team and become familiar with Coach Dollar’s system.

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“We have a lot of new guys that bring a lot to the table... With the athletic players we have now, we are going to pick up the pace...” AARON BROUSSARD, SENIOR

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SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 13

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14 / Feeling Good

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SU’s new Fitness Center takes wellness to the next level

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THE WELLNESS EXPERIENCE At the opening of Seattle University’s new William F. Eisiminger Fitness Center, President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., told a rapt audience just how important a fitness center is in creating a full and rich educational experience. “The fitness center was the piece missing from providing that great college experience,” Father Sundborg said. Just as the Chapel of St. Ignatius is the spiritual center of campus and the Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons the intellectual heart, the fitness center fulfills the wellness part of the equation. Wellness is integral to SU’s commitment of “educating the whole person.” In addition to a first-class fitness facility, the university offers a host of programs and services, from counseling and assistance in mental health matters to healthy food choices and more, that promote wellness. Read on to learn more about how our students, faculty, staff and alumni stay fit and find balance.

STORIES BY ANNIE BECKMANN / PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 15

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alking into Seattle University’s new fitness center, you get the feeling this is anything but your typical gymnasium or dimly lit weight room. The high ceilings, wall of windows that flood the space with natural light and the impressive—and diverse—array of

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New William F. Eisiminger Fitness Center offers first-class fitness experience

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The fitness center is equipped with a slew of weight lifting and body strengthening equipment.

the latest and greatest workout machines signal this is a 21st-century fitness facility. The shiny and new two-story center, officially named the William F. Eisiminger Fitness Center in honor of alumnus and generous supporter Bill Eisiminger, adjoins the existing Connolly Center (read about the man behind the name on page 19). The fitness center significantly enhances the overall educational experience. As the Chapel of St. Ignatius is the spiritual center and the Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons the intellectual heart, the fitness center responds to students’ need for a top-notch workout and wellness space. The fitness center reflects the marked transformation

of the physical campus in the past 10-plus years. Beyond promoting health, fitness and overall wellness, the center is the largest investment in campus fitness in more than 40 years. Executive Vice President Timothy Leary underscores this point when he calls the new facility “a significant investment in student life.” “With a campus fitness center like this we provide an anchor point for our students,” says Derek Hottell, director of university recreation. “They become happier, healthier and lead more successful lives.” Early reviews on the center, which officially opened in late September, are full of raves. Visitors working out on the treadmills or elliptical machines on the second floor get a scenic view as the fitness center looks out onto Championship Field. There were 2,700 visitors in the first five days of opening. Freshmen roommates Cayla Olson of Spokane and Noah Campbell of Park City, Utah, are especially impressed with the new cardio equipment. “It’s so high-tech compared with anything I’ve experienced,” Olson says. “This is the nicest gym I’ve ever been to,” adds Campbell, who typically works out five days a week. The new center has nearly $300,000 in cardio machines and strength equipment. The 21,000-square-foot center has loads of distinctive features, from the rain garden outdoors to the soothing sage-colored mind-body studio with its hardwood floor

“With a campus fitness center like this, we provide an anchor point for our students.” Derek Hottell, director, university recreation and dimmable lights, suitable for yoga and other fitness classes. Two big group exercise rooms provide the space

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And of course, who wouldn’t want to watch the Redhawk soccer teams defeat our opponents while going for a run on one of the new treadmills.” The way Hottell sees it, the fitness center is an important element in SU’s commitment to educating the whole person. “The Chapel of St. Ignatius is the embodiment of the education of the spirit. The Lemieux Library is the embodiment of the education of the mind,” he says. “Now we have the Eisiminger Fitness Center, which represents the education of the body.” The wellness movement that’s unfolding at the nation’s colleges and universities indicates the timing is right for a facility like this on SU’s campus, Hottell points out. Deb Hinchey, SU’s director of wellness and health promotion, agrees. A spring 2011 assessment by the American College Health Association indicates 58 percent of Seattle University students do moderate-intensity cardio and aerobic exercise for at least 30 minutes one to four times a week, Hinchey says. More than 40 students and three professional staff members are on hand during regular hours to assist visitors, provide quick tutorials on the different equipment and continued on page 18

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for salsa and spin classes. There’s also a dedicated space for martial arts. The cardio level includes enough electrical outlets to accommodate as many as 120 pieces of equipment. The weight lifting area has nearly doubled in size. One unique feature that isn’t found in many fitness centers is artwork, which is displayed throughout the building. For those who want some distraction while working up a sweat—and don’t want to be too far from technology—the fitness center has it covered. There are several large flat screen TVs high against the front wall on the second level, allowing visitors to get their cardio workout on a treadmill, recumbent bike or elliptical while catching up on the news, a sitcom or reality TV show. There are also viewing screens on several of the machines and plug-ins for handheld music players. “I love the fact that I no longer have to wait to use an elliptical or treadmill during what’s considered the building’s peak times, lunch and afternoons,” says Leilani Balais, assistant director of Alumni Relations. “There are a variety of machines that allow you to diversify your workouts, both on the cardio floor and the weight floor.

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Technology and fitness coexist in harmony as visitors can get a good workout and catch up on news and television shows courtesy of the wall of flat screen TVs.

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SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 17

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make sure you have the correct athletic shoes for the machines—that means no ballet flats or flip flops. For the weight lifters, they’ll also spot you. Alumnus Ernie Dunston, ’64, was one of the first to use the fitness center. Dunston, a former member of the SU Alumni Board of Governors and SU basketball player, had worked out at Connolly for longer than he could recall. “This is great,” Dunston says. “Bill Eisiminger must be very proud.” Another plum is that the fitness center achieved a gold ranking from the Leadership in Energy and

“It’s so high-tech compared with anything I’ve experienced.” Cayla Olson, ’15 Environmental Design (LEED). The LEED Gold status “reflects the university’s widely recognized commitment to sustainable practices and green building design,” Vice President Leary notes. For those who use the facility, Hottell hopes different habits will form. He encourages visitors to try things they’ve never done before such as an exercise class or a new workout regimen. “We want people to have the opportunity to try new forms of recreation and we hope through this process, they discover positive recreational pursuits to serve

ONLINE CONTESTT Weighty Matters Think you can guess how many an ny pounds of strength equipment are in the he new William Willi F. F Eisiminger Fitness Center? (Think free weights as well as the iron you pump on weight machines; skip the heft of the cardio machines.) The prize is one, three-month pass (worth $90) to the center. Enter your guesses in the comments section under the Fitness Center story online at www. seattleu.edu/magazine/. (Open to alumni only. Entrant who comes closest to the total pounds without going over will win. Be sure to include full name and contact info in your entry. One entry per person.) them throughout their lives,” he says. Alvin Sturdivant, assistant vice president for Student Development, emphasizes that navigating stress—both physical and emotional—is part of the student experience that can’t be overlooked. He sees the fitness center as a way to expand strategies for greater self-care. “The habits our students develop now are likely to be held for a lifetime, whether bad or good,” he says. “We’re not saying, ‘What you’re doing is unhealthy,’ we’re just giving them a different perspective on it.”

The first floor of the fitness center is home to an impressive collection of weights and weight machines.

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The Man Behind the Name Alumnus Bill Eisiminger embraces fitness center that bears his name Bill Eisiminger at his home in Seattle.

During a workout at the William F. Eisiminger Fitness Center, you have to feel gratitude toward the person whose name is on the building. When Bill Eisiminger, ’67, ’73 MEd, toured the gleaming new facility, he said, “This is the realization of a dream not just for me but for our students.” The dynamic donor and member of the Board of Regents is both bold and playful, a lot like the physical education coach he was in the late 1960s and early ’70s for elementary students at Holy Rosary School in West Seattle. Long before he entered SU in the early 1960s, Eisiminger watched the campus and surrounding neighborhood go through plenty of changes. He grew up just steps from campus in a Madison Street home that’s now the site of the International House of Pancakes. Today, he lives not far from the university in a lively high-rise retirement community. It’s here that Eisiminger reaches into one of his closets so he can share a point of tremendous pride—a copy of an author-autographed book, Jimi Hendrix, Voices From Home by Mary Willix. He flips through the hardback until he can find the pages that highlight one of his prized youthful memories. An accomplished bass and saxophone player and singer, Eisiminger got to know the legendary Hendrix in English class at Seattle’s Garfield High School. They frequently talked music and jammed together with other young musicians.

HOURS Monday–Thursday: 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday: 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday: Noon to 9 p.m.

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For more information on the fitness center and to purchase a membership (alumni memberships available quarterly or annually), visit www.seattleu.edu/recreation.

As an educator, he taught PE, science and reading at Holy Rosary for five years and became a vice principal there before he returned to SU to get his master’s in education in 1973. He then became principal at Holy Family Parish School in Kirkland. By 1980, he had it in mind to take a year off from his work at Holy Family. He started to buy real estate and he purchased so much residential and commercial property that he found he couldn’t straddle two careers. Soon Eisiminger became president and owner of Barcelona Enterprises Inc. Eisiminger says he has always had a passion for athletics and fitness and recognized the aging Connolly Center just wasn’t serving the fitness needs of today’s students.

“This is the realization of a dream not just for me but for our students.” Bill Eisiminger, ’67, ’73, commenting on the new fitness center “It definitely was time,” he says, describing his motivation for contributing to the fitness center. Then, nearly three years ago, his life took a big turn. His first notion something was wrong came when he regained consciousness after he ran into a half dozen parked vehicles near campus. Eisiminger had no clue what happened. The next morning he was at the Chapel of St. Ignatius for Mass and a Regents meeting and was having trouble organizing his thoughts and putting words together. Before long, he was in an ambulance on the way to Swedish Medical Center. Doctors told him he suffered a series of seven strokes. The way Eisiminger sees it, one life ended and another began that day. Today, he’s on the road to recovery. Five days a week he is in physical therapy, hopeful about regaining his strength and mobility. And he’s looking forward to using the fitness center soon. Read more about Bill and see photos from the opening at www.seattleu.edu/magazine.

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eating well SU’s food options are healthful and plentiful

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he new fitness center is good for the body. But an important element of the living well and being well puzzle is what you eat. And at Seattle University, the options for healthy food—and more importantly, good eats that are good for the environment, too—are impressive. So much so that in Sierra Club’s recent “Cool Schools” survey, SU was one of only two schools out of 118 nationwide to score a nine out of 10 for its environmentally friendly offerings.

“We’re here to serve customers. We’re not here to preach and prevent them from eating what they want.” Buzz Hofford, resident district manager, Bon Appétit Management Company Buzz Hofford, resident district manager for Bon Appétit Management Company, SU’s food-service provider, says it’s a great example of how Bon Appétit and SU partner for positive change. Think back to almost any university’s cafeteria food options of a few decades ago: canned fruit with high fructose corn syrup, frozen vegetables, loads of starches and mystery meats disguised in sauces laced with monosodium glutamate and a heavy hand on the salt shaker. The demand for healthy foods and a greater interest in where it comes from has translated into food beyond the standard lunchroom fare, says Hofford. “The salad bar has always been a hallmark of our operation. Volumes have increased consistently year to year,” he says. “You find a lot of canned and frozen foods on most college salad bars. Ours are all fresh.” Then there’s the “frugal option,” a Bon Appétit meal that’s under $5, but still healthy. “It used to be a deep-fried food. Now it’s a fully balanced vegan meal: a plate piled high with steamed, fresh vegetables, an interesting grain like bulgur or

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quinoa and protein-rich legumes such as scarlet runner, favas or black-eyed peas,” Hofford says. “It’s super healthy, inexpensive and truly delicious.” Just 10 years ago, vegetarians and vegans were a small minority on campus. That has changed, with vegetarian options often outselling their meaty counterparts. Consumer awareness and diverse dietary needs have impacted menus and labeling as well as purchasing decisions. Students today want to know more about what goes into what they eat. Ethically sourced coffee, milk free of artificial bovine growth hormones, cage-free eggs that are Certified Humane and “Farm to Fork” produce harvested within 150 miles of campus are just a few of Bon Appétit’s commitments to its customers. “We’re here to serve customers. We’re not here to preach and prevent them from eating what they want,” Hofford says. “But it’s also a time in their lives when they can start to learn about ethical food supply chains, where their food comes from.” Hofford spends a lot of time educating students on Bon Appétit’s mission. He meets regularly with representatives of student government and the Residence Hall Association, not just to pitch the Bon Appétit mission, but also to solicit feedback. “Students are our most important customers,” he says. “When they’re happy, I’m happy.”

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Hungry diners line up for food service at Campion Hall.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF LEMIEUX LIBRARY, SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

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One of the most popular—and colorful—food options at SU is the salad bar, chock full of more than just standard salad-bar fare.

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The serving line at Bellarmine Hall.

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Techie by Day,

YOGI FOR LIFE Yoga passageway to wellness for Microsoft worker

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hen George Makarenko was just 9 years old, he got his first introduction to yoga and was well on his way to a life of wellness. Over summer break he discovered a small Hatha yoga book in his family’s library and spent the next three months practicing postures and breathing techniques. His high-level interest in yoga continued into the next school year when he was able to demonstrate his newfound abilities—including holding his breath under water and swimming across an Olympic-size pool. Though yoga was his newfound passion, it would be years later before he would fully understand the meaning behind the art. “Yoga has several aspects to it, all of which lead an individual inward and toward the center, making him/her stronger, more balanced and energized,” he says. Every couple of months, he leads a four-day yesplus workshop (at SU and other Seattle-area locations) based on the Art of Living philosophies of Sri Sri Ravi Shankar. The workshops aim to create more awareness about a healthy and stress-free way of life. “Art of Living helped me discover that yoga includes much more than holding my breath. …” he says. “Yoga, breathing techniques and meditation get you out of your head. We also blend volunteer service into the workshop so participants can sink even deeper into the experience.” In the fall, workshop participants took part in a service project with Somali refugees. Last summer, Makarenko joined 50,000 others to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Art of Living Foundation with a two-day festival of world culture and peace in Berlin, Germany. What keeps him on this healthful path? “Seeing my students shine with smiles and enthusiasm

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at the end of each course is the ultimate satisfaction.” Makarenko, a 2011 graduate of SU’s Master of Software Engineering program, also derives satisfaction from his work at Microsoft. When Makarenko first came to the United States from Russia, he was a high school exchange student who landed in the town of Castle Rock in Cowlitz County, Wash.

“Yoga, breathing techniques and meditation get you out of your head.” George Makarenko, ’11 MSE Fifteen years later, the program manager at Microsoft smiles when he thinks about how far he has come and where he is today—developing Web services to enable interactive support communities to be creative. Some of Makarenko’s areas of expertise include Web services aimed at self-help community forum experiences for Windows, Office and Internet Explorer. He had found his way to SU’s College of Science and Engineering when he recognized his career might call for stronger skills in software development. SU proved the best option, he says. “With its evening classes, the MSE program is tailored to people who are working for companies like Microsoft and Boeing,” he says. “Over the three years I was in the MSE program, I grew technically on my job at Microsoft and that was important for me.” To find out more about George Makarenko’s upcoming yesplus yoga workshops and SU classes, visit http://secure.artofliving.org/.

Read the full story on George and his work at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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George Makarenko, ’11, strikes a pose.

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SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 23

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Staying Well Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) provides valuable resources to students on issues of wellness and mental health

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t’s as though she’s helping students learn to fly, says Kim Caluza, director of Seattle University’s Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), when she describes what it’s like to counsel students as they steer past rough spots in their lives. “We’re good at knowing what a student is experiencing. We can get them connected so they can grow their roots at SU,” she says. “It’s all about helping them find the resources so they can navigate and connect.” Wellness plays an integral role in many aspects of the overall college experience. Like a net below a trapeze artist, the numerous support services of CAPS provide students with added security when they falter. “We recommend students get in to see us before they have a crisis,” says Caluza, adding that a student typically can see a therapist within two weeks and CAPS offers urgent care appointments every weekday. In addition, quarterly campus screenings address issues around alcohol and drugs, anxiety, depression and eating. During summer orientation, Caluza makes a presentation to parents and students so they know more about the services of CAPS and about mental health in general. Student leaders, including resident assistants, receive basic training in mental health issues so they can develop good antennae, gauge how to respond to a situation or crisis and when to refer fellow students to CAPS. “I tell our staff that students often just need a place to land,” Caluza says. “When students come here, they get to be real and tell us what they’re anxious about. They can be comfortable and safe in this space. Here, it’s confidential and private.” Relationships, depression and anxiety are the leading issues that motivate students to seek counseling from one of the six licensed psychologists at CAPS. CAPS serves eight or nine percent of the student population from year to year. That amounts to more than 3,400 appointments annually. Students may participate in individual or couple therapy or group sessions. CAPS also offers referrals for community-based mental health resources. The fall crunch time for CAPS has passed now. Late October and early November—when students are adjusting to campus life as well as their first exams of the school year—can be a busy time for counselors. Another crunch comes in May, when finals and end-ofthe-year projects loom large.

Caluza emphasizes SU’s deep commitment to the fundamental Jesuit value cura personalis (a Latin term that translates into care of the whole person). That commitment has an impact on current students and leaves its imprint on alumni as well. “When they get ready to graduate, our students talk about their connectedness and the Seattle University values,” she says. “They’re very serious about what they will contribute to global and local communities and how they’ll make a difference.”

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CAPS GROUP SESSIONS Here are some of the quarterly group counseling sessions offered through CAPS. Deeper Connections Positive support and feedback with topics based on what students bring to the group A Group for Every Body For students with body image and eating concerns Flow For women in recovery from body image and eating issues Building Better Relationships For students’ relationship challenges with romantic partners, friends, parents, siblings or roommates Making It Work. Live, Love, Laugh For couples in committed relationships Not Alone For individuals who are coping with depression

Man Talk Male students learn about themselves, their peers and masculinity For more information on these and other services, visit www.seattleu.edu/caps/. For faculty and staff, there’s GuidanceResources (www.guidanceresources.com), which offers an employee assistance program for counseling, legal and financial information.

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hat people do to wriggle out of their woes and banish the winter blahs and blues says plenty about their creative strengths. Just ask any number of Seattle University folks what they do when they’re fogged in by a funk. Inventive? Playful? You bet. Sometimes a little surprising, too. Who would think a pair of slippers, a car radio, a

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load of clean clothes fresh from the dryer or a sketchpad might have the ability to lift one’s spirits? We asked several members of the campus community—from faculty and staff to students—what they do to bust the blues. Their responses were especially heartening with the dark and chilly days of winter upon us.

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WINTER BLUES JACKIE HELFGOTT, who chairs the Criminal Justice department, seeks balance—and exercise—to beat the blues. She runs. A lot. “… About 35–50 miles a week, marathons, usually two full marathons a year,” she says. “The other thing I like to do is draw. I’m part of the Urban Sketchers of Seattle. I try to go out sketching whenever I can. I love doing that.” AMY LANE, gift and data integrity coordinator for University Advancement, wears something blue to thwart the blues. “After a rough day, I’ll take a moment to myself, let out a deep sigh of relief and put on my comfy blue slippers,” Lane says. “…They just have a way of making me feel better.” Men’s basketball coach CAMERON DOLLAR counts his blessings when he’s feeling down. “I literally make a list of all the things I can be thankful for,” he says. “That always works for me.” And, he adds, “I’ll watch NFL football, because I love football.” ERIN LANE, ’12, president of the REDZONE, likes his lattes. “When I’m feeling the blues I like to whip myself up a latte on my espresso machine and get some tunes going on my surround sound and chill out, listen and sip away,” he says. Sitting quietly intensifies being in the dumps for SUE HOGAN, director of marketing and communications for the School of Theology and Ministry.

The thought of Gene Kelly dancing around d lamp posts in a downpour and singing that 1950s classic “Singin’ in the Rain” prompts her to sing out loud when nobody’s around. JANI MEDEIROS, administrative assistant at Albers who is pursuing a master’s in professional accounting, lifts her spirits in an unconventional way. All is right with her world when she follows a ritual of a little-known saint named Hunna, whose Saint Day happens to fall on her birthday. “She is the patron saint of laundry workers,” Medeiros says. “I like to fold laundry. It relaxes me,” she says. “If I’m really upset, I’ve even had the urge to wash clean clothes just so I could refold them. But I wouldn’t because it’s a waste of water, and besides, my husband would kill me.” Seattle University Librarian JOHN POPKO escapes by, well, escaping with music. “When I get the blues my first reaction is to pout and feel sorry for myself, until it eventually goes away. Then I like to listen to a little Patsy Cline or George Jones. There’s nothing like a heart-broken country song to help put one’s own problems in perspective.” KEVIN MAIFELD, professor and director of the MFA Arts Leadership program, sticks with what he knows. “I go see a play or a musical I know I’ll really like,” he says. “I try to get into the theater. It always works for me to take my mind off things. JAKE DIAZ, vice president for Student Development, has a bevy of tricks to ward off the blues, including reflecting on the many things he’s grateful for, listening to calming piano music, taking a walk and fishing.

Read more about how SU folks beat the blues at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Rising to the Challenge Together

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Thanks to our generous alumni and friends, Seattle University is well positioned to meet the challenges of educating students as leaders for a just and humane world. This year with help from our Board of Trustees we set out to connect with alumni through our “600+ Challenge.” We are especially grateful to the more than 920 new alumni donors who participated and I am proud to share that alumni from every decade since the 1960s gave their first gifts to the university through this campaign. We also received an enthusiastic response to the launch of the Seattle University Youth Initiative. Alumni and friends are excited to join with us in this long-term commitment to partner with parents, the Seattle School District, the City of Seattle, foundations, faith communities and more than 30 community organizations to help children of Seattle succeed in school and in life. Altogether, donors contributed $19.8 million in support of Seattle University students during the 2010–11 fiscal year. In addition to funding undergraduate and graduate scholarships within all of the colleges and schools, we are pleased to report these milestones: The completion of the William F. Eisiminger Fitness Center created a new home for recreational sports and fitness for all students. The new Pigott Family Endowment for the Arts in the College of Arts & Sciences launched a residency program giving students opportunities to engage with outstanding visiting artists. Our Redhawk pride continues to grow as Athletics surpassed 1,000 donors for the first time.

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Foundations granted record amounts for strategic program initiatives with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Henry Luce Foundation, Raikes Family Foundation, Carpenter Foundation and the PGA Foundation.

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We remain dedicated to enhancing academic excellence, embracing our Catholic Jesuit tradition and educating students in service to our society. Thank you for your gifts in support of the students, faculty and all who are part of this community.

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M Mary K Kay M McFadden F dd Vice President, University Advancement

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THANKS TO YOU

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PRESIDENT’S CLUB

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*Deceased

The names in the following honor roll reflect alumni, parents, faculty, staff, friends, corporations and foundations who generously contributed $1,000 or more to Seattle University during the fiscal year, July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011. DIAMOND CIRCLE ($100,000 AND ABOVE) James Degel and Jeanne Berwick Bill Eisiminger Thomas and Katia Healy Elizabeth and Richard Hedreen August Hoba, Stella G. Hoba, Donald W. Hoba and Frederick A. Hoba Mark and Cindy Pigott David and Sandra Sabey Howard and Sheri Schultz Jim and Janet Sinegal Stevens and Tricia Trainer Betty Woods Ann Wyckoff Anonymous (1)

PLATINUM CIRCLE ($25,000–$99,999) Nicolaos and Athena Arvanitidis John S. Banchero, Jr. and Linda Banchero Maureen and Joel Benoliel Robert and Mary Bertch Cynthia and Alan Boyce Chris and Liz Browning Bill and Paula Clapp Kelly and Laurie Corr Lucio and Marta Dalla Gasperina James Eblen Thomas and Susan Ellison Marcia and Pat Halligan Jim and Timmie Hollomon Steve and Cathy Beth Hooper Hon. Donald and Lynda Horowitz Helen M. Jolly Robie Livingstone Holli and Edgar Martinez Frederick Brandauer and Marie Materi John and Ginny Meisenbach James and Gaye Pigott Joan Razore Connie and Steven Rogel Theiline and Douglas Scheumann Estate of Olga R. Shen Estate of Elaine Smith Elbridge Stuart III and Debra Stuart Richard and Karen Tonelli Patrick and Mary Welch Irene and James Worminghaus Anonymous (2)

PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE ($10,000–$24,999) Joel and Misty Andersen Hugh Bangasser and Lucy Homans Gubby and Gillian Barlow Carol Ann (Conroy) Barnickol and Karl Barnickol

Carl and Renee Behnke J. Nicholas Bez, Jr. Clarice Bocek Lisa S. Brown Harry and Pauline Buhler Suzanne Burke Alan and Bonnie Cashman Alan Chaffee and Mary Raschko Sally Chambers Frank and Marilyn Clement Theodore and Patricia Collins John and Judy Curran Betty and Marty DeLaurenti Mr. and Mrs. James A. Dunnam James Durigan* Richard and Maude Ferry Janet Fisher Joseph and Terri Gaffney Ken and Lisa Geisen Julie Hungar Henry and Mary Ann James Rick Jones Carolyn Kelly Anne and Lee Kilcup David Kitchell Rhoady and Jeanne Marie Lee Maureen Lee and Mark Busto Paula Lustbader Mary Kay McCaw Steve and Ashlie McConnell Bruce McLeod Alison and David Miller Glen and Alison Milliman William and Lyanne Monkman Larry and Mary Jo Nejasmich Nick and Sheila Nesland Grace Nordhoff and Jonathan Beard Jack Olive Bijan and Alice Pakzad Winston Pavitt Susan Payne Mary Lee Peters Tom and Brooke Pigott Riley and Nancy Pleas Chuck and Nancy Porter Marilyn and Thomas Price Rick and Jennifer Redman Mark and Sheri Robison Stuart and Lee Rolfe Jeff and Lara Sanderson Carlos and Deborah Santana Steven Scalzo Kathleen and Thomas Schafer John and Elaine Shephard Rev. Dr. Virginia and Gerald Sparling Estate of Claire Suguro Douglas Tellefson Jon and Cindy Tellefson Ruth Tressel

Catherine Walker and David Fuqua Thomas Wright and Alexandra Brouwer-Wright Martha Wyckoff Ann Wyman David Wyman, Jr. and Linda Wyman Deehan Wyman Virginia Wyman Anonymous (6)

GOLD CIRCLE ($5,000–$9,999) Martha and Thomas Anfang Claire Angel Sanjay and Catherine Batra Walt and Rita Braithwaite Alan and Kelise Burk Bill and Phyllis Campbell Ross and Julie Case Dorene Centioli-McTigue and Terence McTigue Joseph and Lila Champoux Richard and Suzan Chavez Brenda Christensen and Thomas Barry Alfred Clise Julie and Dan Coleman Michael and Kathy Collins Patrick and Jean Corr John and Mary Jo Costello Leo and Carol Costello Patrick and Paula Costello Mark and Julie DeLaurenti Rebecca and Paul deVille Shane and Katie Dir Elizabeth Dofredo-Murakami Craig and Stephanie Duncan LeeAnn Farrell Patricia and Victor Feltin Elizabeth Fenn Mike Foley and Mari Power Alana Fornoni Cay Fortune and John Shimer Linda and Bradley Fowler Pierre and Jacqueline Gehlen Michael and Kristy Gibson Allan Golston Kathleen and Keith Hallman Jack and Myra Hanover Charles R. and Virginia C. Harmon Buffie Hebert Jim Kenyon Hank McGee and Victoria Kill Colleen Kinerk Michael and Jean Krsak Rosalyn and Patrick Kwan, Sr. Thomas and Agnes Lee Steven D. Looney and Dana L. Frank Donald Luby Henry Mao

May McCarthy Jim* and Lynn Merlino Furman and Susan Moseley Grace Elaine Munzer Lawrence Oberto Marlys and Ralph Palumbo Rosemary Peterson B. Raymond and Linda Russo Mimi and Gary Schulze James and Janice Scott Boyd and Mikki Sharp Janene Siers and Joseph Ittes Lilyan and Donald Snow John and Rose Southall Clyde and Karen Summerville Mike Templeton Ezra and Mulugeta Teshome Kip and Claudia Toner Barbara and Orrin Vincent, Jr. Vernon and Mary Williams Sheila Wyckoff-Dickey and Charles Dickey Judith Yeakel Anonymous (3)

SILVER CIRCLE ($2,500–$4,999) David and Patricia Allen Robert and Margaret Alston Robert and Clodagh Ash Ray and Edith Aspiri Kent and Dana Bailey Dayton and Jeanne Balinbin Arthur and Mary Fran Barkshire Millard and Martha Battles, Jr. Douglas and Lynne Bevis Paul and Lisa Bialek Veronica and Lawrence Bilder Sheila and Byron Bishop Robert and Susan Blethen Jack and Maralyn Blume David and Barbara Boerner Paula Boggs John and Fran Bradley Hon. Bobbe and Jonathan Bridge Lisa Brodoff and Lynn Grotsky Maria Cayetano and Capt. Trevor Cobb Robert Chang and Catheryne Nguyen David B. Chow Thomas and Barbara Clerkin Melanie Curtice and Jill Mehner Karen and Thomas Cusick III Marilyn Dennehy Dick and Chris DiCerchio James Doucett Melissa and Louis Dugan John and Marlene Durbin Sheila Edwards-Lienhart and Ross Lienhart

SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 27

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Anne and Steve Enquist Virgil and Sunni Fassio Brent Fernyhough Jim Fitzsimmons John Garner and Lizbeth Cardwell Scott Grimm Rob Harris Jack Harvey Matthew and Jessica Hooper John and Judith Hopcroft Ronald Hosogi Michael Hosterman Mitzi Hu Steve and Elizabeth Huebner Sanjay and Seema Jejurikar Kent Johnson James and Dianne Jorgensen Estate of Jim Keyes Kevin and Janice Krieger George Krsak Mimi Krsak Michael Kucha and Tammy Roe Donald Leuthold Jeffry and Andrea Levy Daniel and Julie Little Dave and Mary Anne Madsen Jack and Mary McCann Thomas and Karen McCormick John and Catherine McDowall Michael and Nancie McKay Emmanuel and Darlena Medeiros Christopher Meyer Sheldon Midgett John Miller, Jr. and Marlene Miller Matthew and Anne Moran Dan and Joyce Murphy Masakazu Nakamura James and Jill Navone Edward O'Brien and Terryl Hackett O'Brien John and Jeanne O'Brien Charles and Doris (Cockrill) O'Connor Penny and Bruce Oleszczuk Mark Olson and Renee Korda Michael Patterson Sarah Perry and Bill Ramos Tony and Patty Philippsen Joseph Phillips and Mary Sebek Mark and Andria Pinkowski Christopher and Katheryn Porter Andy and Carrie Read Katherine and Scott Renschler David Rothrock and Kirsten Johnson Sharon Sakamoto and Ron Takemura Paul and Debra Sauvage James and Shannon Schneider Mary and Robert Sepulveda Julie Shapiro and Shelly F. Cohen David Shoultz Jennifer Sik Adrian Smith and Deb Waldal Joseph Straus and Mary Shima Erin Swezey and Tim Leary Gerard (Jerry) Tardie Terrance Thomas II and Sandra Thomas

Phillip and Jeanne Thompson Vincent and Christine Tobkin Jerry and Gail Viscione Tim Ward and Cheryl Uyeji Leonard Weber Susan Weihrich Bill Weis and Marilyn Roy Ken Whalen John Wilkins Charlie Winters Kenwood Youmans Robert Yunker Anonymous

BRONZE CIRCLE ($1,000–$2,499) Harry and Grace Acuna Susan K. Ahearn Janet Ainsworth and Michael Reed Stuart and Fay Allen Guy and Katherine Alloway Hon. Robert and Sarah Alsdorf Greg and Marybeth Alwood Carl and Tami Amala Jason and Tamara Amala David and Concetta Anastasi Carol and Robert Anderson Loren and June Arnett Joaquin Avila Dawn and Richard Bangert Lorraine Bannai Ryan Barnes Karen Barta Mary Bartholet Lisa Barton Sarah and James Bee Richard Beers II Craig and Victoria Beetham Len Beil and Stella Ley Jane Beno and Michael Edwards Anders M. Berg, Jr. Diane and Rick Betts Mary Helen and David Bever John and Karen Bianchi Douglas and Beth Biette Judith and Donald Billings Mary Alice and Don Binder Richard Bird, Jr. and Laurie Prince John and Victoria Bjorkman Don and Mindy Black Robert and Cindy Blais Joseph and Linda Blaschka Verle Bleese Alfred and Jan Blue Bruce and Ann Blume Joanna Plichta Boisen and Matthew Boisen James and Caroline Boitano Joan Bonvicini William and Marguerite Borgert Dora and Angelo Borracchini Richard and Margaret Bossi Harlan Boyd James Boyd Stephen Boyd

Brendan Boyle and Sheila Harrington Pamela Bradburn Colleen and Paul Brajcich Carolyn and Jeff Brandsema Steve Brashear Robert and Eileen Brennan Jeffrey Brennan Sean and Gretchen Brennan Rev. Robert* and Berlena Brock Stephen and Jennifer Brooks Joseph and Maureen Brotherton Colleen and Guy Brown Patricia and Christian Buchsel Gary and Diane Buckley Tim Burner and Camille Gearhart Mark Burnett Dane Butswinkas Frank and Carlene Buty J. Kevin Cahill Deborah I. Cain Sharon and Neil Callahan Katherine Camacho Carr and F. Dean Carr Eric Candell and William Powell

Christopher Canlas Kathleen and Charles Cannon Thomas and Cynthia Captain Bridget Carney Geraldine Carolan Gary and Christin Carpenter Hon. Terrence and Diane Carroll Diane Castanes Seth and Susan Chalmers Chester and Sue Chen Kristin Cheney Michael and Marilyn Cherry Martha Choe Sloan Chong and Ted Koehn Annette Clark John Clarkson and Elizabeth Gilchrist Chris and Rebecca Clements Susan Clifford Jamroski and Gregor Jamroski Dr. Pauline Cline Carol Cochran Rebecca and Ariye Cohen Ronald and Guadalupe Cohn Martin and Jennifer Coles

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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PRESIDENT’S CLUB, CONTINUED

PAT WELCH, ’69, AND MARY HERMANN WELCH, ’69, ‘76 / PRESIDENT’S CLUB Pat Welch and Mary Herman Welch on why they support the College of Science and Engineering’s undergraduate research program: “We believe research is a critical element of the educational experience for science and engineering students. We’re supporting the summer undergraduate research program in the College of Science and Engineering because this opportunity keeps students engaged in their fields over the summer and helps prepare them for graduate school or a career in the industry.”

28 / Thanks to You

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Thomas and Judith Connor Dick and Bridget Cooley Richard and Amy Corbett Kerry Corr and Cameron Corr O. Casey Corr and Sally Tonkin Christopher and Caroline Corr Michael and Becky Costello Walter Cougan and Margaret Ganong John Coughlan Sr. Joyce Cox Miles and Anita Cramer Isiaah Crawford and Kent Korneisel Sharon and Art Crisera Marilyn Crone Calvin and Lois Crow Jose Cueto and Anita Prietto Bob and Grace Cumbow Paul Cummings Daniel and Cleo Cummins Stephen and Catherine Cummins Dick and Carol Cunningham John and Margaret Cunningham Barry and Leslie Dahl Paul and Lisa Dally Howard and Dolores Davis Michael Davy Marlene and Thomas DeCosta Mary Jo Dedomenico and Douglas Mollet Jennifer Deger Cesar P. and Rosario T. DeGracia Richard and Maureen DeGroot Fred DeKay and Kathleen Mohn-DeKay Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic Sidney DeLong and Jeanne Matthews Dennis DeMille Christina DeRosa and James McRedmond, Jr. Joe and Pat Desimone George and Judith Diefenbach John Dienhart and Jean Boler Steve and Shirley DiJulio Forrest and Mary Dill Gregory and Beverly Dimartino Victor* and Diana DiPietro Susan and Lawrence Donohue John and Diana Dougherty Mary Dixon Drake and David Drake Nancy and Thomas Drechsel Paul Dueffert Karin Dufault Monica and Martin Duke Robert and Robin Dullea James and Gaylé Duncan Charles Dupuis and Sandra Dupuis Jim and Janet Dwyer Curtis and Olga Dyckman Jim and Geri Dykeman James and Peggy Dynes Bogdan and Lea Dziurzynski Christopher and Carolyn Eagan Cully and Tracy Ecklund Frank and Vickie Edmondson, Jr. David and Deborah Ellenz Tom Elzey and Maggie Smith

Azita Emami and Massod Madani Bill and Mary Epping Elaine Ervin John and Susan Eshelman Kimberly and Carl Eshelman Pat and Barbara Fahey Steven Fantello Anne and Bob Farrell Juli Farris Maria Feliciano and W. Ross Honey Hal and Carolynn Ferris Sarah and Kevin Finney Jack and Carol Fisher John and Anne Fletcher Chris Flint Phyllismary Flood David Foley Parker and Carol Folse Dawn and Bruce Foster Jack Frank William and Deryn Fulton Yusaku Furuhashi* Theresa Gallant and Edward Bulchis Tom and Susan Galligan Marvel and Ty Galvin Mary Kendrick Gartshore and Peter Gartshore Christine and Steven Gerdes Frank and Philomena Glassy Peter Goldman and Martha Kongsgaard Mark Gould and Lisa Dobson Gould William Gould Jeffrey Grant and Mercedes Fernandez Ralph and Carolyn Graves Josef and Stephany Gray Jeffrey and Janiene Greenaway Holly Greenspoon Kirk Greiner and Jackie Cyphers Greiner Patrick and Nancy Grimm Peter Grimm and Dawn Winters Peter and Deanna Gumina Joseph and Nancy Guppy Pauline D. Guppy Reed and Wynne Guy Russell and Corinne Hagen Peg Haggerty Cary and Maureen Halpin Rick E. Hansen Bradley and Alison Harlow Michael Hart Jane and Sigfred Haugland Lt. Col. Kathleen Haugland Hinson Elizabeth and Matthew Hedlund Brian and Margaret Heeb T. Daniel and Muff Heffernan Nathan Heitzinger Sean and Sheila Henderson Paul Heneghan and Barbara Brady Heneghan Albert and Susan Hideshima Kenneth R. Hill Frederick Hines, Jr.

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PHOTO BY JOHN LOK

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JORDAN BELMONTE, ’10 /RECENT GRADUATES PRESIDENT’S CLUB Jordan Belmonte, a 2010 graduate of Seattle University’s Strategic Communications program in the College of Arts & Sciences, has a unique perspective on the importance of giving. During her four years at SU she worked as a Tell-aHawk phonathon caller, telling the story of the university while asking for contributions to support students and programs. “It was great to connect with all the alumni and work with people to fundraise for the school,” says Belmonte, who is a product marketing manager at Microsoft. As a donor herself, she supports the Public Relations Student Society of America club through contributions to the Student Activities Fund. The club was invaluable in providing support and tools, both personally and professionally, that she uses today in her work with Microsoft. “Giving is about supporting what you are passionate about,” she says. “You can contribute to the part of your SU experience that is most meaningful to you.” Ken and Pattie Hitch John and Christina Hogan Susan and Dr. James Hogan William and Sarah Hogan Paul Holland and Tana Lin Pam Hom John and Lisa Hooper Steve and Patricia Hopps Lorraine Hougham Joseph Howard, Jr. Estate of Robert W. Howard Lt. Col. (Ret.) Audrey Hudgins Peggy Hudson Jason Huff Gerald and Nan Huffman Jarlath Hume and Irene Mahler Thornton and Maud Humphries Katy and John Hunter Dianne and David Irwin

Charles Isaacson Susan and Charles Jackels Beth Jackson Lori Claudon James and Jeffrey James Margaret and James Jimenez Lyn Johnson and Mary Murphy-Johnson Truman Johnson Eric and Cathleen Johnson Hon. Charles and Dana Johnson William Jolly and Tiffany Gilkison Edward Jonson George and Eleanor Jonson Lily Kahng Danica Kaloper Dinesh KC Richard and June Kennedy Julia and Ali Khodabandeh

SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 29

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Bob and Mary Jo Kilian* Christian Kim and Nhi Pham Dale Kingman Dennis and Maureen Kinzel-Grubbs Eric and Jennifer Kirbach Charles Kirchner and Gillian Allard Laura Klingenstein Sean Klosterman W. H. Knight, Jr. and Susan Mask Diane Siderius-Kocer and Daniel Kocer Bruce and Carol Koch Stephen and Carol Koehler Christopher Koenigs and Jeanne Collopy Constance and Ray Krontz Daniel Kyler Marianne LaBarre Paul and Denise LaBissoniere Norma Jean and Eric LaRock Bob and Maxine Larson Steve and Carol Latimer Wayne and Bev Lauerman Jeanne Lavell Patrick and Cheryl Layman Franz and Grace Lazarus Joanne Lazzaretti Denise and Doug Leary Brody O'Harran and Lisa Lederer Mary and Michael Lee Robert and Jacqueline Lee Sharon Lee Y. C. Lee Steven Leirer and Linda Murray-Leirer Butch and Pamela Leonardson Maximus and Marylou Leone Joy and Thomas Lewis Russell and Raven Lidman Julie Lim and Lloyd Herman Molly Linden Shawn and Nicole Lipton Bob and Sarah Long Robert and Susan Lorbeski Arthur and Suzanne Lowell Terry Lucas Hon. Terence and Rev. Ann Lukens Clement Lum Glenn Lux Moses Luyombya Matthew Lyons Col. David and Patricia Maddock Paul Maffeo Hiro and Linda Makino Michael J. Malik, Sr. Trust J. Richard Manning William and Stephanie Mannion Mark and Terry Markuly Bill and Julie Marler Ed Maron Judd Marten Molly and Mike Martinez John and Marion Martinolich Randy and Kathryn Massengale Kara and Ken Masters Thomas and Jodi Matchett Susan and Jay Matt

PHOTO BY MIKE THEE

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PRESIDENT’S CLUB, CONTINUED

DAVID MADSEN, ’69, GAYATRI EASSEY, ’03 / FACULTY & STAFF GIVING Two Seattle University alums, David Madsen, associate professor of history, and Gayatri Eassey, associate director for external relations with Career Services, co-chaired this year’s Faculty and Staff Giving Campaign. This year, 44 percent of SU’s faculty and staff gave to the campaign, up from 40 percent last year. The success of the campaign speaks to the strengths of the university, its Jesuit values and dedication to providing a first-rate and well-rounded education to students. “The primary reason I agreed to serve as co-chair of the campaign is because this institution continually invests and reinvests not only in our students but also in our faculty and staff,” Eassey says. “As an employee it’s just my small way of being able to give back for what I’ve been given, both as a member of the staff but also as an alum. The tradition of giving back began when I graduated and it’s been reinforced by my opportunity to be here as a staff member.” Adds Madsen, “I was also a student here and a recipient of scholarship assistance. A lot of my giving to the university is directed to programs that I believe in very strongly. “Probably the majority of my giving goes to the library because I believe the library is the heart and soul of a university.”

Cecilia Matta and Casey Riske Holly Kirschke Marvin and Jonathan Marvin Gerry and Barbara Maurer James and Judith McAteer E. Walter McCarthy Andy and Jane McClure Mary McClymont Michael and Dorothy McCoy Mark and Lisa McDevitt Mary Kay McFadden Gordon McHenry, Jr. and Dorina Calderon-McHenry

Nancy and James McKenney William and Michelle McKinnon Marianne McKnight Brian and Peggy McMahon Joseph McMonigle Rev. Clinton McNair Joseph and Patricia McNamee Curly and Judy McNamee Stanley and Kathleen McNaughton Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. McTaggart Mary McWilliams Jeff and Debe Meder Theresa Scott Meditch

Scott and Wynne Mentink Jean Merlino David and Carlene Merlino Joan and Richard Merritt Chip and Leslie Meserole Scott Meyer Alexandra and Ross Mickel Agnieszka and Fabrice Miguel Steven and Rebecca Mikami Robert and Phyllis Miller James Miller and Gretchen Vogel Miller Jason Mills

30 / Thanks to You

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John Monahan Justin and Anne Moon Douglas and Janet Moore Kasia Benson Moore and Mark Moore John and Jerene Morford William and Barbara Morkill Winona and Royce Morrison Rev. Kathryn and Steven Morse Matt and Cristina Murphy Reid and Amelia Nabarrete Lt. Col. Lawrence and Louise Naehr Mike Nesteroff and Kimm Viebrock Victoria and David Nickinovich Maureen Niland Russell and Gwen Nomi Eric Nooyen Anne Northrup and Ralph Hawkins Terence and Laurel Oates Sean O'Brien John Ochs Roger and Sheron O'Connell Edward O'Connor Mark O'Donnell and Sandra O'Donnell Peter Offenbecher James and Marjorie O'Hara Susan Oistad Eileen Olson Ernst and Kathy Oosterhof John Ora Carol Orr Jane Orr James and Cynthia Oster Randall Pace Antonio Padilla Benjamin Page and Bryan Adamson Paul and Karyn Pasquier Jeffrey and Vikki Pearce Richard and Diane Pedack Carol and John Penny, Jr. Josh and Anne Petersen Jeffrey Philpott and Jeanne Donovan Donald and Dottie Piasecki Kathleen Pierce Jaime Pinkham and Tija Karklis Joseph Piper and Lisa Kinerk Piper Richard and Joanne Pirret Peter and Nancy Pitarys Robert Pitre Shonagh and Kevin Pleas Lawrence Plummer Jim and Cheryl Podolny

Mark Porcello Karen Porterfield Judy Poutre David Powers and Amy Chasanov Barry Provorse Mark Pulitano and Mary Freeman Pulitano Harry Purpur and Karen Scherrer Purpur Michael and Victoria Quinn Gregory Quinn and Nancy Quinn-Nerdrum Patricia Radle Michele Radosevich and Hon. Dean Morgan Laurene and Edward Raleigh In memory of Rosemary Laura Ramsden Rev. Michael Raschko Bob and Lisa Ratliffe Robert Rebar Ferd and Kathy Reichlin Shelly Brown Reiss and Michael Reiss Rao and Satya Remala George Renzoni Victoria Ries Patricia and Keith Riffle Richard and Bonnie Robbins Nathan Roberts Gene and Ginnie Roeglin James Roes Floyd and Judy Rogers David and Shelley Rolfe Albert Rosellini, Jr. and Vicki Rosellini John and Marjorie Rosellini John and Christine Rostas Stephen Rothrock and Tessa Keating Sandy and Jodi Sanders Mary Ann and Lester Sauvage Ryan Sawyer and Jane DePaolo Sheila and John Scates Margaret and Fred Schacht Sue Schmitt Lauren and George Schuchart, Jr. Jenifer Fitterer Schultz and Roderick Schultz Robert Schultz Michael Sclafani Mary and Gerald Segal Greg and Claire Seibly Paula Selis and Jonathan Fine

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George and Mary Ellen (Doran) Unzelman Renee Vandermause Gina Vangelos and James Schneidmiller Antoinette Wagner Art and Eva Wahl Jill and Douglas Wakefield Jim Walsh Art Wang and Nancy Norton Sylvia and Harry Watson Gerald and Sharon Watts Ginger and John Weaver Eugene and Marilyn Webb Mary Ellen and James Weber Bruce and Bobbie Weber Peter J. Weber and Denise Bunchek Weber James Wedin Chuck and Keely Weidenbach Frederic and Martha Weiss Walter and Denise Weller Robert and Barbara Welsh Eileen Glasser Wesley and Mark Wesley Katharine Weymouth Lee White June and Roger Whitson Deborah and Freddie Wilds, Jr. Debra Wiley John Wolfe Connie Wong Wallace and Alicia Wong Katharina and Alistair Woodman Thomas Workman Kathleen Wright Jeffrey and Korynne Wright William Wurts Gail D. Yates Barbara and Lee Yates Kai-Ping Yiu Hon. Mary Yu and Sue Secker Joe and Mary Zavaglia Ralph Zech II and Cynthia Zech Ralph and Bette Zech George Zeno M. Anthony and Dolores Zimmerman Eugene and Kim Zipp Anonymous (7)

RECENT GRADUATES PRESIDENT’S CLUB Alumni from Seattle University’s nine most recent classes are automatically enrolled in the Recent Graduates President’s Club when their cumulative gifts during the fiscal year, July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011, reaches $100 for each year since graduation. Mariam Abarientos Gregory Alex and Dora Krasucki-Alex Babar and Sarah Ali Mari Anderson Jana Banjanin Jordan Belmonte Harold Berry

Michael Beyers Theresa and Steven Binger Justin Borgen Charles Bourain Matthew Brock Brandon Bruan Patrick and Catherine Callans

Pamela and Davis Carvey Analisa Castaneda Gloria Chang Darrell Charles Melissa Chin Susan Chloupek Christopher Choe

Harris Clarke Carol Cochran Jeffrey Cole Kathryn and William Collins Andrew Compton Ruben de Anda and Mike Kaminski Claire Dellegrotti

SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 31

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Elizabeth Dennis Dana Diederich and Shawn Temming Ryan Dillon Jeffrey Eaton Vonelle Elison Brian and Shannon Ellis Alyssa Emmons Carol Everson Bret Eytinge Valerie and Kent Ferris Sarah and Kevin Finney Matthew and Alayna Gagnier Margaret Garrett William Graves Kathryn Greve Shannon Hill Andrew Hinrichs

Abigail and Frank Hodge Gretchen Hoog Sterling Jaquith Susan and Steven Jayich Maryann Johnston David Keenan Julia and Ali Khodabandeh Sarah Kluesner John and Jill La Pointe Robert Lebo Michael Leigh 2nd Lt. Joseph Locke Jeffrey and Robin Lyons Gregory and Jane Magnan Emily Marshall Enrico Martinez Eric Matt Cecilia Matta and Casey Riske

Caitlin McClain Bennet and Dawn McConaughy Collin McFadden Michael Miller Kristen Morgan Rev. Kathryn and Steven Morse Maren Nelson Robert Nguon William and Laura Northey Valerie and Jeffrey Ohlstrom Tiffany Pascua Gail Pollack Diana Rauen Karin and Jeff Reed Phillip Roman Robert Roodhouse Victoria Rucker Elizabeth Safranski

Rev. Joanne Sanders Debra Sather Diane Schmitz and William Stalder Brandy Schwartz Ivette Serna Aerica Shimizu-Banks Micaela Shorrock Florence Smith Eric Stroo Le Tat Todd and Monique Thackray Anh-Thu Vo Rachel Wang Jennifer Weitman and Chad Wilcox Chad Wiggins Susan Woerdehoff Christina Yuen and Brandon Morrison

Bank of America Beckman Coulter BelGioioso Cheese Bimbo Bakeries USA Borghese CHEP Equipment Pooling Systems Clorox Company Colgate-Palmolive Company Continental Mills, Inc. Crunch Pak Edward Jones Investments Electroimpact, Inc. Expeditors International of Washington Foster Pepper PLLC GLY Construction GoldToeMoretz Greatergiving, Inc. Harvest Manor Farms Institute of International Education International Vitamin Corporation Intuit Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products Company Johnson Controls, Inc. Kenworth Truck Company Lakeside Industries Mastronardi Produce Limited MCM Mortenson Construction Novak Construction NY Pizza Company, Inc. Olde Thompson Pacific Coast Feather Company Perkins Coie LLP Philips Healthcare PRO Sports Club Procter & Gamble Co. Ricardo Beverly Hills Robinson Construction Sealy, Inc. Seattle Pacific Industries

Seyfarth Shaw, LLP Snak King Snohomish County Public Works Starbucks Coffee Company Sugar Bowl Bakery Synod of Alaska NW Presbyterian Church (USA) Terlato Wines International Trident Seafoods Corporation Twin-Star International Unilever Home & Personal Care, USA United Stationers Supply Co. US Bank Washington Dental Service Welspun WFF Facility Services Anonymous (2)

Chateau Ste. Michelle Clise Properties, Inc. Coca-Cola North America Compass Group Complete Restaurant Repair, LLC Coughlin Porter Lundeen Custom Decorators DWI Holdings, Inc. Emerald Services, Inc. Ezra Teshome Insurance Agency Foss Maritime Company H.J. Heinz Company Hanes Brands, Inc. Heartland Waste Solutions International Language Services, Inc. Jackson Dean Construction Kenyon Company KPMG LLP Ledcor Industries, Inc. Lifespan Biosciences, Inc. Madison Development Group LLC Marine Resources Group MBI McKinstry Company Michelin North America Miller Nash LLP Moose Creek, Inc. Morey's Seafood Mulvanny G2 Architecture National Park Service Northwest Atlantic Partners Northwest Regional Christian Church Novartis Oberto Sausage Company Pactiv Corporation Pan Abode Homes, Inc. Peninsula Packaging Company Premera Blue Cross Providence Health and Services: Washington/Montana Puget Sound Energy

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PRESIDENT’S CLUB RECENT GRADUATES, CONTINUED

CORPORATIONS DIAMOND CIRCLE ($100,000 AND ABOVE) American Bar Association Costco Wholesale Corporation United Way of King County

PLATINUM CIRCLE ($25,000–$99,999) Anderson Daymon Worldwide Archdiocese of Seattle Association of Theological Schools BECU The Boeing Company Campbell Soup Company Dorsey & Whitney LLP Edmonds Christian Church First Quality Georgia-Pacific Corporation Kellogg Company Kelsen, Inc. Kerry, Inc. Kimberly-Clark Corp. Leiner Health Products Microsoft Corporation Niagara Bottling LLC Nice-Pak Products, Inc. PACCAR Inc PepsiCo, Inc. Pharmavite LLC REI, Inc. Schiff Nutrition GRP Inc. Seattle City Light Sony Electronics Sun Products Corporation Washington State Bar Association

PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE ($10,000–$24,999) The Alliance of Nonprofits Alstom Andersen Construction Company Arthur Schuman Inc.

GOLD CIRCLE ($5,000–$9,999) Alaska Airlines Allied Marketing, Inc. Almax Company Altria Group, Inc. American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers American Express Aon Hewitt Asian Bar Association of Washington Bluetooth SIG, Inc. Bon Appétit Brooks Rand Labs, LLC The Buck Law Group, PLLC Buyken Metal Products Inc. Campbell's Resort on Lake Chelan Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce Carters Inc. Cedar Grove Composting Chandos Construction

32 / Thanks to You

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Regence Blue Shield Request Brand Foods, Inc. Rotary Club of Emerald City (Seattle) Saybr Contractors, Inc. SeaBright Insurance Holdings, Inc. Seattle Preparatory School Seneca Group Shawn Warren Designs, LLC Silver Cloud Hotel The Society of the Friends of St. Patrick Sony Pictures Entertainment Swedish Medical Center Talking Rain Beverage Tarantino Gourmet Sausage Unilin Group Vacation Internationale Vander Hoek Corporation W. L. Butler Construction Inc. WCP Solutions Westinghouse Electric Corp. Woodcock Washburn LLP Anonymous

SILVER CIRCLE ($2,500–$4,999) 3M Company 4Culture Accelerated Payment Solutions, LLC Advanced Cosmetic & Laser Dentistry America Cargo Transport Corporation American Meter and Appliance Amgen, Inc. Association of Corporate Counsel, WA State Chapter Atlas Supply, Inc. Avanade, Inc. CashMap Consulting LLC Clifford Produce Sales Copiers Northwest Inc. Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Divco Canada Limited Doyenz, Inc. Fairfield Suisun Rotary Flexon Industries Freeport-McMoRan, Inc. GEICO Insurance Gethsemane Lutheran Church Guidant Financial Group, Inc. Hydraulic Repair & Design Icicle Seafoods, Inc.

Ignition Partners, LLC Impac Imaging, Inc. Jack McCann Company, Inc. JBW Enterprises LLC Jesuit Community of Seattle University Krsak Family LLC Livemocha, Inc. Locke Lord Bissell & Liddell LLP Love Rocks by JAGS Ltd. Nordstrom, Inc. Pacific Market International LLC PEMCO Mutual Insurance Company Philips Consumer Lifestyle Phillips Real Estate Services, LLC Physicians Insurance Precision FNC Services LLC Pure Hot House Foods Quorum Review IRB Qwest Communications Rotary International District 5160 School Employees Credit Union of Washington Shuman Produce SIFE Worldwide Sisters of Providence SRS Energy, LLC State Farm Insurance Tetra Tech KCM, Inc. Thompson & Knight LLP T-Mobile USA, Inc. Tree Top, Inc. United Parcel Service, Inc. Washington Park Ventures, LLC Wright Hotels Inc.

BRONZE CIRCLE ($1,000–$2,499) Aberfoyle Springs Water Acoustical Designs, Inc. All Wood Cabinetry Alpine Fresh, Inc. American Inns of Court, Honorable Robert J. Bryan Chapter Ameriprise Financial, Inc. Aspen Beverage Group B&G Machine, Inc. Bainbridge Island Ace Hardware Bayer Healthcare Brother International Brown Paper Tickets, LLC Buckley & Associates

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Cardno WRG Cascadia Capital, LLC Casio, Inc. Chicken of the Sea International CIO on Demand Columbia Marketing International Comfort Revolution Community of Christ–Greater Pacific NW Cott Corporation Crider, Inc. Del Real Foods Deloitte & Touche, LLP Dole Food Company Dymarco Energizer Personal Care Ernest Jonson & Company, PS Ernst & Young Expedia Inc. Feit Electric Company, Inc. Fremont Dock Co. FujiFilm USA General Mills, Inc. George K. Baum & Company Goldberg & Jones, PLLC Graham Construction and Engineering, Inc. Greenberg Glusker Group Health Cooperative Gunning & Associates, Inc. Health Net, Inc. Hershey Foods Corp. Hollander Home Fashions Huhtamaki iGPS Company, LLC Installs, Inc. International Beauty Products Inc. Iris USA, Inc. The Italian Club JM Smucker Co. Jones Dairy Farm Jones Jeanswear Group K & L Gates LLP K.B. Socks, Inc. KAO Brands Krasnow Saunders Cornblath, LLP L.G. Isaacson Co., Inc. The Learning Journey International, LLC Lexmark International, Inc. Little Farm Frozen Foods, Inc. Liz Claiborne, Inc.

LNK International, Inc. Longfield Gardens LLC MackayMichell Photopak Mahlum Architects McKay Chadwell, PLLC Morgan Stanley Nautica VF Sportswear Newport Presbyterian Church Nine Stars International Nonni's Food Company North American Society for Sports Management (NASSM) Olson Kundig Architects Pacific Modular Pacific Northwest Conference UCC Palm Bay International Perrigo PJM I, LLC The Principal Financial Group PSF Mechanical, Inc. RG Barry Corporation RAFN Company Reckitt Benckiser RMC Constructors Rogue Fisheries, Inc. Ruiz Food Products Saputo Cheese USA Seattle Steam Company Sellen Construction Company Skellenger Bender, P.S. Smith & Greene Company Springs Window Fashions LLC The Standard Insurance Company Stemilt Growers Inc. Sunkist Growers, Inc. Supplies Network T D Farrell Construction, Inc. Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc. TJ’s Happy Landing Tavern, Inc Tracy's Print Shop Viaquest, Inc. Voss, Cook & Thel, LLP Warehouse Demo Services Weider Global Nutrition Welch's Whalen Furniture Manufacturing White Wave Foods Windset Farms Wurts & Associates, Inc. Anonymous (2)

PLATINUM CIRCLE ($25,000–$99,999)

Jansing-Cook Foundation The Marcia S. Halligan Trust The Martinez Foundation Moccasin Lake Foundation Razore Foundation Seattle Foundation Seattle International Foundation The Sherman Fairchild Foundation, Inc. Shinnyo-En Foundation Tillie and Alfred Shemanski Testamentary Trust

FOUNDATIONS DIAMOND CIRCLE ($100,000 AND ABOVE) The Berwick Degel Family Foundation Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation College Success Foundation E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation Harry & Clare Cayo Wilson Charitable Trust Henry Luce Foundation Inc.

Independent Colleges of Washington M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Open Society Foundations PACCAR Foundation PGA Foundation Raikes Foundation Schultz Family Foundation Stuart Foundation The Teagle Foundation, Inc. Anonymous

Ben B. Cheney Foundation Charles Simonyi Fund for Arts and Sciences China Friendship Foundation Charitable Trust Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund The Grove Foundation Herbert B. Jones Foundation

SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 33

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FOUNDATIONS, CONTINUED Val A. Browning Charitable Foundation Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program Anonymous

PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE ($10,000–$24,999) The Anderson Foundation Byron & Alice Lockwood Foundation Clement Family Foundation Elbridge & Debra Stuart Family Foundation Ernst & Young Foundation The Ferry Family Charitable Foundation Ford Foundation Fred H. and Mary S. Dore Charitable Foundation Harris myCFO Foundation Keith & Mary Kay McCaw Family Foundation Koch Foundation, Inc.

Koeplin Family Foundation National Philanthropic Trust DAF The Norcliffe Foundation The Peach Foundation PEMCO Foundation Inc. The Radford Foundation Riley & Nancy Pleas Family Foundation Robert’s Fund Schwab Fund for Charitable Giving TEW Foundation The Wollenberg Foundation Wyman Youth Trust

GOLD CIRCLE ($5,000–$9,999) Benaroya Family Foundation Fortune Family Foundation George P. Hardgrove Foundation Juniper Foundation KPMG Foundation Lee Family Charitable Lead Annuity Trust Nesholm Family Foundation Patricia A. Brown Charitable Lead Annuity Trust

Petunia Foundation Prairie Foundation Qwest Foundation Schulze Family Foundation Spark Charitable Foundation State Farm Companies Foundation Wahle Family Foundation Wells Fargo Foundation Wheeler Charitable Trust

SILVER CIRCLE ($2,500–$4,999) The Ash Family Foundation Bank of America Foundation Bishop Family Foundation Dorsey & Whitney Foundation Dupar Foundation GlobalGiving Foundation Huntsinger Education Trust Ireene S. Barnett Foundation The Presto Foundation The Pride Foundation Renaissance Charitable Foundation, Inc.

LEGACY SOCIETY

BRONZE CIRCLE ($1,000–$2,499) Alpha Sigma Nu Bilder Foundation, Inc. Chevron Matching Gift Program Deloitte Foundation Horrigan Foundation Inc. JAMS Foundation JS Turner Family Foundation KeyBank Foundation The Medtronic Foundation New York Life Foundation Nike Employee Matching Gift Program Norman Archibald Charitable Foundation O'Connell Family Foundation The Picsha Foundation Plum Creek Foundation Remala Foundation Sepic Family Foundation W Foundation

*Deceased

Seattle University’s Legacy Society recognizes and honors alumni and friends who have remembered the university in their estate plans. These gifts may include a bequest, life income gift, life insurance or gift from a retirement plan. We gratefully acknowledge all of our Legacy Society members who have generously committed to support the long-term mission and vision of SU. Rev. Dr. David Aasen Gloria Ysmael Adams Anthony J. Ahn, M.D. Maxime and Maureen Albi Inez D. Allan Robert and Margaret Alston Adele Alton Mary Lou L. Amen Rev. Loren and June Arnett Clodagh Ash Veronica L. Asui Paul Ballard, M.D. Thomas F. Bangasser Mary Nigg Bartholet Michael J. Bathum Dr. Robert and Helen Batie Marsha and John Baumann Len Beil and Stella Ley Jean A. (Werner) Beland Mr. and Mrs. Philip Bellefeuille Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Benoit Hubert T. Bily Jack and Maralyn Blume Clarice Bocek James and Georgana Bond William and Marguerite Borgert Dr. Hamida H. Bosmajian Richard and Sheridan Botts Jeanette T. Bowker John B. Brackbill Pamela Bradburn

Lawrence N. Brouse Joy Daniels Brower Charles R. Brown Elena Brown Gary and Diane Buckley Kenneth Bumgarner Traci M. Burgler Suzie Burke Frank and Carlene Buty Rock E. Caley Frances B. Call Terence J. Callaghan Sharon and Neil Callahan Susan C. Campbell Harry L. and Diane Carle Peter J. Carlozzi Paul Carlson and Judith Carlson Robert W. Carroll Rev. William and Janice Cate Les and Mary Lou Cathersal Sally Franett Chambers Robert S. Chang Tony Y. Chinn Brenda Christensen and Thomas Barry Steve and Bonnie Clark Frank and Marilyn Clement Dr. Pauline Cline Donald F. Cofer Theodore and Patricia Collins Dorothy E. Cook

David L. Corn Perrin Cornell Robert and Frances Cronin William J. Cruzen and Steven Catching Michael G. and Shannon K. Crvarich Betty Cummins Rev. Dr. Richard and Carol Cunningham Francis Daly Michael G. Daniels Michael Day Cesar P. and Rosario T. DeGracia Betty and Marty DeLaurenti Mary Derig Angeline Dick James and Joan DiJulio David and Theresa Donovan James M. Donovan Judith and William Doyle Monica J. and Martin H. Duke Craig P. Duncan John and Marlene Durbin Mary Kay Dyckman Dolores Libri Eagan, in memory of Allan J. Eagan Rev. James E. Eblen Bill Eisiminger Doris Eriksen John D. Eshelman

Patrick M. and Barbara A. Fahey Frank and Barbara Fanger David Farkouh Paul H. Feldman Lee E. Fickle Janet S. Fisher Cecelia Fjellman David and Carmel Fleck Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Fletcher Linda and Bradley Fowler John M. Foy Donna J. Franklin David P. Frerk Joseph and Terri Gaffney Madeline B. Galbraith Sharon Galbraith Theresa M. Gallant Ken and Lisa Geisen Sharon E. Gillaspie Iva Gjerde Helen Goehring Carey M. Golden Lydia Alcala-Gonzales Eva Gordon Martin J. Granger Linda S. Green Dr. Huber K.* and Mary C. Grimm Pauline D. Guppy Donald and Victoria Haberman Robert G. Hacker Russell S. Hagen

34 / Thanks to You

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Peg Haggerty Marcia A. Halligan Jack A. and Myra Hanover Deborah J. Hardie Dr. and Mrs. John M. Harding Charles R. Harmon and Virginia C. Harmon James E. Harnish Linn and Dorothy Harris Mr. & Mrs. Walter Hart Margaret Hastings Thomas W. Healy Harold H. and Ernestine M. Heath Marion J. Helenkamp Paul Heneghan and Barbara Brady Heneghan Dennis M. Hennessy James Henriot Patricia J. Hildreth August Hoba, Stella G. Hoba, Donald W. Hoba and Frederick A. Hoba C. Leon Hopper Hon. Donald and Lynda Horowitz Alan T. and Sigrid D. Horwedel Eva B. Huntsinger David M. Irwin Sr.and Dianne H. Irwin John and Patricia Isaksen Gerri Derig Jackson-Bell David M. and Linda Johnson Kent Johnson Helen M. Jolly James and Dianne Jorgensen Mr. and Mrs. H. Peter Kasama Leslie and Don Kazarian Melanie A. Kelsey Roberta A. Kendall Paul J. and Dana Kertes Anne and Lee Kilcup Colleen Kinerk Robert O. and Miriam Kinsey Sr. Dorothy (Dottie) Klingele, SP John M. Kloeck J. Stephen Knapp Amy C. Worrell-Kneller and Byron Kneller Bruce and Carol Koch Steven C. Kocharhook P. Michael Koenig Gerald W. Koethe Nina and Tom Kornell Matthew C. Kosanke Keith and Kathy Kragelund George Krsak Mimi Krsak Rosalyn Kwan John Q. La Fond Bob Labbé Terence J. Lacey Ann F. Lackey Bruce and Brigid Laing Edward and Pat Lamb Georgia Lang Diana K. Larkin Rhoady Lee, Jr. and Jeanne Marie Lee

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PHOTO BY JOHN LOK

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PAULINE GUPPY, ’49, ’69 AND JOE GUPPY, ’77, ‘98 Pauline Guppy, ’49, ’69 MIT, and her son Joe, ’77, ’98 MAP, say their motivation to give to Seattle University has much to do with supporting the Jesuits. “My Seattle University degrees have given me a faith-based and philosophically based foundation for more effective action on behalf of my values,” Joe says. He suggests other potential donors examine their own deeper values. They may find that giving to SU is the best way to propagate those values for future generations, including through gifts by will. Pauline isn’t likely to forget the tenacity of Father William LeRoux, S.J., when it came time to donate to the President’s Club. “He wouldn’t take no for an answer,” she says. As an SU student, Pauline met her husband the late William A. Guppy, ’50, when he was president and she vice president of the campus philosophy club in 1948. She then worked on staff at SU and taught high school for a short while. Later she became a nationally published author of children’s short stories. The late William Guppy, in 1970, became the first layman to serve as academic vice president, a position he held for a decade that spanned three SU presidents. In addition to Joe, three other Guppy children are alumni: Edward, ’76, Paul, ’82, and Mark, ’88. Joe and Pauline’s President’s Club donations are earmarked for the Jan Rowe Scholarship Fund, as is Pauline’s bequest through her will. Jan Rowe was a foundational influence on the Master’s in Psychology program and a friend and colleague of William Guppy. “We sometimes referred to Jan as our ‘den mother’ when I was a student,” says Joe, who today is a psychotherapist with a Seattle practice. “She was the compassionate heart of the program.”

Marie Legaz Whitley Donald and Caroline Leuthold Maye L. Liebeck George V. and Mary K. Lombardi Arthur F. and Gloria Long Sarah S. Long Thomas and Mary Pat Lord Larry O. Lorenz R. Terrence Losh Donald W. Luby Gloria Lung Wakayama

Gene Lynn Mary B. Magnano Robert B. and Alice E. Maguire Edna J. Maguire Laura Ellis Mahoney Thomas F. Mahoney Ms. Laurie Mailloux and Mr. Paul Guedet Rev. William and Laurel Malcomson J. Richard Manning

Michael J. Manning Doreen A. Marchione Peter V. Marchuk, Jr. and Galina Marchuk Raymond Marik Norman C. Mattson Rev. Dr. Donald and Lynnea Mayer Sheila M. McAlister Philip D. and Mary McEachern

SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 35

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Betty J. Olson Anthony Palmer Robert Pankl Ralph F. Peak John D. Penny Robert M. Petersen Ann Richard Pfingsten and C. Thomas Pfingsten Anthony J. Philippsen Jane P. Philips Linda Plaag Casey Plank Claire M. Putnam John and Heidi Rabel Patricia Radle Victor G. Rafanelli Darlene Risse Raftis In memory of Rosemary Laura Ramsden Patricia C. Repikoff Frances A. Richmond Evelyn and Bruce Rick M. Victoria Ries Johanna P. Roach John M. Roach Patrick T. and LeeAnn Roach Thomas and Nancy Roach Sally M. Rogers Lena M. Rutherford Valerie J. Ryan John L. Salverson Sandy and Jodi Sanders Judith E. Schoenecker Peter and Connie Scontrino Boyd and Mikki Sharp John F. Shaw

Ruth E. Shipp-Dart Roy L. Short Anthony Simhauser George and Mary Simmons John and Elizabeth Sloan Fred Sommer Geraldine Sorensen Nancy L. Sorensen John W. and Rose M. Southall Rev. Dr. Virginia and Gerald Sparling Dorothy Speidel Sam and Winnie Sperry Malcolm* and Mari Stamper Bernard M. and Joyce J. Steckler Donald L. and Betty I. Stern Elizabeth M. Stevenson-Collins Marnie D. Stocker Carl Swenson and Julia Buchholz Colonel Marilyn J. Sylvester John A. Tellesbo Marsha Tellesbo-Kembel Narciso and Luth Tenorio Dee M. Teodoro Patricia J. Terry and Michael Cooney Lou and Diane Tice Sharon J. Todd Helen G. Topel Peter L. Tountas and Michelle Bergh-Tountas Dr. Henry S. Uchida Catherine G. Uhl Sheila Umlauf Mary Ellen (Doran) and George Unzelman

Floren J. and Mildred Van de Putte Paul and Roberta Van der Voort Cathryn D. Vanderzicht Eugene and Catherine Voiland Colleen M. Voiss Marian Volpe Lloyd M. Von Normann Janet K. Wallace Rev. Richard Ward Peter J. Weber and Denise Bunchek Weber Arlene R. Wechezak Robert and Barbara Welsh June and Roger Whitson William N. Wilber J. Vernon Williams Caroline Wilson Richard and Elaine Wilson Robert F. Winkel Betty Woods Judith Yeakel Armen Z. Yousoufian Robert J. Yunker Ralph K. Zech, M.D. and Helen Zech M. Anthony Zimmerman, DDS, and Dolores A. Zimmerman Peter J. Zografos Anonymous (70)

VICE PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY PLANNING AND VICE PROVOST

ASSOCIATE PROVOST, ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

DEAN, COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Robert Dullea

Charles Lawrence

Timothy Leary

VICE PRESIDENT, MISSION AND MINISTRY

ASSOCIATE PROVOST, FACULTY AFFAIRS

Azita Emami

PROVOST

Peter Ely, S.J.

Jacquelyn Miller

DEAN, COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES AND UNIVERSITY SERVICES

ASSOCIATE PROVOST, GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT

Michael Quinn

INTERIM VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE

James Adolphson

Gerald Huffman

Victoria Jones

INTERIM DEAN, MATTEO RICCI COLLEGE

VICE PRESIDENT, ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

VICE PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT

DEAN, ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

Jodi Kelly

Marilyn Crone

Mary Kay McFadden

Joseph Phillips

DEAN, SCHOOL OF LAW

VICE PRESIDENT, STUDENT DEVELOPMENT

VICE PRESIDENT AND UNIVERSITY COUNSEL

DEAN, COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Jacob Diaz

Mary Petersen

David Powers

ADMINISTRATION PRESIDENT

Stephen Sundborg, S.J. EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Sue Schmitt DEAN, COLLEGE OF NURSING

Isiaah Crawford

Mark Niles

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Gordon McHenry, Jr. and Dorina Calderon-McHenry Nancy and James McKenney Carol Lynn McLaughlin Duncan McNab Curly and Judy McNamee Dr. Donna and Bill McNeese-Smith Helen Jo McNeil Sandra S. Mears John and Ginny Meisenbach John G. Menges Donald and Joan Merlino Michelle Harvey Merlino Lotte L. Meyer J. Colleen Michael Gordon L. Miller Robert G. Miller John A. Moga John and Jerene Morford David Morgan Eleanore S. Mortenson Patrick C. Mowery Grace Elaine Munzer Jeanne Murray Charles G. Nau Donald L. Navoni James E. Neal Melvin G. Nelson Philip and Carilyn Norris David G. Novak James H. O'Brien John P. O'Connell Charles and Doris (Cockrill) O'Connor James W. and Marjorie K. O'Hara Tim and Mary O'Keefe

DEAN, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AND MINISTRY

Mark Markuly UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN

John Popko

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LEGACY SOCIETY, CONTINUED

36 / Thanks to You

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CHAIR Betty Woods VICE CHAIR Stuart Rolfe

EX OFFICIO/SU PRESIDENT Stephen Sundborg, S.J. BOARD MEMBERS Mohamed Alabbar Michael Bayard, S.J. Scott Coble, S.J. Theodore Collins Marta Dalla Gasperina Thomas Ellison Patrice Fersch

Allan Golston Hon. Donald Horowitz Patrick Howell, S.J. W. Craig Jelinek Kent Johnson Patrick Kelly, S.J. Michael McCarthy, S.J. Gordon McHenry, Jr. Carol Nelson Nicole Piasecki Robert Ratliffe Rick Redman Peter Rose Dave Sabey Mick Schreck Stevens Trainer Jill Wakefield

ALUMNI BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRESIDENT Sean Henderson PRESIDENT-ELECT Christopher Canlas BOARD MEMBERS Zachary Anderson Analisa Castaneda Brian Considine Shane Dir Joslyn Donlin Kymberly Evanson Mary Henderson

Joseph Hueffed William Jolly Annie Lee Joseph Leigh Karen Lynn Maher Cisco Malpartida Smith Jason McGill Daniel Nicholson James Policar John Ruffo Lauren Sedillo Michelle Smith ALUMNI CHAPLAIN David Anderson, S.J.

EMERITUS Rhoady Lee, Jr. Ann Wyckoff

BOARD OF REGENTS CHAIR Maureen Benoliel EX OFFICIO Stephen Sundborg, S.J. BOARD MEMBERS Mary Lou Amen Carol Ann Barnickol Maria Barrientos Mary Helen Bever Robert Brennan Maureen Brotherton Patricia Buchsel Suzanne Burke Brian Comstock Christopher Corr John Costello Sr. Joyce Cox, B.V.M. Hon. Anita Crawford-Willis Salah Dandan Michael G. Daniels Marilyn O. Dennehy Anthony G. DiRe Janet M. Dwyer William F. Eisiminger Peter Ely, S.J.

Michael O. Evered Claudia Garcia Medina Ronald J. Giuffre Brenda L. Gomez Jeffrey C. Grant Myra Bisio Hanover Timotha Hollomon Steven D. Huling James Jorgensen Adam B. Jussel Anne E. Kilcup Diane Siderius Kocer Rosalyn C. Kwan Butch Leonardson Curly McNamee J. Jeffrey Meder Marlene R. Miller Richard E. Mitchell, JD Larry P. Nejasmich Carol V. Penny William J. Ramsden Connie Rogel Judy L. Rogers Kathleen H. Schafer Rose M.Southall Paul A. Stoot Kevin C. Suther Gerald P. Tardie

Venerria Lucas Thomas Mark R. Wesley Katelyn Wieliczkiewicz Deborah Wilds Kathleen Wright Martha m. Wyckoff Joseph P. Zavaglia Ralph K. Zech II EMERITUS Gregory Alex William Almon Robert Blethen Maj. Gen. Patrick Brady Robert Braukus Hon. Terrence Carroll Dorene Centioli-McTigue Paul Chiles Marilyn Clement Dennis Colleran John David James Dykeman Thomas Elzey Theresa Gallant James Henriot Michael Hosterman Walter Hubbard, Jr. Dianne Irwin

Helen Jolly Hon. Richard Jones Kenyon Kellogg Colleen Kinerk Patrick Mahoney Hon. Ricardo Martinez Randy Massengale Michael K. Mastro, Jr. P. Gerry Maurer Michael McHugh Andrew Mirkovich Enid Moore Susan Picht Jody Sheppard Mullally Charles Riley Thomas Roach Mary Ann Sauvage Boyd Sharp, Jr. John Southall Samuel Sperry Joseph Straus Nick Tarlson Kip Toner Michael Torre Ruth Tressel Peter Truex Greg Van Pelt Arthur Wahl Frederic Weiss

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SECRETARY Maureen Lee

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SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 37

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

Alumni Board of Governors aims to strengthen ties to alumni base

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Meet Your Board

THIS YEAR’S ALUMNI BOARD OF GOVERNORS President Sean Henderson Chris Canlas, president-elect Annie Lee Karen Lynn Maher

Shane Dir Zachary Anderson Analisa Castaneda Joslyn Donlin

Kymberly Evanson Mary Henderson Joseph Hueffed William Jolly

Joseph Leigh Cisco Malpartida Smith Jason McGill Daniel Nicholson

To learn more about the board and how it works for you, visit www.seattleu.edu/alumni/.

survey says… In the spring 2012 issue of Seattle University Magazine, we’ll be sharing results and outcomes of the recent alumni survey. This is the most complete survey of alumni ever done by Alumni Relations and sets a new bar for responsiveness to what you want from the alumni association and the university. If you were not able to participate in this survey, e-mail alumni@seattleu.edu to share your feedback. Check out the spring issue to read what alumni and former classmates had to say.

James Policar John Ruffo Lauren Sedillo Michelle Smith Susan Woerdehoff, AVP, Alumni Relations

ALUMNI AWARD NOMINATIONS SOUGHT Every year since 1984, Alumni Relations has recognized and honored the work and accomplishments of many distinguished alumni with the Alumni Awards. Alumni Relations is accepting nominations for the 2012 alumni awards, which will be bestowed during a dinner and ceremony in spring. Nominations sought by Dec. 15 for the following categories: Alumnus/Alumna of the Year Professional Achievement Distinguished Teaching University Service Community Service

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ALUMNI VOICE

Outstanding Recent Alumnus/Alumna 38 / Alumni Voice

For information and a nomination form, visit www.seattleu. edu/alumni/awards.aspx.

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For the Love of the Game | By Tina Potterf Gary Pennington, ’59, racks up achievements in impressive range of sports PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Former SU baseball player Gary Pennington stands on Logan Field during a recent visit to SU.

The Vancouver, B.C., native and father of seven feels blessed to have had the opportunity to watch and know some of SU’s All-American athletes from Elgin Baylor to Johnny and Eddie O’Brien, Cal Bauer and others. At SU, one of his fondest memories is having the chance to share the court on rare occasion with Elgin Baylor. “Sports have been a big part of my life. But the most important thing for me is the fine people I have known and the relationships I have enjoyed,” he says. “I have tremendous regard for the people who I played with and who have coached me.” Pennington’s story is unique not only for his abilities to play well in several sports but also his longevity. “Sports were my way out of what were very trying circumstances growing up on the streets of downtown Vancouver,” says Pennington, who credits many mentors, One might say that when Gary Pennington slipped on a friends and his education for shaping the person he is today. pair of boxing gloves and climbed into the ring in a boxing Effortlessly, he seemed to excel in club in a rough and tumble area of Vancouver, British whatever sport he took up. He did Columbia, his life changed. well in track and field as a naturally For Pennington, boxing provided sport—rugby. “A sport I found to be fast runner (he continues to run today, a glimpse into a world outside of the much more in keeping with my free-to- participating in half-marathons.) In walls of the cramped rooming house move spirit,” he says. eighth grade, he started playing baskethe lived in with his siblings, all raised This is more than a story about an ball at the local church and by the by a hard-working single mother. athlete who liked to dabble in a panoply time he was in high school was a team Although he says he was “no of sports in pursuit of excellence. Name captain. He was on the SU team as a Rocky,” he did ok in the ring. With a sport—including the above and tacking freshman and decades later still has growing confidence in his athletic on basketball, baseball, handball, and skills in the game—he has medaled in capabilities—and with skills to track and field—and Pennington, a the senior league in basketball at the boot—he went from boxing gloves 1959 graduate of Seattle University, Australian Masters Games. to a soccer ball, playing the game has likely excelled in it. And not just Of all the sports, baseball is his with some of Vancouver’s top youth in a way to pass the time but as a “longest lasting and greatest love,” teams. Although he was fast on his competitive athlete. Pennington says. “I remember playing feet, he found soccer limiting and A love of sports sparked as a kid hookie from school in 1948 to hear the the playing field conditions less than carried over into his college days at World Series game. I was 12 years old at ideal. This led him to try another Seattle University. the time.” continued on page 40

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continued from page 39

In the second grade he discovered he had some talent in the sport when he could effectively swing a bat and, more importantly, make contact with the ball. His penchant for playing baseball continued into high school and with winning results, as he was among the top hitters on his high school team. His prowess on the field caught the attention of major league scouts. While many seniors in high school are charting their next move, typically work or college, Pennington was considering turning pro, with offers from major league teams on the East Coast including the New York Yankees. After considering his options and talking to his basketball coach at the time, he decided to forgo entering the big leagues for university life and was admitted to the University of California at Berkeley on a baseball scholarship. Missing home and feeling out of his element, Pennington left the University of California to return to Canada. For a while he stayed up north, doing odd jobs and considering his next move. During this time he was in touch with Al

Gary Pennington fields the ball in a 65+ seniors league world series game as a San Diego Padre.

Brightman, the famed basketball coach at SU, who encouraged him to come to Seattle University. Soon Pennington was in Seattle and at SU, playing basketball and varsity baseball. The teams at the time were full of excellent players, he recalls, and the education he received was top notch. “I treasure the days I was at SU, the many friends I made, the outstanding teachers and coaches and the education

“Sports have been a big part of my life... I have tremendous regard for the people who I played with and who have coached me.”

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GARY PENNINGTON, ’59

I had,” he says. “As a former university dropout, it was amazing to me to be able to graduate cum laude my senior year.” Father William Logan was one of Pennington’s mentors at SU. The two played handball at the Washington Athletic Club. Pennington was an accomplished handball player but no match for Father Logan. “I was a young man in my early 20s, at the prime of my athletic prowess, yet I could never get the better of Father Logan, a much older man,” he says. “He was just too smart of a player.” Following graduation from SU, Pennington went on to earn a master’s in education degree. Midway through his studies, he went to spring training with the Tri-City Braves in California. A separated shoulder injury sidelined his chance to go pro in baseball. So he finished his degree and returned to Canada to teach at a junior high school. Later he would come back to the States to earn a doctorate at the University of Oregon. With degree in hand he again headed back to Canada, to begin a long career teaching at the University of British Columbia, where he taught education and the arts and is today associate professor emeritus.

40 / Alumni Voice

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PHOTO COURTESY OF GARY PENNINGTON

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Gary Pennington (far left) poses with some of his SU baseball teammates in the 1950s.

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Baseball was never far from his mind. After taking a 15-year break from actively playing, he reconnected with the game as a member of a senior league that was starting in Vancouver. He played for a couple years and had the opportunity to join an elite-level league in Australia when he was there to teach. He accepted and in Australia helped lead the country baseball league to the state championships. Now in his mid-70s, Pennington is still active in the game, playing in senior leagues in Canada, Australia and the U.S., and coaching and mentoring up

and coming players. Every fall he returns to Arizona to play in the Men’s Senior Baseball League (MSBL) World Series. When it comes to describing his never-ending passion for baseball, he quotes his childhood hero and Baseball Hall of Fame player Rogers Hornsby, “who once said, ‘People ask me what I do in winter when there’s no baseball. I’ll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring.’” The time at SU left an indelible mark, says Pennington, who added that he felt welcomed from the first time he stepped on campus.

“I want to thank Seattle University for being such a big part of my formative years and giving me another chance to play sports and learn,” he says. “I think that much of what transpired there has given me the foundation to be a lifelong player and to live out the expression that, ‘We don’t stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.’”

Gary Pennington would like to reconnect with friends from his SU days. E-mail him at gazpen@gmail.com.

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Baked Holiday Cheer | By Annie Beckmann Family with SU ties cooks up business selling homemade rum cakes The Seattle Rum Cake Company is gearing up to quash that perennial Christmas curse also known as fruitcake.

gave them away to family, friends and co-workers, especially those of dad James Hershey, ’77, a lieutenant with The answer to that dense fruit and Armed with a degree in finance and the Bellevue Police Department. Pat nut loaf may just be rum cake, baked economics and a full-time career with says it was not unusual for her husband with care and love by Pat Hershey an accounting firm, Jason put together to give away a hundred or more of the and sold by her son, Jason Hershey, a business plan to sell his mom’s rum cakes during the holiday season. a 2006 Albers graduate. specialty cakes. Jason saw this as an opportunity as Seattle Rum Cake Company is a “There was something special about golden as the rum cakes themselves. true family operation. Mom Pat has these cakes,” he says. So, nearly three years ago, he and Pat tinkered with her rum cake recipe for Over the years, he watched as his searched out a licensed kitchen and more than 30 years and Jason saw mom baked hundreds of rum cakes sent the cake off to a lab for nutrition the potential to make it a business. at Christmastime and cheerfully information and alcohol testing. To

42 / Alumni Voice

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Albers alum Jason Hershey, ’06, displays the rum cake that is at the heart of his family business.

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adhere to the requirements of the Washington State Liquor Control Board, the rum cakes cannot contain more than one percent of alcohol. Pat’s rum cake recipe harks back to a friend of her mother’s in Japan, although Pat has refined it over the years to make it her own. It’s rich, dense and buttery—not unlike a pound cake that has been laced with rum and topped with chopped pecans—a festive, wreath-shaped treat that’s a good fit for the Christmas holidays.

When not baking her rum cakes, Pat by day takes people’s finger prints, a business she started more than 20 years ago while also working at the Bellevue Police Department. This Jesuit-educated family continues to be influenced by Jesuit values, even when it comes to their tasty concoctions. There’s a community page on the company website that says, “Cake this good is worth sharing.”

GET YOUR OWN SLICE Seattle Rum Cake Company’s classic rum cake or a batch of six mini rum cakes (suitable for tucking into Christmas stockings) sell for $30. A large classic one is $38. Available online only at

www.seattlerumcake.com

Read more online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Books by Faculty/Staff/Alumni

Reviewed by Maura Beth Pagano, ’12 Especially sweet for the experienced hiker, Kevin Grange’s Beneath Blossom Rain is a treat for any adventurer. Grange allows his readers to come along as he and his brave companions take on a 24-day, 216-mile trek through the Himalayas and the fascinating country of Bhutan. This corner of the world, so full of myth and mystery, is brought brilliantly to life through Grange’s humorous and lively prose. Grange writes of his journey on the brutal trail known as the Snowman Trek. The storied trail, which traverses through 11 mountain passes, including seven that top out over 16,000 feet, is a considerable challenge for even the most robust outdoorsmen. Severe weather conditions, high elevations and limited access to medical treatment make the Snowman Trek one of the most difficult and dangerous trails in the world. As Grange tells of his unbelievable

expedition, one cannot sense even an ounce of fear in his words despite warnings of a grueling journey ahead. He writes, “Hiking along the trail, I had a wonderful sense of surrendering to adventure, of looking resolutely forward, of feeling ready for what may come.” Risks aside, the Snowman Trek offers hikers an up-close-and-personal experience with the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan. Warm and rich with culture, Grange’s accounts of his interactions with the Bhutanese people are the true gems of his book. The author explains to the reader that Bhutan is governed by a policy of “Gross National Happiness,” meaning the people of Bhutan are genuinely committed to promoting joy in themselves and others. Grange writes that Bhutan takes happiness so seriously, they have devoted an entire branch of their government to it. He writes, “The Center for Bhutan Studies

is like the Federal Reserve Bank of the U.S., only instead of prioritizing their country’s economic future, it studies the economy of bliss and makes every effort to ensure there is never a recession in Bhutan’s bank vault of joy.” Further illustrating his experience are several photographs throughout Blossom Rain. From a snapshot of grinning Bhutanese school boys to breathtaking images of clouds settling between soaring mountain peaks, these pictures provide even more insight into Grange’s unforgettable journey. Conquering the trek at age 33, Grange encountered more spellbinding adventure in those 24 days than most people will know in a lifetime. Not only does the author let readers catch a glimpse into his time on the toughest trek in the world, he inspires them to set out on their own fearless explorations.

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Beneath Blossom Rain | By Kevin Grange, ’04

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Conquering the trek at age 33, Grange encountered more spellbinding adventure in those 24 days than most people will know in a lifetime.

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BOOKMARKS

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EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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The Latino/a Condition: A Critical Reader (2nd ed.) Editors | Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic, professors, School of Law The acclaimed book brings together a range of new and classic Latino and Latina voices from the fields of law, sociology, history, media studies and politics. Delgado and Stefancic edit this collection of stories that offer a broad portrait of Latino/a life in the United States at the beginning of the 21st century.

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Pick Up Your Own Brass: Leadership the FBI Way Authors | Kathleen McChesney, ’76 MPS, and William Gavin, ’77 MBA Pick Up Your Own Brass is a story of leadership at the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Namely, the leadership qualities that enable the FBI to “successfully navigate through a century of war, espionage, organized crime, terrorism, fraud and corruption,” according to the book’s back cover. Alums Gavin and McChesney pulled together a compelling subject born from real-life stories from within the bureau.

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NEW RELEASE

It’s So Easy: and other lies. Author | Duff McKagan Duff McKagan, former SU MBA student who rose to fame as the bassist for Guns ’N Roses and more recently, rock group Velvet Revolver, has just released a new book, It’s So Easy: and other lies. McKagan returned to his SU roots in October when he visited campus for a panel discussion on life as a rock star, his work as a writer—he is a regular contributor to publications including Seattle Weekly—and how his Albers education helps in his endeavors in wealth management. SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 45

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class notes

Avijit Sinha, ’09, MBA, and Sangeeta Ranjit, ’09 MBA, were blessed with a lovely daughter, Meher Sinha, born on June 1, 2011. The family lives in Newcastle, Wash.

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Leslie Ann Budewitz, ’81, has released her first book, Books, Crooks & Counselors: How to Write Accurately About Criminal Law and Courtroom Procedure. A practicing lawyer with more than 25 years experience in the field, Budewitz is also a published mystery writer. Read an excerpt of her work at www.lawandfiction.com.

46 / Class Notes

Rebecca Salinas, ’10, married Trevor Kane Aug. 6, 2011, in the chapel at Seattle’s Holy Names Academy. Salinas and Kane currently reside in South Bend, Ind., where Kane is working on a PhD from the University of Notre Dame and Salinas works at Penn High School.

Submit achievements, personal and professional news and photos for Class Notes at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Christina (Kressner) Easton, ’95, was elected president of the Board at the Eastside German Language School in Issaquah, Wash. The Eastside German Language School (EGLS) offers German language immersion classes and cultural activities to students of all ages, from preschoolers to adults.

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versity. In 1980, Hennessy joined the Texas State faculty and was promoted to professor in 1987. For two years he served as Associate Dean in the College of Liberal Arts prior to chairing the English department from 2005 to 2011. Hennessy has written three widely used textbooks, The Borzoi Handbook for Writers (with Frederick Crews and Sandra Schor), The Borzoi Practice Book for Writers and The Random House Practice Book.

a student, particularly a course by Robert Cousineau, S.J., that dealt with existentialism. Says Swindal of Father Cousineau, “He was well known in those days—he was an inspiring, enthusiastic and enthralling teacher. … He very much inspired me to study more philosophy and particularly existentialism.” He adds, “I just want to say that the education I received at SU, and not just in the philosophy department, continues to inspire me profoundly.”

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2001 Sue Kleitsch, MEd, is the new principal of Whitman Middle School in Seattle. In 1997, Kleitsch joined Whitman and served as the school’s assistant principal for the past decade. Prior to Whitman she taught classes at Marshall Alternative High School.

2005

Deborah Solatka, a graduate of SU’s doctoral program in Educational Leadership, accepted a position as program director for school guidance and counseling at City University of Seattle. Solatka served for Don Nelson has purchased the 30 years in K–12 education as a school Methow Valley News in Twisp, Wash., 1994 counselor and central office administrator. and will serve as editor and pubDanielle Burd, Matt Hanna, ’94 lisher of the 108-year-old weekly and Tina Marie Mares, ’08 JD, were She says she is excited to pursue her 1971 newspaper. Previously, Nelson named in the Puget Sound Business “passion for preparing future generations Richard Gaspar was recently apof professional, caring and competent was editor of the Skagit Valley Journal’s “40 Under 40” issue in pointed to the U.S. Small Business Herald in Mount Vernon, Wash., September. Burd works as executive school counselors.” Administration’s Region X Regula- and editor of the Puget Sound vice president, Commercial Region tory Fairness Board. Gaspar, who Business Journal in Seattle. He is a Manager, at Umpqua Bank. Hanna 2008 owns Seattle-based Gaspar ConKaren Ward, a graduate of Albers, runs former member of the Seattle Uni- is chair of the real estate group at struction, will serve as a resource versity Alumni Board of Directors, Cairncross & Hempelmann. Mares Girly Girl Wines. The inspiration came for small businesses and will work and was editor of The Spectator from participation in the 2008 Albers is deputy prosecuting attorney at with business trade groups to Business Plan Competition. Each bottle during his senior year. the King County Prosecuting address regional concerns around of wine under her Girly Girl brand has Attorney’s Office. federal regulatory enforcement a fun “girly” name and personality at1978 and compliance issues. tached. After winning the Albers Jim Swindal will soon release a 1997 Business Plan Competition’s $10,000 book on existentialism, Action and Cory Hitzemann was promoted Michael J. Hennessy has been prize, she presented her plan and Girly Existence. Swindal, a philosophy at Coughlin Porter Lundeen, a appointed Dean of the College Girl is now owned and produced by major at SU, says he was inspired structural, civil and seismic engiof Liberal Arts at Texas State UniWashington Wine & Beverage. by several courses he took while neering firm.

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Claud A. Johnson recently ended 45 years in education when he retired from St. Paul’s Academy in Bellingham, Wash., where he served as upper school director and teacher. Initially, he taught for two years at Queen of Angels in Port Angeles. In 1998, Johnson retired from the Tukwila School District where he taught for 31 years. He then embarked on another career at St. Paul’s Academy. During his time there he established the British Studies program, in which students traveled and studied in England.

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Angelica Germani, ’04, and Pablo Mendoza were engaged July 21, 2011. Mendoza proposed to Germani while on summer vacation in Ashland, Ore. The two look forward to honoring their 10th year as a couple by marrying in an intimate wedding celebration planned for September 2012 in Woodinville, Wash.

Eva (Wolff) Hortsch, ’02, and her husband, Gary Hortsch welcomed their first child, August Peter Hortsch—“Gus” for short— May 22, 2011. He was 8 pounds, 6 ounces and according to mom Eva, the first grandchild on her side of the family and the third on her husband’s side.

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Emmanuelle Escandar, ’10, is the new administrative assistant for the office of Alumni Relations at Loyola University, Chicago.

SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 47

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Father James Louis Plastino (July 20, 2011)

Daniel Strickland (Sept. 23, 2011)

Daniel graduated from Seattle University with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and went on to Stanford University where he earned his master’s and PhD. In 2010, he joined Santa Clara University’s engineering school as an assistant professor in mechanical engineering, where he taught classes in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics.

1943 Robert “Bob” Borrows (July 18, 2011)

1948 Robert Aquinas Dempsey (July 16, 2011)

1950 Vito Trifone Chiechi (July 26, 2011) Jules Edmond Gamache (Aug. 13, 2011) Charlotte Sohnly (Sept. 5, 2011)

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1962 William B. (Bill) MacIsaac Cardiff (July 17, 2011) Albina Therese O’Sullivan (July 7, 2011)

1965 Charles George “Chuck” Dynes (June 24, 2011)

1969 1970 Taylor Tag Greene, MBA (Aug. 25, 2011)

1971 F. Bernard Lally (June 12, 2011)

1973 Frances Mayer (Sept. 9, 2011) Christine Clishe, JD

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THINKING OF YOU

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Terry Byrne (June 11, 2011) Mary Ellen McLane Maffia, ’81 MEd (May 31, 2011)

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Thomas Patrick Colleran (June 7, 2011) Shirley Ann Ryan (April 27, 2011)

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James E. Merlino (Aug. 10, 2011)

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Seattle University remembers those in our alumni family and university community whom we’ve lost. Share your memories of those we honor by visiting In Memoriam at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

Geoffrey George (Aug. 30, 2011)

1978 Sonya Ann Fujioka (July 19, 2011)

We ask readers and family members to inform us of the death of alumni and friends of Seattle University. If a newspaper obituary is available, please e-mail it to sumagazine@ seattleu.edu or send via mail to Seattle University Magazine, Attn.: Obits, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122–1090. (Obits may be edited for space and clarity.) Seattle University Magazine now publishes full obituaries online only at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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IN MEMORIAM

1984 Alfred B. Williams (Aug. 29, 2011)

1986 Thomas Arthur Neumann, MEd (July 20, 2011)

1993 Kathryn Katie Marie Roe (Sept. 7, 2011)

FACULTY/STAFF Virginia M. Steele (July 13, 2011) Richard L. Turner, Jr. (Sept. 5, 2011)

STUDENTS Cameron Christian (senior; Oct. 16, 2011) Taro Kobayashi (senior; Oct. 15, 2011)

48 / In Memoriam

ICS# 110641 • Seattle University 2011 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 56pg PAGE 48 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 Gracol • 80# Nature Matte Book

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It was a happy sea of red as alumni, students, faculty/staff and our community friends turned out for the second annual Red Out. The spirit-driven (Go Redhawks!) event was fraught with fun, thanks to games, face painting, good food and great company. Following Red Out, people made their way over to Championship Field to watch men’s soccer take on Sacramento State.

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PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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BEING SCENE

SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 49

ICS# 110641 • Seattle University 2011 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 56pg PAGE 49 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 Gracol • 80# Nature Matte Book

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The Last Word is an interesting take on the arts/literature/academia/travel and more.

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Six years ago, Stephen Hueffed, ’88, ’95, and his family traded in city life for greener pastures—and a dairy farm in Pe Ell, Wash., in the southwest corner of the state.

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The move marked more than a dramatic geographical shift. For Hueffed, it was an opportunity to start anew professionally. After years working in administrative roles for religious organizations and churches, he decided it was time to go into business for himself. While he found his work rewarding after the birth of their first child, Hueffed and his wife, Amy—a naturopathic physician in private practice at the time—decided to take stock of their lives. “You start to do a little soul searching,” he says. “Both of us looked at our hopes and dreams, considering that our lives were evolving.” They thought about what types of businesses would be both practical and profitable. In the end they went for one that was agricultural in nature, which led to their purchase of a historic 146acre farmstead. And a focus on cheese. “We settled on cheese,” Hueffed says. “The idea had taken root on our trips to the wine country in California.”

©2011 GREGORY CLARK, PHOTOGRAPHER

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Alum Stephen Hueffed and family find success with Willapa Hills Cheese company

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Say Cheese | By Tina Potterf

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develop cheeses that were different than the mass-produced varieties on the market. “There are only a few sheep’s milk blue cheese like ours being produced in any Three years ago, the couple opened volume in the continental United States. a creamery on the site and soon, The farm’s sheep’s milk blues are one of Willapa Hills Cheese was born. a kind,” says Hueffed, adding that there Hueffed wasn’t deterred by the is little head-to-head competition for the fact that he had no experience in the types he produces. cheese-making business. After taking Originally the plan was to offer only a class, working with a consultant and sheep’s milk cheeses but because of the obtaining a Ph meter, “a modern cheese short, seasonal nature of sheep’s milk, maker’s best friend,” says Hueffed, the available six months of the year, Hueffed family was soon making cheese. Sure, had to diversify and did so by adding there was plenty of trial and error, cow’s milk into the mix. Some of their testing recipes and experimentation. most popular cheeses in the blue family “On one level it is very much like are Two-Faced Blue, a blend of sheep’s and following a cooking recipe,” he says. cow’s milk, and Big Boy Blue, a classic cow’s “But to make good cheese, there’s a milk blue cheese. They also offer artisan science behind it but also an art to it. spreads and yogurt cheeses in both sweet There’s an old saying that some of the and savory varieties. The cream cheesebest cheeses come out of mistakes.” based blue cheese dips and other spreads Willapa Hills’ specialties are natural have enabled Hueffed and company to rind farmstead and artisan cheeses. reach a broader market. They have become known for their line “Classic cheese making is still the heart of fresh and aged sheep’s milk blue and soul of what we do,” he says, “but cheeses including their “Willapa White,” these tub products have helped us access “Fresh With Ewe” and “Ewe Moon.” retail in a different way.” Why sheep’s milk? Hueffed wanted to Willapa Hills’ cheeses are made in small batches and by hand on the farm. Hueffed’s efforts have paid off, with national recognition and growing interest in their offerings—the cheeses have been picked up VISIT WILLAPA HILLS by consumers, chefs, restaurants and the like throughout the region and beyond. Willapa Hills Cheese The cheeses and spreads are available offers Saturday tastings on location on the farm, at various on the farm. To plan a farmers markets, Whole Foods, PCC visit and a tasting, visit Natural Markets, Metropolitan Markets willapahillscheese.com/. and smaller area grocery stores throughout And check out Stephen Washington, Oregon and in San Francisco. and Amy’s blog at Does he ever miss the big city out on willapahillsfarmsteadthe farm? Not a chance. cheese.blogspot.com/. “We are building something as a family,” Hueffed says. “I love the city but never need to live in the city again. This is heaven on earth.”

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ICS# 110641 • Seattle University 2011 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 56pg PAGE 50 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 Gracol • 80# Nature Matte Book

Read more about Stephen and his family’s deep ties to SU at www. seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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©2011 GREGORY CLARK, PHOTOGRAPHER

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The Hueffed family on the farm: Stephen and wife Amy with sons Willem and Lucas, daughter Lillian Grace and some furry friends.

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Willapa Hills’ specialties are natural rind farmstead and artisan cheeses. They have become known for their line of fresh and aged sheep’s milk blue cheeses.

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SU Magazine Winter 2011 / 51

ICS# 110641 • Seattle University 2011 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 56pg PAGE 51 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 Gracol • 80# Nature Matte Book

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SEATTLE UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE 901 12th Avenue PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090

Fond Memories and Much Gratitude

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ven now, some 55 years after graduating from Seattle University, Bill, ‘55, and Judy Doyle, ‘56, have indelibly fond memories and much gratitude for their Jesuit education. “We want the next generation to have the same experiences that we had and better,” says Judy. “We think Seattle University is an excellent place to put our money and invest in the future. That is why we have included the university in our estate plans.”

Contact Seattle University, Planned Giving, at (206) 296-6974 or e-mail orrj@seattleu.edu.

www.seattleugift.org.

Bill and Judy Doyle are supporting students at Seattle University through their estate plans.


Seattle University Magazine - Winter 2011