Issuu on Google+

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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Seattle University

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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The new Seattle University Park creates a vibrant outdoor space for intramural, club and rec sports and softball on Logan Field. Synthetic turf means the park can withstand continuous use and the addition of lights throughout the playing field allows the park to be utilized on even the darkest of winter days.

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SEATTLE UNIVERSITY PARK

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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Seattle University Volume 37 • Issue Number 1 • Winter 2013

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Art Director Terry Lundmark, ’82

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Editor Tina Potterf

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Photographer Chris Joseph Taylor

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Contributing Writers Annie Beckmann, Jason Behenna, Maura Beth Pagano,’12, Mike Thee

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Editorial Assistant Emily Downing

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Brand Director Mary Olson Vice President/University Advancement Mary Kay McFadden

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Assistant Vice President/Alumni Relations Susan Vosper, '90, '10 LEMBA

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Seattle University Magazine (ISSN: 15501523) is published in fall, winter and spring by Marketing Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Distributed without charge to alumni and friends of Seattle University. Comments and questions about Seattle University Magazine may be addressed to the editor at (206) 296-6111; address: Seattle University MARCOM, 901 12th Ave. PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090; fax: (206) 296-6137; or e-mail: tinap@seattleu.edu. Check out the magazine online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Susan Meyers, '99, returns to her alma mater to teach in the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services and Equal Opportunity Officer, Gerald V. Huffman, RINA 214, (206) 296-5869 or e-mail huffmaje@seattleu.edu.

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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MAGAZINE

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Faculty Focus

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Class Notes

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The Last Word

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On Campus

Seattle University students expand their global engagement experiences—and their minds—during a service trip to northern Thailand.

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 1

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ON THE COVER Junior Alex Walz looks over his textbook for his Buddhist philosophy class with his friend Fai, a Chiang Mai University student, as the two explore Wat Suan Dok in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Walz studied abroad at the university this past summer.

ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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Web extras and special features at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Saturday, March 9 All day, Seattle University campus The School of Theology and Ministry presents its annual Search for Meaning Book Festival, featuring notable authors Michael Chabon, a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and Reza Aslan, internationally acclaimed scholar and writer, plus more than 40 authors in session. Information: www.searchformeaning.us.

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NATIONAL JESUIT ALUMNI DAY OF SERVICE

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Saturday, April 27 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Seattle neighborhoods Alumni and friends are invited to participate in Seattle University’s annual day of service in the community. RSVP and information: (206) 296-2637 or e-mail magis-rsvp@ seattleu.edu.

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For more information on these and other alumni events, visit www.seattleu. edu/alumni/events.

ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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Saturday, February 23 9 a.m to 3 p.m., Chapel of St. Ignatius Each year a day of reflection is held at the Chapel of St. Ignatius providing an opportunity for retreat and renewal for Jesuit-educated alumni and friends. Directors design the day with time for quiet prayer, presentations, small group conversation and a liturgy. Information and RSVP: (206) 296-2637 or e-mail magis-rsvp@seattleu.edu.

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SERVICE SATURDAYS AT ST. MARY’S FOOD BANK January 26 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., St. Mary’s Food Bank (611 20th Ave. South, Seattle) Serve with other Jesuit-educated alumni at St. Mary’s Food Bank in Seattle’s Central District. Volunteers sort and distribute food, check-in clients and participate in a short reflection following service. Alumni family and children welcome. Service Saturdays occur on the fourth Saturday of the month through June. Information and RSVP: (206) 2962637 or e-mail magis-rsvp@seattleu.edu.

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Tuesday, January 22, 2013 7 p.m., Pigott Auditorium Seattle University’s annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration will feature Carlotta Walls LaNier, one of the Little Rock Nine. LaNier, a Congressional Gold Medal winner, was the youngest of nine students who desegregated Central High School in Little Rock, Ark. in 1957. She is the author of A Mighty Long Way: My Journey to Justice of Little Rock Central High School. Following her presentation, she will sign books at a reception in Paccar Atrium. Information: (206) 296-6070 or e-mail oma@seattleu.edu.

Friday, February 15 6 to 8 p.m., Casey Commons (SU campus) Join members of the African American Alumni Chapter for a meeting and program in honor of Black History Month.

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MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. CELEBRATION WITH CARLOTTA WALLS LaNIER

AFRICAN AMERICAN ALUMNI CELEBRATION

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Saturday, January 19 5:30 to 7 p.m., Connolly Center Show your support for the women’s basketball team as they take on Louisiana Tech at Connolly Center’s North Court. An alumni pre-game rally will take place before the game starting at 5:30 p.m. Information and tickets: (206) 296-2835; pre-game: (206) 296-6127. A pre-game rally (same time and location) is scheduled for: February 9 (v. Mexico State).

Saturday, February 2 5:30 to 7 p.m., Club Live at KeyArena at Seattle Center Celebrate Homecoming weekend and cheer on the men’s basketball team as it takes on Utah State in the final home game of the regular season. An alumni pre-game rally featuring Family Hoops Night will take place before the game starting at 5:30 p.m. Information and tickets: (206) 296-2835; pre-game rally: (206) 296-6127.

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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL IN FULL SWING

CHEER ON THE HOME TEAM AT HOMECOMING

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Thursday, January 10 5:30 to 7 p.m., KeyArena at Seattle Center Show your support for the men’s basketball team as they take on New Mexico State on SU’s home court at KeyArena. An alumni pre-game rally will take place before the game starting at 5:30 p.m. at Club Live at KeyArena. Tickets and information: (206) 296-2835; pre-game rally: (206) 296-6127. Future pre-game rallies (same time and location) are scheduled for: January 12 (v. University of Denver), 24th (v. University of Texas), 26th (v. Texas State) and 31st (v. San Jose State University); and February 2 (v. Utah State) and 16th (v. University of Texas, Arlington).

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MEN’S BASKETBALL IN ACTION

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january

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Alumni Awards Celebration SAVE THE DATE! S

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Tuesday, April 16 T 5 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., Campion Ballroom Come celebrate the achievements of alumni and members of the SU community at the 28th Annual Alumni Awards. The event will recognize this year’s award recipients and members of the President’s Club and Legacy Society. RSVP and information: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail alumnirsvp@seattleu.edu.

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 3

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A compilation of fun facts, news bites, events and more connecting you to SU. B

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Read more about the award and Fr. O’Leary at www.seattleu.edu/magazine.

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At this year’s Gala, SU’s signature blacktie event to raise funds for student scholarships, Patrick O’Leary, S.J., was awarded the St. Ignatius Medal, the highest honor bestowed on an individual by the university. Fr. O’Leary is the chaplain for SU faculty and staff.

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FATHER O’LEARY RECEIVES ST. IGNATIUS MEDAL

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FUN FACT

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The number of students (on average) in an undergraduate class at SU.

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Seattle University once again ranks among the top regional universities in the West, according to U.S. News and World Report’s America’s Best Colleges 2013 guide. SU ranks 10th among 121 regional universities in the West that provide a full range of undergraduate and master’s degree programs. The university has maintained a spot in the top 10 consistently for more than a decade. The prestigious academic ranking coincides with widespread recognition of the university’s significant achievements in academic excellence, campus experience, athletics and commitment to service and social justice as a Jesuit Catholic university.

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U.S. NEWS: WE’RE IN THE TOP 10

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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The Albers Placement Center recently hosted a career fair for business and engineering majors. The event provided students with opportunities to connect with leading employers from the Puget Sound region, explore various job and internship options and build their professional network.

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JOB HUNTING

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More than 300 students attended this year's career fair, where they were able to meet with 61 employers.

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Grammy award-winning composer, classical violinist and folk fiddler Mark O’Connor was a source of inspiration for Fine Arts music students when he visited Seattle University in the fall. During a lively two-hour master class, O’Connor—a native of Mountlake Terrace, Wash., who now calls New York home—offered insights on string performances as he listened to students play sections of his original compositions. He then played bits of them himself and explained how the students could advance their performance. O’Connor’s first-ever master class on campus was made possible by Quinton Morris, SU’s director of chamber and instrumental music, and the Pigott Family Endowment for the Arts.

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PHOTO BY MORGAN RODRIGUEZ

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FINE ART OF FIDDLING

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 5

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Mark O’Connor

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Solid Gold | By Tina Potterf

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It seems that nearly every time Aldrich dips her toes in the water she emerges as a new record holder, besting her own previous record-breaking times. Born and raised in Walla Walla, Wash., Aldrich worked for years as a secretary and later went to New York City for a banking job on Wall Street. But without a degree she felt she was in a dead end job. So she packed up and headed back home to earn that college degree. Back in Eastern Washington, Aldrich started swimming at her local YMCA. What makes Aldrich’s victories in the pool all the more sweet? She found success in a sport that she all but had given up on. At a college swim meet, Aldrich had a bad finish that was so defeating that she decided to leave the

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the backstroke and most recently, freestyle. And she’s amassed an impressive collection of medals—mostly gold. In the 25-, 50-, 100- and 200-yard backstroke at competitions in Alaska, North Idaho, Eastern Washington and the Washington Senior Games in 2012, she set new records in her age group. Early last year she took up freestyle swimming and was a slim .05 of a second sport altogether. It would be nearly 50 from setting a statewide record in the years before she would reenter the pool 25-yard. After this round of wins, Aldrich and do so with renewed purpose. says she was “a puddle of joy.” “I learned as a kid how to splash She also set new state records in the around and doggy paddle but that was 25-, 50- and 200-yard freestyle. Aldrich the extent [of my abilities] in my youth,” again swam for gold—and the record Aldrich says. “After 48 years out of the books—in freestyle and backstroke pool, I returned in 2010 and trashed all events, including a record-setting 38.03 of the records.” seconds in the 50-yard freestyle in North At the Y, Aldrich worked on refining Idaho and 16.99 seconds in the 25-yard her backstroke, which she exhibited with freestyle at an Eastern Washington senior great finesse during a visit to Seattle games meet, among other victories. University last year. She slipped on her Despite her remarkable success in bright pink swim cap and one-piece suit the water, and all those medals, Aldrich and eased effortlessly into the pool at is refreshingly modest. But make no Connolly Center, doing lap after lap in mistake, that competitive streak is as the water without breaking a sweat. strong as ever. In a couple short years, Aldrich has “I have to break my own records,” she turned in powerhouse performances in says. “I’m competitive like that.”

Competitive swimmer Suzie Aldrich, ’86, is the Michael Phelps of the Senior Games. The lithe 69-year-old, with the graceful long limbs on a striking 6-foot-1 frame and ever-present smile, is a marvel in the water, setting records with every stroke. She is living proof that competitive drive doesn’t have to wane with age, evident with the astounding success she’s had in competition for the age 60 and over set.

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Senior swimmer laps the competition and obliterates records

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“I learned as a kid how to splash around and doggy paddle but that was the extent [of my abilities].” SUZIE ALDRICH, ’86

ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 7

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Suzie Aldrich, ’86, shows some of her many medals during a visit to SU's Connolly Center pool.

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Frequency of Success | By Tina Potterf

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Graduate helps secure important grant for radio station in Zambia

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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Kimberly Whalen (above) receives a chicken as a gift from a community member who works with her in the Home Based Care program. Whalen (far right) teaches math lessons to a fifth grade class at the radio school in Sintemba.

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the clarity and strength of the broadcast signal. The grant was especially critical because ZICTA, the national regulatory organization, mandated a switch to digital broadcasting. Without the new equipment, Chikuni Radio would have to stop broadcasting, Whalen explains, which The opportunity to apply the knowthings that are most scary can be the would be devastating for the community. ledge gained in the college’s Humanities most life changing.” Whalen, who as an undergraduate for Teaching program in a real world At the school in Zambia, located at worked in SU’s Writing Center, put her setting in a school a world away—far a Jesuit mission, Whalen was tasked skills to use in drafting the grant proposal. from this corner of the world and the with teaching one class period a day. And her efforts paid off in a big way. This Bellevue, Wash. home she hails from— This left her with some time on her past July, she learned that the station has proved life changing not only for hands. One day she got to talking with was awarded the grant, totaling nearly Whalen but also for the people who live a priest from the local parish, inquiring $125,000 USD, providing the necessary in the village in this rural area. about any projects he needed help funding to buy the equipment and train Although she had her sights set on with and offering her assistance. He the DJs and technicians on how to use it. teaching, she never imagined it would be mentioned a grant he was writing to gain “It was so exciting to learn we got the at an international level. financial support for Chikuni Radio, the grant,” says Whalen. “It was rewarding “When I came to Seattle University as community radio station that is the main to be able to apply my writing skills to a freshman, I was never planning to study source for disseminating news, school a project like this and have a successful abroad,” she says. lessons and reminders for people living outcome.” But by her junior year, she was getting with HIV/AIDS to take their medications. Whalen’s connection to Zambia didn’t an urge to explore what existed outside of The station serves Chikuni Parish, an end with her teaching and grant writing the campus borders. area of about 10,000 square kilometers, efforts. Over the summer she was in “I went to [Dean] Jodi Kelly and said, and operates on an analog broadcasting Zambia for 10 days and in October, went ‘I think I want to study abroad. And system. The grant would fund the back to start a year-long job as assistant Africa seemed pretty cool. It was never purchase of new equipment to upgrade director of Home Based Care, which something I planned,” Whalen says. “The to digital, which would vastly improve tackles issues that people living with HIV/ AIDS face. As part of her job she will also oversee Taonga, a program that provides free elementary schooling to marginalized youth through lessons broadcast over the radio. In this new position, Whalen is responsible for evaluating and monitoring the various programs, writing grants and developing new programs. Whalen credits SU, especially her Matteo Ricci College education, for solidifying her career path. “My education has changed who I am as a person,” she says. “… It has been more than memorizing facts and refining skills; it has been discovering who I am as a person and becoming more conscious of who I want to be.”

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Early last year, Kimberly Whalen landed a teaching internship in Zambia, Southern Africa, for her senior teaching practicum at Matteo Ricci College. In many ways her role at Chikuni Girls School in Zambia’s Southern Province was the realization of a dream held since Whalen was young: to teach.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF KIMBERLY WHALEN/KELLY MICHELO, S.J.

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 9

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“My education has been more than memorizing facts and refining skills; it has been discovering who I am as a person and becoming more conscious of who I want to be.”

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PERSPECTIVES B

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Here to Represent | By Annie Beckmann

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and child welfare systems. Ever since her high school years when she began working as a community organizer Hendren, a 2012 School of Law grad, saw a need to assist the vulnerable and marginalized. Her unwavering commitment to those with criminal histories spans housing, employment discrimination, immigration and family and domestic issues. “I felt as though people in my life were rarely able to access an attorney when they needed one because there were not enough attorneys who provided free legal services to low-income and poor people,” she says. In 2012, Hendren became the law school’s Leadership for Justice Fellow. SU is the only law school in Washington to offer a fellowship for a graduate to work with an organization on a specific social justice project for underserved or marginalized individuals or communities. Of all the schools in the Northwest, Seattle University’s School of Law had the

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Hendren’s desire to assist women who lose custody of their children because of incarceration has much to do with the lack of access to legal representation for mothers once they are released from prison. In private custody battles for their kids, these women frequently go against fathers with whom they have a history of abuse. Hendren is also concerned with relatively recent—and well-intended— legislation that compels the state to begin a process to permanently terminate parental rights when a child becomes a dependent of the state for a year. The law addresses the lifelong consequences for children who never progress from foster care to adoption. The same law, however, affects an increasing number of women in prison who lose their children even though these moms may have no history of abuse or neglect. Mothers who are African American, Latina and Native American are more likely to be impacted, Hendren notes, because of racial disparities in the state’s criminal

deepest commitment to social justice work, she says. She describes SU’s Access to Justice Institute as critical both to connect her to opportunities and to nurture her growth in social justice law. Ada Shen-Jaffe, professor from practice in the School of Law, has been an active member of the equal justice community at the local, state and national levels for more than three decades. Hendren was among her students. “Elizabeth came to the School of Law as a community organizer, already possessing a passionate drive to use her energy, education and talents in the service of justice for communities and individuals written off and made invisible in our society—incarcerated mothers,” says Shen-Jaffe. Hendren interned with the domestic violence unit of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project and the family law and housing units of the Northwest Justice Project in Seattle, where she developed the Reentry Initiated through Services and Education (RISE) Project. With RISE, Hendren plans to build a state-wide network of family law, housing and public benefits’ support for formerly incarcerated mothers through strategic partnerships and greater community education.

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When family law works against formerly incarcerated mothers, Elizabeth Hendren is prepared to provide legal support to help these women navigate life on the other side.

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Law grad offers a voice and inspiration to formerly incarcerated women

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“I felt as though people in my life were rarely able to access an attorney when they needed one because there were not enough attorneys who provided free legal services to low-income and poor people .” ELIZABETH HENDREN, ’12 JD

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Elizabeth Hendren, ’12, is helping to provide legal services and a voice to formerly incarcerated women.

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PHOTO BY MARCUS R. DONNER

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ON CAMPUS B

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Looking to the Future | By Mike Thee

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President Sundborg begins new five-year term at the helm of SU

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The president envisions himself being a lot more externally focused. If there’s one thing he is most excited about, it’s the Seattle University Youth Initiative, which is “off to such a remarkably strong start” he says, referencing the Presidential Award for community service that SU received last year. Not surprisingly, much of the president’s universities are panicking in terms of So is this Father Sundborg’s last term as next term will focus on the university’s chasing the new technology, but our president? That will be as much a question upcoming capital campaign, set to launch strategy is to have the technology chase for the trustees as the president, he says. “So this summer. our academic quality.” much depends on my health and the need The president sees a new era dawning Also on the president’s mind these for the university to have fresh leadership.” at SU in which the university will days is how to continue to make an SU Of the 28 presidents at Jesuit instistrengthen and develop new partnerships, education what he calls a “patently global tutions, he is now third in seniority—only particularly with the significant global education.” One way this is happening the presidents of Saint Louis University and institutions of Seattle such as the Gates is with the revamped Core curriculum Boston College have served longer. At 69, Foundation and PATH. He also cites and its greater emphasis on global Fr. Sundborg is four years older than any as important the creation of a series of education built into course offerings. other president at Seattle University has ever health and medical centers that focus on Key to his agenda for the next five been. STEM (science, technology, engineering years is “the community of colleagues— Yet this president, who is palpably and math) and health sciences. our faculty and staff who believe in energetic and enthusiastic for Seattle UnivAnother area of focus for the president and hold the mission. We can’t keep ersity's next five years, shows no signs of will be "finding our way with how developing new initiatives and not slowing down. we use technology to best deliver a develop that community of colleagues,” “I'm feeling great and loving what I do,” Seattle University education. … Many Sundborg says. he says.

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There were no attack ads. No conventions, no debates. As presidential races go, the Board of Trustees’ decision to reappoint Stephen Sundborg, S.J., as SU’s leader for another five-year term came and went without much fanfare. And yet, uneventful as his “re-election” may have been, Father Sundborg is entering the 16th year of his presidency with a very ambitious agenda.

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”Many universities are panicking in terms of chasing the new technology, but our strategy is to have the technology chase our academic quality.”

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The Cost of Higher Education

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GUEST COLUMN BY JOSEPH PHILLIPS DEAN, ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 13

ILLUSTRATION BY ROBERT NEUBECKER

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“To keep our program relevant, we need to rein in the financial cost and increase accessibility. That means identifying what is really needed in an MBA and delivering that in an even more convenient format.”

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ways. Perhaps the slowest to be impacted is our undergraduate business degree, which by its nature has a strong formative character to it. Where we think it is showing up first is in our MBA program. Our program is strong and highly rated, but tuition and fees are high for the average student. And while we have always prided ourselves on the flexibility of our program and the ability to accommodate working professionals, it still takes a lot of time and requires many visits to campus. Overlaying all of that is a steady drumbeat of commentaries critical of the value of the MBA. Of course, we don’t agree with that, but that talk is on the street. To keep our program relevant, we need to rein in the financial cost and increase accessibility. That means identifying what is really needed in an MBA and delivering that in an even more convenient format. We need to design different ways for students to complete prerequisites, cut some of the coursework and move to “hybrid” models of teaching, where lectures seldom take place when classes meet. To the extent that students (and employers, perhaps) question the value of the MBA, they may have more interest in certificate programs. There is no way to know for certain how “Disruptive Innovation” will impact higher education, but it would be foolish to assume it will not. New developments are taking place very quickly and we must stay alert and be ready to respond.

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Two forces are coming together to force our hand. One is the continuing improvement in technology that facilitates online education. Online instruction is not new. It has been around for several decades, but what is different now is that it is getting better. The second force is the high cost of higher education, whether it is private or public. Private universities have been consistently raising tuition faster than the rate of inflation. That is not sustainable. Public higher education, perhaps underpriced at one time, has increased sharply in cost due to financial pressures experienced by state governments. This story is familiar to every family trying to send their children off to college. Clayton Christensen, a management professor at Harvard, has made a name for himself with his research on “Disruptive Innovation,” a model he uses to explain why companies at the top of many sectors have found themselves suddenly struggling to survive. Whether it is explaining the demise of Blockbuster, Kodak or Borders, each was the victim of a disruptive innovation. Sometimes it is the development of a new technology or process. Sometimes it is the development of a new product that overtakes an existing one. Christensen has applied his insights to his own industry, higher education, which is presented in his co-authored book, The Innovative University. In it, he argues that universities will need to re-engineer themselves to assure ongoing relevance. Across our programs in Albers, we expect these trends to appear in different

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Compared to other sectors of our economy, higher education has not changed that much. How we do things is not all that different now than it was 30 years ago when I started my career in higher education. We have continuously refined and improved upon what we do, but the basic framework has persisted. That seems like it is about to change.

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AT H L E T I C S B

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Action Heats Up | By Jason Behenna

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and at Stanford. The Redhawks also welcome defending WAC Tournament champion New Mexico State, regional rival Idaho and perennial WAC contender Utah State to town during the 2012-13 campaign. Coming off a 20-win season and a semifinal appearance in the Women’s Basketball Invitational postseason tournament, the women’s basketball team looks to make an immediate impact within the conference. Joan Bonvicini, also starting her fourth season at the helm of the women’s program, returns eight players, including Independent Player of the Year Kacie Sowell and juniors Ashley Ward and Sylvia Shephard. The team is looking forward to a strong season of play both at home— on the team’s home court at Connolly Center—and away.

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Senior Kacie Sowell was named Independent Player of the Year.

The Seattle University men’s and women’s basketball programs have been building momentum for several years. Now, with the athletics department completing the process toward NCAA Division I membership and SU entering the Western Athletic Conference (WAC), Redhawks basketball is primed for big accomplishments this season. Cameron Dollar begins his fourth year as head coach of the men’s basketball program and welcomes back eight letter winners from last year’s squad that finished strong, winning nine of its last 12 games, including eight consecutive games at KeyArena at Seattle Center. Juniors Sterling Carter and Clarence Trent will lead the Redhawks into a 28-game regular season schedule that features 15 home games at KeyArena as well as road contests at Virginia

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“… (With) SU entering the Western Athletic Conference (WAC), Redhawks basketball is primed for big accomplishments this season.”

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SHOW YOUR SUPPORT

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Junior Sterling Carter is a formidable force on the men's team.

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Support the Redhawks as they strive to win the WAC championship and reach the NCAA Tournament. Get your season tickets today. Visit GoSeattleU.com or call the Athletics ticket office at (206) 398-GOSU (4678).

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FA C U LT Y F O C U S B

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Full Steam(punk) Ahead | By Maura Beth Pagano, ’12

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of the accessories, gadgets and various accouterments associated with Steampunk are handmade. In fact, prefabricated embellishments might even be considered taboo. Within the community, this appreciation of DIY reaches beyond fashion. “These people are making a cultural statement and a political statement,” says Cohan. Their celebration of handcrafted goods and rebuff of massmanufactured products is an intentional rejection of modern corporations. Not only is the community inclusive when it comes to sharing resources, but also in terms of accepting its members for who they are. And that’s a good thing, because as Cohan notes, Steampunks come from all walks of life. One’s day job, socioeconmic status or sexual orientation are inconsequential to Steampunks. In fact, cross-gender costuming is a common occurrence within the community. Cohan likens Steampunk to an “identity creation machine.” Because the community is so supportive, and so uniquely contrasted with mainstream culture, the opportunities for creative expression are endless. “Steampunk gives people the freedom to create their own identity,” says Cohan.

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Cohan’s work on Steampunk took the form of an ethnography, a kind of research aimed at understanding a group or community by participating in it. Cohan says, “I had to dwell among them. You know, do their thing.” For starters, this meant attending SteamCon. This annual convention takes place in the Seattle area, which is home to a sizable Steampunk community. Cohan says he was among only a handful of the 1,800 attendees who wasn’t in costume. That’s the thing about Steampunk community members— they’re a dedicated breed. For Steampunk enthusiasts, “in costume” means donning the apparel most of us would associate with Victorian England or the early 20th century American Wild West. But it doesn’t stop there. A Steampunk look also incorporates an element of sci-fi or technology. For example, a gentleman sporting a top hat and waistcoat might complete his look with a bionic arm. Cohan says that for both men and women, goggles have become essential in a Steampunk wardrobe. The Steampunk approach to fashion says a lot of about how members of the culture value the notion of DIY. Many

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Although Mark Cohan is an accomplished scholar of the Steampunk subculture, he admits, “Steampunk is, in reality, difficult to define.” According to Cohan, an assistant professor of sociology, the simplest explanation of Steampunk is that it emerges from an interest in Victorian-era science fiction. “Steampunk is about imagining the future from the past,” says Cohan. In practice, this takes many forms. “It is a multitude of things: a subculture, an arts movement, an identity, a literary genre, an aesthetic.” Cohan is the author of the paper, “The Problem of Gears and Goggles: Managing Membership Boundaries and Identities in the Steampunk Subculture,” which he presented at a 2012 meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association in San Diego. His interest in Steampunk subculture started as a personal curiosity and, at first, he didn’t pursue it on an academic or professional level. But when he found himself “between projects,” he decided to seize the opportunity to take a more in-depth look at Steampunk. Cohan has cultivated an impressive knowledge of the subject, but as he shares, the idiosyncratic nature of Steampunk means his study isn’t finished just yet.

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Assistant Professor Mark Cohan focuses research on unique subculture

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“Steampunk gives people the freedom to create their own identity.”

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MARK COHAN, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR / SOCIOLOGY

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 17

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Integral to the Steampunk movement is the fashion or look of its members, with a nod to technology and a DIY spirit.

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PHOTO BY MIKE KANE

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FA C U LT Y F O C U S B

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FACULTY & STAFF / news and notes COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

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was a co-author on the paper.

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COLETTE HOPTION, assistant professor of management, co-authored an article, "Submitting to the Follower Label: Followership, Positive Affect and Extra-Role Behaviors," which has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Psychology.

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ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

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Associate Professor ROBERT ANDOLINA (international studies) is the new director of the Latin American Studies program.

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TOM TAYLOR, chair of the history department, has been appointed as the Reverend Louis Gaffney, S.J., Chair. As Gaffney Chair, Taylor will address the theme "Jesuit Missionaries: A Historical and Global Perspective" through a series of events.

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History Professor THERESA EARENFIGHT has been awarded the Theiline Pigott McCone Chair in Humanities. The award is given to an outstanding teacher and scholar in one of the humanities disciplines. Earenfight is known internationally for her scholarship on medieval Europe and gender issues.

DANUTA WOJNAR, RN, PhD, an associate professor and chair of the maternal/child and family nursing JOHN DIENHART, professor and department, Boeing Frank Shrontz Endowed Chair of was selected Professional Ethics, published an op-ed as a Robert on the financial crisis in the Seattle Wood Johnson Danuta Wojnar Times, "Greed is Just a Clue about the Foundation Real Problem." (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellow. Wojnar, one of only 20 individuals selected for COLLEGE OF SCIENCE the fellowship nationwide, will participate AND ENGINEERING in a three-year leadership development CAROLYN STENBAK, assistant professor program that aims to build effectiveness of biology, student Jeremiah Grams and in improving the health care system. Wojnar is a consultant for PATH and the Katie Deets, ’12, gave a presentation at Baby Friendly Initiative at the University the American Society for Virology's 31st Annual Meeting in Madison, Wis., which of Washington Valley Medical Center. Her research focuses on the promotion was attended by scientists throughout of health and healthcare for underserved the world. With Grams and Deets, Stenbak presented "Exploring the role of and vulnerable populations. foamy virus polymerase protein in virion SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AND MINISTRY assembly and polymerase dimerization utilizing an integrase deletion panel." MARY ROSE BUMPUS, a member of the Student Christopher Hagan also worked Sisters of Mercy, will transition from the on the project. School of Theology and Ministry’s core faculty to serve as part of a leadership Assistant Professor of chemistry team for her religious community, a role JOSEPH LANGENHAN co-authored the paper, “A Direct Comparison of the that will last a minimum of four years. In Anticancer Activities of Digitoxin MeON- this new position, Bumpus, who has been with STM since 2004, will help guide the Neoglycosides and O-Glycosides,” Sisters of Mercy into the next phase of which appeared in ACS Medicinal their lives. Chemistry Letters. Derek Rogalsky, ’10, JOT YAU, the Khalil Dibee Endowed Chair in Finance, coauthored a paper that was published by the Cato Institute. The paper is, "Would a Financial Transaction Tax Affect Financial Market Activity? Insights from Futures Markets."

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GARY CHAMBERLAIN, professor emeritus of Theology and Religious Studies, published an article, "Water's Spirit," in the summer 2012 edition of Earth Letter.

THERESA GRANGER, assistant clinical professor, is the recipient of a Nursing Faculty Initiatives Grant for her project, "The use of POGIL in first quarter nursing immersion courses: A pilot project." POGIL (process-oriented, guided inquiry learning) is an award-winning pedagogical technique and philosophy that has been well studied in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) courses at the high school and undergraduate level. However few studies have explored using the pedagogical approach in nursing.

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SEAN MCDOWELL, associate professor of English, has been named the new director of the Seattle University Honors Program.

COLLEGE OF NURSING

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College of Education Professor KATHERINE SCHLICK NOE'S first novel, Something to Hold (Clarion Books), is a 2012 Washington State Book Award winner. The book, based on her own childhood experiences living on Indian reservations in Washington and Oregon, was published in December 2011.

The article "Self Efficacy,” by MARILYN GIST and co-authored with Angela Gist, has been accepted for publication in the forthcoming edition of the Oxford Marilyn Gist Bibliographies in Management. Marilyn is the executive director of the Executive Leadership Program at Albers.

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Remembering the Life of Rhoady Lee, Jr.

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 19

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A dedicated alumnus and friend of the university, Lee’s commitment to SU “was boundless and unwavering.”

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Family recall that when people asked Lee how he was, his response was always the same: “Any better I couldn’t stand it.” Rhoady is survived by his wife Jeanne Marie; his children Sharon, Rhoady III, Timothy, Maureen, Mary Pat and Michael and their partners and spouses; his sister Sheila; and 15 grandchildren.

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“Rhoady was instrumental in shaping the university as we know it today. The Lees had a hand in enriching and making possible so many aspects of the Seattle University experience,” Father Sundborg said, noting the family’s support of many of the university’s most recognized buildings and learning spaces including the Casey Building, the Quad and Upper Mall, Chapel of St. Ignatius and the Student Center. Lee served on SU’s Alumni Board of Governors, the President’s Club Steering Committee and the Board of Trustees. He was also chair of the $10 million campaign for the Sullivan Leadership Endowment. Rhoady Lee, Jr. was a longtime and faithful In 1985, he was named the first supporter of SU, someone who left an indelible Alumnus of the Year, and in 1997 he mark on the university and community. and Jeanne Marie received honorary The university and community at large doctorates from the university. And in remember Rhoady Lee, Jr., who died Aug. another first, a decade later the couple 22, 2012. He was 84. received the St. Ignatius Medal, the Born in Seattle in 1928, Lee graduated university’s highest honor for service. from O’Dea High School and then went He was also active with the Forest Ridge on to earn a business degree from Seattle School and through the years chaired University in 1950. Here he met his wife many capital campaigns. of 61 years, Jeanne Marie. The Jeanne Marie and Rhoady Lee In his youth, Lee worked at the hotel Jr. Center for the Arts, which was properties owned by his father, Rhoady completed in 2006, is “a living tribute Lee, Sr. Following employment at Boeing, to the Lees and all that they have he and his family purchased a small sand meant to our university,” Fr. Sundborg and gravel company and later an asphalt said of the center built largely through paving business that is known today as the generosity of Jeanne Marie and Lakeside Industries. The company has Rhoady's children, who themselves have 650 employees with locations in Washextended their family's great legacy of ington, Oregon and Idaho. support for Seattle University. Lee was a successful business owner A devoted friend, family man and defined by family, his faith and genermentor to many, Lee loved to spend osity. A dedicated alumnus and friend of time outdoors with loved ones, whether the university, Lee’s commitment to SU it was fly fishing in Alaska, skiing Mt. “was boundless and unwavering,” said Baldy or riding horses and raising cattle President Stephen Sundborg, S.J. in Idaho’s Wood River Valley.

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 21

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n the distance, a glow from the morning sun spills over the silhouetted mountains and down into the valley. Beams of light cut through the rising fog and illuminate life along the hillside rice paddies, down to a valley community and the fringe of the northern Thai jungle. The village of Mae Nam Khun starts to stir. Mae Nam Khun is located in the Chiang Rai providence of Thailand near the border of Myanmar in an area historically known as the Golden Triangle. It is made up of a dynamic melting pot of northern hill tribes such as the Lahu and the Akha, mixed with a local Chinese community. At the community school the crackle from the loudspeaker awakens six Seattle University students and an alumnus sleeping in a bamboo-constructed house. The tune gliding forth through the air is reminiscent of the heyday of the Thai monarchy. In late summer, Professor Phil Thompson, PhD, and a contingent of SU’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders—two civil engineering students and a mechanical engineering student—joined with two English majors and a music student on an assessment trip to this part of the world to scout for possible future projects that Engineers Without Borders could tackle. Past projects include building a dormitory and clean water and sanitation measures. For this trip, water treatment was still top of mind as the untreated water in this rural village is a dangerous cocktail of pathogenic bacteria and viruses such as E. coli. All the residents get their water from the same source, which is often contaminated. “More than 4,000 people per day are dying in the world because they don’t have access to safe water,” says Thompson. “And it’s such a preventable problem.” While in Mae Nam Khun, the engineering students worked on existing safe water projects and filtration systems, along with three civil engineering students from Chiang Mai University who were there to learn how to keep the systems up and running for the future. The other SU students taught English and piano daily to school children and members of the community. This latest service-learning trip to Thailand was a continuation of a connection that was initiated back in 2005. According to Thompson, at that time the SU EWB chapter was searching for a structural engineering project and found one at a boarding school dorm in northern Thailand, listed by Joni Morse and the NGO FAITH International. “Since then we have built a 3,000 square foot dormitory and installed drinking water treatment systems there and for the nearby medical clinic [in 2010],” he says. “In 2011, we completed a 9,500 liter rainwater collection and storage system for the dormitory.” Adding music to the mix was a new element first introduced in the last trip Thompson and students took to the country in 2011. Thompson was asked to play piano at the church next to where he and the students were staying. After a while a couple of the audience members asked if he would teach them to play. Even though they had instruments, no one in the congregation of approximately 50 people were able to read the music or play the piano. Before long they were learning how to play “Amazing Grace” and “Joy to the World.” “In my 15 years of teaching, I have rarely seen students so hungry to learn,” says Thompson. “It was at that moment that I realized our SU students could contribute to the lives of Mae Nam Khun in a different way.” Seattle University photographer Chris Joseph Taylor made the voyage to Thailand with Thompson and his team of students and offers a look into the transformative experience in the following photo essay.

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 23

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Junior English major Courtney Clark, above, shares a laugh with three young girls of Mae Nam Khun during an evening English lesson that included singing songs like “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” and playing games. Above right: Many students are eager to learn English from the SU students, who helped teach during their stay. Below right: A Lahu village elder pulls down a banana tree from the jungle while out on a water assessment trek with students.

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 25

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An expectant couple fills up a water jug at the water filtration station located at the town’s health clinic. SU’s Engineers Without Borders installed the system in 2010. A second system was installed at the boarding school dorm next to the church that about 50 children use on a daily basis. Upper right: Professor Phil Thompson (center) and alumnus Akharint “Nok” Khuhapinant, ’03, pour a water sample from the medical clinic into a filter test kit that checks for pathogenic bacteria and viruses such as E. coli and general Coliform. Lower right: The 5-micron filter is one of three filters in the micro-filtration unit with ultra violet light disinfection (MF-UV). 26 / Broadening Perspectives

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 27

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Mae Nam Khun students play checkers with rocks and leaves during their school recess. Upper right: Sophomore music major Ivvie Shellhorn teaches piano to a small group of community members at the town’s only Christian church. (Read an essay on Ivvie’s experience at www.seattleu.edu/magazine.) Lower right: A young Lahu boy stands next to his mother in a rural community located about an hour from Mae Nam Khun. Many Akha children come from rural areas for their education and to stay at the boarding school dorms.

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28 / Broadening Perspectives

Check out more photos from Thailand and video clips featuring participants at www.seattleu.edu/magazine.

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 29

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A Mae Nam Khun student plays Takraw, a popular sport in Southeast Asia, at the school. “Every (SU) student in one way or another expressed to me their appreciation for the experience,” Thompson says in summarizing the trip. “It’s an irreplaceable moment in their lives that they were able to see firsthand how people half way around the world live their everyday lives.”

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achievements of our alumni in the community, workplace and at the university. I look forward to working with each of you to achieve the goals we’ve set for the coming months and hope to see you at one of the many offerings we are rolling out this year. Alumni often ask, “How can I help?” Here are a few ways to become more involved: – Serve as an ambassador for Seattle U wherever you go. Think SU first! – Promote Homecoming to other alumni, friends and family. – Encourage alumni to network and keep in touch via the Alumni Online Directory. – Recommend top prospective students or bring a prospective student for a campus visit or a university event. I welcome your input at alumnifeedback@seattleu.edu.

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alumni. I am pleased to announce the following developments: • Our office is partnering with Career Services to ensure that every graduate has the opportunity to hire quality candidates, become a valued employee and network with outstanding individuals. • Seattle U is celebrating a new era in sports with its first full season of Division I play for the Redhawks. I hope you will join me and Coach Cameron Dollar at our pre-game rallies at KeyArena at Seattle Center. • On Feb. 2 we will launch a pilot program to bring Homecoming back to the university. This is your chance to see some of the beautiful changes we’ve made to your campus, as well as share your own experiences at SU with alumni and current students. • On April 16 we host the 28th Annual Alumni Awards celebration at Campion Ballroom. I hope to see you there for an evening to showcase the

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By the time you read this, we will have finished fall quarter and be in the early days of the winter season and winter classes. It is an exhilarating time of year with many eventful happenings on campus. In Alumni Relations we share in this sense of excitement as we build new programs for our alumni and strengthen traditions. A strong, motivated Alumni Board of Governors has been working hard this year to support Alumni Relations in these endeavors. We are fortunate to have an effective group of dedicated individuals who will help us achieve our goals. Our status report (www.seattleu. edu/alumni/) is evidence that we are building a world-class Alumni Relations office and remain on target with our strategic plan. We continue to make strides to help you better connect with Seattle U, your fellow alumni and the next generation of

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Recently engaged or married? Got a job promotion? We want to hear from you. Send us your updates for Class Notes through the new and improved alumni directory: www.seattleu.edu/alumni/get-involved/directory/. And join in the conversation as part of our growing online community via Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

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Student Becomes Teacher | Interview Q&A by Tina Potterf

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Susan Meyers in the classroom, teaching English to students in the College of Arts and Sciences.

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What does it mean to be back here, teaching students, at your alma mater? It’s been a powerful experience coming back. Honestly, I wondered what it would be like. A bit surreal, perhaps? Walking into the classroom on that first day of class was pretty emotional. I still remember the eager but quiet student that I was here and I’m aware of how much I’ve grown over the years in large part because of the strong mentorship that I received here. The fact that I am now in the position to provide that kind of mentorship to new generations of SU students is just amazing. … There is something quite powerful about coming back to the place where you were a student.

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What drew you back to SU and the College of Arts & Sciences? One of the main things has been the values here. As I have gone out into the world during the past decade or so, I’ve been continually amazed by how much my foundations at SU have continued to inform who I am and what I have chosen to do with my life. As a teacher, I’m always drawn toward approaches that focus on civic engagement, social justice and student empowerment. And as a writer, I’m constantly drawn toward projects that speak to some kind of social impact. Over the years, I’ve been grateful for that legacy on my life—and honestly a little bit surprised by it. Anyone who knew me as a student at SU will remember that I was a quiet, introspective young woman. I was a very engaged student, but I was initially a bit intimidated by SU’s values. I had no idea how a quiet person like me could become

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Why did you decide to become an English professor? I love creative expression: working at the intersections of language, passion and ideas. I was always very clear about my focus on writing. After graduating from SU and spending a year teaching ESL in Chile, I moved back to the U.S. to enter an MFA program in creative writing at the University of Minnesota. During my time there I had the chance to teach sections of college-level writing classes and I loved the experience. I really enjoy helping people figure how

to translate their ideas and experiences into language. Writing is such an important and empowering skill and I love being able to help people—especially young adults who are just beginning to make their way in the world—learn how to access it. Following my time in Minnesota I moved to the University of Arizona to pursue a PhD in composition and rhetoric. Combining graduate degrees in the practice (MFA) and the teaching (PhD) of writing has been very helpful for me. It’s kept me feeling energized and active as a writer and a teacher.

What are you most looking forward to now as a professor at SU? I’m excited about all of the new programs here and I’m looking forward to getting involved in several of them. Most significantly, the English department now has a major track in creative writing. This is something that was developed a few years after I graduated and I’m so pleased that students now have the option to major in creative writing. Moreover, the fact that, as the department’s new hire in this area, I will be involved in helping to shape and steward the program in the future is just wonderful. I hope to develop new classes and opportunities for students that will open more opportunities for them both at and beyond SU. For example, this year I am developing a course on travel writing and I would love to eventually develop a related study abroad program on that topic.

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Why did you choose Seattle University as an undergraduate? My earliest contact with SU was when I visited a class with my father, who was taking general enrichment courses to complement his work with the diocese. Given that positive experience, I applied. Once admitted, I was offered a scholarship through the Honors program and I met with the director to discuss the curriculum and life at SU. I remember that meeting well. At no other university had I been offered such a personal and invested reception. The faculty member with whom I met that day made her interest in my learning very clear and her welcome made me decide to enroll. Early on, I recognized SU to be a place that cares about and connects with students, as well as a place that would offer me intellectual rigor and creative outlets.

a leader, connect with community or create a real vision for social change. But I have— and I’m so glad. The chance to come back and be a part of the kind of educational tradition that can have this kind of impact on people is really a dream come true.

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Susan Meyers has a unique perspective of being a student at the university where she now teaches. Meyers, a 1999 graduate, returned to her alma mater as an assistant professor of English in the College of Arts and Sciences. She shares her thoughts on her return to the university she holds in high regard, how this once “introspective and quiet girl” chose English professor as a career and more in this Q&A.

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SUSAN MEYERS, ’99

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“There is something quite powerful about coming back to the place where you were a student.”

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Jennifer DellaCroce Baker, ’03, married Geoff Baker June 16, 2012, at Corpus Christi Catholic Church in the bride’s hometown of Colorado Springs, Colo. Blessed to be married in the same church as three previous generations of DellaCroce’s, Jennifer and Geoff were joined in celebration by family and friends, including several SU alumni: Greg Coffey, ’02, Kael Pittman Coffey, ’03, and Jennifer Leary, ’03. The couple resides in Boulder, Colo., and both work for RES Americas, a renewable energy company.

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Page 34

Connie Ripley Lujan, MTS, ’94, is the author of the recently published Montessori: Living the Good Life. Lujan’s book is a guide for mothers, fathers, grandparents, educators and citizens concerned for peace in the home, schools and the world. Lujan is a mother of five children and certified Montessori teacher.

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34 / Class Notes

Alex Weiss, ’10, and Jeff Morrison, ’08, married July 28, 2012, in Lake Tahoe. The couple met in Alex’s freshman year and both were members of SU’s swim team. The couple has been together ever since. Friends and family, including several SU alumni, attended the wedding.

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Alisa Murray, ’03, and her husband JD McAlpine welcomed their third child, Griffin Henry McAlpine July 15, 2012. Griffin joins big brother Finley and big sister Avelyn.

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Tara (Daniels) Burton, ’08, married Jeff Burton May 12, 2012, at Herban Feast at Seattle’s Sodo Park. Tara works as an account manager at Microsoft. The couple lives in Seattle.

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1971

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1987

1991 Dorothy Zeviar, EdD, recently graduated from the University of South Florida with an MPH in Health Education and Promotion and a certificate in Disaster Management. Zeviar and her husband Fiorin reside in Camas, Wash.

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Col. Barbara Holcomb became the first registered nurse and only the second woman in history to take command of Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, which is considered the U.S. military’s most esteemed hospital. Col. Holcomb officially

Kerry Sullivan Burrows, a teacher at Our Lady of the Lake Elementary School, received the National Catholic Education Association’s Distinguished Graduate Award in 2011.

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Len Heritage was awarded a Fulbright Scholars grant for 2012-13 at the University of Kosovo (AUK). Heritage has been lecturing at the Milgard School of Business at the University of Washington, Tacoma and is chair of the business department at Tacoma Community College. Heritage will work with business students at AUK and will

Kristin Hannah, JD, recently released her latest novel, Home Front, which explores a modern marriage and the toll war has on a family. Hannah is the author of several books, many of which have made it to the New York Times bestsellers list.

1988

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Christine A. Stevens received the 2012 Distinguished Award from the University of Washington Tacoma.

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1986

Brett Purtzer, JD, received the Outstanding Leadership Award from the TacomaPierce County Bar Association at the 104th Annual Lincoln Day Banquet. Purtzer is a principal of Hester Law Group, Inc. P.S., with a focus on criminal defense and personal injury cases.

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1976

Anthony Panagiotu, JD, CPA, was awarded the Milgard School of Business (University of Washington, Tacoma) small-business leader of the year award. He is president of Panagiotu Pension Advisors in University Place, Wash., where he helps companies build pension, 401(k), profit-sharing or employee stock option plans.

John Hooper is principal and director of earthquake engineering at Magnusson Klemencic Associates (MKA), a Seattle-based consulting structural and civil engineering firm. Hooper, who moved to MKA in 1997, plays an integral role in directing the firm’s technical undertaking, focusing on seismic and earthquake engineering, particularly in the research and development of new codes, methodologies and approaches. He serves on the advisory board of SU’s College of Science and Engineering.

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Betty Woods was named Public Company Director of the Year by the Northwest Chapter of the National Association of Corporate Directors.

1981

began her new position at a formal ceremony attended by 3,000 people. In attendance were service members, civilians and German citizens.

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30

Randiann Porras-Tang, ’82 MEd, recently was named 2012 MetLife / National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) Hawaii High School Principal of the Year.

instruct financial and managerial accounting courses.

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1974

Stevens is an associate professor at the UW Tacoma.

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Dr. Carl Binder received the Thomas F. Gilbert Award for Distinguished Professional Achievement from the International Society for Performance Improvement at the Society’s annual conference in Toronto. Binder lives with his wife and business partner Cynthia Riha and their sons Jeremy and Luca on Bainbridge Island, where he is cofounder of the Performance Thinking Network. Performance Thinking Network is a global management consulting and training organization.

continued on page 36

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Catherine Souva, ’10, married Patrick Dominguez, ’09, at St. Gabriel's Church in San Francisco on Aug. 11, 2012, nearly six years after meeting at SU. Souva and Dominguez live in San Francisco, where Catherine works as the community manager for Taxi Magic and Patrick as a consultant for Gordian Compliance Solutions.

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Jamie (Garcia) O'Brien, ’06, and Bobby O'Brien, ’06, successfully defended their PhD theses in organic chemistry June 2012 at Boston College. Jamie is currently doing materials chemistry research at IBM in San Jose and Bobby is a post-doctoral scholar at Stanford University.

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Erin (Booker) Boespflug, ’04, her husband Nick Boespflug, ’05, and their daughter Adelaide celebrated Erin’s attainment of a Doctor of Philosophy in Neuroscience from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Her dissertation focused on identifying very early changes in the brain from Alzheimer’s disease pathology. She continues her work as a postdoctoral fellow in Alzheimer’s disease research. Nick is slated to complete an MD/PhD program in 2014-15.

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Round 3

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ALUMNI VOICE B

A

100

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100 60

Submit achievements, personal and professional news and photos for Class Notes at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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2008

Stacie Bain, JD, recently opened her own law firm, Rainier Bike Law. She has represented injured bicyclists since 2007. Her practice focuses on helping cyclists who have been injured by drivers, unsafe road conditions or defective products.

Senay Kahsay received a Fulbright and is studying the coffee supply chain in Ethiopia.

1995

100

Kevin Noreen, JD, is the new director of human resources at the Hood River County School District in Hood River, Ore. Noreen is a graduate of the SU School of Law.

2010

Sarah Hiraki, a graduate of the College of Arts and Sciences, is featured on a new reality TV show by Bravo called “LOLwork.” The show focuses on Hiraki and some of her coworkers at Cheezburger, the company behind the popular icanhascheezburger.com site. Check out Hiraki at work and more at www.bravotv.com/lolwork.

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Veronica Asence is the 2012 Miss Seafair. During her reign Asence, who graduated from SU with degrees

2012

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Kaye Dowdy graduated from the U.S. Military Medical School, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in May 2012.

Steve Galatro, MFA, is the new executive director at Seattle’s Pratt Fine Arts Center, a nonprofit multidisciplinary arts education center. Galatro remains an adjunct faculty member in SU’s Fine Arts department, where he had worked as operations manager.

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2006

2009

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James Pirtle, JD, and Alex Ferguson started the Pirtle Ferguson PLLC law firm. The firm represents plaintiffs in personal injury cases, including auto and boating accidents, animal attacks, product liability, unsafe premises and wrongful death.

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Adam Snyder, JD, has joined Ogden Murphy Wallace, P.L.L.C., a multi-specialty law firm with offices in Seattle and Wenatchee. Snyder’s focus is health care practice, specifically transactions and litigation involving hospitals, longterm health care facilities, physician groups and healthcare providers. Prior to his new role, Snyder was a shareholder at Inslee, Best, Doezie & Ryder, PS, where he was co-chair of the Health Law Practice Group.

2005

Merideth Colliander Swallow, EDLR, received a Math Hero Award from Raytheon's MathMovesU program. She teaches at Billings Middle School.

David Kelly, MFA, is the new executive director of the Federal Way Symphony. Previously he was development director of Seattle’s Balagan Theatre. In a statement on his new role, Kelly said, “The Federal Way Symphony is one of the best cultural treasures in the Puget Sound area. It provides the finest symphonic music to audiences of all ages through both performances and education. I am proud to be a part of the Federal Way Symphony as it enters a new era of arts innovation.”

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2004

in French and Humanities, will make more than 100 appearances at events throughout the area.

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30

Dowdy, an active duty service member while pursuing her medical degree, was promoted to Captain on May 19, 2012.

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Michele McCarthy, JD, married Fitzroy Lindsay April 14, 2012 at St. Paul’s Chapel at Columbia University in New York City.

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2000

Angela Carlson-Whitley, JD, was recognized as Volunteer Attorney of the Year, along with her law partner Judith E. Luther-Shiflett by Thurston County Volunteer Legal Services. Their firm, Carlson-Whitley & Luther, LLP, is based in Olympia and focuses on estate planning, probate and guardianship law.

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1994

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(l-r) Craig Jelinek, Costco’s president and CEO (and SU Trustee), Brandon Knight, ’09, Perla Casteneda and Savannah Romero, current scholars, Marjorie James, UW Costco Scholar alumna, and Jeff Brotman, co-founder and chairman of Costco.

36 / Class Notes

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More than 1,000 supporters gathered for the 13th annual Costco Scholarship Fund Breakfast in late September. The annual event raised more than $3.1 million for scholarships for underrepresented students at UW and SU.

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COSTCO SCHOLARS BREAKFAST

Members of the Class of ’62 reconvened and reconnected on campus in late fall for a special Golden Reunion luncheon. President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., and Dave Anderson, S.J., alumni chaplain, were in attendance at the lively event. Alumni had an opportunity to share their memories and experiences of SU and reminisce about all that has changed in the past 50 years.

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CLASS OF 1962 REUNITE

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BEING SCENE

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GALA 2012

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It was a night to remember as alumni, SU community members and friends gathered for good times and a great cause at the 29th annual Gala. The black-tie affair raised more than $670,000 for student scholarships.

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 37

PHOTOS BY KERRY DAHLEN AND MATT HAGEN

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Gala-goers kicked up their heels to the music of Peter Duchin and his orchestra. The event also honored Pat O'Leary, S.J., (middle, top right pictured with President Sundborg and Gala co-chairs David Rothrock, ’91, and Kirsten Johnson and Mary Jo and Rod Bench) who was the recipient of the St. Ignatius Medal, the university's highest honor.

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IN MEMORIAM B

A

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Seattle University remembers those in our alumni family and university community we’ve lost.

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Louis Tice (April 1, 2012; age 76)

An accomplished businessman, Buty along with two friends from high school acquired a transfer/moving business, which is today one of the oldest businesses in Seattle. Additionally, he helped build a delivery business that grew from several Harley motorcycles to 120 vehicles serving Washington and Oregon. In his free time, Buty enjoyed spending time with family, golfing, sailing and fishing.

Tice is survived by his wife, Diane, five adopted children, his foster daughter Kady, his brothers Wally and T.R., and 13 grandchildren.

Bea Edwards (Feb. 17, 2012; age 89)

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Richard A. Foley (Oct. 4, 2012; age 83)

McGavick joined the U.S. Coast Guard and served on the USCG Northwind icebreaker as an electronics technician in Alaska. He also served at the Cape Blanco Lighthouse at Cape Blanco, Ore. Following service in the Coast Guard, McGavick joined the Naval Reserve.

Keith Anthony Mead (July 7, 2012; age 79) Born in Chicago, Mead spent his life loving and caring for family and friends. He graduated from St. Francis Xavier Academy in Denison, Texas, eventually relocating to the Pacific Northwest.

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1963 Helen Humbert, ’82 MEd (April 24, 2012; age 72)

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Mary Ellen Dunbar (May 1, 2012; age 66) For several years Dunbar was a Girl Scout leader and an active volunteer at her children’s schools. She loved to sew, sing, cook, travel, read and entertain family and friends.

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25

Ray Barthol Weber (Oct. 23, 2010; age 74)

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38 / In Memoriam

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A graduate of Friday Harbor High School, Lang worked in a pea cannery and drove for her father’s lumber company. She taught in the Seattle School District on a war emergency certification then later graduated from SU’s College of Education.

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The longtime Bellevue, Wash., resident paid his way through college at SU by working a paper route. He found time to be very active in college, joining the Army ROTC, serving as class officer for three years, chairman of the Military Bar and as a member of the ROTC drill team.

Florence May Lang (June 22, 2012; age 87)

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Crowell served in the U.S. Army and was a veteran of World War II. In 1990, he retired from Boeing.

1967

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3

Philip John Crowell (June 9, 2012; age 84)

Ward served in the U.S. Army and enjoyed spending time with his grandsons and attending their school and sport activities. For 35 years he worked as a regional program manager with the San Mateo County, Calif., government.

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A graduate of Bothell High School and Seattle University, Darcy was a retired Naval Reservist who worked for General Electric and later the Boeing Company, until his retirement.

Edward Ward (April 18, 2012; age 68)

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James A. Darcy (Aug. 17, 2012; age 79)

After 23 years of service in the Army, Dempsey was a recipient of the Bronze Star. He retired as a financial planner for Ameriprise.

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1957

Dan Dempsey (April 10, 2012; age 66)

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Along with her husband, John, Scherer enjoyed adventures that involved traveling the world, with trips to Africa, the Middle East and Europe. The couple were active in the arts and cultural scene in Seattle.

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Humbert devoted her life to teaching, offering guidance and encouragement to high school students in the Kent School District. She served as president of the Washington State Business Education Association.

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Israel served as a sergeant in World War II and the Korean War. With a business partner he started Pine Street Food in Seattle. The grocery and deli was an institution in downtown Seattle for 20 years.

Verna Scherer (Jan. 10, 2012; age 88)

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Solomon Israel (April 13, 2012; age 86)

Leo McGavick (March 28, 2012; age 76)

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Foley spent 56 years as a Trappist monk, known as Brother Gerard Foley, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Trappist Abbey in Lafayette, Ore. In addition to living a life of monastic prayer, he was skilled in building church furniture and worked as a book binder, forester and logger.

1961

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1952

In 1960 Levine, a graduate of SU with a business administration degree, opened a chain of pizzerias and gained many lifelong friends. He’s remembered for his unfailing sense of humor.

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Born in Juneau, Alaska, Edwards settled in Spokane following her time at SU. Edwards was a longtime member of the Order of the Eastern Star and Hope Rebekah Lodge #38.

John Levine (April 17, 2012; age 73)

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1945

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Frank C. Buty (Dec. 28, 2011; age 92)

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1959

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1943

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1974

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 39

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Seattle University Magazine publishes full obituaries online only at www.seattleu.edu/ magazine/. Note: Obituaries are edited for space and clarity.

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We ask readers and family members to inform us of the death of alumni and friends of Seattle University. If a newspaper obituary is available, please e-mail it to sumagazine@seattleu.edu or send via mail to Seattle University Magazine, Attn.: Obits, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122–1090.

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THINKING OF YOU

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After graduation from Lutheran Hospital School of Nursing, where Krost earned a nursing degree in 1964, she began her career in the field at Children’s Hospital in St. Louis. In the early 1980s Krost relocated from St. Louis to Seattle and soon became assistant director of nursing at Group Health Cooperative’s Redmond Hospital.

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Jean C. Krost, MBA (July 14, 2012)

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1988

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Following graduation from SU, Carter went to Frieburg, Germany, where she lived for many years. Later in life she moved to New York City and earned a law degree from NYU. For the past 11 years, she was Secretary General at the Claims Resolution Tribunal in Zurich, Switzerland.

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Mary Bethia Carter (July 31, 2012; age 50)

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1984

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Following high school, Sullivan went to work for Beebe and Runyon as a warehouse man before becoming ill with kidney disease. The donation of a kidney from his older brother Sean helped him be well enough to go back to school, first Shoreline Community College and then SU.

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Kevin James Sullivan (July 20, 2012; age 60)

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1978

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Born in Iowa, the 14th child of his parents Sylvester and Anna, Lang was an ordained minister and graduate of Mount St. Bernard Seminary and SU’s Theology and Religious Studies program. In Sheridan, Wyo., Lang established a recovery home for alcoholics and was a volunteer in hospice care.

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Edward Lang (March 18, 2012)

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1976

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Born in Idaho, Fettig taught 33 years in the Auburn School District, earning the district’s Teacher of the Year award in 1968 and serving as the Auburn Education Association’s president. Fettig was active in her Catholic Church in Kent, Wash., and enjoyed spending time with family and friends, traveling and doing crossword puzzles.

Sue Schmitt, EdD, professor and former dean of the College of Education, died suddenly on Sept. 28, 2012. She was 66. In July, Dr. Schmitt stepped down from her 16-year position as dean and spent a couple months traveling and enjoying time with her family. In announcing her move from dean to teaching, Dr. Schmitt emphasized her joy in overseeing many historical events during her tenure and was excited about the college’s position to engage in new opportunities at the university, state and national levels. Dr. Schmitt touched many lives during her remarkable career as an administrator, educator and scholar. She helped organize the college’s 75th anniversary celebration (a milestone event that drew more than 1,000 alumni and friends to campus) and oversaw Conversation Education, a symposium on education policy that brought great visibility to the university. Over the past several years she led a collaborative and successful process to revise and restructure the college’s doctoral program. Additionally, Dr. Schmitt spearheaded an effort that will bring a Seattle Public Schools Middle College program to the university. Prior to her appointment as dean, she had served as dean and professor in the College for Human Resources at the University of North Dakota, where she had also served as associate vice president for academic affairs, responsible for the design and implementation of the Center for Instructional Technology. She served at the University of Wisconsin, Stout, as deputy vice chancellor and professor of rehabilitation, department chair and director of the Independent Living Center. Dr. Schmitt also served as the administrative associate to the vice president for academic affairs of the University of Wisconsin System Administration. Dr. Schmitt received the outstanding alumni award from Viterbo College, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in English and was a Leadership Fellow at Mississippi State University. She was among a select group of educational leaders to participate in Harvard University’s IEM Program. Dr. Schmitt’s doctorate, from Mississippi State University, was funded through a Bush Leadership Fellowship. The Dr. Sue A. Schmitt Scholarship Fund has been established to honor her memory and the legacy she has left at Seattle University. The fund will support the academic advancement of underrepresented students enrolled in the College of Education, a commitment that Dr. Schmitt championed during the course of her career. For more information or to contribute to the fund, call (206) 296-1896.

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Margaret (Beckman) Fettig, MEd (June 15, 2012; age 75)

Remembering Former COE Dean Sue Schmitt

L/C

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BOOKMARKS B

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Under the Red Roof

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special attention they received. Social activities were encouraged. Jobs were assigned that gave patients a sense of purpose. Community interaction was promoted. For example, in the early years, hospital patients raised chickens, collected the eggs and decorated them for the town’s Easter celebration. The development of more modern treatments for mental health issues, coupled with advancements in medications and changes in governmental policies and funding programs, led Northern State Hospital to close in 1973. Some patients were sent to other mental health facilities; most were released back into their communities. Under the Red Roof portrays the rise and fall of Northern State Hospital and the complex realities of mental illnesses. McGoffin coaxes a spectrum of engrossing stories from denizens who lived under the “red roof.”

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own medical facilities, operating farm, bakery and cemetery. Landscape architect John Charles Olmsted situated the hospital in a bucolic setting on a low bluff over-looking the Skagit Valley. Architects specified red clay to roof the Spanish Colonial Revival-style buildings at Northern State Hospital. The grand façade, however, could not erase the harsh realities of how mental illness was treated in the early- to mid20th century. Alcoholism, drug addiction, mental defects and epilepsy were all causes for admission. McGoffin’s brother developed epilepsy at age five. “In another era,” she writes,” my brother would have been a patient at Northern State Hospital without the love of his parents and the companionship of his brothers and sisters, a difficult scenario to imagine.” Upon reflection, the writer wonders if the real treatment for patients was the

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Author M.J. McGoffin grew up in the shadows of Northern State Hospital. Like many in the frontier town of Sedro-Woolley, Wash., she was profoundly impacted by proximity to the town’s mental hospital. Under the Red Roof: One Hundred Years at Northern State Hospital documents the sense of community and interdependency that existed among patients, employees, doctors’ families and townsfolk. McGoffin’s firsthand observations are intertwined with hospital records, newspaper accounts and interviews with former staff and patients’ relatives. The first patients were admitted to Northern State Hospital, a mental institution for the harmless insane, in 1912. By 1950, the hospital housed 2,200 patients and employed 415 people. Also known as the Bughouse, the self-sufficient hospital contained its

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By M.J. McGoffin, ’81 | Reviewed by Chelan David

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40 / Bookmarks

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Under the Red Roof portrays the rise and fall of Northern State Hospital and the complex realities of mental illnesses.

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Read On… FACULTY

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The Life of Understanding: A Contemporary Hermeneutics

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Author | James Risser (A&S)

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Indiana University Press released The Life of Understanding: A Contemporary Hermeneutics by Philosophy Professor James Risser (College of Arts and Sciences). In the book, Risser places 20th century philosopher Hans-Georg Gadamer in dialogue with Plato and develops themes pertaining to hermeneutics.

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Risser joined the college more than 30 years ago and has served as director of the Honors program. His scholarship focuses on contemporary philosophy, hermeneutics, existentialism and phenomenology.

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Catholic Perspectives on Sports: From Medieval to Modern Times Author | Patrick Kelly, S.J. (A&S)

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Patrick Kelly, S.J., associate professor of Theology and Religious Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences, provides a provocative look at how Catholics have engaged in play and sports from the medieval times to the 20th century. Kelly’s book examines this in the context of theology and spirituality; two chapters expressly explore the history of sports at Jesuit schools.

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Author | Mary Frances Dondelinger, ’92

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Modern Icons: The Sacrifice of Endangered Species of the American Southwest

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ALUMNI PICK

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Modern Icons: The Sacrifice of Endangered Species of the American Southwest by Mary Frances Dondelinger features images of various species of the Southwest United States along with descriptive details on its origin and source of its endangered status.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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“I use the ancient art of egg tempera iconography on the most disposable of backdrops, the humble paper plate,” Dondelinger wrote. “The plate-as-canvas serves as a symbol of 21st century throwaway culture, just as the creatures have become expendable in our fast-moving culture.”

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THE LAST WORD

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A take on what has people talking. B

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Chieftain: The Cool Hotspot | By Annie Beckmann Irish pub fast becoming the hangout for SU folks

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GOOD EATS The menu is a mix of traditional Irish fare like corned beef and cabbage and shepherd’s pie and American bar food DRAWS A CROWD staples of hot wings and mozzarella sticks. The Chieftain attracts a great mix of There are some perhaps unexpected offerWHAT’S IN A NAME customers. ings such as kobe beef sliders, hummus and What to call the new place on 12th Johnson says Ed and John O’Brien, the crab cakes. Avenue was a bit of a quandary. Turns out twins known for their impact on SU basketOnce your belly is full, you can quench Johnson got to know SU Athletic Director ball and baseball in the 1950s, pop in your thirst with one of the microbrews on Bill Hogan and his wife Sally, manager now and then with a sizable entourage. tap or settle in with a glass a wine or a cup of budget and operations for the College A surprise birthday bash for Men’s Soccer of tea or coffee.

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Coach Pete Fewing took place here in the fall. “People wave at each other when they walk in,” says Johnson. “There might be a group of 10 students who come in, flip up their laptops and start networking.” The fact that part-time students come to campus for evening courses is another advantage because they’ll stop by after class. Campus clubs often have their meetings at the Chieftain and faculty and staff are no strangers, either. “I want this to be a place for SU,” says the affable Johnson.

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of Arts and Sciences, from their visits to McGilvra’s. So he put the big question to them. Sure, there was controversy over calling this pub and restaurant the Chieftain. Johnson, however, was born in Belfast, Ireland, where the Chieftains are the name not only of an immensely popular Irish band but also of respected leaders in Irish history. Among the most celebrated Chieftains (and much of their history is featured prominently on the pub’s menu) was Brian Boru, who unified Ireland and defeated the Norse King Ivar of Limerick. In the end, Irish history and lore won out and the Chieftain name has turned out to be a big draw for alumni of Seattle University’s Chieftains era.

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The Chieftain Irish Pub is fast becoming the “Cheers” of the Seattle University set. Since opening in fall 2011, the hopping spot across from the Lee Center for the Arts has fast become the go-to place for lunchtime crowds and co-workers and friends looking to toast the end of the workday or workweek at happy hour. The Chieftain is the third Irish pub for owner Peter Johnson and his wife Adrianna, who are the minds behind Finn MacCool’s Irish Public House in the U-District and McGilvra’s Irish Pub in Madison Park. Why a third Irish pub? “Six kids, that’s why,” says Johnson, with a laugh. “Three of them are at St. Joe’s, two are at Seattle Prep and one’s still at home. That’s a lot of tuition and it doesn’t stop.”

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Chieftain owner Peter Johnson outside his third Irish pub in the city.

A patron at the pub wears his SU pride well.

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PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR AND MORGAN RODRIGUEZ

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The Chieftain is the go-to place for happy hour with co-workers and friends after work or to get in a game of pool while watching a favorite sporting event on one of the pub's flat screen TVs.

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CHIEFTAIN IRISH PUB 908 12th Ave. Seattle, WA

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Happy Hour at the Chieftain is all day Monday and 3–6 p.m. Tuesday–Friday, with drink and food specials. There’s also live music on Saturday nights, with football and soccer televised on the flat screen TVs throughout the pub.

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HAPPY TIME

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A Community of Gratitude

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Mary Kay McFadden

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Seattle University is a grateful community—we are thankful for the generosity of the many alumni, friends, corporate and foundation partners who contribute to the ongoing success of our students. During the 2011–12 fiscal year, our donors contributed nearly $17 million to Seattle University. Each gift represents an investment in our shared mission to educate students as leaders for a just and humane world. The impact of these gifts is alive and visible across the campus and beyond. Here are some highlights from the past year:

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More than 64 percent of all Seattle University students—graduate and undergraduate—receive scholarships and financial aid support. We are fortunate to celebrate gifts to our scholarship program including the Costco Scholarship Fund and those unique to each college, school or program that give our students the opportunity to earn a degree. Thanks in part to our generous supporters, we launched the Institute for Catholic Thought and Culture, reflecting our commitment to our Jesuit Catholic character. We are pleased to announce that Dr. Catherine Punsalon-Manlimos, professor of theology and religious studies, was appointed as the Institute’s first director. Enhancing our commitment to the success of children and families in our neighborhood, hundreds of Seattle University students, faculty and volunteers worked and engaged with children and families in the Bailey Gatzert neighborhood adjacent to our campus as part of the Seattle University Youth Initiative. This past year our alumni and friends contributed more than $7.4 million to Seattle University’s eight schools and colleges, building on the strong academic programs in each.

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Please know that each time you make a gift to Seattle University you are part of a ripple effect, creating an impact that stretches beyond a specific student, program or campus facility and making a difference in our community and around the world. For this we thank you.

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dd Mary Kay McFadden Vice President, University Advancement

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FACULTY AND STAFF GIVING

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The faculty and staff of Seattle University further demonstrate their gratitude and generosity with 48 percent making a gift. That’s nearly one of every two faculty and staff making gifts in 2011–12.

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Martha and Thomas Anfang Robert and Clodagh Ash Ray and Edith Aspiri Kent and Dana Bailey Jeanne and Dayton Balinbin Catherine and Sanjay Batra Anders M. Berg, Jr. Lisa and Paul Bialek Lawrence and Veronica Bilder Byron and Sheila Bishop Karen and Rockne Blair Linda and Joseph Blaschka Robert and Susan Blethen Bruce and Ann Blume Jack and Maralyn Blume David and Barbara Boerner Paula Boggs

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SILVER CIRCLE ($2,500–$4,999)

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Gregory Adams Claire Angel Hugh Bangasser and Lucy Homans Arthur and Mary Fran Barkshire Robert and Mary Bertch Heidi Bond Steve Bossi Harlan Boyd Pamela Bradburn John and Fran Bradley Kelise and Alan Burk Michael and Michelle Burris Julie and Ross Case Alan and Bonnie Cashman Richard and Suzan Chavez Lisa Chissus Brenda Christensen and Thomas Barry Barbara and Thomas Clerkin Alfred Clise Paula and Patrick Costello Walter Cougan and Margaret Ganong Bob and Gerri Craves James Degel and Jeanne Berwick Mark and Julie DeLaurenti Rebecca and Paul deVille James and Camelia Dobrick Judith and William Doyle Dick and Rebecca Dudley John and Alice Dulin Rev. Dr. Marvin K. Eckfeldt Janet Fisher Donna J. Franklin Joseph and Terri Gaffney Kristy and Michael Gibson Allan Golston Keith and Kathleen Hallman Steve and Jo Marie Hansen Rob Harris Buffie Hebert John and Judith Hopcroft Michael Hosterman Truman Johnson Dianne and James Jorgensen Jim Kenyon Yaffa and Paul Maritz Julie and Bill Marler May McCarthy Mary Kay McCaw

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GOLD CIRCLE ($5,000–$9,999)

Dorothy and Mike McCoy John Miller, Jr. and Marlene Miller Jill and James Navone Kenneth and Carol Nelson Lawrence Oberto Michael Osterfeld Susan Payne Patty and Tony Philippsen Joseph Phillips and Mary Sebek Nicole Piasecki and Peter Heymann Marilyn Price Tony and Autumn Ridnell Tom and Jeanie Robinson Charles Rosenberry Thomas and Kathleen Schafer Julie Shapiro and Shelly F. Cohen Boyd and Mikki Sharp Ping Shih Janene Siers and Joseph Ittes Walter Smith Rose and John Southall Denis Stearns Christopher and Krista Stipe Gerald and Gloria Swanson Shane Tangen Ezra and Mulugeta Teshome Wilma and Jon Tucker Mark and Mattie Vadon Barbara and Orrin Vincent, Jr. Thomas and Jeanne Walker James and Mary Ellen Weber Susan Weihrich Vernon and Mary Williams Sheila Wyckoff-Dickey and Charles Dickey Judith Yeakel Gary and Lark Young Bob Yunker Anonymous (6)

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Ruth Tressel Ruth and Bill True Martha Wyckoff Ann Wyman David Wyman, Jr. and Linda Wyman Deehan Wyman Virginia Wyman Anonymous (2)

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Kelvin Bohrer and Shelley Manning-Bohrer Lisa Brown Helen Bosanko* Mary and Don Burdick Rob Deltete Suzanne Burke Duane Dier and Stella Dier Frank and Marilyn Clement Pat and Marcia Halligan Dr. Pauline Cline Jim and Timmie Hollomon Michael and Kathy Collins Henry and Mary Ann James Theodore and Patricia Collins Grace Elaine Munzer Madelyn Connolly Mark and Cindy Pigott John and Mary Jo Costello David and Sandra Sabey Leo and Carol Costello Mick and Marnie Schreck John and Judy Curran Howard and Sheri Schultz Lucio and Marta Dalla Gasperina Jim and Janet Sinegal Betty and Marty DeLaurenti Donald and Lilyan Snow Stephanie and Craig Duncan Stevens and Tricia Trainer Bill Eisiminger Bill Weis and Marilyn Roy Thomas and Susan Ellison Betty Woods LeeAnn Farrell Ann Wyckoff Richard and Barrie Galanti Anonymous (3) Helene Gilroy Helen M. Jolly PLATINUM CIRCLE Rick Jones ($25,000–$99,999) Carolyn Kelly Nicolaos and Athena Arvanitidis Carol Ann (Conroy) and Karl Barnickol Paul and Paulette Kidder David Kitchell Richard Beers II Mimi Krsak Jeff and Susan Brotman Joseph LaCugna Chris and Liz Browning Rhoady* and Jeanne Marie Lee Bradley and Rev. Linda Fowler Maureen Lee and Mark Busto Jack Harvey Thomas and Agnes Lee Richard and Betty Hedreen Donald Luby Hon. Donald and Lynda Horowitz Ashlie and Steve McConnell Catherine Mowry LaCugna Bruce and McLeod Paula Lustbader Dan and Joyce Murphy Holli and Edgar Martinez Frederick Brandauer and Marie Materi Mary Jo and Larry Nejasmich Nick and Sheila Nesland John and Ginny Meisenbach HJ O'Donnell Jr. and Mariette Jim* and Lynn Merlino O'Donnell Ann Merryfield James and Diane Osborne Laura Ellen and Bob Muglia James and Gaye Pigott James and Marjorie O'Hara Tom and Brooke Pigott Margaret Passanisi* Chuck and Nancy Porter Mary Lee Peters Leonard and Laurie Quadracci Judy Pigott John and Heidi Rabel Connie and Steven Rogel David Rothrock and Kirsten Johnson Rick and Jennifer Redman Lee and Stuart Rolfe James Sexton Estate* Jeff and Lara Sanderson Rev. John and Julia Shaw Deborah Santana Martin and Mary Ann Simonetti Steven Scalzo Geraldine Sorensen Frank and Harriet Shrontz Patrick and Mary Welch Marcia Joslyn Sill and Peter Sill Bob Woodruff Gerald Sparling Elbridge Stuart III and Debra Stuart PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE Douglas Tellefson ($10,000–$24,999) Cindy and Jon Tellefson Carl and Renee Behnke Terrance Thomas II and Sherry and Larry Benaroya Sandra Thomas Joel and Maureen Benoliel Vincent and Christine Tobkin Jon Berquist Claudia and Kip Toner Clarice Bocek

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DIAMOND CIRCLE ($100,000 AND ABOVE)

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*Deceased SU alumni in bold

The names in the following honor roll reflect contributions of $1,000 or more to Seattle University during the fiscal year, July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012.

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PRESIDENT’S CLUB

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FINDING AND BUILDING COMMUNITY THROUGH GIVING

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Even before she chose Seattle University, Becca Lowry, ’12, recognized how a small school in an urban setting would offer her the community she hoped to find. And giving back had much to do with how the liberal studies major shaped her education. In her sophomore year, this recipient of several SU scholarships chose to join the dynamic Tell-a-Hawk team of students who contribute to fundraising efforts as callers. By her junior and senior years, she became a Tell-a-Hawk supervisor. Lowry sees Tell-a-Hawk as one of many communities she was able to explore at SU. For four years, she participated in women’s recreational sports through Club Lacrosse. She was a work-study student at Bailey Gatzert Elementary School, where she helped with Seattle University Youth Initiative (SUYI) afterschool programs. After graduation, Lowry’s appreciation for the work at Bailey Gatzert led her to pursue a year of service with AmeriCorps. She now continues to assist SUYI with afterschool programming at Bailey Gatzert. “The kindergarteners I worked with in 2011 are now in second grade so I can watch the progression and growth they’ve made. It’s very powerful to see that,” she says. Giving at the Recent Graduates President’s Club level is something she says she does for herself and others in the community. “Giving back is something you do on a continuing basis. Any gift really helps.”

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Harry and Grace Acuna Jean and Joe Adams Janet Adkisson Janet Ainsworth and Michael Reed Joe and Doreen Alhadeff Inez Allan Stuart Allen Katherine and Guy Alloway Abdulla and Kristen Almoaibed Joanne and William Almon Hon. Robert and Sarah Alsdorf Robert and Margaret Alston David and Concetta Anastasi Alan and Marilyn Anderson Barbara Anderson Carol and Robert Anderson

Rodney and Mary Jo Bench Deborah and John Bender Jane Beno and Michael Edwards David and Lucinda Berkey Lynne Berry Diane and Rick Betts David and Mary Helen Bever John and Karen Bianchi Don and Mary Alice Binder Bill and Kathy Binder Steven and Theresa Binger Richard Bird, Jr. and Laurie Prince Jeanne and Richard Birmingham Irene Bjorklund and Michael Karn Mindy and Don Black Robert and Cindy Blais Verle Bleese PHOTO BY JOHN LOK

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BRONZE CIRCLE ($1,000–$2,499)

Tim and Lisa Anderson Hanna Andersson Loren and June Arnett Patrice and Merritt Auld H. Brent and Joanne Austin Joan Bader Brian Baldwin Lorraine Bannai Matt Barnes and Lesa Sroufe-Barnes Mrs. and Mr. Joyce L. Barnett Marjie Barrows Mary Bartholet Lisa Barton Martha and Millard Battles, Jr. James and Sarah Bee Victoria and Craig Beetham Len Beil and Stella Ley

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Michael and Nancie McKay Frank and Pam McKulka Joan and Richard Merritt Christopher Meyer Sheldon Midgett William and Lyanne Monkman Matthew and Anne Moran James and Vicki Murphy Russell and Gwen Nomi Mae and Larry Numata John and Jeanne O'Brien Charles and Doris (Cockrill) O'Connor Penny and Bruce Oleszczuk Mark Olson and Renee Korda Paul and Karyn Pasquier Christina Pate Mark and Andria Pinkowski Christopher and Katheryn Porter Claire Putnam* Mitra and Tony Ravani Andy and Carrie Read Scott and Katherine Renschler Ulises Rodriguez James Roes David and Shelley Rolfe Debra and Paul Sauvage Roderick and Jenifer Schultz Greg and Claire Seibly Jennifer Sik Wolf Bay Equity LLC Joseph Straus and Mary Shima Erin Swezey and Tim Leary Mark Tamola and Josephine Hidalgo-Tamola Gerard (Jerry) Tardie* Tim and Tiffinie Tollen Myong and John Tomita Judith and William Tsoukalas Jerry and Gail Viscione Jack and Mary Ellen Warfield Eugene and Marilyn Webb Leonard Weber John Wolfe Gail Yates Joe and Mary Zavaglia Dolores and M. Anthony Zimmerman

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Dan and Cindy Brettler Tim Burner and Camille Gearhart Diane and Hon. Terrence Carroll Robert Chang and Catheryne Nguyen Jeffrey Cole Julie and Dan Coleman Martin and Jennifer Coles John and Carolyn Cunningham IV Dick and Carol Cunningham Karen and Thomas Cusick III Bertrand and Brooke de Boutray Jennifer Deger Barbara and Brian DiJulio Shane Dir Melissa and David Dugan John and Marlene Durbin James Eblen Anne and Steve Enquist Virgil and Sunni Fassio Brent Fernyhough Jim Fitzsimmons Pat Fleenor Bruce and Dawn Foster Jack Frank Theresa Gallant and Edward Bulchis John Garner and Lizbeth Cardwell Lisa and Ken Geisen Sandra and T. Patrick Gillis Jeffrey Grant and Mercedes Fernandez Scott Grimm Scott and Lisa Gunning Jack and Myra Hanover F. Geraldine Hansen*, in memory of Joel Hansen Margaret and Brian Heeb Frederick Hines, Jr. Paul Holland and Tana Lin Ronald Hosogi Harley Howe Peggy Hudson Gerald and Nan Huffman Steven and Sharon Huling David Jackson Craig Jelinek Kent Johnson Eleanor and George Jonson Brent and Jodie Kalas Dinesh KC Sydney Keegan Ray Khirallah Kevin and Janice Krieger George Krsak Michael and Jean Krsak Mimi Krsak Deirdre Kuring and Jesse Nunez Donald Leuthold Terence and Deborah Limb Daniel and Julie Little Ryan Longwill John and Phyllis MacKenzie Dave and Mary Anne Madsen Rebecca and Bryan Maruhashi Kara and Ken Masters Jack and Mary McCann

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 47

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Peter Grimm and Dawn Winters Deanna and Peter Gumina Kelly and Julie Gunderson Nancy and Joseph Guppy Pauline Guppy Reed and Wynne Guy Corinne and Russell Hagen Peg Haggerty Cary and Maureen Halpin Thomas Hansen Aladene and Jim Harney Matt Harper Diane and Walter Harrel

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Steven and Christine Gerdes Jim and Celia Gillis John and Ginnie Giordano Nan and Ron Giuffre Eileen Glasser Wesley and Mark Wesley Tom and Ann Gores Mark Gould and Lisa Dobson Gould Jennifer Graves Ralph and Carolyn Graves Beth Grayson Willie Gregory II and Alice Gregory Kirk Greiner and Jackie Cyphers Greiner

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Wells Fargo’s generous support of an innovative urban agriculture project, spearheaded by Seattle University’s Environmental Studies program, is helping to put fresh produce on the table for families in need in the Puget Sound region. The aptly named Urban Farm, located on the site of the King County South Wastewater Treatment Plant, was created on unused land with the support of a $100,000 grant from Wells Fargo. After the area was cleared of debris and fortified with nutrient-rich soils, the first crop of fruits and vegetables was planted in January 2011. The idea for a farm in an urban setting came about through a collaborative effort of SU’s Environmental Studies program, chaired by Professor Gordon Miller, and the county’s wastewater treatment division. In its first year, the farm generated nearly 7,000 pounds of produce for area food banks. That number was expected to double by the end of 2012. Patrick Yalung, regional president of Wells Fargo, says the urban farm speaks to what the bank looks for when awarding these grants: projects and programs that are communitybased and promote sustainability, renewable energy or energy efficiency. “We recognized that this project could be a model for urban agriculture on a long-term basis,” Yalung says. In addition to Wells Fargo, GroCo and the Henderson Foundation generously support the Urban Farm. Learn more at www.seattleu.edu/artsci/urbanfarm/.

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Stephen and Catherine Cummins Jill Cuniff Paul and Lisa Dally Salah Dandan John Danell Mike and Linda Daniels Vinay Datar Howard and Dolores Davis Thomas and Marlene DeCosta Cesar P. and Rosario T. DeGracia Maureen and Richard DeGroot Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic Sidney DeLong and Jeanne Matthews Dennis DeMille Marilyn Dennehy Pat and Joe Desimone Jake Diaz George and Judith Diefenbach Shirley and Steve DiJulio Forrest and Mary Dill Beverly and Gregory DiMartino Anthony Di Re Meredith Dodd Susan and Lawrence Donohue Ted and Dorothy Doyle Thomas and Nancy Drechsel Gayle and Brian Ducey Martin and Monica Duke Robin and Robert Dullea Gaylé and James Duncan Mr. and Mrs. James A. Dunnam Sandra and Charles Dupuis Jim and Janet Dwyer Peggy and James Dynes Lea and Bogdan Dziurzynski Cully and Tracy Ecklund Frank and Vickie Edmondson, Jr. Sheila Edwards-Lienhart and Ross Lienhart Vonelle Elison John and Doris Ellis Pam Elvy Tom Elzey and Maggie Smith Azita Emami and Massod Madani Dee and William Endelman Mary and Bill Epping Elaine Ervin John and Susan Eshelman Barbara and Pat Fahey DeAnn and Frank Feeman Richard and Maude Ferry Rick and Patti Fersch Sarah and Kevin Finney Norma and Jerry Fitzmaurice Phyllismary Flood David Flynn David Foley Parker and Carol Folse Christine Foster Tony and Leslie Freytag Esther Furugori Susan and Tom Galligan Ty and Marvel Galvin Jennifer and Tom Gates Bill and Mimi Gates Kyle Gelsthorpe

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Jan and Alfred Blue Joanna Plichta Boisen and Matthew Boisen James and Caroline Boitano Michelle Bomberger Joan Bonvicini Marguerite and William Borgert Kurt Boyd Stephen Boyd Ladd Braganza Paul and Colleen Brajcich Jeff and Carolyn Brandsema Kyle Branum Steve Brashear Eileen and Robert Brennan Hon. Bobbe and Jonathan Bridge Berlena and Rev. Robert Brock Stephen and Jennifer Brooks Joseph and Maureen Brotherton Rebecca Brown-Nienow and Dale Nienow Christian and Patricia Buchsel Gary and Diane Buckley Ilya Bukshteyn Mark Burnett Scott Burns Frank and Carlene Buty Jim and Mary Callahan Sharon and Neil Callahan Carol and Edward Campbell Bridget Carney Geraldine Carolan and Barry Tolbert Analisa Castaneda Maria Cayetano and Capt. Trevor Cobb Sherryl and Bert Cehovet Seth and Susan Chalmers Sue and Chester Chen Kristin Cheney Marilyn and Michael Cherry Margaret Chon Sloan Chong and Ted Koehn Alex Chursky Jeff and Darlene Clark John Clarkson and Elizabeth Gilchrist Rebecca and Chris Clements Susan Clifford Jamroski and Gregor Jamroski Carol Cochran Steven Cohn and Laura Scheyer Michael and Karen Collins William and Kathryn Collins Brian and Karen Comstock Gary and Lynn Conrad Dick and Bridget Cooley Kerry Corr and Cameron Corr Patrick and Jean Corr Michael and Becky Costello Marc and Katherine Cote Isiaah Crawford and Kent Korneisel Art and Sharon Crisera Marilyn Crone Calvin and Lois Crow Jose Cueto and Anita Prietto Bob and Grace Cumbow Daniel and Cleo Cummins

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Rev. Clinton McNair, left, and Rev. Eugene Kidder.

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When the Rev. Clinton McNair, PhD, was putting the foundation in place for a master’s level pastoral counseling program at Seattle University’s School of Theology and Ministry, he sought out the knowledge of Rev. Eugene Kidder. Kidder, a graduate of the Yale University Divinity School and the University of Washington, is a highly regarded pastor and counselor in the Seattle area. Today, along with his wife Barbara, Kidder does counseling in private practice. In the early 1960s, he was one of only two pastoral counselors in Seattle. To this day, McNair draws from the wisdom Kidder imparted on him during that first meeting before the launch of SU’s program in 2006. “He spoke of the challenges of starting a program like this and how he would meet those challenges,” says McNair, who directs STM’s program. “He gave me the confidence that I can do this. …I left there that day and began to put the pieces into place. When I thought I would go under I would see Gene’s face and it kept me going.” In his mentor’s honor, McNair initiated a new endowed scholarship to be awarded to incoming students who pursue a master’s degree in pastoral counseling. The Reverend Eugene Kidder Pastoral Counseling Endowed Scholarship aims to support the work of future pastoral counselors who follow in Kidder’s footsteps. “With this scholarship, we want students to go out across the world and do this work so Dr. Kidder’s work lives on,” says McNair. “I could think of no one to name it after other than Eugene because of his pioneering work.” Kidder’s work as a pastoral counselor has proven to be a guide for many who seek to merge and integrate spiritual values with the behavioral sciences. His methods fit with the mission of STM’s program: “Central to pastoral counseling is the conviction that mental and emotional illness are best met by incorporating both the wisdom of religious teachings and the knowledge and skills of the human behavioral sciences.” The establishment of this endowed scholarship is an “institutional marker for STM,” noted Dean Mark Markuly at an event announcing the scholarship. “We now have a student scholarship program for each of our five-degree programs at our school. These institutional moments of maturity are essential to the growth of any organization.”

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Michael Hart Brian and Kristin Hartnett Sigfred and Jane Haugland Lt. Col. Kathleen Haugland Hinson Sylvia and Hon. Michael Hayden Thomas and Katia Healy Matthew and Elizabeth Hedlund Nathan Heitzinger Sheila and Sean Henderson Stacey and JoAnn Hendrickson Paul Heneghan and Barbara Brady Heneghan Richard and Susan Heye Albert and Susan Hideshima David and Nancy Hill Kenneth R. Hill Ken and Pattie Hitch Herbie and Jennifer Hoffman Susan and Dr. James Hogan William and Sarah Hogan John and Carolyn Hojaboom Annick Hollingsworth Lisa and John Hooper Steve and Patricia Hopps Lorraine Hougham Joseph Howard, Jr. Harley Howe and Sheri Headdy Mitzi Hu Lt. Col. (Ret.) Audrey Hudgins Jason Huff Jarlath Hume and Irene Mahler Katy and John Hunter Sin and Mi Sook Hwang Jack and Patricia Innes Dianne and David Irwin Charles Isaacson Susan and Charles Jackels Annette and Steven Jacobs Julie and Jeffrey Jacobson Charley Jemley James and Margaret Jimenez Ann Huetter Johnson Dana and Hon. Charles Johnson Eric and Cathleen Johnson Lyn Johnson and Mary Murphy-Johnson William Jolly and Tiffany Jolly Edward Jonson Janine and Aleksandar Jovanovic Lily Kahng Danica Kaloper Connie Kanter Celeste Keaton David Keenan John and Patricia Kelly Richard and June Kennedy Ali and Julia Khodabandeh Lee and Anne Kilcup Bob Kilian Hank McGee and Victoria Kill Christian Kim and Nhi Pham Darryl and Bernadette Kingsland Dennis and Maureen Kinzel-Grubbs Charles Kirchner and Gillian Allard

PHOTO BY JOHN LOK

PRESIDENT’S CLUB, CONTINUED

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3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 49

30 30

30

Page 49

Gerald and Mary Segal Paula Selis and Jonathan Fine Kathleen and G. Michael Selivanoff Carmen and Jim Sepic Karen and Mark Shaffer Jane Shanaman Jay and Jan (Kelly) Shaw Jennifer Shaw John and Elaine Shephard Joy Sherman Walter Shields Frank Shih Raymond and Kimberly Shine Ruth E. Shipp-Dart Paul and Lori Shoemaker David Shoultz Diane Siderius-Kocer and Daniel Kocer Craig Sims and Kara Sims Edward Skone and Rebecca Zerngast Mike Sletten and Joanne Warner Mickey Smith John N. Smith Clive and Frances Sollitt David and Valerie Sorensen Ronald and Angela Souza Christopher Spain Harriet Stephenson Warren Stickney W. Jeremy and Susan Stringer David and Linda Strout Jack and Marion Sullivan Timothy Surdyk Ted Surina Molly Swain Rita Syler Marilyn Sylvester Victoria and Allen Symington Stephen and Kristy Szablya Richard Tait Yoshito and Manami Takano Rev. Karen and Brian Taliesin Erlinda and Michael Tardif Nick Tarlson and Mauna Arnzen Mark Templeton Luth and Narciso Tenorio Mary and Randall Terashima Frances and Bob Terry Monique and Todd Thackray Michael and Tina Thomas Anita Thompson and Steven Franz Todd and Kathy Thull Dave and Caroline Tinius Rex and Jackie Toh John Tousley Ross Treleven Patrick and Catherine Treseler Maureen Tressel Lewis and Jeffrey Lewis Beverly Tufarolo* Dianna Uchida George and Mary Ellen (Doran) Unzelman Anne Utendorf Gina Vangelos and James Schneidmiller Amy Vithayathil-Sydow and Daniel Sydow

70 70

70

ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

Carol and John Penny, Jr. Sarah Perry and Bill Ramos Josh and Anne Petersen Rosemary Peterson Jeffrey Philpott and Jeanne Donovan Dottie and Donald Piasecki Brian Pidgeon Kathleen Pierce Kristine and Gerard Pigotti Joseph Piper and Lisa Kinerk Piper Nancy and Peter Pitarys Riley and Nancy Pleas Kevin and Shonagh Pleas Lawrence Plummer Lachlan Pope John and Kathy Popko Mark Porcello Colleen Powers David Powers and Amy Chasanov Joan Pratt Harry Purpur and Karen Scherrer Purpur Elizabeth and Kenneth Pursley Gregory Quinn and Nancy Quinn-Nerdrum Michael and Victoria Quinn Patricia Quinn Patricia Radle Michele Radosevich and Hon. Dean Morgan Laurene and Edward Raleigh Rev. Michael Raschko Mike and Susie Raskin Bob and Lisa Ratliffe David and Margaret* Read Robert Rebar Ferd and Kathy Reichlin Dave and Sharon Richards Stephen and Karen Ridlon Victoria Ries Keith and Patricia Riffle Doreen and Jim Rigos Joann Riley John Rindlaub and Sarah Uzzell-Rindlaub Floyd and Judy Rogers Albert Rosellini, Jr. and Vicki Rosellini John and Marjorie Rosellini James Roth William and Jill Ruckelshaus John Ruffo Kathryn Rule Nancy Russell Dianna Russo Sharon Sakamoto and Ron Takemura Lester and Mary Ann Sauvage Ryan Sawyer and Jane DePaolo Carol and Jeffrey Sayre John and Sheila Scates Margaret and Fred Schacht Brian Schilling-George and Susan Tucker Lauren and George Schuchart, Jr. Judy Schultz James and Janice Scott Sue Secker

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Mark and Lisa McDevitt Mary Kay McFadden Jourdan McGinn Daniel and Gretchen McKay Ruth and Doug McKnight Peggy and Brian McMahon Joseph McMonigle Rev. Clinton McNair Curly and Judy McNamee Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. McTaggart Bryce and Maureen McWalter David and Carlene Merlino Jean Merlino Chip and Leslie Meserole Diane and Lou Micheli Alexandra and Ross Mickel Steven and Rebecca Mikami James Miller and Gretchen Vogel Miller Phyllis and Robert Miller Liz Hermann Mitchell Barbarann and John Moga Fred DeKay and Kathleen Mohn-DeKay John Monahan Janet and Douglas Moore Ted and Tracy Morales John and Jerene Morford Tomio Moriguchi William and Barbara Morkill Steven and Rev. Kathryn Morse Milly Mullarky Cristina and Matt Murphy Lt. Col. Lawrence and Louise Naehr Masakazu Nakamura Sam Nelsen Patricia and Kirk Nelson Mike Nesteroff and Kimm Viebrock Ryan New Scott and Kathy Nichols Maureen Niland Mark and Carolyn Niles Steve and Diane Norquist Thomas and Erin Norton Terence and Laurel Oates Laura Oberto and Michael McElhoe Edward O'Brien and Terryl Hackett O'Brien John Ochs John P. O'Connell Mark O'Halloran Susan Oistad Kevin and Elizabeth O'Keefe Alan and Judith Olson James and Elizabeth O'Malley Catherine O'Neill and Dave Babcock Ernst and Kathy Oosterhof John Ora Carol Orr Jane Orr and David Prentice Antonio Padilla Ralph and Marlys Palumbo Nancy and Tad Papineau Janet and Mike Parks Jim Pechan and Mary Prestigiacomo Richard and Diane Pedack

B

A

Holly Kirschke Marvin and Jonathan Marvin Sean Klosterman Arne Klubberud and Melissa Lee-Klubberud Brandon Knight James and Donna Knight W. H. Knight, Jr. and Susan Mask Masami and Michael Koenig P. Michael Koenig Christopher Koenigs and Jeanne Collopy Tom and Mary Kofler Jerry Kroon and Roxanne Shepherd Daniel and Stacy Kutz Patrick and Rosalyn Kwan Sr. Dorothy Laidig David Lance Eric and Norma Jean LaRock Paul and Jodi Larsen Bob and Maxine Larson Wayne and Bev Lauerman Jeanne Lavell Cheryl and Patrick Layman Erin and Clive Lea Doug and Denise Leary Brody O'Harran and Lisa Lederer Robert and Jacqueline Lee Sharon Lee Pamela and Butch Leonardson Maximus and Marylou* Leone Jeffry and Andrea Levy Joy and Thomas Lewis Russell and Raven Lidman Julie Lim and Lloyd Herman Nancy Lippert Bob and Sarah Long Steven D. Looney and Dana L. Frank Susan and Robert Lorbeski Hon. Terence and Rev. Ann Lukens Clement Lum Glenn Lux Robin and Jeffrey Lyons Col. David and Patricia Maddock G.R. "Randy" Maedgen and Jason Phillips Joe and Mary Magnano Hiro and Linda Makino Rev. Dr. William Malcomson Michael and Barbara Malone Ruth Maloney Melissa and Donald Manning J. Richard Manning William and Stephanie Mannion Doreen A. Marchione John and Janice Markley Mark and Terry Markuly Natasha and Jeffrey Martin Marion and John Martinolich Thomas and Jodi Matchett Tom and Leslie Mathews Gerry and Barbara Maurer Bobby McAlister James and Judith McAteer E. Walter McCarthy Mary McClymont

6

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

PRESIDENT’S CLUB, CONTINUED

100 70 100

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40 10 25

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Page 50

0000

70 40 40

50 / Thanks to You

ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

20 70 70

70 40 40

American Academy of Nursing Anderson Daymon Worldwide Archdiocese of Seattle BEACON BECU

10 40 40

40 70 40

PLATINUM CIRCLE ($25,000–$99,999)

40 100

40 100

Jansing-Cook Foundation Kellogg Company Kelsen, Inc. Kerry, Inc. Kimberly-Clark Corp. Leiner Health Products The Martinez Foundation MCM Meriwether Partners LLC Merrill Lynch & Company, Inc. The Laura Ellen and Robert Muglia Family Foundation Nice-Pak Products, Inc. NY Pizza Company, Inc. Open Society Foundations PACCAR Inc

100 40

40 100

American Express The Boeing Company College Success Foundation Costco Wholesale Corporation The Marcia S. Halligan Trust King County Bar Foundation Henry Luce Foundation Inc. M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Microsoft Corporation The Norcliffe Foundation PACCAR Foundation PGA Foundation Robert H. Pitts Trust

Sabey Corporation Schultz Family Foundation Seattle Foundation Stuart Foundation Target Corporation United Way of King County Washington State Bar Association Wells Fargo Foundation

100 40

100 40

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Campbell Soup Company China Friendship Charitable Trust Foundation Crunch Pak ENGEO, Inc. Estate of Olga R. Shen Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund First Quality Georgia-Pacific Corporation Harry & Clare Cayo Wilson Charitable Trust Herbert B. Jones Foundation Hope Heart Institute Huhtamaki Independent Colleges of Washington

CORPORATIONS/FOUNDATIONS DIAMOND CIRCLE ($100,000 AND ABOVE)

30 30

30

Dan and Karen Quinn Shea Laurie Rechholtz Megan Rivera Monica and Charlie Roberts Maren and Matt Robertson Geoff Robinson Donald Sable Elizabeth Safranski and Kenneth Mott Rev. Joanne Sanders Kersten Sato Alyson Scott Ivette Serna Christopher Shreeve James and Ronette Snyder Nicholas Spada Eileen and Jacob Stauch Laura Tenisci and Don Cairns Joseph Thompson Misty Watson Geoffrey and Michele White Laura Wilbur and Timothy Onders Sherene Williams-Loughead and Richard Loughead Peter Wilson Mary Kay Woolson Santosh Zachariah Maria Zapata

70 70

70

Eva Levingrub 2nd Lt. Joseph Locke Rebecca Lowry Li Lu-Porter and David Porter Julie and Calvin Lyons Lina Ma Reza Macaraeg and Ryan Cueto George Makarenko Cecilia Matta and Casey Riske Carolyn and Richard Mattern Collin McFadden Andrew McGeehan Kara McKinley Susan McPhee Jamie Mellies Hayley Thompson and Jim Mesplie Steve Messmer Michael Miller Sarah Milne James Mitchell Chilumba and Nelly Mubashi Amy Mutton Aditya Nugraha Valerie and Jeffrey Ohlstrom Jana Pallis Jin Yong Park Tiffany Pascua Anna Pizarro

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Kent and Valerie Ferris Linda Frothinger and Mark Bauhs Margaret Garrett Sonia Glennie Samantha Golden Emma Grochowsky Ryan Groshong David Guidry Jeanne and Gerard Hall Ryan Hamachek Elizabeth Hanks Anetta Hannon Amie Heisserman Chris Hendrix Ed Hiar Shannon Hill Andrew Hinrichs Michael Johnson Cynthia Jones Jodie Jones Brett Jordan Adam Jussel James Kim Maureen Kole John and Jill La Pointe Robert Lebo and Michelle Belzile Annie Lee Tina Leung and Will Pang

30 30

30

Jennifer Ancona Elisa Apostle Matthew Bagayas Mark Ballinger and Marie Sauter Nicole Banal Jordan Belmonte Kelly Benkert Matthew Brock Rodney and Lavonne Bryan Patrick and Catherine Callans Tony Capeloto Pamela and Davis Carvey Tess Cheatle Melissa Chin Andrew Compton Gretchen and Jeffrey Cox Laura Cummings Bryan Croeni and Susa Holt Elizabeth Dennis Dana Diederich and Shawn Temming Ryan Dillon Rachel DiPasquale Teresa and Andrew Dul John Dyson Jeffrey Eaton Carol Everson Bret Eytinge

70 70

100

Alumni from Seattle University’s nine most recent classes are automatically enrolled in the Recent Graduates President’s Club when their cumulative gifts during the fiscal year reaches $100 for each year since graduation.

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

RECENT GRADUATES PRESIDENT’S CLUB

30 30

30

Jeffrey and Korynne Wright William Wurts Dan and Janis Wyatt Marylou Wyse Barbara and Lee Yates Hon. Mary Yu Scott and Tracy Yunker Ralph Zech II and Cynthia Zech Ralph and Helen Zech Kim and Eugene Zipp Anonymous (7)

70 70

70

Deborah and Freddie Wilds, Jr. Debra Wiley Leonard Wilkens and Marilyn Wilkens Compro Donald and Anne Williams Whitney Williams Connie K. Wong Wallace and Alicia Wong Beverly Wong Jan and Frank Jan Katharina and Alistair Woodman Margaret and John Worden Thomas Workman

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Harry and Sylvia Watson Gerald and Sharon Watts John and Ginger Weaver Bruce and Bobbie Weber Denise Bunchek and Peter J. Weber Susan Wedgwood James Wedin Walter and Denise Weller Robert and Barbara Welsh Pete and Patricia Wertheimer Marilyn Whitley Roger and June Whitson

B

A

Eugene and Catherine Voiland Van Vong John and Susan Vosper Antoinette Wagner, ’64 Art and Eva Wahl Jill Wakefield Catherine Walker and David Fuqua Ed and Stephanie Walker Cari and Daniel Wall Pat Wand Art Wang and Nancy Norton Tim Ward and Cheryl Uyeji

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

100 100

70 70

70

30 30 100 100 60 100 100

100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

SILVER CIRCLE ($2,500–$4,999)

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

10 40 40

40 70 40

SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 51

40 100

40 100

Alliance Flooring Services àMaurice Cellars Another Source, Inc. Apio, Inc. The Ash Family Foundation Aspen Beverage Group Association of Corporate Counsel, Washington Chapter Atlas Supply, Inc. Bang Office Interiors Bank of America Bank of America Foundation Bargreen Ellingson BDA Inc Beckwith & Kuffel, Inc. Bilder Foundation, Inc. Cascade Designs Inc CenturyLink Clifford Produce Sales Comerica Bank Comfort Revolution CORT Deloitte Foundation Development Services Consulting, LLC Divatex Home Fashions, Inc. Divco Canada Limited Dupar Foundation DWI Holdings, Inc. East Shore Unitarian Church Ellucian Ernest Jonson & Company, PS Five Star Service Flexon Industries

100 40

40 100

Page 51

100 100 60 100 100

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

30 30

30

American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers American Meter & Appliance, Inc. The Attorney - CPA Tax Clinic The Benaroya Company The Berwick Degel Family Foundation Bluetooth SIG, Inc. BNBuilders, Inc. Bon Appétit Brooks Rand Labs, LLC Buyken Metal Products Inc. Carters Inc. Chandos Construction

Seed Intellectual Property Law Group PLLC Seneca Group Shaw Industries Group, Inc. Sherwin-Williams Ski's Painting, Inc. Sony Pictures Entertainment Starbucks Coffee Company State Farm Companies Foundation Stearns-Shaw Family Foundation Talking Rain Beverage Tarantino Gourmet Sausage Thomas C. Wright Foundation TRInternational, Inc. Turnstyle U.S. Bureau of Reclamation UBS Financial Services Inc. Unilin Group United Way United Way of Snohomish County University of California US Bank Vacation Internationale Vander Hoek Corporation Wahle Family Foundation Washington Dental Service Wells Fargo Western Waterproofing Co. Inc. The Wollenberg Foundation

70 70

70

GOLD CIRCLE ($5,000–$9,999)

Chateau Ste. Michelle Clise Properties, Inc. Coca-Cola North America The Community Foundation for Southwest Washington Compass Group Complete Restaurant Repair, LLC Consumer Source, Inc. Coughlin Porter Lundeen Craves Family Foundation Criterion Brock Custom Decorators Edge Asset Management, Inc. Executive Coatings and Contracting, LLC Ezra Teshome Insurance Agency For Rent Media Solutions H.J. Heinz Company Hanes Brands, Inc. HD Supply J.R. Johnson Inc Jackson Dean Construction Juniper Foundation Keith & Mary Kay McCaw Family Foundation Kenyon Company KPMG LLP Lakeside Industries Ledcor Industries, Inc. Leona Hickman Charitable Trust LG Electronics Louisville-Jefferson County Public Defender Corporation Marler Clark LLP PS MBI McKinstry Company Medtronic Inc. Michael P. Hosterman & Associates Michelin North America Miller Nash LLP Morey's Seafood Mulvanny G2 Architecture Nordstrom, Inc. Northwest Atlantic Partners Novartis Oberto Sausage Company One Hundred and One Club Foundation Pacific Northwest Equipment Inc. PEMCO Foundation Inc. Peninsula Packaging Company Pershing, LLC Petunia Foundation Physio-Control Corporation Powell Property Management Prairie Foundation The Pride Foundation PRO Sports Club Providence Health and Services: Washington/Montana Puget Sound Energy Pure Hot House Foods Raymond James Charitable Endowment Fund Request Brand Foods, Inc. Rosenberry Charitable Term Trust

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

100 60

Alaska Airlines Alstom Andersen Construction Company The Anderson Foundation Aon Hewitt Arthur Schuman Inc. BALAS BelGioioso Cheese Ben B. Cheney Foundation Benaroya Family Foundation Bimbo Bakeries USA Byron & Alice Lockwood Foundation CHEP Equipment Pooling Systems Clement Family Foundation Clorox Company Colgate-Palmolive Company Comcast Corporation Del Campo Supreme, Inc. Disciples Seminary Foundation Dorsey & Whitney LLP Ernst & Young Foundation Expeditors International of Washington Fluke Electronics Corporation Foss Marine Holdings, Inc. Fred H. and Mary S. Dore Charitable Foundation GoldToeMoretz Harris Charitable Fund Program Harvest Manor Farms Henderson Foundation International Vitamin Corporation Intuit Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products Company Kenworth Truck Company Koeplin Family Foundation Lakeside Building II LLC Mastronardi Produce Limited McLeod Scientific, LLC Mortenson Construction Moss Adams LLP National Philanthropic Trust DAF Nesholm Family Foundation

Novak Construction The O'Donnell Foundation Olde Thompson Pacific Coast Feather Company The Peach Foundation Perkins Coie LLP Pierce County Plastic Surgery Associates of Seattle, PLLC Point Inside Inc. Procter & Gamble Co. PSF Mechanical, Inc. Puget Sound Bank The Radford Foundation REI, Inc. Research Corporation for Science Advancement Rhoady and Jeanne Marie Lee Living Trust Ricardo Beverly Hills Riley & Nancy Pleas Family Foundation Robinson Construction The San Francisco Foundation Schwab Charitable Fund Sealy, Inc. Seattle Children's Hospital Seattle Pacific Industries SIFE Worldwide Snak King Snohomish County Public Works The Society of the Friends of St. Patrick Sony Electronics Sugar Bowl Bakery Swedish Medical Center Synod of Alaska NW Presbyterian Church (USA) Tateuchi Foundation Terlato Wines International TEW Foundation Trident Seafoods Corporation Twin-Star International Unilever Home & Personal Care, USA United Stationers Supply Co. Washington Publishing Company Washington STEM Weatherproof Garment Co WhiteWave Foods Wyman Youth Trust

B

30

PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE ($10,000–$24,999)

A

Pacific Market International LLC PepsiCo, Inc. Pharmavite LLC Premera Blue Cross Robert's Fund The Rogel Foundation Schiff Nutrition International Seattle City Light Seyfarth Shaw, LLP Shinnyo-En Foundation Sun Products Corporation Tillie and Alfred Shemanski Testamentary Trust U.S. District Court - Western District of Washington Val A. Browning Charitable Foundation Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program WN Pharmaceuticals Ltd.

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

CORPORATIONS/FOUNDATIONS, CONTINUED

100 100 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

0000

70 40 40

Page 52

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Lawrence N. Brouse Charles R. Brown Elena Brown Lisa Brown Carl Swenson and Julia Buchholz Gary and Diane Buckley Gary and Diane Buckley Kenneth Bumgarner Traci M. Burgler Suzie Burke Frank and Carlene Buty

52 / Thanks to You

ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

30 30

30

Tom and Bonnie Bily Jack and Maralyn Blume Clarice Bocek James and Georgana Bond William and Marguerite Borgert Hamida H. Bosmajian Richard and Sheridan Botts Jeanette Bowker John Brackbill Pamela Bradburn Berlena C. Brock

70 70

70

*Deceased

Seattle University’s Legacy Society recognizes and honors alumni and friends who have remembered the university in their estate plans. These gifts may include a bequest, life income gift, life insurance or gift from a retirement plan. We gratefully acknowledge all of our Legacy Society members who have generously committed to support the long-term mission and vision of SU. Paul Ballard, M.D. Thomas F. Bangasser Mary Nigg Bartholet Michael J. Bathum Dr. Robert and Helen Batie Marsha and John Baumann Len Beil and Stella Ley Jean A. (Werner) Beland Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Benoit Anders M. Berg, Jr. Peter L. Tountas and Michelle Bergh-Tountas

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

LEGACY SOCIETY

Rev. Dr. David Aasen Gloria Ysmael Adams Anthony J. Ahn Maxime and Maureen Albi Inez Allan Robert and Margaret Alston Adele Alton Mary Lou L. Amen Rev. Loren and June Arnett Robert and Clodagh Ash

30 30

30

AAA Washington Aberfoyle Springs Water Alpine Fresh, Inc. American Drapery, Blind & Carpet, Inc. American Water Resources Association Aurora Organic Dairy Bainbridge Island Ace Hardware Bayer Healthcare BNSF Foundation Brother International CDS Distributing, Inc. Chicken of the Sea International Cirt Yancy Photography Coalision Cochran, Inc.

Noel-Schumaker Family Foundation Olam Spices and Vegetables One Strategic Capital, Inc. Overseas Food Trading, Ltd. Oxford Industries, Inc. Pacific Northwest Conference UCC Pacific Pier, Inc. Palm Bay International Pernod Ricard USA Perrigo PJM III, LLC Plum Creek Foundation The Principal Financial Group Provident Electric, Inc. The Public Welfare Foundation R.G. Barry –The Dearfoams Co Rains Plan Group, LLC Reckitt Benckiser Red Lion Hotels Corporation RMC Constructors Roth Hill Engineering Partners, LLC SDI Technologies Sheraton Seattle Hotel & Tower Shure Products, Inc. ShurTech Brands, LLC Sisters of Providence Smith & Greene Company Springs Window Fashions LLC Sprint Nextel Corporation The Standard Insurance Company Sunkist Growers, Inc. Synergy Corporate Housing T-Bar Construction, Inc. Team Too Trinchero Family Estates United Way of Spokane Voss, Cook & Thel, LLP W Foundation Warehouse Demo Services Wash Multifamily Laundry Systems Washington State Mentors Windset Farms Yardi Systems, Inc. Yunker Painting Company

70 70

70

BRONZE CIRCLE ($1,000–$2,499)

Copiers Northwest Inc. Cott Corporation Crider, Inc. Del Real Foods Deloitte & Touche, LLP Dole Food Company DSJS, Inc. Earthbound Farm Edward Jonson & Associates, PS Expedia Inc. Fantasy Diamond Corporation Fifth & Pacific Companies, Inc. The Ferry Family Charitable Foundation Fidelity Investments GE Foundation General Mills, Inc. Gil Moore Family Foundation Graham Construction and Engineering, Inc. Hamilton Zanze & Co Hansen Beverage Company Health Net, Inc. Helen John Foundation Hershey Foods Corp. Holland American Line Inc. iGPS Company, LLC Index Fresh (AvoTerra) International Beauty Products Inc. The Italian Club JAD Construction, Inc. JM Smucker Co. Jones Dairy Farm K & L Gates LLP KAO Brands LaserMasters, LLC The Learning Journey International, LLC LeVecke Corporation Little Farm Frozen Foods, Inc. Loma Linda University Health Services Nelson Electric, Inc. Network For Good Newell Rubbermaid Newport Presbyterian Church Niagara Bottling LLC Nike Employee Matching Gift Program Nine Stars International

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Rigos Professional Education Programs Inc. Roussos Construction Scentair Technologies, Inc. Schneider National, Inc. School Employees Credit Union of Washington Silver Cloud Hotel Skanska USA Building, Inc Sorrento Hotel Sound Community Bank SRS Energy, LLC St. James Cathedral T D Farrell Construction, Inc. Tetra Tech KCM, Inc. T-Mobile USA, Inc. Tree Top, Inc. TSI, Inc. United Parcel Service, Inc. University Mechanical Contractors, Inc. Valet Waste, LLC Washington Park Ventures, LLC Washington Women's Foundation WCP Solutions Weider Global Nutrition Whalen Furniture Manufacturing The Wolff Company, LLC Zevenbergen Capital Investments LLC

B

A

Foster Pepper PLLC Freeport-McMoRan, Inc. FujiFilm USA GE Company Gensco, Inc. GlobalGiving Foundation Goldberg Jones GoodHeart Brand Specialty Google, Inc. The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation Greenberg Glusker HaloSource, Inc. Horrigan Foundation Inc. Huntsinger Education Trust Ignition Partners, LLC Inland Northwest Association of General Contractors Ireene S. Barnett Foundation Jack McCann Company, Inc. JBW Enterprises LLC Jones Apparel Group KPMG Foundation Krieger Insurance, Inc. Krsak Family LLC Lotus Law Group, PLLC Massimo Zanetti Beverage USA Masters Distribution, Inc. McKinley Irvin PLLC Michigan Turkey Producers National Financial Services, LLC New York Life Foundation NW Next Leaders Council OncoGenex Pharmaceuticals On-Site.Com Parametrix, Inc. PEMCO Mutual Insurance Company Photon Machines Physicians Insurance Pin Hsiao & Associates, LLC Precision FNC Services LLC The Presto Foundation RAFN Company RealPage, Inc. Red Arrow Logistics Ricoh Americas Corporation

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

LEGACY SOCIETY MEMBERS JAMES AND MARJORIE O’HARA

0000

70 40 40 10 25

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3

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

70 40 40

40 70 40

Page 53

70 70 40

40 70 40

ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

20 70 70

70 40 40

SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 53

10 40 40

40 70 40

Linda S. Green Dr. Huber K.* and Mary C. Grimm Pauline D. Guppy Donald and Victoria Haberman Bob and Beverly Hacker Russell and Corinne Hagen Peg Haggerty Jack and Myra Hanover Deborah J. Hardie

40 100

40 100

Sharon Galbraith Theresa M. Gallant Ken and Lisa Geisen Sharon and Otis Gillaspie Iva Gjerde Helen Goehring Carey M. Golden Lydia Alcala-Gonzales Eva Gordon Martin J. Granger

100 40

40 100

Janet Fisher Cecelia Fjellman David and Carmel Fleck Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Fletcher Thelma and Yan Fong Bradley and Rev. Linda Fowler John Foy Donna J. Franklin Joseph and Terri Gaffney Madeline B. Galbraith

100 40

100 40

Education—particularly a Jesuit Catholic education—is important to James and Marjorie O’Hara. The couple met at Loyola Law School after James returned from service in World War II. Although law school didn’t work out for James—he ended up pursuing studies in the business school and MBA program—he found love with Marjorie and the couple married in 1949. Eventually they settled in Minnesota where they raised their six daughters. One daughter, Ann O’Hara Graff, taught in Seattle University’s Theology and Religious Studies program until her death in 1996. Marjorie and James funded a gift annuity in 2011 in honor of their daughter Ann and a lecture series established in her memory. Ann taught at SU in the 1995–96 academic year. Prior to coming to SU she was on the faculty at Loyola University in Chicago. Ann was a much sought-after lecturer and speaker for her expertise on women’s issues, particularly women in the church. “[With the lecture series] we wanted to do something for Seattle University because Father William Sullivan and so many others were so good to Ann when she became ill,” James says. “… And my dad, myself and my girls all went to Jesuit schools so I really felt that we owed Seattle University a great deal.” A gift annuity provides fixed income to James and Marjorie during their lifetimes and will provide a future gift to ensure that the lecture series will live on and so too will the legacy of their daughter. Learn more about the Legacy Society gift annuities and other giving options at www.seattleugift.org.

30 30

30

Gordon McHenry, Jr. and Dorina Calderon-McHenry Rock Caley Frances B. Call Terence J. Callaghan Sharon and Neil Callahan Susan Campbell Harry L. and Diane Carle Peter J. Carlozzi Paul Carlson and Judith Carlson Wayne Carroll Alan and Bonnie Cashman Rev. William and Janice Cate Les and Mary Lou Cathersal Barbara and Norm Chamberlain Sally Franett Chambers Robert Chang and Catheryne Nguyen Tony Chinn Brenda Christensen and Thomas Barry Steve and Bonnie Clark Frank and Marilyn Clement Dr. Pauline Cline Marty Collins and Elizabeth Stevenson-Collins Theodore and Patricia Collins Dorothy and John Cook David Corn Perrin Cornell John and Mary Jo Costello Robert and Frances Cronin William J. Cruzen and Steven Catching Michael G. and Shannon K. Crvarich Betty Cummins Rev. Dr. Richard and Carol Cunningham Francis Daly Mike and Linda Daniels Michael Day Cesar P. and Rosario T. DeGracia Betty and Marty DeLaurenti Mary Derig Angeline Dick Duane Dier and Stella Dier James and Joan DiJulio David and Theresa Donovan James M. Donovan Judith and William Doyle Monica J. and Martin H. Duke Craig and Stephanie Duncan John and Marlene Durbin Mary Kay Dyckman Dolores Libri Eagan, in memory of Allan J. Eagan Rev. James E. Eblen Bill Eisiminger Doris Eriksen John and Susan Eshelman Marvin Evans Patrick M. and Barbara A. Fahey Frank & Barbara Fanger David Farkouh Paul Feldman Elizabeth Fenn Lee E. Fickle

PHOTO COURTESY OF STEVE LUCAS

LEGACY SOCIETY, CONTINUED

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

LEGACY SOCIETY, CONTINUED

100 100 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50 90 100

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75

Color OK_____ Layout OK_____

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Page 54

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30

ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

70 70

70

54 / Thanks to You

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Share corrections, comments or questions regarding these lists and donor recognition with Katie Chapman, (206) 296-2321 or e-mail chapmank@seattleu.edu.

30 30

30

Dorothy Speidel Sam and Winnie Sperry Malcolm* and Mari Stamper Bernard M. and Joyce J. Steckler Donald L. and Betty I. Stern Elizabeth Stevenson-Collins and Marty Collins Marnie D. Stocker Charlotte and Earl Sutherland Carl Swenson and Julia Buchholz Colonel Marilyn J. Sylvester Kae and John Tellesbo Marsha Tellesbo-Kembel Narciso and Luth Tenorio Dee M. Teodoro Patricia J. Terry Sharon and John Todd Helen G. Topel Peter L. Tountas and Michelle Bergh-Tountas Dr. Henry S. Uchida Catherine and Bruce Uhl Sheila Umlauf Mary Ellen (Doran) and George Unzelman Floren J. and Mildred Van de Putte Paul and Roberta Van der Voort Cathryn D. Vanderzicht Eugene and Catherine Voiland Colleen M. Voiss Marian Volpe Lloyd Von Normann Janet Wallace Rev. Richard Ward Peter J. Weber and Denise Bunchek Weber Arlene R. Wechezak Bill Weis and Marilyn Roy Robert and Barbara Welsh June and Roger Whitson William N. Wilber Mary McLellan Williams Caroline Wilson Richard and Elaine Wilson Robert and Sally Winkel Betty Woods Amy C. Worrell-Kneller and Byron Kneller Judith Yeakel Donna and Richard Yellam Eugenia and Armen Yousoufian Robert J. Yunker Ralph K. Zech, MD, and Helen Zech M. Anthony Zimmerman, DDS and Dolores A. Zimmerman Peter Zografos Anonymous (70)

70 70

70

Grace Elaine Munzer Jeanne Murray Mary and Chuck Nau Donald L. Navoni James Neal Melvin and Jeanne Nelson Philip and Carilyn Norris David and Donna Novak James H. O'Brien John P. O'Connell Charles and Doris (Cockrill) O'Connor James W. and Marjorie K. O'Hara Tim and Mary O'Keefe Betty J. Olson Anthony Palmer Robert Pankl Ralph and Mary Lou Peak Carol and John Penny, Jr. Robert M. Petersen Ann Richard Pfingsten and C. Thomas Pfingsten Tony and Patty Philippsen Jane Philips Linda Plaag Casey Plank John and Heidi Rabel Patricia Radle Victor and Loa Rafanelli Darlene Risse Raftis In memory of Rosemary Laura Ramsden David and Margaret* Read Patty Repikoff Frances A. Richmond Evelyn and Bruce Rick Victoria Ries John M. Roach, MD, and Nancy M. M. Roach Patrick T. and LeeAnn Roach Thomas and Nancy Roach Sally Rogers Lena and Roger Rutherford Valerie Ryan John and Julianne Salverson Sandy and Jodi Sanders Judith Schoenecker Peter and Connie Scontrino Boyd and Mikki Sharp Rev. John and Julia Shaw Ruth E. Shipp-Dart Roy Short Anthony Simhauser George and Mary Simmons John and Elizabeth Sloan Fred Sommer Geraldine Sorensen Nancy L. Sorensen John W. and Rose M. Southall

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Rhoady Lee, Jr.* and Jeanne Marie Lee Marie Legaz Whitley Donald Leuthold Maye L. Liebeck Greer and Mark Lipson George V. and Mary K. Lombardi Don Lonam and Tricia Lewicki Arthur F. and Gloria Long Bob and Sarah Long Thomas and Mary Pat Lord Larry and Betsy Lorenz Terry and Bonnie Losh Donald W. Luby Gloria Lung Wakayama Gene Lynn Mary and Joe Magnano Robert B. and Alice E. Maguire Edna J. Maguire Laura Ellis Mahoney Theresa and Thomas Mahoney Laurie Mailloux and Paul Guedet Rev. William and Laurel Malcomson J. Richard Manning Linda and Michael Manning Michael and Linda Manning Doreen A. Marchione Peter V. Marchuk, Jr. and Galina Marchuk Raymond Marik Norman C. Mattson Rev. Dr. Donald and Lynnea Mayer Sheila McAlister Philip D. and Mary McEachern Gordon McHenry, Jr. and Dorina Calderon-McHenry Dr. Ruth McIntyre and Dr. David McIntyre Nancy and James McKenney Carol Lynn McLaughlin Duncan McNab Curly and Judy McNamee Dr. Donna and Bill McNeese-Smith Helen Jo McNeil Sandra S. Mears John and Ginny Meisenbach John G. Menges Donald and Joan Merlino Michelle Harvey Merlino Lotte Meyer J. Colleen Michael Dr. Jacquelyn Miller Robert and Phyllis Miller John and Barbarann Moga John and Jerene Morford David and Wendy Morgan Eleanore S. Mortenson Pat Mowery Milly Mullarky

B

A

Dr. and Mrs. John M. Harding Charles R. Harmon and Virginia C. Harmon Mr. and Mrs. James E. Harnish Linn and Dorothy Harris Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hart Margaret and Roger Hastings Thomas and Katia Healy Harold H. and Ernestine M. Heath Paul Heneghan and Barbara Brady Heneghan Dennis and Valerie Hennessy James Henriot Patricia and Michael Hildreth August Hoba, Stella G. Hoba, Donald W. Hoba and Frederick A. Hoba Leon and Dorothy Hopper Hon. Donald and Lynda Horowitz Alan T. and Sigrid D. Horwedel Eva B. Huntsinger David M. Irwin Sr. and Dianne H. Irwin John and Patricia Isaksen Gerri Derig Jackson-Bell David M. and Linda Johnson Kent Johnson Helen M. Jolly James and Dianne Jorgensen Mr. and Mrs. H. Peter Kasama Leslie and Don Kazarian Melanie A. Kelsey Roberta Kendall Paul J. and Dana Kertes Anne and Lee Kilcup Colleen Kinerk Robert O. and Miriam Kinsey Sr. Dorothy (Dottie) Klingele, S.P. John Kloeck Steve and Elaine Knapp Bruce and Carol Koch Steve and Joan Kocharhook P. Michael Koenig Gerald W. Koethe Nina and Tom Kornell Matthew Kosanke Keith and Kathy Kragelund George Krsak Mimi Krsak Rosalyn Kwan John and Evelyn La Fond Bob Labbé Kathleen and Terence Lacey Ann F. Lackey Bruce and Brigid Laing Edward and Pat Lamb Georgia Lang Diana Larkin

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

ADMINISTRATION

100

Charles Lawrence

Timothy Leary

VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES AND UNIVERSITY SERVICES

ASSOCIATE PROVOST, GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT

Jodi Kelly

PROVOST

Gerald Huffman

Victoria Jones

DEAN, COLLEGE OF NURSING

VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE AND BUSINESS AFFAIRS

ASSOCIATE PROVOST, RESEARCH AND GRADUATE EDUCATION

Connie Kanter

William Ehmann

VICE PRESIDENT, COMMUNICATIONS

DEAN, COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Mark Niles DEAN, MATTEO RICCI COLLEGE

Isiaah Crawford

Azita Emami

30 100 60

VICE PRESIDENT, ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

Marilyn Crone

DEAN, COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Michael Quinn

100

Scott McClellan

Jacob Diaz

VICE PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT

David Powers

VICE PRESIDENT AND UNIVERSITY COUNSEL

UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN

Joseph Phillips

John Popko

100 100 60 100 100

Robert Dullea 100 60

Mary Kay McFadden

Mark Markuly DEAN, ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

30 30

30

VICE PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY PLANNING AND VICE PROVOST

DEAN, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AND MINISTRY

70 70

70

VICE PRESIDENT, STUDENT DEVELOPMENT

INTERIM DEAN, COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Mary Petersen

Robert Hughes 100

GOVERNANCE EMERITUS Ann Wyckoff

VICE CHAIR Stuart Rolfe

PRESIDENT Chris Canlas

10 25

50 40 40

50 90 100

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

70 40 40

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SU Magazine Winter 2013 / 55

70 70 40

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ALUMNI CHAPLAIN David Anderson, S.J.

EMERITUS Gregg Alex Bill Almon Bob Blethen Pat Brady Bob Braukus Terry Carroll Dorene Centioli-McTigue Paul Chiles Marilyn Clement Denny Colleran Jack David Jim Dykeman Tom Elzey Theresa Gallant

20 70 70

70 40 40

BOARD MEMBERS John Bianchi Analisa Castaneda Rachel DiPasquale Joslyn Donlin Lisa Downy Jim Dykeman Kymberly Evanson Katy Greve Joseph Hueffed William Jolly Audra Lawlor Joseph Leigh Karen Lynn Maher Cisco Malpartida Smith Sheely Mauk Jason McGill James Policar John Ruffo Lauren Sedillo D.J. Weidner Amanda Wong

10 40 40

40 70 40

BOARD MEMBERS Michael Bayard, S.J. Bob Blais Mark Bosco, S.J. David Burcham Peter Chiarelli Marta Dalla Gasperina Tom Ellison Allan Golston Don Horowitz Patrick Howell, S.J. Craig Jelinek Kent Johnson Patrick Kelly, S.J. Michael McCarthy, S.J. Gordon McHenry, Jr. Carol Nelson Nicole Piasecki Bob Ratliffe Rick Redman Pete Rose Dave Sabey Mick Schreck Steve Trainer Jill Wakefield Jeff Wright

PRESIDENT-ELECT Dan Nicholson

BOARD MEMBERS Mary Lou Amen Carol Barnickol Maria Barrientos Maureen Benoliel Mary Helen Bever Robert Brennan Maureen Brotherton Patricia Buchsel Suzanne ”Suzie“ Burke Brian Comstock Chris Corr John Costello Sr. Joyce Cox, B.V.M. Hon. Anita Crawford-Willis Salah Dandan Michael Daniels Janet Dwyer William Eisiminger Peter Ely, S.J. Mike Evered Ron Giuffre Jeff Grant Myra Bisio Hanover Timotha ”Timmie“ Hollomon Steve Huling James Jorgensen Adam Jussel

40 100

40 100

EX OFFICIO/SU PRESIDENT Stephen Sundborg, S.J.

EX OFFICIO Stephen Sundborg, S.J.

Jim Henriot Mike Hosterman Walt Hubbard Dianne Irwin Helen Jolly Richard Jones Ken Kellogg Colleen Kinerk Pat Mahoney Ricardo Martinez Randy Massengale Michael Mastro, Jr. Gerry Maurer Mick McHugh John Meisenbach Andy Mirkovich Enid Moore Susan Picht Chuck Riley Tom Roach Mary Ann Sauvage Boyd Sharp Jody Sheppard Mullally Jack Southall Sam Sperry Joe Straus Nick Tarlson Kip Toner Mike Torre Ruth Tressel Peter Truex Greg Van Pelt Art Wahl Fred Weiss

100 40

40 100

SECRETARY Maureen Lee

CHAIR Butch Leonardson

Anne Kilcup Curly McNamee Jeff Meder Marlene Miller Richard Mitchell, JD Carol Penny Connie Rogel Judy Rogers Kathleen Schafer Diane Siderius-Kocer Paul Stoot Kevin Suther Venerria Lucas Thomas Mark Wesley Deborah Wilds Kathleen Wright Martha Wyckoff Joe Zavaglia Ralph Zech, II

100 40

100 40

ALUMNI BOARD OF GOVERNORS

BOARD OF REGENTS

30 30

30

CHAIR Betty Woods

70 70

70

As of November 2012

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

100 100 60 100 100

Peter Ely, S.J. EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

DEAN, SCHOOL OF LAW

30 30

ASSOCIATE PROVOST, ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

70 70

70

VICE PRESIDENT, MISSION AND MINISTRY

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Stephen Sundborg, S.J.

B

A

PRESIDENT

L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

100

Seattle, WA Permit No. 2783

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

PAID

B

A

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage

SEATTLE UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE 901 12th Avenue PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

See Yourself In

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

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70 40 40 10 25

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3 50

50 40 40

www.seattleu.edu

10 40 40

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Imagine yourself center stage. At Seattle University, whether it’s fine arts or another area of study, you receive personal attention in small classes with great professors. Eight colleges and schools provide plenty of undergraduate and graduate programs so it’s easy to find the academic path that’s right for you.

40 100

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RED

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ICS# 120540 • Seattle University 2012 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 60 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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Color OK_____ Layout OK_____


Seattle University Magazine: Winter 2013