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a publication for alumni and friends of Southern Connecticut State University

ALUMNI MAGAZINE | Fall | 09

A look at some of the major events and minor moments that shaped the university during one ordinary, yet extraordinary, week.

LET TER FROM THE

President Dear Southern Alumni, The continuing challenges of these economic times provide a conundrum for public universities such as Southern Connecticut State University. Last spring, applications closed in March and a first-ever waiting list was established as we experienced unprecedented interest in our affordable, highquality educational offerings.At the same time, Southern was faced with budget reductions, cuts in financial aid, and an endowment negatively impacted by the financial market downturn, meaning fewer dollars available for student scholarship support. Yet despite those realities, your university continues to thrive.A special photo essay in this issue —“Southern: A Week in the Life”— provides a glimpse into our vibrant campus life during one ordinary, yet extraordinary, week in April. Through strategic planning, innovative thinking, and the active involvement of all members of the Southern community, we are learning to do more with less.Yes, these are challenging times, but to paraphrase Walt Disney: all of our dreams can come true if we have the courage to pursue them.At Southern, we have that courage in abundance, and our efforts to provide the very best in public higher education remain undiminished. One of the reasons for this is the support that we have received from our alumni and friends. Last semester, in the wake of the financial markets’ near-record losses, we made special appeals to both donors with established scholarships and to our alumni population in general for contributions to support student financial aid. This aid is critical; while Southern’s tuition and fees are among the lowest of any fouryear institution in the state, our students graduate with an average debt of nearly $20,000. This debt would be even higher if our students were not working while studying for their degrees.A recent survey of Southern seniors indicated that

almost 80 percent work off campus, with approximately 23 percent of these students working 30 or more hours per week. The response to our appeals was outstanding. Several alumni groups stepped forward with class contributions — with the Classes of ’51, ’54, and ’55 leading the way.A spring phonathon, headlined“Yes You Can — help a student succeed,” raised almost $100,000. Donors with established scholarships contributed an additional $70,000.And thanks in large part to these contributions, we have more than $250,000 already available in scholarship and programmatic support for the new academic year. Overall contributions to the university in the 2008-09 fiscal year exceeded our goal at $1.73 million—at a time when philanthropic support for higher education has been in marked decline across the country. On behalf of our current and future students, I thank all of our supporters and friends for their generosity. Because of you, educational opportunities will continue to be accessible to students who have already committed themselves to earning degrees in critically needed fields such as education, nursing, social work, public health, and communication disorders.And because of you, long-held dreams of attaining a college education can still be a reality. I look forward to your continued involvement as we further Southern’s mission as a university of opportunity and choice for students in Connecticut and beyond.

Dr. Cheryl J. Norton President

Southern

ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Fall | 09 features In the News

10

Our spotlight on journalism alumni includes profiles of three media movers-and-shakers: award-winning entertainment journalist — and rock-chic goddess extraordinaire — Carrie Borzillo-Vrenna, ’92; Dallasbased television anchor Chris Flanagan, ’94; and Elizabeth Ailes, ’82, a former CNBC news executive who has taken the reins at several upstate-New York-based newspapers, the purchases of which were recently completed by her husband, Roger Ailes, chairman and chief executive officer of the Fox News Channel.

Southern...

Follow the Leader

26 John P. Schreitmueller, ’75, founder, president, and chief executive officer of the Resolute Consulting Group, talks about reinventing the corporate world. His advice to leaders? Get real!

A look at some of the major events and minor moments that shaped the university during one ordinary, yet extraordinary, week.

departments

16

From the President

inside cover

Campus News Nostalgia

2

28

30 Out and About 32 Alumni News 34 Alumni Notes 38 Southern Events 44

Supporting Southern

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

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Page 2

Campus

NEWS I

I

Congratulations Class of 2009!

Recognizing Student Excellence Four exceptional students from the Class of 2009 were recognized for their accom-

plishments as the recipients of the Henry Barnard Foundation Student Award. The award, one of the university’s most prestigious honors, recognizes high academic achievement and commitment to the campus and the greater community. Award recipient Alberto Cifuentes, Jr., a media studies and English major, served as treasurer of the Media Studies Club, secretary of the Southern Chapter of Amnesty International, and co-president of LGBTQIA Prism, which strives to increase educational awareness of different sexualities. Also active in the general community, Cifuentes serves as co-chairman of the Connecticut chapter of the Education Network and led a discussion for the Ella Grasso Youth Action Conference on teen driving laws. Honoree Megan Rudne, an art education major, graduactivities include providing meals to homeless people on the New Haven Green. A mem-

EDITORIAL OFFICE Southern Connecticut State University Office of Public Affairs/ Southern Alumni Magazine 501 Crescent Street New Haven, CT 06515-1355 Telephone (203) 392-6591; fax (203) 392-6597 E-mail address: struykv1@SouthernCT.edu University Web site: www.SouthernCT.edu Printed by Imperial Graphics

ber of the President’s Sustainable Climate Committee and the Environmental Futurists Club, she has worked in the Office of Judicial Affairs and as a resident adviser. Rudne plans

amily and friends

sense wisdom and humor.

Maury’s show,” she told

University, served as the

to pursue a Master of Science

gathered on May 29

While acknowledging the

the graduates with a laugh.

guest speaker during the

degree in special education

to attend Southern’s

difficult job market, Chung

“If I see any of you up

afternoon ceremony for

with a specialization in autism

undergraduate com-

stressed ongoing opportu-

there, Cheryl [SCSU

the School of Arts and

spectrum disorders.

mencement exercises at

nities in computer technol-

President Norton] and I

Sciences, the School of

the Connecticut Tennis

ogy and the importance of

will come after you.”

Business, and the School

tory/secondary education major

Center in New Haven,

giving back through volun-

Southern also held

of Health and Human

and member of the Honors

Conn. A total of 1,438

teerism. Chung also took a

two graduate commence-

Services. Grammy Award-

College, plans to teach high

students earned bache-

moment to poke fun at her

ment ceremonies at John

winning singer and song-

school social studies. A member of the executive board for Zeta Delta Epsilon, the university’s

lor’s degrees.

husband’s role as host of

Lyman Center for the

writer Michael Bolton

honors community service organization, Shortell also was active in the Newman Society, a reli-

Connie Chung, for-

the Maury Povich Show, a

Performing Arts on May

delivered the address

gious organization, and served as its president in 2005. (See the back page of the magazine

mer co-anchor of the CBS

reality TV program known

28, with about 1,100 stu-

during the evening cere-

for a related story.)

Evening News and award-

for spotlighting guests who

dents earning graduate

mony for the School of

winning investigative

discuss their personal lives

degrees. Orlando Taylor,

Education and the School

4.0 grade point average in January. Stutzman, who plans to teach music at the secondary

reporter, delivered the

in an extremely dramatized

vice provost for research

of Communication,

school level, pursued his degree after working 30 years in software design and implementa-

keynote address with a

way. “I do not want to see

and dean of the graduate

Information, and Library

tion. He earned a Master of Arts degree from Yale University in linguistics in 1975 and a

combination of common-

you on my husband

school at Howard

Science.

Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics from Pomona College in 1971.

2 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Dr. Cheryl J. Norton, President Megan A. Rock, Vice President for Institutional Advancement

ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE Michelle R. Johnston, Director of Alumni Relations (203) 392-6500

ated in August. Her volunteer

F

| ALUMNI MAGAZINE | VOL 8 • NO 1

STAFF Patrick Dilger, Director of Public Affairs Villia Struyk, Editor Marsha Rabe, Associate Editor Michael Kobylanski, Sports Editor Marylou Conley, ’83, Art Director Isabel Chenoweth, Photographer Thomas Cain, Assistant Photographer Nancy Ronne, Development Editor Charlie Davison, Alumni Notes Editor

Gay, Lesbian, and Straight

Connie Chung, former co-anchor of the CBS Evening News [PICTURED LEFT CENTER], delivered the keynote address at Southern’s undergraduate commencement exercises.

Southern

Catherine Shortell, a his[CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT] Alberto Cifuentes, Jr., ’09; Megan Rudne ’09; Walter Stutzman, ’09; and Catherine Shortell, ’09

The honorees also include Walter Stutzman, a music major who graduated with a

Southern Alumni Magazine is published by the university in cooperation with the SCSU Alumni Association three times a year and distributed free of charge to alumni and friends of the university. Opinions expressed in Southern Alumni Magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the university or of the SCSU Alumni Association.Although the editors have made every reasonable effort to be factually accurate, no responsibility is assumed for errors. Postage paid at New Haven, Conn. Southern Connecticut State University, in compliance with federal laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices, or procedures. This includes, but is not limited to, admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational services. Fall 2009 | 3

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:53 AM

Page 2

Campus

NEWS I

I

Congratulations Class of 2009!

Recognizing Student Excellence Four exceptional students from the Class of 2009 were recognized for their accom-

plishments as the recipients of the Henry Barnard Foundation Student Award. The award, one of the university’s most prestigious honors, recognizes high academic achievement and commitment to the campus and the greater community. Award recipient Alberto Cifuentes, Jr., a media studies and English major, served as treasurer of the Media Studies Club, secretary of the Southern Chapter of Amnesty International, and co-president of LGBTQIA Prism, which strives to increase educational awareness of different sexualities. Also active in the general community, Cifuentes serves as co-chairman of the Connecticut chapter of the Education Network and led a discussion for the Ella Grasso Youth Action Conference on teen driving laws. Honoree Megan Rudne, an art education major, graduactivities include providing meals to homeless people on the New Haven Green. A mem-

EDITORIAL OFFICE Southern Connecticut State University Office of Public Affairs/ Southern Alumni Magazine 501 Crescent Street New Haven, CT 06515-1355 Telephone (203) 392-6591; fax (203) 392-6597 E-mail address: struykv1@SouthernCT.edu University Web site: www.SouthernCT.edu Printed by Imperial Graphics

ber of the President’s Sustainable Climate Committee and the Environmental Futurists Club, she has worked in the Office of Judicial Affairs and as a resident adviser. Rudne plans

amily and friends

sense wisdom and humor.

Maury’s show,” she told

University, served as the

to pursue a Master of Science

gathered on May 29

While acknowledging the

the graduates with a laugh.

guest speaker during the

degree in special education

to attend Southern’s

difficult job market, Chung

“If I see any of you up

afternoon ceremony for

with a specialization in autism

undergraduate com-

stressed ongoing opportu-

there, Cheryl [SCSU

the School of Arts and

spectrum disorders.

mencement exercises at

nities in computer technol-

President Norton] and I

Sciences, the School of

the Connecticut Tennis

ogy and the importance of

will come after you.”

Business, and the School

tory/secondary education major

Center in New Haven,

giving back through volun-

Southern also held

of Health and Human

and member of the Honors

Conn. A total of 1,438

teerism. Chung also took a

two graduate commence-

Services. Grammy Award-

College, plans to teach high

students earned bache-

moment to poke fun at her

ment ceremonies at John

winning singer and song-

school social studies. A member of the executive board for Zeta Delta Epsilon, the university’s

lor’s degrees.

husband’s role as host of

Lyman Center for the

writer Michael Bolton

honors community service organization, Shortell also was active in the Newman Society, a reli-

Connie Chung, for-

the Maury Povich Show, a

Performing Arts on May

delivered the address

gious organization, and served as its president in 2005. (See the back page of the magazine

mer co-anchor of the CBS

reality TV program known

28, with about 1,100 stu-

during the evening cere-

for a related story.)

Evening News and award-

for spotlighting guests who

dents earning graduate

mony for the School of

winning investigative

discuss their personal lives

degrees. Orlando Taylor,

Education and the School

4.0 grade point average in January. Stutzman, who plans to teach music at the secondary

reporter, delivered the

in an extremely dramatized

vice provost for research

of Communication,

school level, pursued his degree after working 30 years in software design and implementa-

keynote address with a

way. “I do not want to see

and dean of the graduate

Information, and Library

tion. He earned a Master of Arts degree from Yale University in linguistics in 1975 and a

combination of common-

you on my husband

school at Howard

Science.

Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics from Pomona College in 1971.

2 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Dr. Cheryl J. Norton, President Megan A. Rock, Vice President for Institutional Advancement

ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE Michelle R. Johnston, Director of Alumni Relations (203) 392-6500

ated in August. Her volunteer

F

| ALUMNI MAGAZINE | VOL 8 • NO 1

STAFF Patrick Dilger, Director of Public Affairs Villia Struyk, Editor Marsha Rabe, Associate Editor Michael Kobylanski, Sports Editor Marylou Conley, ’83, Art Director Isabel Chenoweth, Photographer Thomas Cain, Assistant Photographer Nancy Ronne, Development Editor Charlie Davison, Alumni Notes Editor

Gay, Lesbian, and Straight

Connie Chung, former co-anchor of the CBS Evening News [PICTURED LEFT CENTER], delivered the keynote address at Southern’s undergraduate commencement exercises.

Southern

Catherine Shortell, a his[CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT] Alberto Cifuentes, Jr., ’09; Megan Rudne ’09; Walter Stutzman, ’09; and Catherine Shortell, ’09

The honorees also include Walter Stutzman, a music major who graduated with a

Southern Alumni Magazine is published by the university in cooperation with the SCSU Alumni Association three times a year and distributed free of charge to alumni and friends of the university. Opinions expressed in Southern Alumni Magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the university or of the SCSU Alumni Association.Although the editors have made every reasonable effort to be factually accurate, no responsibility is assumed for errors. Postage paid at New Haven, Conn. Southern Connecticut State University, in compliance with federal laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices, or procedures. This includes, but is not limited to, admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational services. Fall 2009 | 3

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:53 AM

Page 4

Campus

NEWS I

s

outhern, originally known as the New Haven State Normal School,

From Associate’s to Bachelor’s

welcomed its first class of students on Sept. 11,

I

1893

.

Several Grants Forward Research The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded

I

n the 116 years since its inception, Southern has grown

The Connecticut State University System

from a student body of 84 to approximately

will enable Southern faculty and students to conduct cutting-

12,000

edge research on ancient volcanic rocks from Antarctica.

.

(CSUS) and the

O

Connecticut Community

The rocks were collected by grant co-author and Associate Professor of Earth Science Thomas Fleming, who has

riginally consisting of one building, Southern’s

College (CCC) system have

campus now totals

approved the Transfer

s

168

been studying Antarctic geology for more than a quarter of a

acres.

century. Fleming has traveled to the continent six times since

outhern prides itself on its diverse, culturally rich campus:

Compact Agreement, which will offer dual

Minority students make up more than

20%

of the full-time undergraduate population.

admission to students who are planning to enroll at

s

State University, Central

high marks from students: for example,

79%

1985, bringing Southern students with him as part of the research expedition twice in the last decade. The highly competitive grant was funded as part of a twoyear $329,260 package shared by Southern, the Massachusetts

Connecticut State University,

participating students said they believe they are gaining the

Eastern Connecticut State

knowledge needed to conduct academic research.

Ms. Magazine Cites Southern

Participants at the annual Women’s Studies Conference enjoy a lively discussion.

Southern was

Southern also offers an undergraduate minor and

institutions of higher learn-

a graduate certificate in

notable awards from the National Endowment for the

ing highlighted by Ms.

women’s studies. The

Humanities (NEH). Associate Professor of History Nikolaos

magazine in its 2009 Guide

magazine listed Southern

Two other members of Southern’s faculty also received

of

I

among a select group of

Institute of Technology, and The Ohio State University.

outhern’s First-Year Experience (FYE) program continues to get

Southern Connecticut

$60,390 to the university as part of a collaborative grant that

Chrissidis received an NEH Faculty Research Fellowship of

to Women’s Studies, which

among 31 institutions that

University, or Western

$33,600 to further the writing of a book provisionally titled,

was part of the publica-

offer freestanding master’s

Connecticut State University

“Education and Westernization in Eastern Orthodoxy: The Case of

tion’s spring issue. In addi-

degrees in women’s and

after completing an associ-

the Slavo-Greek-Latin Academy of Moscow, 1685-1725.” Chrissidis

tion to a graduate program

gender studies, describing

ate’s degree at a commu-

also received a $32,000 Sabbatical Fellowship from the

leading to a Master of Arts

the university as “a vibrant

American Philosophical Society to support his work, which

degree in women’s studies,

regional institution.”

nity college.

uniform, statewide, dualadmission program.

Set to begin in the

“Receiving aca-

Hillhouse High School in

teaming up with mathe-

New Haven, Hamden High

matics and English teach-

School, and Maloney High

ers from Hillhouse,

fall 2009 semester, the pro-

demic advising from both

School in Meriden.

gram will permit students

institutions,” says CSUS

The primary

who are still working on

Chancellor David G.

goal of the

their associate’s degrees to

Carter, “and developing

program,

enroll at a CSUS university

an academic plan from

which is

informa-

for future study. Once they

day one, will be tremen-

support-

tion, visit

earn the associate’s degree,

dously helpful to students,

ed by a

each oth-

they will be eligible to

potentially saving them

$72,250

ers’ class-

transfer to the university

time and money and

grant from

they have designated.

improving the likelihood

the state

Although each of the uni-

that they will continue

Department of

versities has had some

through graduation at one

Higher Education, is to

form of enhanced admis-

of the universities.“

sion program in place with neighboring community colleges, the new program

I

Hamden High, and Maloney to share curriculum

es, and develop

in Russia. The NEH also awarded a $6,000 Summer Stipend to Professor of Music Tilden Russell to support his work, “The Compleat Dancing Master: A Translation of Gottfried Taubert’s Rechtschaffener Tantzmeister (1717).” Written in old-fashioned German, the 1,231-page Rechtschaffener Tantzmeister is the most voluminous and compendious source for 18th-century dance, according to Russell. Thomas Fleming, associate professor of earth science, is co-author of a National Science Foundation grant that is enabling Southern faculty and students to study volcanic rocks previously collected from Antarctica.

strategies to improve instruction. In

improve student prepara-

addition, the university is

tion for college-level math-

collecting data to deter-

College Bound

ematics and composition

mine which factors are

Southern’s Galileo

classes. Working toward

linked to successful per-

that end, faculty members

formance in mathematics

expands benefits for stu-

Project is designed to ease

dents. The signing also

the transition to college for

from Southern’s depart-

and English. The grant also

marks the first time that all

students from three

ments of mathematics,

covered the cost of a two-

16 institutions will adopt a

Connecticut schools:

English, and education are

day teaching academy.

4 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

focuses on the first institution of higher education established

Fall 2009 | 5

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:53 AM

Page 4

Campus

NEWS I

s

outhern, originally known as the New Haven State Normal School,

From Associate’s to Bachelor’s

welcomed its first class of students on Sept. 11,

I

1893

.

Several Grants Forward Research The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded

I

n the 116 years since its inception, Southern has grown

The Connecticut State University System

from a student body of 84 to approximately

will enable Southern faculty and students to conduct cutting-

12,000

edge research on ancient volcanic rocks from Antarctica.

.

(CSUS) and the

O

Connecticut Community

The rocks were collected by grant co-author and Associate Professor of Earth Science Thomas Fleming, who has

riginally consisting of one building, Southern’s

College (CCC) system have

campus now totals

approved the Transfer

s

168

been studying Antarctic geology for more than a quarter of a

acres.

century. Fleming has traveled to the continent six times since

outhern prides itself on its diverse, culturally rich campus:

Compact Agreement, which will offer dual

Minority students make up more than

20%

of the full-time undergraduate population.

admission to students who are planning to enroll at

s

State University, Central

high marks from students: for example,

79%

1985, bringing Southern students with him as part of the research expedition twice in the last decade. The highly competitive grant was funded as part of a twoyear $329,260 package shared by Southern, the Massachusetts

Connecticut State University,

participating students said they believe they are gaining the

Eastern Connecticut State

knowledge needed to conduct academic research.

Ms. Magazine Cites Southern

Participants at the annual Women’s Studies Conference enjoy a lively discussion.

Southern was

Southern also offers an undergraduate minor and

institutions of higher learn-

a graduate certificate in

notable awards from the National Endowment for the

ing highlighted by Ms.

women’s studies. The

Humanities (NEH). Associate Professor of History Nikolaos

magazine in its 2009 Guide

magazine listed Southern

Two other members of Southern’s faculty also received

of

I

among a select group of

Institute of Technology, and The Ohio State University.

outhern’s First-Year Experience (FYE) program continues to get

Southern Connecticut

$60,390 to the university as part of a collaborative grant that

Chrissidis received an NEH Faculty Research Fellowship of

to Women’s Studies, which

among 31 institutions that

University, or Western

$33,600 to further the writing of a book provisionally titled,

was part of the publica-

offer freestanding master’s

Connecticut State University

“Education and Westernization in Eastern Orthodoxy: The Case of

tion’s spring issue. In addi-

degrees in women’s and

after completing an associ-

the Slavo-Greek-Latin Academy of Moscow, 1685-1725.” Chrissidis

tion to a graduate program

gender studies, describing

ate’s degree at a commu-

also received a $32,000 Sabbatical Fellowship from the

leading to a Master of Arts

the university as “a vibrant

American Philosophical Society to support his work, which

degree in women’s studies,

regional institution.”

nity college.

uniform, statewide, dualadmission program.

Set to begin in the

“Receiving aca-

Hillhouse High School in

teaming up with mathe-

New Haven, Hamden High

matics and English teach-

School, and Maloney High

ers from Hillhouse,

fall 2009 semester, the pro-

demic advising from both

School in Meriden.

gram will permit students

institutions,” says CSUS

The primary

who are still working on

Chancellor David G.

goal of the

their associate’s degrees to

Carter, “and developing

program,

enroll at a CSUS university

an academic plan from

which is

informa-

for future study. Once they

day one, will be tremen-

support-

tion, visit

earn the associate’s degree,

dously helpful to students,

ed by a

each oth-

they will be eligible to

potentially saving them

$72,250

ers’ class-

transfer to the university

time and money and

grant from

they have designated.

improving the likelihood

the state

Although each of the uni-

that they will continue

Department of

versities has had some

through graduation at one

Higher Education, is to

form of enhanced admis-

of the universities.“

sion program in place with neighboring community colleges, the new program

I

Hamden High, and Maloney to share curriculum

es, and develop

in Russia. The NEH also awarded a $6,000 Summer Stipend to Professor of Music Tilden Russell to support his work, “The Compleat Dancing Master: A Translation of Gottfried Taubert’s Rechtschaffener Tantzmeister (1717).” Written in old-fashioned German, the 1,231-page Rechtschaffener Tantzmeister is the most voluminous and compendious source for 18th-century dance, according to Russell. Thomas Fleming, associate professor of earth science, is co-author of a National Science Foundation grant that is enabling Southern faculty and students to study volcanic rocks previously collected from Antarctica.

strategies to improve instruction. In

improve student prepara-

addition, the university is

tion for college-level math-

collecting data to deter-

College Bound

ematics and composition

mine which factors are

Southern’s Galileo

classes. Working toward

linked to successful per-

that end, faculty members

formance in mathematics

expands benefits for stu-

Project is designed to ease

dents. The signing also

the transition to college for

from Southern’s depart-

and English. The grant also

marks the first time that all

students from three

ments of mathematics,

covered the cost of a two-

16 institutions will adopt a

Connecticut schools:

English, and education are

day teaching academy.

4 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

focuses on the first institution of higher education established

Fall 2009 | 5

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:53 AM

Page 6

Campus

NEWS Assistant Professor of Biology I

Jonathan Weinbaum Play Ball! On April 22, Yankee fans came out in full force for Southern’s 11th Mary and Louis Fusco

Distinguished Lecture, a lively talk between Brian Cashman, general manager of the New York Yankees (left), and Peter Gammons, ESPN’s Hall of Fame baseball analyst. The lecture, held days after the opening of the new Yankees Stadium, covered prospects for the Yankees and the game in general. A portion of the proceeds from the event supports Southern’s Endowed Awards of Excellence, a merit-based scholarship program.

I

Outstanding Professors Honored

are exciting, rigorous, and informative.” Sargent’s strong

Two members of

commitment to student

the faculty, Margaret M.

success extends beyond

Sargent, associate profes-

the classroom to include

sor of communication, and

academic advising, serving

Diane Frankel-Gramelis,

as the faculty adviser for

’80, M.S. ’82, adjunct pro-

the College Republicans,

fessor of Public Health, are

and working with students

the recipients of the J.

on communication

Philip Smith Outstanding

research. An active mem-

Teaching Award. The annu-

ber of numerous university Associate Professor of Communication Margaret M. Sargent

Adjunct Professor of Public Health Diane Frankel-Gramelis

in teaching, carries with it a

then returned in 2003,

because our students are

ise through workshops,

$2,500 prize.

was lauded by students

so attracted to her teach-

including the First-Year

and faculty during the

ing style,” said Dr. Jos

Experience Academy and

joined the Communication

nomination process. “I like

Ullian, chairman of the

the Teaching Innovation

Department at Southern

to describe her as one of

Communication

Program.

in 1999, left in 2000, and

our teaching ‘rock stars,’

Department. “Her classes

al award, which recognizes excellence and innovation

Sargent, who

6 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

committees, she also shares her teaching expert-

continues on page 8

At Southern: Teaches classes in zoology, vertebrate zoology, and comparative vertebrate anatomy.

Hands-on Training: Weinbaum has worked with the Museum of Western Colorado in Grand Junction; Dinosaur State Park in Rocky Hill, Conn.; and for a now-defunct Colorado company that organized dinosaur digs.

Food for Thought: The commonly held belief that dinosaurs were cold-blooded is subject to debate, according to Weinbaum. “Dinosaurs, for the most part, appear to have been endothermic (warm blooded) and possessed high metabolisms,” says Weinbaum.

Looking Forward: Weinbaum is among the recipients of the 2009-2010 Connecticut State University (CSU) System Research Grant Awards. His research project is “Were the Ancestors of Crocodiles Endothermic?: Systematics, Form and Function in Extinct Relatives of Crocodylians.” Fall 2009 | 7

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10:53 AM

Page 6

Campus

NEWS Assistant Professor of Biology I

Jonathan Weinbaum Play Ball! On April 22, Yankee fans came out in full force for Southern’s 11th Mary and Louis Fusco

Distinguished Lecture, a lively talk between Brian Cashman, general manager of the New York Yankees (left), and Peter Gammons, ESPN’s Hall of Fame baseball analyst. The lecture, held days after the opening of the new Yankees Stadium, covered prospects for the Yankees and the game in general. A portion of the proceeds from the event supports Southern’s Endowed Awards of Excellence, a merit-based scholarship program.

I

Outstanding Professors Honored

are exciting, rigorous, and informative.” Sargent’s strong

Two members of

commitment to student

the faculty, Margaret M.

success extends beyond

Sargent, associate profes-

the classroom to include

sor of communication, and

academic advising, serving

Diane Frankel-Gramelis,

as the faculty adviser for

’80, M.S. ’82, adjunct pro-

the College Republicans,

fessor of Public Health, are

and working with students

the recipients of the J.

on communication

Philip Smith Outstanding

research. An active mem-

Teaching Award. The annu-

ber of numerous university Associate Professor of Communication Margaret M. Sargent

Adjunct Professor of Public Health Diane Frankel-Gramelis

in teaching, carries with it a

then returned in 2003,

because our students are

ise through workshops,

$2,500 prize.

was lauded by students

so attracted to her teach-

including the First-Year

and faculty during the

ing style,” said Dr. Jos

Experience Academy and

joined the Communication

nomination process. “I like

Ullian, chairman of the

the Teaching Innovation

Department at Southern

to describe her as one of

Communication

Program.

in 1999, left in 2000, and

our teaching ‘rock stars,’

Department. “Her classes

al award, which recognizes excellence and innovation

Sargent, who

6 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

committees, she also shares her teaching expert-

continues on page 8

At Southern: Teaches classes in zoology, vertebrate zoology, and comparative vertebrate anatomy.

Hands-on Training: Weinbaum has worked with the Museum of Western Colorado in Grand Junction; Dinosaur State Park in Rocky Hill, Conn.; and for a now-defunct Colorado company that organized dinosaur digs.

Food for Thought: The commonly held belief that dinosaurs were cold-blooded is subject to debate, according to Weinbaum. “Dinosaurs, for the most part, appear to have been endothermic (warm blooded) and possessed high metabolisms,” says Weinbaum.

Looking Forward: Weinbaum is among the recipients of the 2009-2010 Connecticut State University (CSU) System Research Grant Awards. His research project is “Were the Ancestors of Crocodiles Endothermic?: Systematics, Form and Function in Extinct Relatives of Crocodylians.” Fall 2009 | 7

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:53 AM

Page 8

Campus

NEWS

Meet South Student Athern’s lete

sport shorts continued from page 6

gymnastics 

athletics program lauded 

The director of community education at Milford Hospital, Frankel-Gramelis teaches courses on stress management and

Sarah Darst

Coach Jerry Nelson

Southern’s Athletics

has been named chairman

health promotion for Southern’s Public Health Department.

Department placed third in

She earned both her bachelor’s degree in Health Education

of the USA Gymnastics

the 2008-09 Northeast-10

and her master’s in Public Health Education from Southern.

(USAG) Collegiate

Conference Presidents’

Women’s Championship

Cup race, which recognizes

performed her teaching role with distinction, even beyond the

Committee. He will serve a

overall excellence in athlet-

level I had imagined,” says Bill Faraclas, chairman of the public

four-year term in this

ics. The Presidents’ Cup is

health department. “Her energy is matched only by the joy she

capacity, which will coin-

awarded annually to the

derives from her classroom experiences.”

cide with his duties at

institution that earns the

Southern. Nelson, the 2007

most points based on the

mentors student interns in Milford Hospital’s Education

USAG National Coach of

placement at the conclu-

Department and presents workshops on stress reduction and

the Year, recently complet-

sion of the regular season

health-related strategies.

ed his fifth season as head

of each of its programs

coach of the Owls and has

that compete in league

Gymnastics Championships — earned All-America

won three Eastern College

championships.

honors this year in the uneven bars; Named

Athletic Conference titles.

Eastern College Athletic Conference Scholar-Athlete

“From the very start, and without exception, she has

Outside of the classroom, Frankel-Gramelis guides and

I

Grad Poet Wins Prizes Lee Keylock, ’01, M.S. ’03, was

earned his under-

“bombarded with poetry” when he was

graduate degree at

growing up in England. “Whether or not

Southern, as well as

I liked it as a kid, I was exposed to it,”

an M.S. in English

says Keylock, who seems to have profit-

with teacher certifi-

ed from his years of literary immersion.

cation. An English

A graduate student in creative writing at

teacher at Newtown

Southern, Keylock won the 2009 Leo

High School,

Connellan Prize for his poem, “The Tattie

Keylock also co-

Hawker,” and the 2009 John Holmes

coaches, with poetry

Poetry Award for his poem, “Font.”

slam champion

The Connellan Prize, open to students at the four Connecticut State University System (CSUS) universities, is

The Owls conclud-

Connecticut’s youth poetry slam team. Keylock’s own poetry is largely

Keylock left England when he was almost 17, backpacked around

CoSIDA’s First-Team Academic All-District I honors.

and Rutgers — during the regular season.

ing poetry in earnest about four years

indoor and outdoor track

the 1980s, when he was growing up.

ago, once he had finished his teacher cer-

and field. In addition, the

tification. “I started writing and just got

softball team finished sec-

ed for a single outstanding poem by an

town, and in the ‘80s, the Irish

into it,” he says. “I started reading more

ond in the Northeast-10

undergraduate or graduate student enrolled

Republican Army was pretty big,” says

about poetic structure and form and

championship.

in a New England college.

Keylock. “There was tension between the

university’s new M.F.A. program in cre-

long, I write a lot about that topic now

ative writing, which starts in the fall. He

because I have some distance from it.”

Favorite Athlete(s): “My grandfather worked for the Yankees in Tampa, Fla., where they conduct spring training. I’m a diehard Yankees fan.” Well-rounded: Works for the Athletics Department; Volunteer activities include tutoring and reading to children at local elementary schools.

learning more about the genre. I became

Keylock’s winning poems may be read online at www.SouthernCt.edu/news/ gradpoetwinsprize_191/. Follow the links at the end of the article.

songs — “How Bad Do You Want It,” by Tim

Cyrus help her relax.

Irish/English conflict in England during

England and being away from it for so

Pre-meet rituals: Says a prayer and listens to three

by Nelly, and “Ready, Set, Don’t Go,” by Billy Ray

in-residence. The John Holmes Award,

Southern, but was accepted into the

personality.”) and uneven bars (“I love to swing.”)

and women’s swimming

given by the New England Poetry Club, the

more willful in my choices as I wrote.”

Favorite events: Floor exercises (“I get to show my

McGraw, pumps her up; “Heart of a Champion,”

and diving, and men’s

off every week in England. Leaving

began competing at age 6.

championships in men’s

himself when he was 18. He began writ-

toward an M.A. in creative writing at

Born Champion: Started gymnastic lessons at age 3;

The Owls won league

volatile atmosphere engendered by the

Irish and the English. Bombs were going

defeated four Div. I pro-

02, when it placed third.

Connecticut, who was also the CSUS poet-

8 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Directors of America (CoSIDA); Also earned

the 2009 USA Gymnastics

grams — Yale, Brown, Penn

Europe, and came to New York City by

Keylock has been working

selection by the College of Sports Information

highest finish since 2001-

inspired by his experiences within the

“There were a lot of Irish in my

of the Year for the second-consecutive season.

finished in eighth place at

139 points to match its

named for the former poet laureate of

oldest poetry club in the country, is present-

Claims to Fame: Three-time qualifier for the USA

Named a Second-Team Academic All-America

Southern hosted. They

Elizabeth Thomas,

Exercise Science Major (3.95 grade point average)

a 17-7 win-lose record and

Championships, which Southern earned

Co-captain of the Gymnastics Team

ed the regular season with

Collegiate National

Lee Keylock, ‘01, M.S. ‘03

Senior

Gymnastics Coach Jerry Nelson talks with a team member.

Career Aspirations: To earn a doctorate and become a physical therapist.

For more sports news, visit www.SouthernCTOwls.com. Fall 2009 | 9

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:53 AM

Page 8

Campus

NEWS

Meet South Student Athern’s lete

sport shorts continued from page 6

gymnastics 

athletics program lauded 

The director of community education at Milford Hospital, Frankel-Gramelis teaches courses on stress management and

Sarah Darst

Coach Jerry Nelson

Southern’s Athletics

has been named chairman

health promotion for Southern’s Public Health Department.

Department placed third in

She earned both her bachelor’s degree in Health Education

of the USA Gymnastics

the 2008-09 Northeast-10

and her master’s in Public Health Education from Southern.

(USAG) Collegiate

Conference Presidents’

Women’s Championship

Cup race, which recognizes

performed her teaching role with distinction, even beyond the

Committee. He will serve a

overall excellence in athlet-

level I had imagined,” says Bill Faraclas, chairman of the public

four-year term in this

ics. The Presidents’ Cup is

health department. “Her energy is matched only by the joy she

capacity, which will coin-

awarded annually to the

derives from her classroom experiences.”

cide with his duties at

institution that earns the

Southern. Nelson, the 2007

most points based on the

mentors student interns in Milford Hospital’s Education

USAG National Coach of

placement at the conclu-

Department and presents workshops on stress reduction and

the Year, recently complet-

sion of the regular season

health-related strategies.

ed his fifth season as head

of each of its programs

coach of the Owls and has

that compete in league

Gymnastics Championships — earned All-America

won three Eastern College

championships.

honors this year in the uneven bars; Named

Athletic Conference titles.

Eastern College Athletic Conference Scholar-Athlete

“From the very start, and without exception, she has

Outside of the classroom, Frankel-Gramelis guides and

I

Grad Poet Wins Prizes Lee Keylock, ’01, M.S. ’03, was

earned his under-

“bombarded with poetry” when he was

graduate degree at

growing up in England. “Whether or not

Southern, as well as

I liked it as a kid, I was exposed to it,”

an M.S. in English

says Keylock, who seems to have profit-

with teacher certifi-

ed from his years of literary immersion.

cation. An English

A graduate student in creative writing at

teacher at Newtown

Southern, Keylock won the 2009 Leo

High School,

Connellan Prize for his poem, “The Tattie

Keylock also co-

Hawker,” and the 2009 John Holmes

coaches, with poetry

Poetry Award for his poem, “Font.”

slam champion

The Connellan Prize, open to students at the four Connecticut State University System (CSUS) universities, is

The Owls conclud-

Connecticut’s youth poetry slam team. Keylock’s own poetry is largely

Keylock left England when he was almost 17, backpacked around

CoSIDA’s First-Team Academic All-District I honors.

and Rutgers — during the regular season.

ing poetry in earnest about four years

indoor and outdoor track

the 1980s, when he was growing up.

ago, once he had finished his teacher cer-

and field. In addition, the

tification. “I started writing and just got

softball team finished sec-

ed for a single outstanding poem by an

town, and in the ‘80s, the Irish

into it,” he says. “I started reading more

ond in the Northeast-10

undergraduate or graduate student enrolled

Republican Army was pretty big,” says

about poetic structure and form and

championship.

in a New England college.

Keylock. “There was tension between the

university’s new M.F.A. program in cre-

long, I write a lot about that topic now

ative writing, which starts in the fall. He

because I have some distance from it.”

Favorite Athlete(s): “My grandfather worked for the Yankees in Tampa, Fla., where they conduct spring training. I’m a diehard Yankees fan.” Well-rounded: Works for the Athletics Department; Volunteer activities include tutoring and reading to children at local elementary schools.

learning more about the genre. I became

Keylock’s winning poems may be read online at www.SouthernCt.edu/news/ gradpoetwinsprize_191/. Follow the links at the end of the article.

songs — “How Bad Do You Want It,” by Tim

Cyrus help her relax.

Irish/English conflict in England during

England and being away from it for so

Pre-meet rituals: Says a prayer and listens to three

by Nelly, and “Ready, Set, Don’t Go,” by Billy Ray

in-residence. The John Holmes Award,

Southern, but was accepted into the

personality.”) and uneven bars (“I love to swing.”)

and women’s swimming

given by the New England Poetry Club, the

more willful in my choices as I wrote.”

Favorite events: Floor exercises (“I get to show my

McGraw, pumps her up; “Heart of a Champion,”

and diving, and men’s

off every week in England. Leaving

began competing at age 6.

championships in men’s

himself when he was 18. He began writ-

toward an M.A. in creative writing at

Born Champion: Started gymnastic lessons at age 3;

The Owls won league

volatile atmosphere engendered by the

Irish and the English. Bombs were going

defeated four Div. I pro-

02, when it placed third.

Connecticut, who was also the CSUS poet-

8 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Directors of America (CoSIDA); Also earned

the 2009 USA Gymnastics

grams — Yale, Brown, Penn

Europe, and came to New York City by

Keylock has been working

selection by the College of Sports Information

highest finish since 2001-

inspired by his experiences within the

“There were a lot of Irish in my

of the Year for the second-consecutive season.

finished in eighth place at

139 points to match its

named for the former poet laureate of

oldest poetry club in the country, is present-

Claims to Fame: Three-time qualifier for the USA

Named a Second-Team Academic All-America

Southern hosted. They

Elizabeth Thomas,

Exercise Science Major (3.95 grade point average)

a 17-7 win-lose record and

Championships, which Southern earned

Co-captain of the Gymnastics Team

ed the regular season with

Collegiate National

Lee Keylock, ‘01, M.S. ‘03

Senior

Gymnastics Coach Jerry Nelson talks with a team member.

Career Aspirations: To earn a doctorate and become a physical therapist.

For more sports news, visit www.SouthernCTOwls.com. Fall 2009 | 9

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:54 AM

Page 10

In the News: Journalism Alumni Spotlight

The Write Way to Award-winning entertainment journalist — and rock-chic goddess extraordinaire — Carrie Borzillo-Vrenna, ’92, pens a fun, edgy how-to-book that makes cool accessible. By Marianne Lippard

T

here are certain times in a woman’s life when Mom and Dear Abby just don’t have all the answers. Enter Carrie BorzilloVrenna, ’92, whose latest book,“Cherry Bomb: The Ultimate Guide to Becoming a Better Flirt, a Tougher Chick, and a Hotter Girlfriend, and to Living Life Like a Rock Star”(Simon Spotlight Entertainment) offers advice with a rock-n-roll twist. The book, described as“an A-to-Z reference for everything awesome a girl needs to know,” includes many of the author’s own insights gained while working as an entertainment journalist for Billboard, People, and other magazines. Additional spicy words-of-wisdom are offered from a host of rock chicks and

me for an interview and dished out advice, it felt like Christmas morning when you’re a kid and you get every gift you want,” Borzillo-Vrenna says. Writing an advice book from a rock-and-roll perspective was a dream assignment, says Borzillo-Vrenna, who has interviewed plenty of famous actors and musicians, and counts questioning Madonna and George Clooney on the red carpet as some of the more exciting moments of her career. Borzillo-Vrenna says her guide, which she recommends for those ages 18 and over due to its adult content, is for a woman“who is not afraid to take chances, make a fool of herself, or boldly go for what she wants in life.”

“It’s amazing what you can get when you just ask for it”

— Borzillo-Vrenna, ’92

celebrity insiders, including fashion designers Betsey Johnson and Vivienne Westwood, singer/songwriter Tori Amos, professional dancer Cheryl Burke of television’s“Dancing with the Stars,” and others. Topics range from the ordinary — chart topper Katy Perry offers tips on vintage shopping — to the edgy — Kat Von D talks tattoos and master chef Dave Rubell serves up black vodka recipes. “Every time one of my contributors handed in a section or sat down with 10 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

The latter certainly fits BorzilloVrenna, herself. Raised in Wallingford, Conn., she knew early on that she was interested in music and entertainment — knowledge that propelled her forward despite obstacles.As a college student, her determination and power of persuasion helped her land an internship at Entertainment Weekly, despite initially being told that there were no such opportunities available. Hard work and perseverance have

continued to drive her success. In addition to writing two books on the rock group Nirvana, Borzillo-Vrenna has spent 16 years covering music and celebrities for Billboard, Spin, People, US Weekly, and other magazines.Acclaim has followed. In January, she was named Best Music Writer/Journalist by the National Association of Record Industry Professionals.

The author, who lives in Los Angeles and is married to Chris Vrenna, a Grammy Award-winning musician who plays keyboards with Marilyn Manson, has maintained a connection to her alma mater. Last fall, Borzillo-Vrenna spoke to students in Journalism Professor Jerry Dunklee’s classes about how to break into the field. Her advice: don’t waste a single writing assignment, go above and beyond

what is required, and consider specializing in a particular area in order to get ahead. In college, Borzillo-Vrenna says her social life was centered on her love of music, so even downtime was spent productively. Dunklee says Borzillo-Vrenna connected with students during her class visits, and several have stayed in touch with her through e-mail.“Many of my students have big dreams, and when they see that

someone else from Southern has done well, it encourages them,” says Dunklee.“We have a number of very successful alumni, and it’s great to have them come back and talk about how they’ve done it.” In that same vein, Borzillo-Vrenna says her latest book encourages women to be resourceful and take control of their own lives.“It’s amazing what you can get when you just ask for it,” she says. I

Fall 2009 | 11

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:54 AM

Page 10

In the News: Journalism Alumni Spotlight

The Write Way to Award-winning entertainment journalist — and rock-chic goddess extraordinaire — Carrie Borzillo-Vrenna, ’92, pens a fun, edgy how-to-book that makes cool accessible. By Marianne Lippard

T

here are certain times in a woman’s life when Mom and Dear Abby just don’t have all the answers. Enter Carrie BorzilloVrenna, ’92, whose latest book,“Cherry Bomb: The Ultimate Guide to Becoming a Better Flirt, a Tougher Chick, and a Hotter Girlfriend, and to Living Life Like a Rock Star”(Simon Spotlight Entertainment) offers advice with a rock-n-roll twist. The book, described as“an A-to-Z reference for everything awesome a girl needs to know,” includes many of the author’s own insights gained while working as an entertainment journalist for Billboard, People, and other magazines. Additional spicy words-of-wisdom are offered from a host of rock chicks and

me for an interview and dished out advice, it felt like Christmas morning when you’re a kid and you get every gift you want,” Borzillo-Vrenna says. Writing an advice book from a rock-and-roll perspective was a dream assignment, says Borzillo-Vrenna, who has interviewed plenty of famous actors and musicians, and counts questioning Madonna and George Clooney on the red carpet as some of the more exciting moments of her career. Borzillo-Vrenna says her guide, which she recommends for those ages 18 and over due to its adult content, is for a woman“who is not afraid to take chances, make a fool of herself, or boldly go for what she wants in life.”

“It’s amazing what you can get when you just ask for it”

— Borzillo-Vrenna, ’92

celebrity insiders, including fashion designers Betsey Johnson and Vivienne Westwood, singer/songwriter Tori Amos, professional dancer Cheryl Burke of television’s“Dancing with the Stars,” and others. Topics range from the ordinary — chart topper Katy Perry offers tips on vintage shopping — to the edgy — Kat Von D talks tattoos and master chef Dave Rubell serves up black vodka recipes. “Every time one of my contributors handed in a section or sat down with 10 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

The latter certainly fits BorzilloVrenna, herself. Raised in Wallingford, Conn., she knew early on that she was interested in music and entertainment — knowledge that propelled her forward despite obstacles.As a college student, her determination and power of persuasion helped her land an internship at Entertainment Weekly, despite initially being told that there were no such opportunities available. Hard work and perseverance have

continued to drive her success. In addition to writing two books on the rock group Nirvana, Borzillo-Vrenna has spent 16 years covering music and celebrities for Billboard, Spin, People, US Weekly, and other magazines.Acclaim has followed. In January, she was named Best Music Writer/Journalist by the National Association of Record Industry Professionals.

The author, who lives in Los Angeles and is married to Chris Vrenna, a Grammy Award-winning musician who plays keyboards with Marilyn Manson, has maintained a connection to her alma mater. Last fall, Borzillo-Vrenna spoke to students in Journalism Professor Jerry Dunklee’s classes about how to break into the field. Her advice: don’t waste a single writing assignment, go above and beyond

what is required, and consider specializing in a particular area in order to get ahead. In college, Borzillo-Vrenna says her social life was centered on her love of music, so even downtime was spent productively. Dunklee says Borzillo-Vrenna connected with students during her class visits, and several have stayed in touch with her through e-mail.“Many of my students have big dreams, and when they see that

someone else from Southern has done well, it encourages them,” says Dunklee.“We have a number of very successful alumni, and it’s great to have them come back and talk about how they’ve done it.” In that same vein, Borzillo-Vrenna says her latest book encourages women to be resourceful and take control of their own lives.“It’s amazing what you can get when you just ask for it,” she says. I

Fall 2009 | 11

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:54 AM

Page 12

In the News: Journalism Alumni Spotlight

Media a n

N

What’s happening? From sports to politics, television anchor Chris Flanagan, ’94, has built a career around telling it like it is. By Joan Wells

ews anchor Chris Flanagan, ’94, program and dedicated professors for preparLady Michelle Obama. Flanagan describes first interviewed Barack Obama ing him for the highly competitive field. Obama as“earthy”and“personable.” when he was a political newcomer, observ“I’m really proud that I graduated Flanagan says he’s been lucky to ing firsthand in subsequent meetings from Southern,” Flanagan says.“They do a have the opportunity to interview a wide Obama’s evolution from a quiet man with fantastic job preparing people for the outrange of celebrities, including Tiger Woods, high aspirations to the self-assured, confiside world.We were able to go out, get Clint Eastwood (nice guy, Flanagan says), dent leader who made history when he video, edit it — everything from A to Z.” Barry Bonds, Michael Jordan, Donald became President. It doesn’t get much betFlanagan landed his first industry Trump, Huey Lewis, and Neil Young. His ter than that for a journalist. job some 15 years ago as a sportscaster at career also has provided a firsthand view of “It’s something different every day. one of the smallest stations in the country, some of the most esteemed sports events People have wonderful stories to tell,” in Elmira, N.Y. He then spent about a in the world, including the Winter Flanagan says of his career.“I’ve always decade as a sportscaster for stations in Olympics, the World Series, the NBA Finals, been a news junkie. I’ve always loved newsVermont, Indianapolis, San Francisco, and and the Indianapolis 500. papers and magazines.” But it’s the daily task of Since March 2009, I’m really that I bringing news to the communiFlanagan has also loved his new graduated from Southern, ty that most inspires the veteran job at ABC affiliate WFAA in newscaster. Flanagan particularThey do a fantastic job Dallas, where he anchors the people for ly appreciates the philosophy at morning news, from 5 a.m. to 7 WFAA, emphasizing the posithe outside world. a.m., and the mid-day broadcast, — Chris Flanagan, ’94 tive to viewers, even in stories from noon to 1 p.m. The hours about the economy.“That’s been make for an unusual daily schedule — he Connecticut, where, early in his career, he refreshing,” Flanagan says.“The last few wakes for work at 2 a.m. and goes to bed at had a weekend gig at WVIT Channel 30. months, people have been down. People are about 6 p.m. — but Flanagan has put a About four years ago, Flanagan got getting pounded. They don’t want to get positive spin on rising ultra-early. his big break and moved from sports to pounded when they watch the news.” “I enjoy being off with my kids in news, when he was hired by an ABC affiliFlanagan,who grew up in Madison, the afternoon. It’s nice to pick them up ate in Des Moines, Iowa. He especially Conn.,as one of six children,began his colafter school,” he says of Matthew, 7 and loved the exposure to political reporting lege career in a general studies program at Molly, 5.“They put dad to bed, but they’re that he gained through the Iowa caucuses, Colorado State University.Although he loved good about it.” interviewing many national politicians as the skiing,he was put off by the school’s Since graduation, Flanagan has they campaigned during the lead-up to the large class size and decided to transfer to climbed the ladder of success the old fash2008 election. Southern because of its great reputation. ioned way — through hard work, perseverIt was then that Flanagan repeated“I knew they had a good journalism ance, and talent. He is quick to credit ly sat one-on-one with the then relatively program,” he says, noting the move served Southern’s top-notch, hands-on journalism unknown Barack Obama and future First him well.“I love what I do everyday.” I

proud

photo courtesy of Chris Flanagan, ’94

preparing

12 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Fall 2009 | 13

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11/5/09

10:54 AM

Page 12

In the News: Journalism Alumni Spotlight

Media a n

N

What’s happening? From sports to politics, television anchor Chris Flanagan, ’94, has built a career around telling it like it is. By Joan Wells

ews anchor Chris Flanagan, ’94, program and dedicated professors for preparLady Michelle Obama. Flanagan describes first interviewed Barack Obama ing him for the highly competitive field. Obama as“earthy”and“personable.” when he was a political newcomer, observ“I’m really proud that I graduated Flanagan says he’s been lucky to ing firsthand in subsequent meetings from Southern,” Flanagan says.“They do a have the opportunity to interview a wide Obama’s evolution from a quiet man with fantastic job preparing people for the outrange of celebrities, including Tiger Woods, high aspirations to the self-assured, confiside world.We were able to go out, get Clint Eastwood (nice guy, Flanagan says), dent leader who made history when he video, edit it — everything from A to Z.” Barry Bonds, Michael Jordan, Donald became President. It doesn’t get much betFlanagan landed his first industry Trump, Huey Lewis, and Neil Young. His ter than that for a journalist. job some 15 years ago as a sportscaster at career also has provided a firsthand view of “It’s something different every day. one of the smallest stations in the country, some of the most esteemed sports events People have wonderful stories to tell,” in Elmira, N.Y. He then spent about a in the world, including the Winter Flanagan says of his career.“I’ve always decade as a sportscaster for stations in Olympics, the World Series, the NBA Finals, been a news junkie. I’ve always loved newsVermont, Indianapolis, San Francisco, and and the Indianapolis 500. papers and magazines.” But it’s the daily task of Since March 2009, I’m really that I bringing news to the communiFlanagan has also loved his new graduated from Southern, ty that most inspires the veteran job at ABC affiliate WFAA in newscaster. Flanagan particularThey do a fantastic job Dallas, where he anchors the people for ly appreciates the philosophy at morning news, from 5 a.m. to 7 WFAA, emphasizing the posithe outside world. a.m., and the mid-day broadcast, — Chris Flanagan, ’94 tive to viewers, even in stories from noon to 1 p.m. The hours about the economy.“That’s been make for an unusual daily schedule — he Connecticut, where, early in his career, he refreshing,” Flanagan says.“The last few wakes for work at 2 a.m. and goes to bed at had a weekend gig at WVIT Channel 30. months, people have been down. People are about 6 p.m. — but Flanagan has put a About four years ago, Flanagan got getting pounded. They don’t want to get positive spin on rising ultra-early. his big break and moved from sports to pounded when they watch the news.” “I enjoy being off with my kids in news, when he was hired by an ABC affiliFlanagan,who grew up in Madison, the afternoon. It’s nice to pick them up ate in Des Moines, Iowa. He especially Conn.,as one of six children,began his colafter school,” he says of Matthew, 7 and loved the exposure to political reporting lege career in a general studies program at Molly, 5.“They put dad to bed, but they’re that he gained through the Iowa caucuses, Colorado State University.Although he loved good about it.” interviewing many national politicians as the skiing,he was put off by the school’s Since graduation, Flanagan has they campaigned during the lead-up to the large class size and decided to transfer to climbed the ladder of success the old fash2008 election. Southern because of its great reputation. ioned way — through hard work, perseverIt was then that Flanagan repeated“I knew they had a good journalism ance, and talent. He is quick to credit ly sat one-on-one with the then relatively program,” he says, noting the move served Southern’s top-notch, hands-on journalism unknown Barack Obama and future First him well.“I love what I do everyday.” I

proud

photo courtesy of Chris Flanagan, ’94

preparing

12 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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In the News: Journalism Alumni Spotlight

fit to print

owner, the Journal Register Co. (JRC), shut down that paper, as well as its seven sister publications in the Taconic Press group. (JRC later filed for bankruptcy protection for its entire company.) Loyal Courier readers mourned the end of the home-

town paper that had faithfully served the eastern half of the county. But two months after the Courier’s closing, Roger Ailes, chairman and chief executive officer of the Fox News Channel, announced that he had purchased Taconic

Press from JRC and planned to breathe life back into the Courier.Within a week, the paper was being printed once again.His wife, Elizabeth Ailes,’82 — who has an extensive journalistic resume — is serving as the paper’s publisher and executive editor.After

earning a Bachelor of Science degree in journalism from Southern, she eventually became director of daytime programming for CNBC, and later vice president of programming for America’s Talking Network, the forerunner of MSNBC.At the time, she

was the youngest vice president at NBC. She recently served as a consultant to Internet providers of financial news and commentary. Last July, Roger Ailes purchased the Putnam County News and Recorder, a continues on page 43

At a time when numerous newspapers are falling by the wayside, Elizabeth Ailes, ’82, is helping to breathe new life into several well-established weeklies that were recently purchased by her husband, Roger Ailes, chairman and chief executive officer of the Fox News Channel. By Joe Musante, ’86

t

photo courtesy of Elizabeth Ailes, ’82

he news about the newspaper industry seems to worsen with each passing week. The convergence of two unsettling trends — an economic recession and a shift by younger people to get their news electronically — has spurred a growing number of daily and weekly papers to close. Even newspapers with a proud history of being institutions in their communities have not been immune. Such was the case with the Putnam County Courier, a weekly newspaper based in Carmel, N.Y., which had the distinction of being the state’s oldest continuously published weekly. The Courier stopped publishing last February after its “The key is to be hyper-local, the kind of news you often can’t get anywhere else,” says Elizabeth Ailes, ’82, with her husband, Roger Ailes. 14 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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In the News: Journalism Alumni Spotlight

fit to print

owner, the Journal Register Co. (JRC), shut down that paper, as well as its seven sister publications in the Taconic Press group. (JRC later filed for bankruptcy protection for its entire company.) Loyal Courier readers mourned the end of the home-

town paper that had faithfully served the eastern half of the county. But two months after the Courier’s closing, Roger Ailes, chairman and chief executive officer of the Fox News Channel, announced that he had purchased Taconic

Press from JRC and planned to breathe life back into the Courier.Within a week, the paper was being printed once again.His wife, Elizabeth Ailes,’82 — who has an extensive journalistic resume — is serving as the paper’s publisher and executive editor.After

earning a Bachelor of Science degree in journalism from Southern, she eventually became director of daytime programming for CNBC, and later vice president of programming for America’s Talking Network, the forerunner of MSNBC.At the time, she

was the youngest vice president at NBC. She recently served as a consultant to Internet providers of financial news and commentary. Last July, Roger Ailes purchased the Putnam County News and Recorder, a continues on page 43

At a time when numerous newspapers are falling by the wayside, Elizabeth Ailes, ’82, is helping to breathe new life into several well-established weeklies that were recently purchased by her husband, Roger Ailes, chairman and chief executive officer of the Fox News Channel. By Joe Musante, ’86

t

photo courtesy of Elizabeth Ailes, ’82

he news about the newspaper industry seems to worsen with each passing week. The convergence of two unsettling trends — an economic recession and a shift by younger people to get their news electronically — has spurred a growing number of daily and weekly papers to close. Even newspapers with a proud history of being institutions in their communities have not been immune. Such was the case with the Putnam County Courier, a weekly newspaper based in Carmel, N.Y., which had the distinction of being the state’s oldest continuously published weekly. The Courier stopped publishing last February after its “The key is to be hyper-local, the kind of news you often can’t get anywhere else,” says Elizabeth Ailes, ’82, with her husband, Roger Ailes. 14 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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Southern

riday, April 17, dawned sunny and mild, an auspicious kickoff for the creation of this pictorial documenting one week of life on campus. During the next seven days, University Photographer Isabel Chenoweth and Assistant Photographer Thomas Cain took to their task with gusto, sitting in on classes, attending arts events, and walking campus from morning to midnight in search of images that depict the Southern experience.

The weather did not continue to cooperate. As the week progressed, repeated April showers limited the opportunity for outdoor photography, and a number of athletics events, including women’s softball, were postponed until after Friday, April 24, the final deadline for this assignment. In the end, the two photographers took almost 2,900 photographs, 46 of which are presented in this issue.

And because turnaround is fair play, it seems fitting that photographer Isabel Chenoweth ultimately was caught in the action. On April 23, while taking candid photos of an art class held al fresco, Chenoweth noticed

A look at some of the major events and minor moments that shaped the university during one ordinary, yet extraordinary, week.

16 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

many of the students smiling knowingly as they glanced repeatedly in her direction. Finally, she asked to be let in on the joke, only to learn that she, camera in hand, was being incorporated into their sketches of life on campus.

Fall 2009 | 17

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Southern

riday, April 17, dawned sunny and mild, an auspicious kickoff for the creation of this pictorial documenting one week of life on campus. During the next seven days, University Photographer Isabel Chenoweth and Assistant Photographer Thomas Cain took to their task with gusto, sitting in on classes, attending arts events, and walking campus from morning to midnight in search of images that depict the Southern experience.

The weather did not continue to cooperate. As the week progressed, repeated April showers limited the opportunity for outdoor photography, and a number of athletics events, including women’s softball, were postponed until after Friday, April 24, the final deadline for this assignment. In the end, the two photographers took almost 2,900 photographs, 46 of which are presented in this issue.

And because turnaround is fair play, it seems fitting that photographer Isabel Chenoweth ultimately was caught in the action. On April 23, while taking candid photos of an art class held al fresco, Chenoweth noticed

A look at some of the major events and minor moments that shaped the university during one ordinary, yet extraordinary, week.

16 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

many of the students smiling knowingly as they glanced repeatedly in her direction. Finally, she asked to be let in on the joke, only to learn that she, camera in hand, was being incorporated into their sketches of life on campus.

Fall 2009 | 17

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Page 18

The

SCSU Steppin’ Up Drill Team rocked the house when it hosted a step competition at John Lyman Center for the Performing Arts. A form of percussion dance, step or step-dance uses the participants’ bodies to produce complex rhythms and sounds by combining foot steps, spoken words, and hand claps.

A

run of April showers led to the cancellation of numerous athletics events during the week. We did, however, capture some of the action at the National Gymnastics Championship meet held earlier at Moore Fieldhouse. Southern Owl Justine Basley [IN FLIGHT, ABOVE] earned All-American on the bars and placed fifth nationally.

W

N.E.R.D.

ith a mix of funk, alternative, hip hop, and rap, brought the crowd to its feet — and dozens of students onto the stage — to take part in the action at a concert held at John Lyman Center for the Performing Arts.

The Michael

J. Adanti Student Center includes numerous areas for studying. The four-story, 125,000-square-foot facility is nearly three times larger than the previous student center.

18 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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The

SCSU Steppin’ Up Drill Team rocked the house when it hosted a step competition at John Lyman Center for the Performing Arts. A form of percussion dance, step or step-dance uses the participants’ bodies to produce complex rhythms and sounds by combining foot steps, spoken words, and hand claps.

A

run of April showers led to the cancellation of numerous athletics events during the week. We did, however, capture some of the action at the National Gymnastics Championship meet held earlier at Moore Fieldhouse. Southern Owl Justine Basley [IN FLIGHT, ABOVE] earned All-American on the bars and placed fifth nationally.

W

N.E.R.D.

ith a mix of funk, alternative, hip hop, and rap, brought the crowd to its feet — and dozens of students onto the stage — to take part in the action at a concert held at John Lyman Center for the Performing Arts.

The Michael

J. Adanti Student Center includes numerous areas for studying. The four-story, 125,000-square-foot facility is nearly three times larger than the previous student center.

18 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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T

hree heads are better than one when

studying for class.

I

n Earl Hall, students complete assignments in

A

sculpture and

ceramics classes.

student gets his game on with a ping pong match at the Michael J. Adanti Student Center. The center also offers billiards tables, foosball, a television lounge, and a theater.

Nationally recognized for teaching excellence, Professor of Spanish

Luisa De Palma, a former

flamenco dancer, emphasizes communication and appreciation of Spanish culture in the classroom. In 2002, the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese presented her with the Teacher of the Year Award in the college and university category.

S

oon after Susan Boyle’s appearance on “Britain’s Got Talent” caused a media firestorm, students discuss society’s obsession with appearance in a course on women and art.

20 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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Page 20

T

hree heads are better than one when

studying for class.

I

n Earl Hall, students complete assignments in

A

sculpture and

ceramics classes.

student gets his game on with a ping pong match at the Michael J. Adanti Student Center. The center also offers billiards tables, foosball, a television lounge, and a theater.

Nationally recognized for teaching excellence, Professor of Spanish

Luisa De Palma, a former

flamenco dancer, emphasizes communication and appreciation of Spanish culture in the classroom. In 2002, the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese presented her with the Teacher of the Year Award in the college and university category.

S

oon after Susan Boyle’s appearance on “Britain’s Got Talent” caused a media firestorm, students discuss society’s obsession with appearance in a course on women and art.

20 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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Page 22

A commemorative service to mark

Holocaust Remembrance Day features music performed by the Music Department’s David Chevan and The AfroSemitic Experience.

It’s 5 p.m. and the educators have become the students. With most having already put in a full day of work, students in the listen intently to Assistant Professor Richard Feinn.

Educational Leadership Program

Class is in session!

David Winston

8 p.m. Vocalist

performs at the Small Ensembles Concert directed by Music Professor Mark Kuss.

7 p.m. Just days after the opening of the new Yankee Stadium, New York Yankees General Manager joined legendary ESPN sports reporter for a lively discussion about “The Yankees and the Business of Baseball.” The event, part of the Mary and Louis Fusco Distinguished Lecture Series, brought nearly 1,000 to John Lyman Center for the Performing Arts. (Story on page 6.) [LEFT] At a reception prior to the lecture, Cashman presents baseballs to lecture sponsor Lynn R. Fusco, president of Fusco Corporation.

Brian Cashman Peter Gammons

22 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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Page 22

A commemorative service to mark

Holocaust Remembrance Day features music performed by the Music Department’s David Chevan and The AfroSemitic Experience.

It’s 5 p.m. and the educators have become the students. With most having already put in a full day of work, students in the listen intently to Assistant Professor Richard Feinn.

Educational Leadership Program

Class is in session!

David Winston

8 p.m. Vocalist

performs at the Small Ensembles Concert directed by Music Professor Mark Kuss.

7 p.m. Just days after the opening of the new Yankee Stadium, New York Yankees General Manager joined legendary ESPN sports reporter for a lively discussion about “The Yankees and the Business of Baseball.” The event, part of the Mary and Louis Fusco Distinguished Lecture Series, brought nearly 1,000 to John Lyman Center for the Performing Arts. (Story on page 6.) [LEFT] At a reception prior to the lecture, Cashman presents baseballs to lecture sponsor Lynn R. Fusco, president of Fusco Corporation.

Brian Cashman Peter Gammons

22 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Fall 2009 | 23

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Page 24

Spring Graduate Open House

Prospective students explore offerings at the held at the Michael J. Adanti Student Center. One of the largest graduate schools in New England, Southern has approximately 3,200 students pursuing graduate degrees.

s

outhern’s student-run television station films a game show in the Michael J. Adanti Student Center. The station broadcasts on campus on channels 15 and 715.

A

stunning exhibit on loan from the extensive Robert J. and Yvonne S. Klancko collection, “ICE—Icons, Crosses, and Eggs—the Soul and Culture of the Eastern Christian Faith,” was showcased at the Multicultural Center Gallery located in the Michael J. Adanti Student Center. Highlights included ornately decorated eggs by celebrated artist Yvonne Klancko, ’70, M.S. ’74, 6th Yr. ’94.

The sciences are thriving at Southern. The Physics Club and Chemistry Club have been recognized nationally for excellence --and a recent report revealed that Southern is teaching more undergraduates physics than any other university in Connecticut.

Beginning at 11 a.m., students gather in the mall outside of the Student Center for [Programs Council]. With the theme “At the Circus,” the event included food, music, and activities ranging from mechanical bull riding to inflatable jousting.

ProCon Day

T

he Southern mail truck is a common site on campus.

24 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Bring Your Child to Work Day,

At the second annual

a young girl explores the mystery of DNA at a session led by Biology Professor Jonathan Weinbaum.

O

n a rainy evening, the lights from Engleman Hall hint at the activity inside. Fall 2009 | 25

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Page 24

Spring Graduate Open House

Prospective students explore offerings at the held at the Michael J. Adanti Student Center. One of the largest graduate schools in New England, Southern has approximately 3,200 students pursuing graduate degrees.

s

outhern’s student-run television station films a game show in the Michael J. Adanti Student Center. The station broadcasts on campus on channels 15 and 715.

A

stunning exhibit on loan from the extensive Robert J. and Yvonne S. Klancko collection, “ICE—Icons, Crosses, and Eggs—the Soul and Culture of the Eastern Christian Faith,” was showcased at the Multicultural Center Gallery located in the Michael J. Adanti Student Center. Highlights included ornately decorated eggs by celebrated artist Yvonne Klancko, ’70, M.S. ’74, 6th Yr. ’94.

The sciences are thriving at Southern. The Physics Club and Chemistry Club have been recognized nationally for excellence --and a recent report revealed that Southern is teaching more undergraduates physics than any other university in Connecticut.

Beginning at 11 a.m., students gather in the mall outside of the Student Center for [Programs Council]. With the theme “At the Circus,” the event included food, music, and activities ranging from mechanical bull riding to inflatable jousting.

ProCon Day

T

he Southern mail truck is a common site on campus.

24 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Bring Your Child to Work Day,

At the second annual

a young girl explores the mystery of DNA at a session led by Biology Professor Jonathan Weinbaum.

O

n a rainy evening, the lights from Engleman Hall hint at the activity inside. Fall 2009 | 25

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The

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Page 26

Leading Man John P. Schreitmueller, ’75, founder, president, and chief executive officer of the Resolute Consulting Group, talks about reinventing the corporate world. His advice to leaders? Get real! By Villia Struyk

onservatively stylish in a navy jacket and striped tie, John P. Schreitmueller, ’75, stands at a podium addressing a group of business executives at a breakfast seminar. The lecture, sponsored last year by Southern and the Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce, has drawn business executives from throughout the state to hear Schreitmueller’s thoughts on leadership. Those attending the on-campus event are in good company. Regarded as a top leadership and work/life strategist, Schreitmueller is the founder, president, and chief executive officer of the Resolute Consulting Group, LLC, which has worked with clients from a wide range of organizations, among them Bank of America, CocaCola Bottling Consolidate, Nokia, the Department of Homeland Security, American Airlines, Lockheed Martin, IBM, British Aerospace, Frito Lay, and Boeing.A sought-after speaker, Schreitmueller also is a frequent media guest and has been featured on MSNBC and The NBC Evening News with Tom Brokaw, among others. Clearly, Schreitmueller knows his stuff, and on that warm spring day at Southern, members of the audience are highly engaged, listening intently as they quietly enjoy coffee and Danish. Pausing in his speech, Schreitmueller scans the room. “What do you think about when I say ‘C.E.O.’?”he asks. The audience stares

C

26 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

intently at Schreitmueller — who is, in fact, a C.E.O., or chief executive officer. Coffee mugs are lowered to tables. Mouths cease moving mid-chew.“How many of you thought jerk?”he asks the crowd. Hands raise throughout the room, some with almost lightning speed. Schreitmueller continues,“Why, when we say C.E.O., do we conjure up the picture of a jerk?” The reason, Schreitmueller contends, is that“corporate leadership, in general, has taken it on the chin in the last couple of decades.” Indeed, the ever-growing list of corporate scandals, inept executive boards, and sky-high bonuses awarded to leaders of even failing businesses, make it difficult to conclude that something isn’t wrong with corporate America. And then there are the executives themselves. In his blog last March, Schreitmueller wrote,“75 percent or more of the professional, white-collar workforce in the United States is inauthentically deployed. In other words, at least threefourths of every degreed professional out there in corporate America would prefer to be doing something else for a living.” It is just this anomaly that Schreitmueller and Resolute Consulting seek to address. Based in Atlanta, the company provides a range of services to businesses, organizations, and individuals, exploring issues related to leadership, behavior, work/life balance, and career

transition. Their areas of expertise are farreaching and highly personalized. Coaching leaders who have been recently hired or promoted, helping family businesses develop succession plans, and managing difficult reporting relationships are just some of the company’s countless services. In nearly all cases, the overall goal is to help clients achieve — and in many instances discover — what Schreitmueller refers to as their authentic goals. “We, as leaders, must look at ourselves first,” says Schreitmueller.“The dreams we had as young children were unbiased and untainted by society. But we often stop paying attention to those things…We lose sight of what’s important…what’s authentic.As leaders, we need to rediscover that, because if we’re going to devote so much time to work, it better be authentic. It better be what we want to do.” For Schreitmueller, part of that journey of self-discovery took place at Southern, where he enrolled after visiting campus with a neighbor, the late Gene J. Casey, professor emeritus of health and physical education. Schreitmueller, who earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in liberal studies, held numerous part-time jobs as a student, including working for a menswear retailer and as a pilot. (He began flying at the age of 13 and is a licensed commercial pilot who has logged thousands of hours continues on page 42 Fall 2009 | 27

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The

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Page 26

Leading Man John P. Schreitmueller, ’75, founder, president, and chief executive officer of the Resolute Consulting Group, talks about reinventing the corporate world. His advice to leaders? Get real! By Villia Struyk

onservatively stylish in a navy jacket and striped tie, John P. Schreitmueller, ’75, stands at a podium addressing a group of business executives at a breakfast seminar. The lecture, sponsored last year by Southern and the Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce, has drawn business executives from throughout the state to hear Schreitmueller’s thoughts on leadership. Those attending the on-campus event are in good company. Regarded as a top leadership and work/life strategist, Schreitmueller is the founder, president, and chief executive officer of the Resolute Consulting Group, LLC, which has worked with clients from a wide range of organizations, among them Bank of America, CocaCola Bottling Consolidate, Nokia, the Department of Homeland Security, American Airlines, Lockheed Martin, IBM, British Aerospace, Frito Lay, and Boeing.A sought-after speaker, Schreitmueller also is a frequent media guest and has been featured on MSNBC and The NBC Evening News with Tom Brokaw, among others. Clearly, Schreitmueller knows his stuff, and on that warm spring day at Southern, members of the audience are highly engaged, listening intently as they quietly enjoy coffee and Danish. Pausing in his speech, Schreitmueller scans the room. “What do you think about when I say ‘C.E.O.’?”he asks. The audience stares

C

26 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

intently at Schreitmueller — who is, in fact, a C.E.O., or chief executive officer. Coffee mugs are lowered to tables. Mouths cease moving mid-chew.“How many of you thought jerk?”he asks the crowd. Hands raise throughout the room, some with almost lightning speed. Schreitmueller continues,“Why, when we say C.E.O., do we conjure up the picture of a jerk?” The reason, Schreitmueller contends, is that“corporate leadership, in general, has taken it on the chin in the last couple of decades.” Indeed, the ever-growing list of corporate scandals, inept executive boards, and sky-high bonuses awarded to leaders of even failing businesses, make it difficult to conclude that something isn’t wrong with corporate America. And then there are the executives themselves. In his blog last March, Schreitmueller wrote,“75 percent or more of the professional, white-collar workforce in the United States is inauthentically deployed. In other words, at least threefourths of every degreed professional out there in corporate America would prefer to be doing something else for a living.” It is just this anomaly that Schreitmueller and Resolute Consulting seek to address. Based in Atlanta, the company provides a range of services to businesses, organizations, and individuals, exploring issues related to leadership, behavior, work/life balance, and career

transition. Their areas of expertise are farreaching and highly personalized. Coaching leaders who have been recently hired or promoted, helping family businesses develop succession plans, and managing difficult reporting relationships are just some of the company’s countless services. In nearly all cases, the overall goal is to help clients achieve — and in many instances discover — what Schreitmueller refers to as their authentic goals. “We, as leaders, must look at ourselves first,” says Schreitmueller.“The dreams we had as young children were unbiased and untainted by society. But we often stop paying attention to those things…We lose sight of what’s important…what’s authentic.As leaders, we need to rediscover that, because if we’re going to devote so much time to work, it better be authentic. It better be what we want to do.” For Schreitmueller, part of that journey of self-discovery took place at Southern, where he enrolled after visiting campus with a neighbor, the late Gene J. Casey, professor emeritus of health and physical education. Schreitmueller, who earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in liberal studies, held numerous part-time jobs as a student, including working for a menswear retailer and as a pilot. (He began flying at the age of 13 and is a licensed commercial pilot who has logged thousands of hours continues on page 42 Fall 2009 | 27

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N . Sightings O. Owl S In 1948 students at New Haven State Teachers College, as Southern T Connecticut State University was then known, proudly cheered for the basketball and football teams, which were commonly referred to as “The A Educators” and, to a lesser degree, “The Teachers.” But by the early 1950s, L fans were lauding the athletics exploits of “The Owls.” A small news item, which appeared on the back page of the March 1951 edition of the G Alumni News Bulletin, heralded the change: “TC [Teachers College] has a I brand-new official mascot, a wide-eyed owl, complete with TC sweater, and the traditional volume tucked under one wing.” A

’08

The owl mascot soon became a beloved presence at games and

other events, with a dedicated fan decked out as Southern’s ultimate fine-feathered friend. In step with the ongoing evolution of the university, the

’78

mascot has had its fair share of major makeovers during the last 58 years. A new costume

’52

’91

was developed for the 2006-07 academic year, in conjunction with the adoption of a new athletics logo, according to Michael Kobylanski, associate director of athletics/ communications. Today, Southern students, includ-

’88

ing many student athletes, portray the Owl on a rotating basis. Among them was May graduate Gary Pope, ’09, a liberal studies major and member of the track and field team, who played the Owl at games and other events, including Girls and Women in Sport Day in January.

Circa 1952: Take one set of wings and a painted

’64

Pope was working in the athletics equipment room when opportunity came knocking. “The costume was free and they gave me the chance,” says Pope. “I had always wanted to be the Owl…to get to wear the costume at least once.” When pressed, he grudgingly admits that the costume is heavy, somewhat difficult to put on, and challenging to communicate in, but he insists the rewards far outweigh any difficulties. His visit to a local elementary school provides the perfect illustration. “The kids just love the Owl,” says Pope. “They all come up to you…everyone is so excited, pulling you left and right. It’s a lot of fun to be the owl.”

Sources:“Southern Connecticut State University: A Centennial History,” by Thomas J. Farnham, Alumni News Bulletin New Haven State Teachers College, and the Laurel student yearbooks. 28 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

hat-box. Voila! Meet the New Haven State Teachers College owl.

1964: The owl strikes a relaxed pose during the early Beatles era.

1978: Spreading his fabric wings at a basketball game. 1988: The owl lost his feathers, but gained a fine suit of faux fur.

’99

1991: Big beak equaled big attitude as the owl adopted a more aggressive look.

1999: Soft and cuddly again ruled the day. 2008: The friendly raptor was a big hit on Bring Your

’09

Child to Work Day.

2009: The contemporary owl mixes and mingles. Fall 2009 | 29

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N . Sightings O. Owl S In 1948 students at New Haven State Teachers College, as Southern T Connecticut State University was then known, proudly cheered for the basketball and football teams, which were commonly referred to as “The A Educators” and, to a lesser degree, “The Teachers.” But by the early 1950s, L fans were lauding the athletics exploits of “The Owls.” A small news item, which appeared on the back page of the March 1951 edition of the G Alumni News Bulletin, heralded the change: “TC [Teachers College] has a I brand-new official mascot, a wide-eyed owl, complete with TC sweater, and the traditional volume tucked under one wing.” A

’08

The owl mascot soon became a beloved presence at games and

other events, with a dedicated fan decked out as Southern’s ultimate fine-feathered friend. In step with the ongoing evolution of the university, the

’78

mascot has had its fair share of major makeovers during the last 58 years. A new costume

’52

’91

was developed for the 2006-07 academic year, in conjunction with the adoption of a new athletics logo, according to Michael Kobylanski, associate director of athletics/ communications. Today, Southern students, includ-

’88

ing many student athletes, portray the Owl on a rotating basis. Among them was May graduate Gary Pope, ’09, a liberal studies major and member of the track and field team, who played the Owl at games and other events, including Girls and Women in Sport Day in January.

Circa 1952: Take one set of wings and a painted

’64

Pope was working in the athletics equipment room when opportunity came knocking. “The costume was free and they gave me the chance,” says Pope. “I had always wanted to be the Owl…to get to wear the costume at least once.” When pressed, he grudgingly admits that the costume is heavy, somewhat difficult to put on, and challenging to communicate in, but he insists the rewards far outweigh any difficulties. His visit to a local elementary school provides the perfect illustration. “The kids just love the Owl,” says Pope. “They all come up to you…everyone is so excited, pulling you left and right. It’s a lot of fun to be the owl.”

Sources:“Southern Connecticut State University: A Centennial History,” by Thomas J. Farnham, Alumni News Bulletin New Haven State Teachers College, and the Laurel student yearbooks. 28 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

hat-box. Voila! Meet the New Haven State Teachers College owl.

1964: The owl strikes a relaxed pose during the early Beatles era.

1978: Spreading his fabric wings at a basketball game. 1988: The owl lost his feathers, but gained a fine suit of faux fur.

’99

1991: Big beak equaled big attitude as the owl adopted a more aggressive look.

1999: Soft and cuddly again ruled the day. 2008: The friendly raptor was a big hit on Bring Your

’09

Child to Work Day.

2009: The contemporary owl mixes and mingles. Fall 2009 | 29

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Page 30

A dedicated teacher changed his life. Decades later, successful entrepreneur Richard F. Tripodi, ’67, returns the favor by generously funding a scholarship for tomorrow’s teachers. By Joan Wells s a kid, Richard F. Tripodi, ’67, imagined he would follow in the footsteps of his hardworking, blue-collar parents.And then, high school music teacher,Ann Modugno, steered him toward another destiny.With her encouragement, Tripodi changed his plans and earned a degree from Southern — and today he is a world-class businessman and entrepreneur. “She took a strong interest in me in the middle of senior year,” says Tripodi of Modugno, who also ran the chorus department. “She thought I was college material and offered me the encouragement I needed to believe her. Basically, she gave me a really hard kick in the butt.” Some 42 years after Modugno gave him that proverbial kick — and in the hope that other great teachers like her will

A

30 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

emerge — Tripodi and his wife, Jane E. McKinney, have pledged funds to establish the Richard F. Tripodi Teaching Scholarship at Southern. The annual scholarship will benefit a junior and a senior who are studying to become mathematics or science teachers. The fund will benefit academically strong students with a grade point average of at least 3.0 who demonstrate financial need. Plans are also in place to create an endowment from a large percentage of Tripodi’s 401K-retirement account —“when and if I die,” the optimistic alumnus says. Although reared in Greenwich, a city renowned for its affluence,Tripodi had a working-class upbringing; his father was a factory worker and his mother was a seamstress. Throughout school, he was “an average student at best,” and remembers struggling, especially in mathematics and Spanish.An older brother was encouraged to attend college and went into the mergers and acquisitions field. But Tripodi says he was never groomed for college by his parents or teachers, who, instead, steered him toward a career in the trades. Then along came Ms. Modugno.“It was a turning point in my life,” he says.

With no money to finance his education, Tripodi remained determined to follow Modugno’s advice. He enrolled at Southern because it was close to home, affordable, and offered a tuitionrefund program, as well as other financial help. Fulfilling Modugno’s expectations, Tripodi excelled at Southern, making the dean’s list in his first semester, and graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in education. He taught high school in the late 1960s for several years. But though he loved interacting with students, he felt frustrated by the administration and decided to leave education. “I was disenchanted,” he says,“and my disenchantment led me into sales.” Tripodi found his niche and would ultimately skyrocket to top-executive positions. He started in the sale of packaging and printing materials, then moved on to promotional items, such as the toys found in cereal boxes and fast food meals.“We made the first Ronald McDonald doll,” Tripodi says of his early days in the promotions field. His son has the first one of those dolls ever made, and it’s still unopened. Eventually, Tripodi moved to health and beauty aides, then pesticides, then adhesives for flooring.“It was an educational process,” he says of his days as a business executive.“I found you are not limited by anything other than yourself.” In the late 1990s, he was president and a stockholder of a company that makes tile, mortars, grouts, flooring adhesives, and flooring installation tools. Under Tripodi’s guidance, the small business grew into a substantial company that served retail giants like Home Depot. Tripodi and his partners sold the business, Roanoke Companies, Inc., in 2006 and he stayed on as president for a little more than a year before temporarily retiring in August 2007. Throughout his career, Tripodi never forgot Modugno.

SOUTHERN

Supporting

When he became a general manager of his first company, he and his wife took Modugno and her husband out to dinner to show their gratitude and have kept in touch throughout the years.“I would not be where I am today, without her insight,” he says.“That’s what a good teacher does.” Even though Tripodi’s career took a different path from the one his parents had in mind, he has remained influenced by their work ethic and their belief in the importance of helping others. Those strong values are now Southern’s gain. “When it’s your turn, you help others,” Tripodi says. “Southern gave me something of great value. I had no money when I went to college. I appreciate the fact that I was given an opportunity.” Tripodi, in turn, hopes the scholarship will provide future teachers with the opportunity to “pay it forward” by supporting students in the classroom. In selecting the criteria for awarding the scholarship, Tripodi and his wife focused on future mathematics and science teachers. Their reasoning: Tripodi has learned through business endeavors that entry-level workers often are weak in those disciplines, which are so important to competing in today’s global markets. Tripodi, who lives in Little Rock,Ark., with his wife, will continue to compete in the business arena. His so-called retirement lasted only three months. Tripodi stepped in as president of a small start-up pest control company and launched a business planning and development consulting company, RFTS, Inc. Clearly, the drive that Modugno saw all those years ago still hasn’t subsided. “There’s a great deal of satisfaction in taking something small and making it big,” Tripodi says.“It brings out the entrepreneurial spirit.” I

Richard F. Tripodi, ’67, and his wife, Jane E. McKinney, have pledged to establish a teaching scholarship. Fall 2009 | 31

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Page 30

A dedicated teacher changed his life. Decades later, successful entrepreneur Richard F. Tripodi, ’67, returns the favor by generously funding a scholarship for tomorrow’s teachers. By Joan Wells s a kid, Richard F. Tripodi, ’67, imagined he would follow in the footsteps of his hardworking, blue-collar parents.And then, high school music teacher,Ann Modugno, steered him toward another destiny.With her encouragement, Tripodi changed his plans and earned a degree from Southern — and today he is a world-class businessman and entrepreneur. “She took a strong interest in me in the middle of senior year,” says Tripodi of Modugno, who also ran the chorus department. “She thought I was college material and offered me the encouragement I needed to believe her. Basically, she gave me a really hard kick in the butt.” Some 42 years after Modugno gave him that proverbial kick — and in the hope that other great teachers like her will

A

30 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

emerge — Tripodi and his wife, Jane E. McKinney, have pledged funds to establish the Richard F. Tripodi Teaching Scholarship at Southern. The annual scholarship will benefit a junior and a senior who are studying to become mathematics or science teachers. The fund will benefit academically strong students with a grade point average of at least 3.0 who demonstrate financial need. Plans are also in place to create an endowment from a large percentage of Tripodi’s 401K-retirement account —“when and if I die,” the optimistic alumnus says. Although reared in Greenwich, a city renowned for its affluence,Tripodi had a working-class upbringing; his father was a factory worker and his mother was a seamstress. Throughout school, he was “an average student at best,” and remembers struggling, especially in mathematics and Spanish.An older brother was encouraged to attend college and went into the mergers and acquisitions field. But Tripodi says he was never groomed for college by his parents or teachers, who, instead, steered him toward a career in the trades. Then along came Ms. Modugno.“It was a turning point in my life,” he says.

With no money to finance his education, Tripodi remained determined to follow Modugno’s advice. He enrolled at Southern because it was close to home, affordable, and offered a tuitionrefund program, as well as other financial help. Fulfilling Modugno’s expectations, Tripodi excelled at Southern, making the dean’s list in his first semester, and graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in education. He taught high school in the late 1960s for several years. But though he loved interacting with students, he felt frustrated by the administration and decided to leave education. “I was disenchanted,” he says,“and my disenchantment led me into sales.” Tripodi found his niche and would ultimately skyrocket to top-executive positions. He started in the sale of packaging and printing materials, then moved on to promotional items, such as the toys found in cereal boxes and fast food meals.“We made the first Ronald McDonald doll,” Tripodi says of his early days in the promotions field. His son has the first one of those dolls ever made, and it’s still unopened. Eventually, Tripodi moved to health and beauty aides, then pesticides, then adhesives for flooring.“It was an educational process,” he says of his days as a business executive.“I found you are not limited by anything other than yourself.” In the late 1990s, he was president and a stockholder of a company that makes tile, mortars, grouts, flooring adhesives, and flooring installation tools. Under Tripodi’s guidance, the small business grew into a substantial company that served retail giants like Home Depot. Tripodi and his partners sold the business, Roanoke Companies, Inc., in 2006 and he stayed on as president for a little more than a year before temporarily retiring in August 2007. Throughout his career, Tripodi never forgot Modugno.

SOUTHERN

Supporting

When he became a general manager of his first company, he and his wife took Modugno and her husband out to dinner to show their gratitude and have kept in touch throughout the years.“I would not be where I am today, without her insight,” he says.“That’s what a good teacher does.” Even though Tripodi’s career took a different path from the one his parents had in mind, he has remained influenced by their work ethic and their belief in the importance of helping others. Those strong values are now Southern’s gain. “When it’s your turn, you help others,” Tripodi says. “Southern gave me something of great value. I had no money when I went to college. I appreciate the fact that I was given an opportunity.” Tripodi, in turn, hopes the scholarship will provide future teachers with the opportunity to “pay it forward” by supporting students in the classroom. In selecting the criteria for awarding the scholarship, Tripodi and his wife focused on future mathematics and science teachers. Their reasoning: Tripodi has learned through business endeavors that entry-level workers often are weak in those disciplines, which are so important to competing in today’s global markets. Tripodi, who lives in Little Rock,Ark., with his wife, will continue to compete in the business arena. His so-called retirement lasted only three months. Tripodi stepped in as president of a small start-up pest control company and launched a business planning and development consulting company, RFTS, Inc. Clearly, the drive that Modugno saw all those years ago still hasn’t subsided. “There’s a great deal of satisfaction in taking something small and making it big,” Tripodi says.“It brings out the entrepreneurial spirit.” I

Richard F. Tripodi, ’67, and his wife, Jane E. McKinney, have pledged to establish a teaching scholarship. Fall 2009 | 31

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Page 32

Out and About A look at events for alumni and friends on campus and beyond. The Scholarship Brunch, held on March 29 in the Michael J. Adanti Student Center, celebrated the generous donors who have funded scholarships at Southern and the talented student scholars who have received them. Among those attending were: [FROM LEFT] Donors John Soto, a member of the SCSU Foundation Board, and his wife, Gladys Soto, who met with scholarship recipient Shannon Torres and President Cheryl J. Norton.

An evening reception was held on May 5 at Cava Restaurant in Southington, Conn., for Southern alumni who are employees of ESPN. More than 50 of the network’s 3,400 Connecticut-based staff graduated from Southern, the vast majority as communication majors. ESPN’s Norby Williamson, ‘85, executive vice president of production, and Carol Stiff, ‘83, M.S. ‘89, senior director of programming and acquisitions, who is a board member of the SCSU Foundation, Inc., hosted the event. Enjoying the event are Stiff and Richard Faber, ’87.

The 2009 Southern Connecticut State University Golf Tournament raised more than $40,000 to support Southern’s student athletes. The event, which drew 140 golfers, was held in June at Foxwood Resort Casino’s Lake of Isles on the private South Course. Among the foursomes were: [FROM LEFT] David Bassik, ’90, Joe Franco, ’79, Joe Santagata, ’94, and Richard Faber, ’87. For information on sponsorship/donation opportunities for next year’s event, please contact Gregg Crerar via e-mail at CrerarG1@SouthernCT.edu or call (203) 392-5518.

Congratulations to the members of the Class of 1938 who celebrated their 71st reunion on May 21 with a luncheon and campus tour. Members of the class were the first to receive baccalaureate degrees from New Haven State Teachers College, as Southern was then known. The 84 women who graduated in the class were committed to Southern from the start, making numerous gifts in the ensuing years as a class and individually, including six endowed scholarships. The event was enjoyed by class members [FROM LEFT] Angela Santore Amicone, Ruth Ives Woodruff, Elizabeth Hall de Lucia, Ruth Beer Frohman, and Olga Blahitka Sauer.

32 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

[SECOND FROM LEFT] Donor and Professor of Social Work P. Minou Michlin and David Michlin posed with scholarship recipient Francesca Salzano and President Cheryl J. Norton at the reception.

Regina Barbaresi, ’51, has established two scholarships at Southern. Pictured at the reception are: [FROM LEFT] Kasie Stevens, the recipient of the Gerald and Regina Barbaresi Nursing Scholarship; Barbaresi; Ashley Coombs, the recipient of the Gerald and Regina Barbaresi Education Scholarship; and President Cheryl J. Norton.

Fall 2009 | 33

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Page 32

Out and About A look at events for alumni and friends on campus and beyond. The Scholarship Brunch, held on March 29 in the Michael J. Adanti Student Center, celebrated the generous donors who have funded scholarships at Southern and the talented student scholars who have received them. Among those attending were: [FROM LEFT] Donors John Soto, a member of the SCSU Foundation Board, and his wife, Gladys Soto, who met with scholarship recipient Shannon Torres and President Cheryl J. Norton.

An evening reception was held on May 5 at Cava Restaurant in Southington, Conn., for Southern alumni who are employees of ESPN. More than 50 of the network’s 3,400 Connecticut-based staff graduated from Southern, the vast majority as communication majors. ESPN’s Norby Williamson, ‘85, executive vice president of production, and Carol Stiff, ‘83, M.S. ‘89, senior director of programming and acquisitions, who is a board member of the SCSU Foundation, Inc., hosted the event. Enjoying the event are Stiff and Richard Faber, ’87.

The 2009 Southern Connecticut State University Golf Tournament raised more than $40,000 to support Southern’s student athletes. The event, which drew 140 golfers, was held in June at Foxwood Resort Casino’s Lake of Isles on the private South Course. Among the foursomes were: [FROM LEFT] David Bassik, ’90, Joe Franco, ’79, Joe Santagata, ’94, and Richard Faber, ’87. For information on sponsorship/donation opportunities for next year’s event, please contact Gregg Crerar via e-mail at CrerarG1@SouthernCT.edu or call (203) 392-5518.

Congratulations to the members of the Class of 1938 who celebrated their 71st reunion on May 21 with a luncheon and campus tour. Members of the class were the first to receive baccalaureate degrees from New Haven State Teachers College, as Southern was then known. The 84 women who graduated in the class were committed to Southern from the start, making numerous gifts in the ensuing years as a class and individually, including six endowed scholarships. The event was enjoyed by class members [FROM LEFT] Angela Santore Amicone, Ruth Ives Woodruff, Elizabeth Hall de Lucia, Ruth Beer Frohman, and Olga Blahitka Sauer.

32 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

[SECOND FROM LEFT] Donor and Professor of Social Work P. Minou Michlin and David Michlin posed with scholarship recipient Francesca Salzano and President Cheryl J. Norton at the reception.

Regina Barbaresi, ’51, has established two scholarships at Southern. Pictured at the reception are: [FROM LEFT] Kasie Stevens, the recipient of the Gerald and Regina Barbaresi Nursing Scholarship; Barbaresi; Ashley Coombs, the recipient of the Gerald and Regina Barbaresi Education Scholarship; and President Cheryl J. Norton.

Fall 2009 | 33

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Alumni

NEWS

SCSU Alumni Association Board of Directors 2009-2010 Christopher Piscitelli, ’93, President Hugh S. Cafferty, ’69, M.S. 70, 6th Yr. ’76, Vice President Bessie Scott, ’70, M.S. ’78, 6th Yr. ’81, Secretary Albert Mieczakowski, ’71, Treasurer Michael Roshka, Jr., ’73, M.S. ’79, Past President

Dear Fellow Southern Alumni, I am thrilled to have been elected to serve as the president of the Alumni Association Board of Directors, a group dedicated to forwarding the goals of the university and the Alumni Association. Composed of 20 elected members, the board unites alumni with classmates and the institution, and works diligently to support Southern and its students.

Congratulations

members of the Alumni Association Board of Directors: Nancy Charest, ’71, M.S. ’75, 6th Yr. ’77; Dr. Marybeth Heyward Fede, ’79, M.S. ’87; Jerry Katona, ’74, M.S. ’88; Edwin A. Klinkhammer, II, ’71, M.S. ’76, 6th Yr. ’92; and Mary Martinik, ’76, M.S. ’86, 6th Yr. ’99. Biographies of

Working toward these objectives, our top priorities include:

the new members of the board, whose terms end in

• Supporting the staff of the Office of Alumni Relations as they manage day-to-day operations. • Serving as an advocate for the university at both the local and state legislative levels. • Educating our fellow alumni and community members on progress occurring at the university. • Promoting events that unite alumni, faculty, staff, and students with each other and the university. Clearly, the Alumni Association serves a vital role in the university community, which is why your participation is so important. If you are not currently a member, I urge you to join or renew your membership by contributing to the Annual Giving campaign currently underway.A gift of $35 or more entitles you to membership in the Alumni Association.You may already have received a request. If not, please consider making a gift online at www.SouthernCT.edu/supportsouthern/ or by returning the gift envelope enclosed in the magazine.Your support helps to ensure the continuing success of Southern and its students. During recent years, the Office of Alumni Relations has collaborated with the board to increase and enhance programming. Under Michelle Johnston’s leadership,Alumni Relations has planned a variety of successful activities from trips, wine tastings, and reunions to local and regional networking events. To keep up to date on future events, check www.SouthernCT.edu/alumni/upcomingevents/. There are several other ways to stay connected with Southern, too. Learn about alumni happenings and connect with friends on Facebook. Go to www.southernct.edu/ia/ and click on “Become a Fan on Facebook”under the Alumni listing.You also can follow university developments on Twitter. The SCSUtweet can be found at http://twitter.com/scsutweet. To reach the Alumni Relations Office by phone, call (203) 392-6500. I look forward to an exciting year and would welcome your comments and suggestions.You can reach me at piscitellic1@SouthernCT.edu. Thank you for considering making a gift in support of Southern and its outstanding students. I hope to see you at one or many of the alumni events this year! Best, Christopher Piscitelli, ’93 President Alumni Association Board of Directors 34 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

to the newly elected

2013, will be featured in the next issue.

I

Save the Dates…

for two alumni events that put the spotlight on Southern’s best, brightest, and most entertaining.

b

Distinguished and Outstanding Alumni Awards Oct. 16

A salute to seven exceptionally accomplished Southern graduates, including Distinguished Alumna Elizabeth Missan Yost, ’85, vice president of development for the Hallmark Channel. Michael J. Adanti Student Center (Grand Ballroom); $25; (203) 392-6500.

Denise Bentley-Drobish, ’90, M.S. ’92 Nancy Charest, ’71, M.S. ’75, 6th Yr. ’77 Kathy Glinka Coyle, ’74, M.S. ’77, 6th Yr. ’81 Dr. Marybeth Heyward Fede, ’79, M.S. ’87 Patricia R. Giulietti, ’76, M.S. ’87 William “Doc” Holley, ’55 Jerry Katona, ’74, M.S. ’88 Edwin A. Klinkhammer, II, ’71, M.S. ’76, 6th Yr. ’92 Dr. Anne Hollingworth Leone, ’51 Mary Martinik, ’76, M.S. ’86, 6th Yr. ’99 John Mastrianni, ’66, M.S. ’73 Dr. Marc A. Nivet, ’92 Judit Vasmatics Paolini, ’73, M.S. ’79, 6th Yr. ’93 Bridget Stepeck-Holt, ’95 Marvin G. Wilson, ’01, M.S. ’06

• Ex-Officio Dr. Cheryl J. Norton, President Megan A. Rock, Vice President for Institutional Advancement Michelle R. Johnston, Director of Alumni Relations Patrick Dilger, Director of Public Affairs Robin Sauerteig, Chair, SCSU Foundation, Inc.

c

Homecoming 2009 Oct. 17

Enjoy the fantasy at Homecoming 2009, which will feature a fairytale theme. The day’s events include the Bob Korda 5K Road Race, student parade of floats, alumni tent party, and the Homecoming football game against Stonehill College at 1 p.m. The Alumni Tent opens at 12 p.m., featuring food, beverages, and children’s activities for $10 per person. Please call for more information and tickets. Tickets also will be available at the tent. (203) 392-6500 For tickets to an evening of comedy with Kevin Hart and special guest Dan Boulger at Lyman Center for the Performing Arts, at 7:30 p.m., call (203) 392-6154. $10 for active alumni, faculty, and staff; $15 for general admission; and $5 for Southern students.

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Page 34

Alumni

NEWS

SCSU Alumni Association Board of Directors 2009-2010 Christopher Piscitelli, ’93, President Hugh S. Cafferty, ’69, M.S. 70, 6th Yr. ’76, Vice President Bessie Scott, ’70, M.S. ’78, 6th Yr. ’81, Secretary Albert Mieczakowski, ’71, Treasurer Michael Roshka, Jr., ’73, M.S. ’79, Past President

Dear Fellow Southern Alumni, I am thrilled to have been elected to serve as the president of the Alumni Association Board of Directors, a group dedicated to forwarding the goals of the university and the Alumni Association. Composed of 20 elected members, the board unites alumni with classmates and the institution, and works diligently to support Southern and its students.

Congratulations

members of the Alumni Association Board of Directors: Nancy Charest, ’71, M.S. ’75, 6th Yr. ’77; Dr. Marybeth Heyward Fede, ’79, M.S. ’87; Jerry Katona, ’74, M.S. ’88; Edwin A. Klinkhammer, II, ’71, M.S. ’76, 6th Yr. ’92; and Mary Martinik, ’76, M.S. ’86, 6th Yr. ’99. Biographies of

Working toward these objectives, our top priorities include:

the new members of the board, whose terms end in

• Supporting the staff of the Office of Alumni Relations as they manage day-to-day operations. • Serving as an advocate for the university at both the local and state legislative levels. • Educating our fellow alumni and community members on progress occurring at the university. • Promoting events that unite alumni, faculty, staff, and students with each other and the university. Clearly, the Alumni Association serves a vital role in the university community, which is why your participation is so important. If you are not currently a member, I urge you to join or renew your membership by contributing to the Annual Giving campaign currently underway.A gift of $35 or more entitles you to membership in the Alumni Association.You may already have received a request. If not, please consider making a gift online at www.SouthernCT.edu/supportsouthern/ or by returning the gift envelope enclosed in the magazine.Your support helps to ensure the continuing success of Southern and its students. During recent years, the Office of Alumni Relations has collaborated with the board to increase and enhance programming. Under Michelle Johnston’s leadership,Alumni Relations has planned a variety of successful activities from trips, wine tastings, and reunions to local and regional networking events. To keep up to date on future events, check www.SouthernCT.edu/alumni/upcomingevents/. There are several other ways to stay connected with Southern, too. Learn about alumni happenings and connect with friends on Facebook. Go to www.southernct.edu/ia/ and click on “Become a Fan on Facebook”under the Alumni listing.You also can follow university developments on Twitter. The SCSUtweet can be found at http://twitter.com/scsutweet. To reach the Alumni Relations Office by phone, call (203) 392-6500. I look forward to an exciting year and would welcome your comments and suggestions.You can reach me at piscitellic1@SouthernCT.edu. Thank you for considering making a gift in support of Southern and its outstanding students. I hope to see you at one or many of the alumni events this year! Best, Christopher Piscitelli, ’93 President Alumni Association Board of Directors 34 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

to the newly elected

2013, will be featured in the next issue.

I

Save the Dates…

for two alumni events that put the spotlight on Southern’s best, brightest, and most entertaining.

b

Distinguished and Outstanding Alumni Awards Oct. 16

A salute to seven exceptionally accomplished Southern graduates, including Distinguished Alumna Elizabeth Missan Yost, ’85, vice president of development for the Hallmark Channel. Michael J. Adanti Student Center (Grand Ballroom); $25; (203) 392-6500.

Denise Bentley-Drobish, ’90, M.S. ’92 Nancy Charest, ’71, M.S. ’75, 6th Yr. ’77 Kathy Glinka Coyle, ’74, M.S. ’77, 6th Yr. ’81 Dr. Marybeth Heyward Fede, ’79, M.S. ’87 Patricia R. Giulietti, ’76, M.S. ’87 William “Doc” Holley, ’55 Jerry Katona, ’74, M.S. ’88 Edwin A. Klinkhammer, II, ’71, M.S. ’76, 6th Yr. ’92 Dr. Anne Hollingworth Leone, ’51 Mary Martinik, ’76, M.S. ’86, 6th Yr. ’99 John Mastrianni, ’66, M.S. ’73 Dr. Marc A. Nivet, ’92 Judit Vasmatics Paolini, ’73, M.S. ’79, 6th Yr. ’93 Bridget Stepeck-Holt, ’95 Marvin G. Wilson, ’01, M.S. ’06

• Ex-Officio Dr. Cheryl J. Norton, President Megan A. Rock, Vice President for Institutional Advancement Michelle R. Johnston, Director of Alumni Relations Patrick Dilger, Director of Public Affairs Robin Sauerteig, Chair, SCSU Foundation, Inc.

c

Homecoming 2009 Oct. 17

Enjoy the fantasy at Homecoming 2009, which will feature a fairytale theme. The day’s events include the Bob Korda 5K Road Race, student parade of floats, alumni tent party, and the Homecoming football game against Stonehill College at 1 p.m. The Alumni Tent opens at 12 p.m., featuring food, beverages, and children’s activities for $10 per person. Please call for more information and tickets. Tickets also will be available at the tent. (203) 392-6500 For tickets to an evening of comedy with Kevin Hart and special guest Dan Boulger at Lyman Center for the Performing Arts, at 7:30 p.m., call (203) 392-6154. $10 for active alumni, faculty, and staff; $15 for general admission; and $5 for Southern students.

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Page 36

Alumni

NEWS highlights included a “Meet the Authors” showcase, which brought 21 alumni authors to campus and inspired five more to send their books. And for inquisitive, energetic families and children, the Amazing Race scavenger hunt had participants crisscrossing campus. The winners took home an assortment of goodies. But the ultimate prize went

Happy 50th. . . I

to the Class of 1959, which was honored during Southern’s undergraduate commencement exercises on May 29. Their reunion is scheduled for Oct. 15 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Woodwinds of Branford, Conn. For reservations and more information call (203) 392-6500.

Helping the show go on is a driving force for

mater, while learning about some of

Alumni Day 2009 Donning medical scrubs and masks, a group of

tunities Southern has to offer. This marked the second annual

Catherine Otto Montgomery, M.S. ’78, who co-pro-

children gathered in Southern’s interactive nursing labo-

Alumni Day celebration. Each of

duced the off-Broadway play, “Hell’s Kitchen The

ratory to check the pulse rates of Southern President

Southern’s schools will be spotlighted

Cheryl J. Norton and the Owl mascot. Fortunately, both

in ensuing years on a rotating basis.

Musical,” along with her husband, Jon Montgomery and Bridge Across

were feeling just fine — enjoying the opportunity to help

Productions. The story,

demonstrate the lab’s state-of-the-art equipment to

which takes place in

Southern graduates and their families attending Alumni

the 1960s, spotlights

Day 2009: A

gangs, gangsters, and

Celebration of

families struggling to

the School of

survive in Hell’s

Business and

Kitchen, the infamous-

the School of

ly gritty New York City

Health and

neighborhood just

Human

west of Times Square.

Services.

The work, which is the brainchild of play-

From buildings lauded for eco-friendly design to a reinvigorated, campus-wide recycling program, the university is committed to keeping it green.

Held on May 16, the

Stay tuned for more informa-

wright/composer Jon Montgomery, who also co-wrote

daylong event featured a host of activities, including fac-

tion on Alumni Day 2010, a

of the American College & University

the score with Toby Kasavan, had a successful run at

ulty and student exhibits and presentations, a social

Celebration of the School of

Presidents Climate Commitment.

gathering for the adults, a supervised cupcake/movie

Education, which will be held

party for children, and Alumni College seminars on a

on April 10, 2010.

the Hudson-Guild Theater last winter. Catherine Montgomery, founder and president

36 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

enjoyed reconnecting with their alma the many advancements and oppor-

I

Show Time!

to all who attended the event and

of the American Institute for Stuttering (AIS) Treatment

variety of timely topics, among them, “Wall Street/Main

and Professional Training, is the recipient of Southern’s

Street: The Economy in Crisis,” “New Directions in

2008 Outstanding Alumna Award for the School of

Marketing,” and “Talking Across Time: Considerations for

Graduate Studies.

Effective Cross-Generational Communication.” Other

Guests at Alumni Day enjoyed numerous activities, including “Meet the Authors” showcase, a scavenger hunt, and informative seminars.

That’s why Southern is a proud signatory

Please support Southern and its students by contributing to the Campus Greening Fund. Donations may be made online at www.giving.southernct.edu. Or call (203) 392-6515.

Fall 2009 | 37

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:59 AM

Page 36

Alumni

NEWS highlights included a “Meet the Authors” showcase, which brought 21 alumni authors to campus and inspired five more to send their books. And for inquisitive, energetic families and children, the Amazing Race scavenger hunt had participants crisscrossing campus. The winners took home an assortment of goodies. But the ultimate prize went

Happy 50th. . . I

to the Class of 1959, which was honored during Southern’s undergraduate commencement exercises on May 29. Their reunion is scheduled for Oct. 15 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Woodwinds of Branford, Conn. For reservations and more information call (203) 392-6500.

Helping the show go on is a driving force for

mater, while learning about some of

Alumni Day 2009 Donning medical scrubs and masks, a group of

tunities Southern has to offer. This marked the second annual

Catherine Otto Montgomery, M.S. ’78, who co-pro-

children gathered in Southern’s interactive nursing labo-

Alumni Day celebration. Each of

duced the off-Broadway play, “Hell’s Kitchen The

ratory to check the pulse rates of Southern President

Southern’s schools will be spotlighted

Cheryl J. Norton and the Owl mascot. Fortunately, both

in ensuing years on a rotating basis.

Musical,” along with her husband, Jon Montgomery and Bridge Across

were feeling just fine — enjoying the opportunity to help

Productions. The story,

demonstrate the lab’s state-of-the-art equipment to

which takes place in

Southern graduates and their families attending Alumni

the 1960s, spotlights

Day 2009: A

gangs, gangsters, and

Celebration of

families struggling to

the School of

survive in Hell’s

Business and

Kitchen, the infamous-

the School of

ly gritty New York City

Health and

neighborhood just

Human

west of Times Square.

Services.

The work, which is the brainchild of play-

From buildings lauded for eco-friendly design to a reinvigorated, campus-wide recycling program, the university is committed to keeping it green.

Held on May 16, the

Stay tuned for more informa-

wright/composer Jon Montgomery, who also co-wrote

daylong event featured a host of activities, including fac-

tion on Alumni Day 2010, a

of the American College & University

the score with Toby Kasavan, had a successful run at

ulty and student exhibits and presentations, a social

Celebration of the School of

Presidents Climate Commitment.

gathering for the adults, a supervised cupcake/movie

Education, which will be held

party for children, and Alumni College seminars on a

on April 10, 2010.

the Hudson-Guild Theater last winter. Catherine Montgomery, founder and president

36 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

enjoyed reconnecting with their alma the many advancements and oppor-

I

Show Time!

to all who attended the event and

of the American Institute for Stuttering (AIS) Treatment

variety of timely topics, among them, “Wall Street/Main

and Professional Training, is the recipient of Southern’s

Street: The Economy in Crisis,” “New Directions in

2008 Outstanding Alumna Award for the School of

Marketing,” and “Talking Across Time: Considerations for

Graduate Studies.

Effective Cross-Generational Communication.” Other

Guests at Alumni Day enjoyed numerous activities, including “Meet the Authors” showcase, a scavenger hunt, and informative seminars.

That’s why Southern is a proud signatory

Please support Southern and its students by contributing to the Campus Greening Fund. Donations may be made online at www.giving.southernct.edu. Or call (203) 392-6515.

Fall 2009 | 37

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:59 AM

Page 38

alumni notes

’50s MARGARET RUTH LEGGETT, ’55, was the recipient of the Bells of Saint Mary Award from Saint Mary School. Leggett, a 1932 graduate of Saint Mary, previously received its Distinguished Alumna Award.

Reunion News

KAREN FECKO, M.L.S.’77,was

• The Class of 1959 is celebrating its 50th reunion on Oct. 15 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Woodwinds in Branford, Conn For more information or if you would like to organize a reunion for your class, please contact Alumni Relations at (203) 392-6500.

CARMINE VACCARO, ’59, was the recipient of the Connecticut Sport Writers Association John Wentworth Good Sport Award.

’60s DIANE CANDELORA, ’62, M.S. ’68, lives in Las Vegas, N.V., and works for the Federal Protective Service. Candelora volunteers for Best Friends and the NSPCA, rescuing animals and helping to find them permanent homes.

LARRY CIOTTI, ’66, M.S. ’71, 6th Yr. ’92, a 39-year resident of Madison, Conn., and former Southern football player, established the football and wrestling programs at Madison’s Daniel Hand High School. Ciotti was a coach at the high school for 18 years and served as its director of athletics from 1988-1992. He began serving on the coaching staff at Yale University in 1991 and retired from coaching at the varsity level in 2008. He currently services as director of football operations and director of the Yale Football Camp, as reported in The Source newspaper.

PAMELA (ANSELMI) MCCLOUD, ’66, is living in Maryland on the Chesapeake Bay after many years of living overseas.

’70s MEL FINKENBERG, ’70,has been named interim dean of the College of Education at Stephen F.Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas.

YVONNE SHIA KLANCKO, ’70, M.S. ’74, 6th yr. ’94, lectured at 38 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

named the 2008-2009 Glastonbury Teacher of the Year. Fecko is the library media specialist at Glastonbury High School in Connecticut.

DORIE PETROCHKO, M.S. ’78, displayed her botanical paintings at the Southbury Public Library. Petrochko, an accomplished painter and natural science illustrator, teaches at Common Ground High School in New Haven, Conn.

ROBERT COPPOLA, M.S. ’79, the Seymour Historical Society on the use of eggs in early Christian celebrations and on the influence of egg art.An exhibit on loan from the extensive collection of Klancko, and her husband, Robert, was showcased at Southern’s Michael J.Adanti Student Center earlier in the year. Highlights included ornately decorated eggs by Yvonne Klancko, a celebrated artist.

LES KOZEROWITZ, M.S.’70, M.L.S.’74,is the library director at the Norwalk Public Library in Connecticut. Kozerowitz has worked for the library system for over 35 years.

JAMES P. LONGO, ’70, M.S. ’75, formerly assistant superintendent and a principal in Franklin, Conn., has been named the superintendent of schools in Ashford, Conn.

JOHANNA BRELFORD, M.S. ’71, has retired as assistant principal at Riverside School after 38 years as an educator, as reported in the Greenwich Post newspaper.

ROSEMARIE A. BURTON, M.S. ’72,is the president of Klingberg Family Centers, a private, nonprofit organization that provides a wide range of services to children and families.

JOHN HAYDEN, ’73, a standout high school and college football player and coach, has gone on to become an actor. Hayden lives in California.

DALE WILSON, ’73, 6th Yr. ’79, has retired from the position of superintendent for Wallingford Public Schools,

after serving the district for 36 years.

BOBBIE NELSON-SEELIN, ’75, is an instructor at the Culinary Academy of Long Island Hotel Management.

ERIK STEINERT, ’76, produces DVDs from home movies and photos with his brother, Leif. Their projects include a historic film of the Memorial Day parade, which took place in Portland, Conn., in 1965. They are trying to identify people who appear in the film, which can be viewed at www.youtube.com/ BelmontBigE.

MARGARET FALSEY BRILLIANTE, ’77, was hon-

ored to receive the Hearts of the Community Award, given by Sacred Heart Academy of Hamden, Conn. Since 1991, she has volunteered with Special Olympics and, in 1995, served in the medical unit during the Special Olympics World Games. Brilliante also volunteers with the Girl Scouts of America, the American Cancer Society, and Relay for Life of Hamden.

SUSAN BROSNAN, M.L.S. ’77, has been re-appointed by Governor M. Jodi Rell to the State Historical Records Advisory Board, which promotes the preservation and use of the state’s documentary and historical heritage.

who served on the Town Council and Board of Education for ten years, is running for mayor as a Democrat in New Milford, Conn. Coppola taught special needs students at The Glenholme-Deveraux School in Washington, Conn., before retiring.

SUSAN LOTT, ’79, 6th Yr. ’09, an English teacher at Guilford High School, became the resident director and tutor for Guilford’s A Better Chance (ABC) program. Part of a national organization,Guilford’s ABC program offers promising young women of diverse ethnic and social backgrounds the opportunity to attend Guilford High School and live locally.

Diploma in Hand Brian O’Loughlin, ’08, was living the

River State College in Fort Pierce, Fla., and

Rodriguez, whom he described as “an amaz-

American Dream — a rewarding career that

transferred the credits to Southern.

ing man and an amazing golfer — a magician

provided frequent travel opportunities and

On May 29, he donned his cap and

on the golf course.”

the chance to hobnob with famous athletes

gown to participate in Southern’s undergrad-

and performers. As a personal trainer, he

uate commencement exercises. A huge party

tant/personal trainer for Clarence Clemons

worked with the likes of Hall of Fame golfer

followed in Manchester, Conn., where

for five years on several different tours, not-

Chi-Chi Rodriguez and “The Big Man”

O’Loughlin’s family still resides. Included

ing that the grueling schedule was “consis-

Clarence Clemons, saxophone player for

among the decorations was a slightly yel-

tently inconsistent.” He frequently got by on

parents, who were staunch advocates of edu-

lowed, faded “Happy Graduation” tablecloth

three hours of sleep, and says he once trav-

cation.

that O’Loughlin’s mother purchased many

eled to Spain, Germany, and France in a 24-

years ago in anticipation of the day.

hour period.

He worked as a personal assis-

Bruce Springsteen’s E-Street Band. Yet, there was always one thing missing from an otherwise fulfilling life—a college diploma. O’Loughlin attended Southern in the late 1980s and early 1990s, where he was a member of the Owls’ men’s track and field team. He was nearly finished with his coursework when the lure of a steady paycheck from a local gym tempted him to take a semester off from school. That one semester led to another and another, until O’Loughlin ultimately decided to relocate to Florida to further his personal training career. The decision helped O’Loughlin take his career to the next level. Yet despite his success, the knowledge that he had never completed his degree gnawed at him over the years, particularly when he thought of his

Support Southern. Leave a Legacy. Planned gifts — also called deferred or estate gifts — can help you meet your long-term financial goals, while providing critically needed support to Southern’s talented and deserving students. The university’s Development Office can supply information on a variety of planned gifts that help Southern maintain a climate of excellence — from bequests that extend your generosity beyond your lifetime to charitable gift annuities and trusts, which can provide fixed-income payments and several tax benefits. If you’ve already included the Southern Connecticut State University

“Being so close and never finishing, it killed me inside,” O’Loughlin says. “It chased

“I felt like a thousand-pound weight

“I was able to meet some of the best

me all around the world. No matter what I

was lifted off my shoulders,” says O’Loughlin,

musicians in the world,” he says. “These

did, I never forgot that I didn’t finish college.”

who credited Ladore with helping him

musicians are the legends, talented beyond

rewrite his life story. “He changed my life,”

words.”

About a year ago, O’Loughlin decided to take action and contacted Frank Ladore, a friend from his college days who now serves

he says. Ladore downplays his role in

Today, O’Loughlin works as a therapist at the Egoscue Clinic in Palm Beach

Foundation in your will, please let us know so that we can acknowledge your

as the interim director of Southern’s Office of

O’Loughlin’s accomplishment. “Brian is an

Gardens, Fla., where he helps people correct

generosity by enrolling you in the Heritage Society.

Academic Advisement. Ladore had good

amazing person with so much motivation

their posture through exercises and stretches

news: after reviewing O’Loughlin’s transcript,

and so much to give,” Ladore says. “I was

to eliminate pain.

Southern Connecticut State University Foundation. For more information, contact the

he found he needed only two courses to

just someone who put him in touch with the

Development Office.

complete his degree — a class in a foreign

right people and guided him along the way.”

If not, please consider leaving a legacy by making a planned gift to the

(203) 392-5598 • www.SouthernCT.edu/supportsouthern Southern Connecticut State University 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515-1355

language and one in world history.

O’Loughlin is modest when recount-

O’Loughlin successfully completed courses in

ing his previous work as a trainer to various

Spanish and Western Civilization at Indian

stars. He says he enjoyed working with

“It’s the most amazing thing in the world,“ says O’Loughlin. “We have a 97 percent success rate and get to witness a miracle several times a day.”

—By Marianne Lippard Fall 2009 | 39

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

11/5/09

10:59 AM

Page 38

alumni notes

’50s MARGARET RUTH LEGGETT, ’55, was the recipient of the Bells of Saint Mary Award from Saint Mary School. Leggett, a 1932 graduate of Saint Mary, previously received its Distinguished Alumna Award.

Reunion News

KAREN FECKO, M.L.S.’77,was

• The Class of 1959 is celebrating its 50th reunion on Oct. 15 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Woodwinds in Branford, Conn For more information or if you would like to organize a reunion for your class, please contact Alumni Relations at (203) 392-6500.

CARMINE VACCARO, ’59, was the recipient of the Connecticut Sport Writers Association John Wentworth Good Sport Award.

’60s DIANE CANDELORA, ’62, M.S. ’68, lives in Las Vegas, N.V., and works for the Federal Protective Service. Candelora volunteers for Best Friends and the NSPCA, rescuing animals and helping to find them permanent homes.

LARRY CIOTTI, ’66, M.S. ’71, 6th Yr. ’92, a 39-year resident of Madison, Conn., and former Southern football player, established the football and wrestling programs at Madison’s Daniel Hand High School. Ciotti was a coach at the high school for 18 years and served as its director of athletics from 1988-1992. He began serving on the coaching staff at Yale University in 1991 and retired from coaching at the varsity level in 2008. He currently services as director of football operations and director of the Yale Football Camp, as reported in The Source newspaper.

PAMELA (ANSELMI) MCCLOUD, ’66, is living in Maryland on the Chesapeake Bay after many years of living overseas.

’70s MEL FINKENBERG, ’70,has been named interim dean of the College of Education at Stephen F.Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas.

YVONNE SHIA KLANCKO, ’70, M.S. ’74, 6th yr. ’94, lectured at 38 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

named the 2008-2009 Glastonbury Teacher of the Year. Fecko is the library media specialist at Glastonbury High School in Connecticut.

DORIE PETROCHKO, M.S. ’78, displayed her botanical paintings at the Southbury Public Library. Petrochko, an accomplished painter and natural science illustrator, teaches at Common Ground High School in New Haven, Conn.

ROBERT COPPOLA, M.S. ’79, the Seymour Historical Society on the use of eggs in early Christian celebrations and on the influence of egg art.An exhibit on loan from the extensive collection of Klancko, and her husband, Robert, was showcased at Southern’s Michael J.Adanti Student Center earlier in the year. Highlights included ornately decorated eggs by Yvonne Klancko, a celebrated artist.

LES KOZEROWITZ, M.S.’70, M.L.S.’74,is the library director at the Norwalk Public Library in Connecticut. Kozerowitz has worked for the library system for over 35 years.

JAMES P. LONGO, ’70, M.S. ’75, formerly assistant superintendent and a principal in Franklin, Conn., has been named the superintendent of schools in Ashford, Conn.

JOHANNA BRELFORD, M.S. ’71, has retired as assistant principal at Riverside School after 38 years as an educator, as reported in the Greenwich Post newspaper.

ROSEMARIE A. BURTON, M.S. ’72,is the president of Klingberg Family Centers, a private, nonprofit organization that provides a wide range of services to children and families.

JOHN HAYDEN, ’73, a standout high school and college football player and coach, has gone on to become an actor. Hayden lives in California.

DALE WILSON, ’73, 6th Yr. ’79, has retired from the position of superintendent for Wallingford Public Schools,

after serving the district for 36 years.

BOBBIE NELSON-SEELIN, ’75, is an instructor at the Culinary Academy of Long Island Hotel Management.

ERIK STEINERT, ’76, produces DVDs from home movies and photos with his brother, Leif. Their projects include a historic film of the Memorial Day parade, which took place in Portland, Conn., in 1965. They are trying to identify people who appear in the film, which can be viewed at www.youtube.com/ BelmontBigE.

MARGARET FALSEY BRILLIANTE, ’77, was hon-

ored to receive the Hearts of the Community Award, given by Sacred Heart Academy of Hamden, Conn. Since 1991, she has volunteered with Special Olympics and, in 1995, served in the medical unit during the Special Olympics World Games. Brilliante also volunteers with the Girl Scouts of America, the American Cancer Society, and Relay for Life of Hamden.

SUSAN BROSNAN, M.L.S. ’77, has been re-appointed by Governor M. Jodi Rell to the State Historical Records Advisory Board, which promotes the preservation and use of the state’s documentary and historical heritage.

who served on the Town Council and Board of Education for ten years, is running for mayor as a Democrat in New Milford, Conn. Coppola taught special needs students at The Glenholme-Deveraux School in Washington, Conn., before retiring.

SUSAN LOTT, ’79, 6th Yr. ’09, an English teacher at Guilford High School, became the resident director and tutor for Guilford’s A Better Chance (ABC) program. Part of a national organization,Guilford’s ABC program offers promising young women of diverse ethnic and social backgrounds the opportunity to attend Guilford High School and live locally.

Diploma in Hand Brian O’Loughlin, ’08, was living the

River State College in Fort Pierce, Fla., and

Rodriguez, whom he described as “an amaz-

American Dream — a rewarding career that

transferred the credits to Southern.

ing man and an amazing golfer — a magician

provided frequent travel opportunities and

On May 29, he donned his cap and

on the golf course.”

the chance to hobnob with famous athletes

gown to participate in Southern’s undergrad-

and performers. As a personal trainer, he

uate commencement exercises. A huge party

tant/personal trainer for Clarence Clemons

worked with the likes of Hall of Fame golfer

followed in Manchester, Conn., where

for five years on several different tours, not-

Chi-Chi Rodriguez and “The Big Man”

O’Loughlin’s family still resides. Included

ing that the grueling schedule was “consis-

Clarence Clemons, saxophone player for

among the decorations was a slightly yel-

tently inconsistent.” He frequently got by on

parents, who were staunch advocates of edu-

lowed, faded “Happy Graduation” tablecloth

three hours of sleep, and says he once trav-

cation.

that O’Loughlin’s mother purchased many

eled to Spain, Germany, and France in a 24-

years ago in anticipation of the day.

hour period.

He worked as a personal assis-

Bruce Springsteen’s E-Street Band. Yet, there was always one thing missing from an otherwise fulfilling life—a college diploma. O’Loughlin attended Southern in the late 1980s and early 1990s, where he was a member of the Owls’ men’s track and field team. He was nearly finished with his coursework when the lure of a steady paycheck from a local gym tempted him to take a semester off from school. That one semester led to another and another, until O’Loughlin ultimately decided to relocate to Florida to further his personal training career. The decision helped O’Loughlin take his career to the next level. Yet despite his success, the knowledge that he had never completed his degree gnawed at him over the years, particularly when he thought of his

Support Southern. Leave a Legacy. Planned gifts — also called deferred or estate gifts — can help you meet your long-term financial goals, while providing critically needed support to Southern’s talented and deserving students. The university’s Development Office can supply information on a variety of planned gifts that help Southern maintain a climate of excellence — from bequests that extend your generosity beyond your lifetime to charitable gift annuities and trusts, which can provide fixed-income payments and several tax benefits. If you’ve already included the Southern Connecticut State University

“Being so close and never finishing, it killed me inside,” O’Loughlin says. “It chased

“I felt like a thousand-pound weight

“I was able to meet some of the best

me all around the world. No matter what I

was lifted off my shoulders,” says O’Loughlin,

musicians in the world,” he says. “These

did, I never forgot that I didn’t finish college.”

who credited Ladore with helping him

musicians are the legends, talented beyond

rewrite his life story. “He changed my life,”

words.”

About a year ago, O’Loughlin decided to take action and contacted Frank Ladore, a friend from his college days who now serves

he says. Ladore downplays his role in

Today, O’Loughlin works as a therapist at the Egoscue Clinic in Palm Beach

Foundation in your will, please let us know so that we can acknowledge your

as the interim director of Southern’s Office of

O’Loughlin’s accomplishment. “Brian is an

Gardens, Fla., where he helps people correct

generosity by enrolling you in the Heritage Society.

Academic Advisement. Ladore had good

amazing person with so much motivation

their posture through exercises and stretches

news: after reviewing O’Loughlin’s transcript,

and so much to give,” Ladore says. “I was

to eliminate pain.

Southern Connecticut State University Foundation. For more information, contact the

he found he needed only two courses to

just someone who put him in touch with the

Development Office.

complete his degree — a class in a foreign

right people and guided him along the way.”

If not, please consider leaving a legacy by making a planned gift to the

(203) 392-5598 • www.SouthernCT.edu/supportsouthern Southern Connecticut State University 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515-1355

language and one in world history.

O’Loughlin is modest when recount-

O’Loughlin successfully completed courses in

ing his previous work as a trainer to various

Spanish and Western Civilization at Indian

stars. He says he enjoyed working with

“It’s the most amazing thing in the world,“ says O’Loughlin. “We have a 97 percent success rate and get to witness a miracle several times a day.”

—By Marianne Lippard Fall 2009 | 39

’80s WILLIAM VAZQUEZ, ’81, is employed by People’s United Bank and lives in Stratford, Conn.

ROBERTA LAMONACA, M.L.S. ’82, was appointed director of library services at Bloomfield Library and has been with the library for 29 years.

POLLY BRODY, M.S. ’83, read a selection of her poetry from “In Praise of Nature” at the Garden Club of Newtown. Brody is currently working on her fourth book.

BRIAN ENRIGHT, ’84, was the grand marshal for the Greater New Haven St. Patrick’s Day 2009 parade. Enright is the president of the Orange, Conn.-based law firm, Gorman, Enright & Butler, P.C.

JOHN WHITFORD, ’84, was named the Army National Guard’s deputy personnel director. Whitford has earned the Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal with two oak leaf clusters, Army Achievement Medal with a silver oak cluster, and two National Defense Service Medals.

KAREN (CONNORS) WOODFORD, ’84, M.S. ’96, M.S. ’97, has taught 15 years in Easton, Conn. She lives with her husband and two children in Monroe, Conn.

JOHN FERRARO, ’85, was named editor of the Hartford Business Journal. In 2006 he guided and edited a series on the U.S. military’s mental health policies, which resulted in him being named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He has won numerous national and regional awards, including the George Polk Award.

ANTONIO (TONY) GONZALEZ, ’85, was honored at the New Britain Sports Hall of Fame Induction Dinner, as reported in The Herald. Gonzalez, a basketball player, scored over 1,000 points at Pulaski High School, over 1,400 at 40 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

11/5/09

10:59 AM

Page 40

Mattatuck Community College, and 1,278 at Southern.

In Print AND On Screen THE LATEST BOOK AND FILM RELEASES FROM SOUTHERN ALUMNI

JOHN EMERY ISTVAN, M.S. ’85, is a clinical social worker associate for the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and initiated a Gay/ Lesbian/ Bisexual/ Transgender/Intersex Committee. Istvan lives in Waterbury, Conn.

ANN WILLIAMS, M.S. ’85, was named the Connecticut Outstanding Art Educator for 2009 by the Connecticut Art Education Association.

Hillhouse High School before going on to Guilford High School.

SHEL SHWAYHAT, M.B.A. ’98, was named manager of finance and quality projects for the Yale-New Haven Hospital. Shwayhat previously worked in the hospital’s Clinical Engineering and Financial Planning Departments, most recently as performance lead for diagnostic radiology and laboratory medicine.

Dorothy Ricci, ’66, has published a novel for young adults about the Spanish painter, Francisco de Goya, “Through Goya’s Eyes.” Ricci retired from the public school system after 36 years.

Tracy Knofla, ’82, M.S. ’87, has published her first book, “Thriving in Chaos.” Knofla is the co-owner of a nationally recognized training and development company, High Impact Training. Tom Lombardi, ’96, published his debut novel, “My Summer On Earth,” Simon & Schuster/Simon Pulse. The young-adult novel covers the exploits of an alien disguised as a teenage human. Lombardi’s work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Fence, and numerous other publications.

PETER AUBIN, M.S. ’99, a special education teacher at Plainfield High School in

Connecticut, was elected to the Danielson Borough Council, joining six incumbents, according to the Norwich Bulletin.

TIFFANY DIPRIMIO, ’99, was honored by Governor M. Jodi Rell who proclaimed May 18, 2009 as Tiffany DiPrimio Day in the state of Connecticut. DiPrimio is losing her sight to the genetic condition, retinitis pigmentosa. Chase Elementary in Waterbury, Conn., hosted a fundraiser in her honor. Over $20,000 has been raised through a variety of events.

’00s RANELLE BREW, ’01, accepted a tenure-track position as assistant professor for the Health Professions Program at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Mich.

DANIEL HARAYDA, ’01, M.S. ’04, has been accepted into Northwestern’s doctoral program in law and policy.

GREGORY KALAFUS, M.B.A. ’02, is a member of the security force at The Masters Tournament golf competi-

CAROL BRACKEN, ’88, is the new director of outreach and education at Carolyn’s Place, a pregnancy care center in Waterbury, Conn.

’90s ROBIN MCCAHILL, ’90, artist and puppeteer, had a holiday puppet show at White Memorial Carriage House in New Milford, Conn. The show featured McCahill’s puppets and troupe in a series of European fairy tales.

PAUL MCLAUGHLIN, ’90, has been promoted to senior vice president at Litchfield Bancorp.

BILL NEMEC, ’90, M.S. ’97, was hired as coordinator for physical and health education in the New Fairfield School District. Nemec formerly was a physical education teacher, teacher/student specialist, and variety coach in Cromwell, Conn.

BARBARA DOUGLAS, ’91, M.A. ’93, has joined Wire Journal International as editor. Douglas is also a certified master gardener, and has taught journalism and poetry to adult education students. Her interests include blacksmithing, kayaking, and riding her Harley-Davidson.

MARK GRUTTADAURIA, ’91, has joined Hudson Valley Bank as vice president and branch manager of the Fairfield branch.

SHARI VALENCIC, ’91, earned her doctorate in educational leadership from Argosy University in Sarasota, Fla. Valencic works for the school board of Sarasota County and lives in Venice, Fla., with her two daughters.

MELISSA (WITT) LAMAR, ’92, is a public relations associate at Tunxis Community College in Farmington, Conn. Lamar is married and the mother of a daughter born on Nov. 19, 2008.

KATHY MAZEROLLE, M.A. ’92, accepted a position as nurse administrator at Evergreen Endoscopy Center in South Windsor, Conn. She and her husband, David Moore, live with their dog and two cats.

KERRI SAUER, ’93, works as an advanced practice registered nurse in a primary care clinic in northeastern Conn. Sauer is married with two children.

MARY LOU ARNSON, ’94, M.S. ’05, an art teacher at Barnard and Generali elementary schools, exhibited her acrylic paintings at the Greenwich Audubon Society.

FRANCIS “NICK” DECAPUA,’95, is a commercial real estate broker specializing in Triple Net investments and undeveloped land throughout the United States.

KATRINA STOECKEL, ’95, has received her master’s in theology from St. Louis

University. Stoeckel is a campus minister at St. Elizabeth Academy and a part-time adjunct professor at Fontbonne University in St. Louis, Mo.

ELIE FERNEINI, ’96, has joined Two Spa Girls, and will perform non-surgical cosmetic procedures including, Botox, Restylane, Rejuvederm, and Radiesse. Ferneini is a member of the American Medical Association, the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, and the American Dental Association.

MEREDITH ANN HEYDE, ’96, is a nurse practitioner for the Pulmonary/Critical Care Department at Greenville Memorial Hospital in South Carolina. Heyde was Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) of the Year in Connecticut in 2007, and is the South Carolina state representative for the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

MATTHEW KELEMEN, ’96, established Foundit.com, an Internet site that helps people find lost belongings, while protecting the identities of all parties involved, as reported in the Stratford Star newspaper.

AMITAI SELA, ’96, is a senior lotus notes/domino groupware architect at Datascope Patient Monitoring, a

Mindray Global Company located in Mahwah, N.J.

HEATHER MILESKI, ’97, oversees Community Connections High School in Lisbon, Conn.

MISSY OROSZ, ’97, M.S. ’99, is the associate director of recreation for the town of Seymour, Conn., where she lives with her husband, Frank Orosz, ’97, and two daughters.

CHERYL SCHWARTZ, M.S.W. ’97, a Newtown, Conn.-based career consultant, co-presented a three-session workshop for the underemployed, the unemployed, and those seeking a change in employment, at the C.H. Booth Library. Schwartz has been a consultant/coach to individuals and organizations for more than 20 years.

JUANITA CASTILLO, ’98, M.S. ’00, is attending Fairfield University with a goal of earning a master’s in nursing.

MATTHEW HASTAVA, ’98, has

tell us about it

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

Share your good news with Southern friends and classmates by sending it to Southern Alumni News. Mail this completed form to Southern Alumni News, SCSU Alumni Relations Office, New Haven, CT 06515-1355; fax, (203) 392-5082; or e-mail, alumniinfo@SouthernCT.edu. Name ____________________________________________________ Phone (

) ______________________________________________

Street Address ______________________________________________ City ____________________________State ________Zip __________ SCSU Degree/Year______________Major __________________________ E-mail ____________________________________________________ J Check if this is a new address.

Name under which I attended college ______________________________ News Item__________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________

been promoted to assistant vice president of Newtown Savings Bank. Formerly, Hastava was the branch manager of the Bethel Dolan Plaza office.

Signature __________________________________________________

IAN NEVIASER, ’98, 6th Yr. ’01,

Spouse’s Name ______________________Spouse's SCSU Degree/Yr.______

is the principal of Valley Regional High School. Neviaser was a coaching assistant at Yale University, then coached football and taught social studies at

________________________________________________________

Date ______________________________________________________

Children’s Names/Ages ________________________________________ ________________________________________________________

tion, for the eighth-consecutive year.

KEN SARANICH, 6th Yr. ’02, was named headmaster of Shelton Intermediate School in Connecticut.

JOSE BARROSO, ’03, was inducted into the Connecticut Soccer Hall of Fame. The men’s soccer coach at Sacred Heart University, Barroso was a member of Southern’s Div. II National Championship team in 1990.

JACQUELINE MENEO, ’03, has joined the Westerly Community Credit Union as its business development and lending officer. Meneo lives in Charlestown, R.I.

TIM SALEM, 6th Yr. ’04, was named the 2009 Assistant Principal of the Year by the Connecticut Association of Schools. Salem, was a social studies teacher before becoming assistant principal at Danbury High School.

ELLEN DONNELLY COX, M.S. ’06, an elementary school art teacher in Shelton, Conn., and member of the Stratford Arts Guild, exhibited her art work at the Stratford Library.

CHRISTIAN BAUMBACH, ’07, a seventh-grade teacher at North End Middle School, took 300 students, at his own expense, to see “They Call Me Lizzy,” a one-woman play about a slave who worked to buy her freedom.

CHRISTOPHER LUCCI, ’07, has been hired as one of the Atlanta Braves’ minor league strength and conditioning coaches. He formerly was a strength and conditioning coach at Boston University.

DOMINICK EULA, ’08, is a patrol officer with the Branford Police Department. Eula graduated first in his class from a 22-week police academy program and was one of eight officers recognized for shooting three perfect scores during firearms training.

Corps, Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C., and will continue his training at Camp Geiger in N.C.

KRISTEN KELTZ, ’08, a teacher, painter, and illustrator, presented a program about expressing oneself through poetry, painting, and illustration at the South Norwalk Branch Library in Connecticut.

BRANDON BOBINSKI, ’09, is a financial services representative at the Shelton, Conn.based office of Barnum Financial Group-MetLife.

MAUREEN FARRELL, M.P.H. ’09, a local family physician, is a member of the Brookfield Health Task Force.

Marriages JENNIFER ELYSE BERMAN, ’97, and Edward Ariola, Oct. 12, 2008.

WYATT HALLGREN, ’97, M.S. ’06, and Meredith Mickel, June 28, 2009.

LISA MARIE ALBIS, M.S. ’98, and Thomas Ferree, Aug. 23, 2008.

ANA SOUSA, ’00, and Joseph Kullberg, Oct. 18, 2008.

ROBYN SUE FLASTER, ’01, M.S. ’08, and Michael Spinner, Oct. 19, 2008.

STEVEN WARNER, JR., ’01, and Rebecca Hunt, Oct. 4, 2008.

GINA COLELLA, ’03, and Michael Kelly, Oct. 3, 2008.

ADELEEN JARDELEZA, M.S. ’03, and Luke Moore, Aug. 8, 2009.

MARCEY SPATAFORE, ’04, and JASON RIZZETTA, ’04, Sept. 19, 2008.

JASON STUDENY, ’04, and Kristin Chicatell, April 10, 2009.

MICHELE D’AGOSTINO, ’05, and Christopher Wrenn, June 28, 2008.

KRISTEN ANN SIROIS, ’05, and

Ryan Bessette, Oct. 11, 2008. JEFFREY THOMAS GALVIN FONTI, ’08, graduated private STEPHEN DERASMO, ’06, and first class from the Marine

Gina Croce, Nov. 8, 2008. Fall 2009 | 41

’80s WILLIAM VAZQUEZ, ’81, is employed by People’s United Bank and lives in Stratford, Conn.

ROBERTA LAMONACA, M.L.S. ’82, was appointed director of library services at Bloomfield Library and has been with the library for 29 years.

POLLY BRODY, M.S. ’83, read a selection of her poetry from “In Praise of Nature” at the Garden Club of Newtown. Brody is currently working on her fourth book.

BRIAN ENRIGHT, ’84, was the grand marshal for the Greater New Haven St. Patrick’s Day 2009 parade. Enright is the president of the Orange, Conn.-based law firm, Gorman, Enright & Butler, P.C.

JOHN WHITFORD, ’84, was named the Army National Guard’s deputy personnel director. Whitford has earned the Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal with two oak leaf clusters, Army Achievement Medal with a silver oak cluster, and two National Defense Service Medals.

KAREN (CONNORS) WOODFORD, ’84, M.S. ’96, M.S. ’97, has taught 15 years in Easton, Conn. She lives with her husband and two children in Monroe, Conn.

JOHN FERRARO, ’85, was named editor of the Hartford Business Journal. In 2006 he guided and edited a series on the U.S. military’s mental health policies, which resulted in him being named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He has won numerous national and regional awards, including the George Polk Award.

ANTONIO (TONY) GONZALEZ, ’85, was honored at the New Britain Sports Hall of Fame Induction Dinner, as reported in The Herald. Gonzalez, a basketball player, scored over 1,000 points at Pulaski High School, over 1,400 at 40 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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Mattatuck Community College, and 1,278 at Southern.

In Print AND On Screen THE LATEST BOOK AND FILM RELEASES FROM SOUTHERN ALUMNI

JOHN EMERY ISTVAN, M.S. ’85, is a clinical social worker associate for the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and initiated a Gay/ Lesbian/ Bisexual/ Transgender/Intersex Committee. Istvan lives in Waterbury, Conn.

ANN WILLIAMS, M.S. ’85, was named the Connecticut Outstanding Art Educator for 2009 by the Connecticut Art Education Association.

Hillhouse High School before going on to Guilford High School.

SHEL SHWAYHAT, M.B.A. ’98, was named manager of finance and quality projects for the Yale-New Haven Hospital. Shwayhat previously worked in the hospital’s Clinical Engineering and Financial Planning Departments, most recently as performance lead for diagnostic radiology and laboratory medicine.

Dorothy Ricci, ’66, has published a novel for young adults about the Spanish painter, Francisco de Goya, “Through Goya’s Eyes.” Ricci retired from the public school system after 36 years.

Tracy Knofla, ’82, M.S. ’87, has published her first book, “Thriving in Chaos.” Knofla is the co-owner of a nationally recognized training and development company, High Impact Training. Tom Lombardi, ’96, published his debut novel, “My Summer On Earth,” Simon & Schuster/Simon Pulse. The young-adult novel covers the exploits of an alien disguised as a teenage human. Lombardi’s work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Fence, and numerous other publications.

PETER AUBIN, M.S. ’99, a special education teacher at Plainfield High School in

Connecticut, was elected to the Danielson Borough Council, joining six incumbents, according to the Norwich Bulletin.

TIFFANY DIPRIMIO, ’99, was honored by Governor M. Jodi Rell who proclaimed May 18, 2009 as Tiffany DiPrimio Day in the state of Connecticut. DiPrimio is losing her sight to the genetic condition, retinitis pigmentosa. Chase Elementary in Waterbury, Conn., hosted a fundraiser in her honor. Over $20,000 has been raised through a variety of events.

’00s RANELLE BREW, ’01, accepted a tenure-track position as assistant professor for the Health Professions Program at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Mich.

DANIEL HARAYDA, ’01, M.S. ’04, has been accepted into Northwestern’s doctoral program in law and policy.

GREGORY KALAFUS, M.B.A. ’02, is a member of the security force at The Masters Tournament golf competi-

CAROL BRACKEN, ’88, is the new director of outreach and education at Carolyn’s Place, a pregnancy care center in Waterbury, Conn.

’90s ROBIN MCCAHILL, ’90, artist and puppeteer, had a holiday puppet show at White Memorial Carriage House in New Milford, Conn. The show featured McCahill’s puppets and troupe in a series of European fairy tales.

PAUL MCLAUGHLIN, ’90, has been promoted to senior vice president at Litchfield Bancorp.

BILL NEMEC, ’90, M.S. ’97, was hired as coordinator for physical and health education in the New Fairfield School District. Nemec formerly was a physical education teacher, teacher/student specialist, and variety coach in Cromwell, Conn.

BARBARA DOUGLAS, ’91, M.A. ’93, has joined Wire Journal International as editor. Douglas is also a certified master gardener, and has taught journalism and poetry to adult education students. Her interests include blacksmithing, kayaking, and riding her Harley-Davidson.

MARK GRUTTADAURIA, ’91, has joined Hudson Valley Bank as vice president and branch manager of the Fairfield branch.

SHARI VALENCIC, ’91, earned her doctorate in educational leadership from Argosy University in Sarasota, Fla. Valencic works for the school board of Sarasota County and lives in Venice, Fla., with her two daughters.

MELISSA (WITT) LAMAR, ’92, is a public relations associate at Tunxis Community College in Farmington, Conn. Lamar is married and the mother of a daughter born on Nov. 19, 2008.

KATHY MAZEROLLE, M.A. ’92, accepted a position as nurse administrator at Evergreen Endoscopy Center in South Windsor, Conn. She and her husband, David Moore, live with their dog and two cats.

KERRI SAUER, ’93, works as an advanced practice registered nurse in a primary care clinic in northeastern Conn. Sauer is married with two children.

MARY LOU ARNSON, ’94, M.S. ’05, an art teacher at Barnard and Generali elementary schools, exhibited her acrylic paintings at the Greenwich Audubon Society.

FRANCIS “NICK” DECAPUA,’95, is a commercial real estate broker specializing in Triple Net investments and undeveloped land throughout the United States.

KATRINA STOECKEL, ’95, has received her master’s in theology from St. Louis

University. Stoeckel is a campus minister at St. Elizabeth Academy and a part-time adjunct professor at Fontbonne University in St. Louis, Mo.

ELIE FERNEINI, ’96, has joined Two Spa Girls, and will perform non-surgical cosmetic procedures including, Botox, Restylane, Rejuvederm, and Radiesse. Ferneini is a member of the American Medical Association, the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, and the American Dental Association.

MEREDITH ANN HEYDE, ’96, is a nurse practitioner for the Pulmonary/Critical Care Department at Greenville Memorial Hospital in South Carolina. Heyde was Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) of the Year in Connecticut in 2007, and is the South Carolina state representative for the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

MATTHEW KELEMEN, ’96, established Foundit.com, an Internet site that helps people find lost belongings, while protecting the identities of all parties involved, as reported in the Stratford Star newspaper.

AMITAI SELA, ’96, is a senior lotus notes/domino groupware architect at Datascope Patient Monitoring, a

Mindray Global Company located in Mahwah, N.J.

HEATHER MILESKI, ’97, oversees Community Connections High School in Lisbon, Conn.

MISSY OROSZ, ’97, M.S. ’99, is the associate director of recreation for the town of Seymour, Conn., where she lives with her husband, Frank Orosz, ’97, and two daughters.

CHERYL SCHWARTZ, M.S.W. ’97, a Newtown, Conn.-based career consultant, co-presented a three-session workshop for the underemployed, the unemployed, and those seeking a change in employment, at the C.H. Booth Library. Schwartz has been a consultant/coach to individuals and organizations for more than 20 years.

JUANITA CASTILLO, ’98, M.S. ’00, is attending Fairfield University with a goal of earning a master’s in nursing.

MATTHEW HASTAVA, ’98, has

tell us about it

SMag44ppFall09FIN:Layout 1

Share your good news with Southern friends and classmates by sending it to Southern Alumni News. Mail this completed form to Southern Alumni News, SCSU Alumni Relations Office, New Haven, CT 06515-1355; fax, (203) 392-5082; or e-mail, alumniinfo@SouthernCT.edu. Name ____________________________________________________ Phone (

) ______________________________________________

Street Address ______________________________________________ City ____________________________State ________Zip __________ SCSU Degree/Year______________Major __________________________ E-mail ____________________________________________________ J Check if this is a new address.

Name under which I attended college ______________________________ News Item__________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________

been promoted to assistant vice president of Newtown Savings Bank. Formerly, Hastava was the branch manager of the Bethel Dolan Plaza office.

Signature __________________________________________________

IAN NEVIASER, ’98, 6th Yr. ’01,

Spouse’s Name ______________________Spouse's SCSU Degree/Yr.______

is the principal of Valley Regional High School. Neviaser was a coaching assistant at Yale University, then coached football and taught social studies at

________________________________________________________

Date ______________________________________________________

Children’s Names/Ages ________________________________________ ________________________________________________________

tion, for the eighth-consecutive year.

KEN SARANICH, 6th Yr. ’02, was named headmaster of Shelton Intermediate School in Connecticut.

JOSE BARROSO, ’03, was inducted into the Connecticut Soccer Hall of Fame. The men’s soccer coach at Sacred Heart University, Barroso was a member of Southern’s Div. II National Championship team in 1990.

JACQUELINE MENEO, ’03, has joined the Westerly Community Credit Union as its business development and lending officer. Meneo lives in Charlestown, R.I.

TIM SALEM, 6th Yr. ’04, was named the 2009 Assistant Principal of the Year by the Connecticut Association of Schools. Salem, was a social studies teacher before becoming assistant principal at Danbury High School.

ELLEN DONNELLY COX, M.S. ’06, an elementary school art teacher in Shelton, Conn., and member of the Stratford Arts Guild, exhibited her art work at the Stratford Library.

CHRISTIAN BAUMBACH, ’07, a seventh-grade teacher at North End Middle School, took 300 students, at his own expense, to see “They Call Me Lizzy,” a one-woman play about a slave who worked to buy her freedom.

CHRISTOPHER LUCCI, ’07, has been hired as one of the Atlanta Braves’ minor league strength and conditioning coaches. He formerly was a strength and conditioning coach at Boston University.

DOMINICK EULA, ’08, is a patrol officer with the Branford Police Department. Eula graduated first in his class from a 22-week police academy program and was one of eight officers recognized for shooting three perfect scores during firearms training.

Corps, Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C., and will continue his training at Camp Geiger in N.C.

KRISTEN KELTZ, ’08, a teacher, painter, and illustrator, presented a program about expressing oneself through poetry, painting, and illustration at the South Norwalk Branch Library in Connecticut.

BRANDON BOBINSKI, ’09, is a financial services representative at the Shelton, Conn.based office of Barnum Financial Group-MetLife.

MAUREEN FARRELL, M.P.H. ’09, a local family physician, is a member of the Brookfield Health Task Force.

Marriages JENNIFER ELYSE BERMAN, ’97, and Edward Ariola, Oct. 12, 2008.

WYATT HALLGREN, ’97, M.S. ’06, and Meredith Mickel, June 28, 2009.

LISA MARIE ALBIS, M.S. ’98, and Thomas Ferree, Aug. 23, 2008.

ANA SOUSA, ’00, and Joseph Kullberg, Oct. 18, 2008.

ROBYN SUE FLASTER, ’01, M.S. ’08, and Michael Spinner, Oct. 19, 2008.

STEVEN WARNER, JR., ’01, and Rebecca Hunt, Oct. 4, 2008.

GINA COLELLA, ’03, and Michael Kelly, Oct. 3, 2008.

ADELEEN JARDELEZA, M.S. ’03, and Luke Moore, Aug. 8, 2009.

MARCEY SPATAFORE, ’04, and JASON RIZZETTA, ’04, Sept. 19, 2008.

JASON STUDENY, ’04, and Kristin Chicatell, April 10, 2009.

MICHELE D’AGOSTINO, ’05, and Christopher Wrenn, June 28, 2008.

KRISTEN ANN SIROIS, ’05, and

Ryan Bessette, Oct. 11, 2008. JEFFREY THOMAS GALVIN FONTI, ’08, graduated private STEPHEN DERASMO, ’06, and first class from the Marine

Gina Croce, Nov. 8, 2008. Fall 2009 | 41

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Fit To Print continued from page 15

SALVATORE GUERRERA, M.B.A. ’06, and Jillian Herbert, Sept. 13, 2008.

GENA MARASCO, ’06, and Nicholas Mann, Jan. 11, 2009.

JEFFREY PUGLIESE, M.S. ’06, and Katie Nester,Aug. 30, 2008.

ELIZABETH DEPOLO, 6th Yr. ’07, and Joseph Ciarieglio, Aug. 1, 2008.

LISA CATAUDELLA, M.S. ’08, and Daniel Bedard, Sept. 20, 2008.

DANA GENDEN, ’08, and Brian Blasczyk, May 28, 2009.

MEGHAN LEWIS, M.S. ’08, and David L’Heureux, Oct. 19, 2008.

IN MEMORIAM DOROTHEA E. GUEVIN, ’33, M.A. ’54, Wallingford, Conn.

SYLVIA ZITSER, ’48, M.S. ’62, 6th Yr. ’73, Boynton Beach, Fla., April 14, 2009.

PHYLLIS MOULDEN, ’52, New Haven, Conn., Feb. 4, 2009.

EDWARD HIPPOLITUS, ’53, M.S. ’69, North Branford, Conn., Feb. 1, 2009.

CLIFFORD LEACH, ’58,

Remembering Two of Southern’s Own  Director Emeritus of Health Services Dorothy R. Granoff, a lifelong health advocate who served the Southern community for more than three decades, died on April 21. Granoff, who earned a Doctor of Medicine from Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania and a Master of Public Health degree from Yale University, joined Southern’s staff in 1951 and was director of health services for 33 years. Upon her retirement from Southern in 1984, the health center was named in her honor. She was predeceased by her husband, Dr. Morris Aaron Granoff, who was a part-time university physician at Southern from 1970-1976. Gifts in her memory may be made to the SCSU Foundation for the Dorothy R. and Morris A. Granoff Scholarship Fund, which was established by the couple’s friends and colleagues. Please make checks payable to the SCSU Foundation and write the name of the scholarship in the memo section of the check. Mail donations to SCSU Foundation, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT, 06515.  William “Sully” Sullivan, ’69, M.S. ’77, who served as an assistant director of athletics for 36 years until his retirement in 2006, died on June 14 in Mount Pleasant, S.C. Known as one of the Owls’ most dedicated fans, Sullivan began his tenure with the athletics department during his undergraduate days when he managed the Owls’ basketball team. During his career, he handled the university’s equipment needs for its 19 varsity athletics programs, and assisted with site and facilities management for the Owls’ athletics events, including conference and state championships. He was inducted into Southern’s Alumni Athletics Hall of Fame in 2003.

Please make checks payable to the SCSU Foundation and write the name of the

MURIEL F. BOULEY, M.S. ’68,

Crescent Street, New Haven, CT, 06515.

Norwalk, Conn., Dec. 27, 2008.

SEBASTIAN INFANTINO, M.S. ’74, Groton, Conn., Feb. 24, 2009.

CHRISTINE KONEFAL, ’74, Cromwell, Conn., May 8, 2009.

JAMES DALTON CATALANOTTO, ’75, Branford, Conn., May 15, 2009.

JOAN MARIE (GARAMELLA) PENNELLA, ’75, Plano, Texas, April 23, 2009.

CHRISTOPHER KELLEHER, ’76, Milford, Conn., Feb. 26, 2009.

WAYNE THOMAS TWERIAN, M.S. ’76, 6th Yr. ’81, Naugatuck, Conn., Jan. 10, 2009.

MICHAEL C.ROGERS, ’77, Meriden, Conn.,April 16, 2009.

SHIRLEY DAMON OLSON, 6th Yr. ’85, Hiram, Ga., Feb. 9, 2009.

WALTER J.DURAND, M.S. ’89, Trumbull, Conn., Feb. 10, 2009.

BARBARA REVAY, M.S. ’89, 6th Yr. ’91, Branford, Conn., March 14, 2009.

JEAN H. NEWELL, ’76, M.S. ’80, HEATHER LEE (QUADRATO) RUEL, ’02, Bristol, Conn., Jan. Damariscotta, Mass., May 16, 2009.

12, 2009.

The Leading Man continued from page 27

flying high-performance aircraft.) Reflecting on his days at Southern, he notes that his strongest memories involve music — listening to The Doors, in particular — and the anti-war protests. He also remembers Professor Emeritus of Communication Barnard P. McCabe.“He was very inspirational,” he says.“He knew I was going into the military and was very supportive. It meant the world to me.” After earning his degree,

Class notes are compiled from submissions from alumni, as well as announcements made in newspapers and magazines. 42 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

ment’s news bureau. “Southern offered me many oppor-

Under her leadership, the news talk shows on that network gained a reputation for bringing timely, thought-provoking discussion to their viewers, but generally without the rancor and sensationalism that often fills the airwaves. Ailes hopes to bring that same knack for interesting, yet civil discourse, to her readers in Putnam County. I

The Leading Man continued from page 42

EVA RIDER KENNEY, ’69, Chester, Conn., Feb. 6, 2009.

their communities.“They really are the heart of American democracy,” she says. Ailes credits Southern for providing her with a launching pad to success. “Robin Glassman (then the chair of the Journalism Department) did a wonderful job in creating the department, which offered me so many opportunities,” says Ailes. [Professor Emeritus Glassman passed away on Aug. 18, as the magazine prepared to go to press.] During her college days,Ailes served as an intern for the news operations at such media organizations as WTNH-TV and WPLR radio, as well as Southern’s Office of Public Affairs, where she wrote press releases for the depart-

tunities, and I took each one that came my way,” she says.“The department was flexible enough to enable students to try various internships.” After graduation, Elizabeth Ailes — then Elizabeth Tilson — worked as a production assistant for the Satellite News Channel in Stamford, Conn., where she also had interned as a student, and for WINS radio. She went on to work for NBC in various capacities, including as a researcher and producer. In 1987, she was hired at CNBC to produce that network’s first show, “World Business,” before eventually being named head of daytime programming. She joined America’s Talking Network in 1993.

Contributions in his memory may be made to the SCSU Foundation for a scholar-

scholarship in the memo section of the check. Mail donations to SCSU Foundation, 501

SANDRA GRZYBOWSKI, ’70,

ing up a daily newspaper, but they are willing to buy their hometown weekly. The key is to be hyper-local, the kind of news you often can’t get anywhere else.” Elizabeth Ailes believes weekly papers serve a vital function, informing the public about news and events important to

ship tentatively called, “Sully’s Crew Athletics Memorial Scholarship.”

Centerbrook, Conn., Dec. 14, 2008. Port St. Lucie, Fla., April 29, 2009.

weekly covering the western half of the county. Elizabeth is serving as that paper’s publisher, as well.And while many newspapers these days are owned by corporations headquartered hundreds of miles away, the Ailes, who live in the Philipstown area, are part of the Putnam County community. So what accounts for the Ailes’ optimism about the future of the newspaper industry, particularly at the local level? After all, both have enjoyed distinguished careers in broadcast journalism at the national level. In addition to leading Fox News, Roger was recently named the second most powerful person in television news by TelevisionWeek and previously was awarded the Media Institute’s Freedom of Speech Award and the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation’s First Amendment Leadership Award. “We’re contrarians to some degree, in that we’re not as pessimistic as some about the future of journalism with regard to local and regional weekly newspapers,” Elizabeth says.“Fewer people may be pick-

Schreitmueller was commissioned as an officer into the United States Marine Corps during the lateVietnam era.He commanded an infantry rifle platoon overseas and later flew missions aboard Marine Forward Air Control aircraft. Following military service, he rapidly climbed the corporate ranks at Texas Instruments,Beech Aircraft Corporation,and American Airline’s Sky Chefs,before forming his consulting company. His experience continues on page 43

working with senior executives, business owners, and professionals spans nearly 25 years, including his past roles as a partner and senior vice president of Reedie & Company LLC and partner of the global executive search firm Ray & Berndtson. Helping others reap the fullest rewards from their careers is Schreitmueller’s primary motivation. Today, he remains optimistic about the future for those executives willing to do the “hard work”— to look inward to find meaningful careers and to take the necessary steps to secure them. Likewise, he sees tremendous potential for organizations that value decency and integrity, as well as their bottom lines. It is this optimism that

drives Schreitmueller and his clients, in spite of the economy, massive layoffs, and public anger over corruption in the business world. “We have the ability to reinvent corporate America and, in contrast to where we were 25 years ago, businesses have to listen,” says Schreitmueller.“At most public companies, the greatest challenge is attracting and retaining talent. They have the C, D, E, and F players, but not the As and Bs,” says Schreitmueller.“The As and Bs are running businesses out of their basements and attics. They’ve made the decision,‘I’m not going to work for a jerk.’” Schreitmueller adds that companies, both large and small, will increasingly

need to make a formal outreach to these ultra-talented employees, the“As”and the “Bs.” “They’ll need to solicit you, show that they value you, and truly invest in your role in the company,” he says. The ball is in their court, and Schreitmueller is more than willing to help corporate leaders figure out how to play the game fairly and well. I John P. Schreitmueller earned a Graduate Certificate in Marketing in 1994 at Southern Methodist University and, in 2000, completed the rigorous Program on Leadership for Senior Executives at Harvard University, The John F. Kennedy School of Government. He is the author of numerous books on leadership and aviation, including the award-winning “Of Dreams and Astronauts.” For more information, see www.resoluteconsultinggroup.com. Fall 2009 | 43

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SALVATORE GUERRERA, M.B.A. ’06, and Jillian Herbert, Sept. 13, 2008.

GENA MARASCO, ’06, and Nicholas Mann, Jan. 11, 2009.

JEFFREY PUGLIESE, M.S. ’06, and Katie Nester,Aug. 30, 2008.

ELIZABETH DEPOLO, 6th Yr. ’07, and Joseph Ciarieglio, Aug. 1, 2008.

LISA CATAUDELLA, M.S. ’08, and Daniel Bedard, Sept. 20, 2008.

DANA GENDEN, ’08, and Brian Blasczyk, May 28, 2009.

MEGHAN LEWIS, M.S. ’08, and David L’Heureux, Oct. 19, 2008.

IN MEMORIAM DOROTHEA E. GUEVIN, ’33, M.A. ’54, Wallingford, Conn.

SYLVIA ZITSER, ’48, M.S. ’62, 6th Yr. ’73, Boynton Beach, Fla., April 14, 2009.

PHYLLIS MOULDEN, ’52, New Haven, Conn., Feb. 4, 2009.

EDWARD HIPPOLITUS, ’53, M.S. ’69, North Branford, Conn., Feb. 1, 2009.

CLIFFORD LEACH, ’58,

Remembering Two of Southern’s Own  Director Emeritus of Health Services Dorothy R. Granoff, a lifelong health advocate who served the Southern community for more than three decades, died on April 21. Granoff, who earned a Doctor of Medicine from Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania and a Master of Public Health degree from Yale University, joined Southern’s staff in 1951 and was director of health services for 33 years. Upon her retirement from Southern in 1984, the health center was named in her honor. She was predeceased by her husband, Dr. Morris Aaron Granoff, who was a part-time university physician at Southern from 1970-1976. Gifts in her memory may be made to the SCSU Foundation for the Dorothy R. and Morris A. Granoff Scholarship Fund, which was established by the couple’s friends and colleagues. Please make checks payable to the SCSU Foundation and write the name of the scholarship in the memo section of the check. Mail donations to SCSU Foundation, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT, 06515.  William “Sully” Sullivan, ’69, M.S. ’77, who served as an assistant director of athletics for 36 years until his retirement in 2006, died on June 14 in Mount Pleasant, S.C. Known as one of the Owls’ most dedicated fans, Sullivan began his tenure with the athletics department during his undergraduate days when he managed the Owls’ basketball team. During his career, he handled the university’s equipment needs for its 19 varsity athletics programs, and assisted with site and facilities management for the Owls’ athletics events, including conference and state championships. He was inducted into Southern’s Alumni Athletics Hall of Fame in 2003.

Please make checks payable to the SCSU Foundation and write the name of the

MURIEL F. BOULEY, M.S. ’68,

Crescent Street, New Haven, CT, 06515.

Norwalk, Conn., Dec. 27, 2008.

SEBASTIAN INFANTINO, M.S. ’74, Groton, Conn., Feb. 24, 2009.

CHRISTINE KONEFAL, ’74, Cromwell, Conn., May 8, 2009.

JAMES DALTON CATALANOTTO, ’75, Branford, Conn., May 15, 2009.

JOAN MARIE (GARAMELLA) PENNELLA, ’75, Plano, Texas, April 23, 2009.

CHRISTOPHER KELLEHER, ’76, Milford, Conn., Feb. 26, 2009.

WAYNE THOMAS TWERIAN, M.S. ’76, 6th Yr. ’81, Naugatuck, Conn., Jan. 10, 2009.

MICHAEL C.ROGERS, ’77, Meriden, Conn.,April 16, 2009.

SHIRLEY DAMON OLSON, 6th Yr. ’85, Hiram, Ga., Feb. 9, 2009.

WALTER J.DURAND, M.S. ’89, Trumbull, Conn., Feb. 10, 2009.

BARBARA REVAY, M.S. ’89, 6th Yr. ’91, Branford, Conn., March 14, 2009.

JEAN H. NEWELL, ’76, M.S. ’80, HEATHER LEE (QUADRATO) RUEL, ’02, Bristol, Conn., Jan. Damariscotta, Mass., May 16, 2009.

12, 2009.

The Leading Man continued from page 27

flying high-performance aircraft.) Reflecting on his days at Southern, he notes that his strongest memories involve music — listening to The Doors, in particular — and the anti-war protests. He also remembers Professor Emeritus of Communication Barnard P. McCabe.“He was very inspirational,” he says.“He knew I was going into the military and was very supportive. It meant the world to me.” After earning his degree,

Class notes are compiled from submissions from alumni, as well as announcements made in newspapers and magazines. 42 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

ment’s news bureau. “Southern offered me many oppor-

Under her leadership, the news talk shows on that network gained a reputation for bringing timely, thought-provoking discussion to their viewers, but generally without the rancor and sensationalism that often fills the airwaves. Ailes hopes to bring that same knack for interesting, yet civil discourse, to her readers in Putnam County. I

The Leading Man continued from page 42

EVA RIDER KENNEY, ’69, Chester, Conn., Feb. 6, 2009.

their communities.“They really are the heart of American democracy,” she says. Ailes credits Southern for providing her with a launching pad to success. “Robin Glassman (then the chair of the Journalism Department) did a wonderful job in creating the department, which offered me so many opportunities,” says Ailes. [Professor Emeritus Glassman passed away on Aug. 18, as the magazine prepared to go to press.] During her college days,Ailes served as an intern for the news operations at such media organizations as WTNH-TV and WPLR radio, as well as Southern’s Office of Public Affairs, where she wrote press releases for the depart-

tunities, and I took each one that came my way,” she says.“The department was flexible enough to enable students to try various internships.” After graduation, Elizabeth Ailes — then Elizabeth Tilson — worked as a production assistant for the Satellite News Channel in Stamford, Conn., where she also had interned as a student, and for WINS radio. She went on to work for NBC in various capacities, including as a researcher and producer. In 1987, she was hired at CNBC to produce that network’s first show, “World Business,” before eventually being named head of daytime programming. She joined America’s Talking Network in 1993.

Contributions in his memory may be made to the SCSU Foundation for a scholar-

scholarship in the memo section of the check. Mail donations to SCSU Foundation, 501

SANDRA GRZYBOWSKI, ’70,

ing up a daily newspaper, but they are willing to buy their hometown weekly. The key is to be hyper-local, the kind of news you often can’t get anywhere else.” Elizabeth Ailes believes weekly papers serve a vital function, informing the public about news and events important to

ship tentatively called, “Sully’s Crew Athletics Memorial Scholarship.”

Centerbrook, Conn., Dec. 14, 2008. Port St. Lucie, Fla., April 29, 2009.

weekly covering the western half of the county. Elizabeth is serving as that paper’s publisher, as well.And while many newspapers these days are owned by corporations headquartered hundreds of miles away, the Ailes, who live in the Philipstown area, are part of the Putnam County community. So what accounts for the Ailes’ optimism about the future of the newspaper industry, particularly at the local level? After all, both have enjoyed distinguished careers in broadcast journalism at the national level. In addition to leading Fox News, Roger was recently named the second most powerful person in television news by TelevisionWeek and previously was awarded the Media Institute’s Freedom of Speech Award and the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation’s First Amendment Leadership Award. “We’re contrarians to some degree, in that we’re not as pessimistic as some about the future of journalism with regard to local and regional weekly newspapers,” Elizabeth says.“Fewer people may be pick-

Schreitmueller was commissioned as an officer into the United States Marine Corps during the lateVietnam era.He commanded an infantry rifle platoon overseas and later flew missions aboard Marine Forward Air Control aircraft. Following military service, he rapidly climbed the corporate ranks at Texas Instruments,Beech Aircraft Corporation,and American Airline’s Sky Chefs,before forming his consulting company. His experience continues on page 43

working with senior executives, business owners, and professionals spans nearly 25 years, including his past roles as a partner and senior vice president of Reedie & Company LLC and partner of the global executive search firm Ray & Berndtson. Helping others reap the fullest rewards from their careers is Schreitmueller’s primary motivation. Today, he remains optimistic about the future for those executives willing to do the “hard work”— to look inward to find meaningful careers and to take the necessary steps to secure them. Likewise, he sees tremendous potential for organizations that value decency and integrity, as well as their bottom lines. It is this optimism that

drives Schreitmueller and his clients, in spite of the economy, massive layoffs, and public anger over corruption in the business world. “We have the ability to reinvent corporate America and, in contrast to where we were 25 years ago, businesses have to listen,” says Schreitmueller.“At most public companies, the greatest challenge is attracting and retaining talent. They have the C, D, E, and F players, but not the As and Bs,” says Schreitmueller.“The As and Bs are running businesses out of their basements and attics. They’ve made the decision,‘I’m not going to work for a jerk.’” Schreitmueller adds that companies, both large and small, will increasingly

need to make a formal outreach to these ultra-talented employees, the“As”and the “Bs.” “They’ll need to solicit you, show that they value you, and truly invest in your role in the company,” he says. The ball is in their court, and Schreitmueller is more than willing to help corporate leaders figure out how to play the game fairly and well. I John P. Schreitmueller earned a Graduate Certificate in Marketing in 1994 at Southern Methodist University and, in 2000, completed the rigorous Program on Leadership for Senior Executives at Harvard University, The John F. Kennedy School of Government. He is the author of numerous books on leadership and aviation, including the award-winning “Of Dreams and Astronauts.” For more information, see www.resoluteconsultinggroup.com. Fall 2009 | 43

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Candy Dulfer

Sept. 26

8 p.m.

The renowned saxophonist celebrates the worldwide release of “Funked Up and Chilled Out.” $25 for active alumni, faculty, and staff; $30 for general admission; $24 for the Jazz Series; and $15 for Southern students. (203) 392-6154

Othello

Oct. 13-16 8 p.m.; Oct. 17-18 2 p.m. William Shakespeare’s tragic masterpiece about love, passion, envy, and betrayal. Presented by the Theatre Department and Crescent Players. Directed by Sheila Hickey Garvey.

An Evening with Comedian Kevin Hart

Nick Colionne, Maysa, Jackiem Joyner

and special guest Dan Boulger

Nov. 14 8 p.m.

Oct. 17 7:30 p.m. A special Homecoming performance by the Comedy Central comedian. $10 for active alumni, faculty, and staff; $15 for general admission; $5 for Southern students. (203) 392-6154

Pieces of a Dream and Phil Perry The celebrated jazz combo performs with a special guest vocalist. $25 for active alumni, faculty, and staff; $24 for the Jazz Series; $30 for general admission; and $15 for Southern students. (203) 392-6154

Jigu: Thunder Drums of China

Nov. 22 3 p.m. An interactive science comedy show that will entertain and educate. $8 for general admission. (203) 392-6154

The Nobodies of Comedy

Oct. 16 12 p.m.

Dec. 2 7:30 p.m.

Michael J. Adanti Student Center (Grand Ballroom)

Homecoming 2009

Oct. 17 On Campus (Throughout the day) An action-packed celebration with a fairytale theme. Enjoy the road race, parade, alumni tent party, children’s activities, Homecoming football game, and the student performance of “Othello.” The Alumni Tent, featuring food and beverages, opens at 12 p.m., $10 per person. Please call for information and tickets. (203) 392-6500

$25 for active alumni, faculty, and staff; $30 for general admission; $24 for the Jazz Series; and $15 for Southern students. (203) 392-6154

Oct. 23 8 p.m.

Distinguished and Outstanding Alumni Awards

Please call for ticket information. (203) 392-6500

Guitar, vocals, sax! Three amazing solo artists join forces for a special musical evening.

Doktor Kaboom!

$10 for general admission; $5 for senior citizens and Southern students, faculty, and staff. (203) 392-6154

A salute to seven exceptionally accomplished Southern graduates, including Elizabeth Missan Yost, ’85, Vice President of Development for the Hallmark Channel.

EVENTS

Southern

Catch some of comedy’s funniest rising stars. $10 for general admission; free for Southern students, faculty, and staff. (203) 392-6154

Nov. 10 7 p.m. Hailing from China’s Shanxi Province, this acclaimed company of drummers, percussionists, and musicians has been electrifying audiences throughout the world for nearly two decades. $10 for active alumni, faculty, and staff; $15 for general admission; free for children/students when accompanied by an adult; free for Southern students (limit 2). (203) 392-6154

Student-Directed One Acts

Dec. 2-5 8 p.m.; Dec. 5-6 2 p.m. Kendall Drama Lab Theater at its finest, performed and directed by Southern students. $10 for general admission; $5 for senior citizens and Southern students, faculty, and staff. (203) 392-6154

• Special Series Prices •

at Lyman Center

Get one ticket to four great shows for only $96, a $24 savings on general admission. Includes Candy Dulfer (Sept. 26); Pieces of a Dream and Phil Perry (Oct. 23); Nick Colionne, Maysa, Jackiem Joyner (Nov. 14); and Spyro Gyra with special guest Jane Monheit (Dec. 11).

All events held in John Lyman Center for the Performing Arts,unless otherwise noted.Southern students must have valid identification to receive their ticket discounts. Discounted tickets are limited to two per person,subject to verification.For tickets and additional information and listings,visit Southern’s Web site at www.lyman.SouthernCT.edu 44 | Southern ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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Annual GIVING Make your gift today by returning the envelope provided or visit us online at www.giving.SouthernCT.edu

72% of Southern students receive some form of financial aid. Almost 80% of Southern seniors work. Approximately 23% of these students work 30 or more hours each week.

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elying on talent, determination, and hard work, Catherine Shortell, ’09 [RIGHT], and her younger sister, Meghan, a senior English major with a minor in theater, have earned top academic honors — while juggling demanding schedules that include work, volunteering in the community, and serving as the primary caregivers for their mother, Barbara. When Catherine was in second grade and Meghan was in first, the girls lost their father, John Shortell, to complications associated with chemotherapy to treat cancer. The following year, their mother became progressively ill from a neurological disease that previously had affected only her leg. Symptoms of the disease, which closely resembles multiple sclerosis, became increasingly severe — and in a role reversal, the girls became their mother’s caregivers.



Despite their unique challenges, the sisters have thrived academically. Both participants in the Honors College, they each were awarded prestigious, merit-based Presidential Scholarships, which cover in-state tuition and fees for extremely academically gifted students.

This spring, Catherine, a history/secondary  education major, was one of only four Southern students to receive the 2009 Henry Barnard Foundation Distinguished Student Award — among the university’s top academic honors. As a student, she served on the executive board of Zeta Delta Epsilon and as a member of the Newman Society, both of which participate in community service activities. Today, she continues to work as a tutor and volunteer SAT prep coach.



Meghan has an equally busy schedule. During the summer, she worked as a choreographer and dance instructor at Judyth Parks Academy of Dance and Music and completed an internship with the Wallingford Community Theatre. She began her senior year with an impressive 3.74 cumulative grade point average.


Southern Alumni Magazine Fall 2009