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2013 REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT

AYear in Review

“The kind of workforce we must develop now is by necessity knowledge-based, supporting an economy shaped by the world’s second technological revolution.

Such a workforce must be creative, innovative, entrepreneurial, able to learn and to imagine. And the education we offer must foster those qualities in our students.” President Mary A. Papazian • State of the University Address • September 18, 2013

Dear Friends,

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igher education has recently faced intense scrutiny on the issue of costs versus benefits. Does the degree a student earns really give

a return on investment when it comes to finding a first job and establishing a career? Universities and colleges are grappling with this issue nationwide, even as rising tuition costs and mounting debt levels limit access to higher education for many students. Certainly, there has never been a more crucial time for public higher education to stand up and deliver on its promises. By the year 2020, 67 percent of all jobs in Connecticut will require a career certificate or college degree — yet just 46 percent of adults currently have an associate’s degree or higher.

At Southern, we realize that it is crucial to provide our students with a balance of workforce development and liberal education. This ensures that they will have the practical and intellectual tool kit that they will need to forge a successful career in the new, knowledge-based economy. As you will read in this report, we continue to develop our facilities and enhance our academic offerings to educate and supply more qualified graduates for in-demand fields in areas such as health, business and the sciences, while ensuring that they have the skills and knowledge they will need to continue learning and growing throughout their lifetimes. With 85 percent of our annual graduating class remaining to live and work in Connecticut, an investment in public higher education is clearly an investment in our state’s future. Sincerely,

Mary A. Papazian, Ph.D. President

Southern at a Glance ACADEMICS 69 undergraduate,

47 graduate degree programs

ACCREDITATION In 2012, the New England

Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) voted to continue Southern’s accreditation. The university’s next site visit and comprehensive evaluation by NEASC is scheduled for 2021. ALUMNI 87,500 ATHLETICS The Owls have captured

10 national NCAA Division II team titles and 78 such individual championships. CAMPUS Nearly 172 acres DIVERSITY Minority students comprise

about 29 percent of Southern’s enrollment. The university has more than 650 students with disabilities. ENDOWMENT $11.9 million ENROLLMENT 10,804 students FACULTY 421 full-time; 83 percent

with doctoral and other terminal degrees GRADUATE STUDENTS 2,547 OPERATING BUDGET $200 million RESIDENCE LIFE A total of 2,589 full-time

undergraduates live on campus in nine residence halls. That equals about 37 percent of the full-time undergraduate population. A small number of graduate students also live in campus housing. UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 8,257

In the Name of Science

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he future Academic and Laboratory Science Building at Southern will be a significant step forward for the landscape of the campus and an impressive leap for scientific study in Connecticut.

The four-story, 103,608-square-foot building — slated for completion in spring 2015 — will be the “focal point” for the university’s science programs. “Southern’s new science building will offer our students and faculty a broader array of tools and the essential work spaces to support important teaching, learning and research,” said Steven Breese, dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, at a Sept. 20 groundbreaking ceremony. “It is a critical addition that will strengthen our university and help us to build a stronger workforce for Connecticut.” The building will host teaching and research labs for physics, earth science, environmental science, molecular biology and chemistry. It will include a super-computing lab for research in theoretical physics, bioinformatics and computer science. The $49 million building will also house the Connecticut State University Center for Nanotechnology and the newly designated Werth Center for Coastal and Marine Studies — supported by a record $3 million private gift to the university.

Book It!

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outhern is on course to be, in less than two years, home to to a state-of-the-art library that will offer students the latest in media technology in a modern and attractive facility.

The $31 million project to renovate the 98,000-square-foot original wing of Buley Library, coupled with a 135,000-squarefoot addition completed in 2008, will enable the university to boast a library almost three times larger than its predecessor. The project also includes a 12,000-square-foot atrium and skywalk connecting the two sections of the building on the first and third floors. “It is going to be a beautiful building that will be the academic hub of the campus,” said Christina Baum, director of library services. “I really think it will be a more inviting and approachable facility for our students.” The project includes the creation of an art gallery, as well as space for media collections, special collections, a cyber cafe and an “information commons” for students on the ground floor. Upper floors will feature centers for tutorial support and faculty development, as well as space for the Library Science Department and the Office of Information Technology.

2013 R EPORT OF T HE PR ES IDENT SOUTH ERN CONNECT ICUT STAT E UNIVERS ITY

CL OCKWIS E FROM TOP: S T EVEN BR EESE, TR ACY TYREE, JAY E BAIL EY, R OBERT S TAMP, PAMEL A LAS SITER.

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New Senior Leadership

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uring her first year as President of Southern, Mary Papazian appointed several senior administrators with a breadth of experience in higher education to her leadership team.

Vice President for Student Affairs Tracy Tyree came to Southern from the University of South Florida (USF), where she established a track record of innovation in student programming and support services.While associate vice president of student affairs at USF, Tyree established an office supporting the transition of first-year and transfer students, and a center for leadership and civic engagement. Robert Stamp was appointed vice president for institutional advancement, drawing on more than 20 years of experience as an innovative development professional with expertise in launching new advancement programs. For the previous five years he held a similar title at Florida State College in Jacksonville, where he established the Office of College Advancement. Steven Breese, Southern’s new dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, has served for more than 30 years as a teacher, scholar, artist, administrator and leader in higher education. He was formerly founding dean of the College of Arts and Humanities at Christopher Newport University in Newport News, Va., where he was instrumental in the opening of a new $60 million academic building for the humanities and founded the Department of Theater and Dance. Director of Diversity and Equity Pamela Lassiter formerly led efforts to enhance diversity in recruitment, retention, affirmative action planning and related matters at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh. She led a campus diversity initiative — Inclusive Excellence — and wrote the university’s first Equity and Inclusivity Key Operational Plan. In a pivotal internal move, Jaye Bailey, former associate vice president for human resources, was named chief of staff / vice president for organizational development. Bailey, with a background in labor relations, now works to coordinate and advance key initiatives for the university.

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MEMBERS OF T HE W ERT H FA MILY GATH ER T O CEL EBR ATE T HE GROUNDBREAKING OF T H E NEW A CA DEMIC AND L ABORAT ORY S CIENCE BUIL DING AT S CS U, W H ICH WIL L H OUS E THE W ERTH CENTER FOR COA STAL A ND MAR INE STUDIES . FR OM L EFT T O RIGHT: S TANDING — S UZANNE W ERTH , DEBBIE BA CH ARD, P ETER WERT H JR ., PAM W ERT H AND JACKIE MOORE. S IT T ING — PET ER W ERTH IV, A ND CA R OLYN W ERT H.

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A Transformative Gift

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he largest donation in Southern’s 120-year history — a gift of $3 million from the Woodbridge, Conn.-based Werth Family Foundation — will greatly enhance scientific research opportunities for students and faculty.

The contribution. to be paid over 10 years, will include a $1.5 million endowment for SCSU’s Center for Coastal and Marine Studies — a center that is being renamed in the family’s honor. An additional $750,00 will be donated to the center for equipment and stipends to students, supporting their research efforts. “Above all, we are trying to make a difference,” said Peter Werth, who established the family foundation with his wife, Pam, in 2000. “We’ve had the opportunity to look at the research done at the center and its importance to the community. We’re believers.” The remaining funds are earmarked for two initiatives that combine science education and real-world/business experience — through seminars, internships, and research opportunities for Southern students and area science teachers. “In recent years, Southern has seen impressive programmatic and enrollment growth in the sciences, and this wonderful gift will take scientific research and experiential opportunities for our students to a whole new level,” said President Mary Papazian.

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BIOL OG Y PR OFES S OR S AR AH CRAW FORD ( L EFT ) AND S TUDENT PAULINA MROWIEC CONT INUE T O TEST TH E EFFICACY OF A N ANT I-CA NCER EXT RA CT TH AT H AS SHOW N P ROMIS E IN PR E-CLINICAL T ESTING .

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A Patented Approach to Fighting Cancer

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hristmas ferns are abundant in the eastern half of the United States, yet the properties inside this ostensibly unremarkable fern may be a catalyst toward combatting an aggressive form of brain cancer.

An extract made from the Christmas fern has demonstrated anti-cancer properties in pre-clinical testing conducted by Biology Professor Sarah Crawford and her students. In fact, the results spurred the U.S. Patent Office to award Crawford, as well as Erin Boisvert, one of her former students, a patent for the extract. The extract was tested as part of a three-component cocktail — carmustine, a powerful chemotherapy drug used to treat brain cancer; curcumin, the active ingredient in the spice turmeric that has anti-inflammatory qualities; and polystichum acrostichoides, the technical name for the Christmas fern. The tests showed that the cocktail was effective in killing nearly half of the cancer cells in tiny tumors created in the Biology Department lab — far more effective than using any of the three substances alone. The tests were conducted on glioblastoma multiforme, considered to be the most deadly form of brain cancer with a fatality rate of more than 90 percent within five years.

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BRENDAN WAL SH IS T HE S ECOND SOUTH ERN S T UDENT IN THE H IS TORY OF TH E UNIVERSITY T O EAR N A FULBR IG HT U.S . STUDENT AWARD.

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An International Perspective

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rendan Walsh, an alumnus of the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program, has taken his literary skills to the Southeast Asian nation of Laos after being named a 2013-14 Fulbright U.S. Student Award recipient.

Walsh, who graduated from the M.F.A. program last May, is teaching at Ventiane University in Laos. He has received numerous accolades for his writing, including the Anna Sonder Poetry Prize of the Academy of American Poets and the Leslie Leeds Poetry Prize for the Connecticut State University System. Walsh, who had previously taught English as a Second Language (ESL) in South Korea, said he was particularly interested in teaching in Laos because it is “sort of the last bastion of Asia, unexplained by Westerners,” and he hoped to “create a cross-cultural dialogue between two cultures which have been at odds in recent history.” He said he would use journaling and poetry writing with his Laotian students as ways to improve their communication skills. In addition to teaching, he planned to continue his study of Theravada Buddhism, work on a new collection of poetry inspired by his experiences there and volunteer at a local orphanage.

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S OUT H ER N’ S NEW 1,200-S PACE W INT ER GR EEN PAR KING G ARAG E FEAT URES LED LIG HT ING AND R ECH A RG ING S TAT IONS FOR ELECT RIC CA RS.

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2013 REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY

Kudos for Conservation

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outhern continues to receive recognition for its innovative efforts to conserve energy.

The new School of Business received LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold certification, only the second building in the state to receive this recognition. The 22,000-square-foot structure was revamped at a cost of $7 million to address the programmatic needs of the business school while incorporating sustainable practices and materials, and utilizing alternative-energy solutions. Buildings in the LEED-rating system earn points toward levels of certification depending on how many “green” features are included in the building’s design and construction. Southern continues to pursue these practices in other construction: the new 1,200space Wintergreen Parking Garage, for example, features energy-efficient LED lighting and recharging stations for electricity-powered vehicles. During the fall semester, the university received the Power of Change Top Building Award — a statewide recognition — for its team-based effort to reduce electricity use in nine residence halls. This also earned Southern First Honors in the Innovation Award category at the College Conservation Nationals, the largest nationwide collegiate electricity-and water-reduction competition.

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CL OCKWISE FR OM TOP: U.S.SUP REME COURT JUST ICE S ONIA S OT OMAYOR , OLYMPIC SILVER MEDA LIST ANN MEY ERS DRY SDA LE, JERRY G REENFIEL D OF BEN & JER RY’ S ICE CR EAM, AND ACTOR AL AN AL DA .

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Compelling Speakers: From Ice Cream to the Supreme Court

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peakers appealing to audiences from all generations appeared on campus during the last calendar year.

In April, “Prairie Home Companion” host Garrison Keillor told stories and sang songs to a delighted audience at Lyman Center. In May, Alan Alda, former star of the 1970s and 1980s television series “M*A*S*H” and ex-host of the show “Scientific American Frontiers,” delivered this year’s Mary and Louis Fusco Distinguished Lecture. Jerry Greenfield, co-founder of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, was the featured speaker at undergraduate commencement in May, and handed each graduate a cup of ice cream after they received their diplomas. An October conference — Equality in Action: The Enduring Legacy of Title IX — brought numerous distinguished speakers to campus, including Ann Meyers Drysdale, vice president of the Phoenix Suns and Mercury and an Olympic silver medalist. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor spoke on campus in October and met with freshmen, who were required over the summer to read her memoir, “My Beloved World,” as part of the Common Read program. In November, Mitch Albom, author of bestsellers “Tuesdays with Morrie” and “The Five People You Meet in Heaven,” was at Lyman Center to speak about his latest book, “The First Phone Call from Heaven.” A forum on the Millennial Generation — those born roughly between 1982 and 1995 — brought Kim Lear, an expert on generational differences and trends, to campus and included a focus group discussion moderated by Channel 30’s Amanda Raus.

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S T UDENT S SURVEY T HE W EST HAVEN SH OREL INE A S PA RT OF A P R OJECT HELPING A R EA COMMUNITIES REBUILD H URR ICA NE-DAMA GED BEACH A REA S.

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In the Wake of Sandy’s Wrath

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an effort to help area communities prepare for future storms, Southern faculty members and their students have been analyzing the damage that Hurricane Sandy wreaked on the coastlines of East Haven and West Haven in October 2012.

James Tait, associate professor of science education and environmental studies, led a team examining the massive beach erosion that occurred when Sandy hit the East Coast. Students mapped the flood zones to show the worst affected areas and analyzed where the sand had been dispersed. Tait said that in areas with a wide beach, the damage was minimal, but in narrow beach areas, the effects were much more profound. Mark Paine Jr., assistant to the commissioner of public works in West Haven, said the city could not have done the extensive research that was conducted by Southern. “It’s a perfect example of the type of collaboration our state and municipal entities would benefit by engaging in,” he said. “And as an SCSU graduate, I’m pleased to be a small part of an enriching and tremendously valuable field experience for the students.”

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T W O NEW INIT IATIVES ARE BEING L AUNCH ED BY T H E CH EMIS T RY DEPART MENT WIT H T H E AIM OF IMPR OVING S TUDENTS’ MA RKETABIL ITY IN TH E W OR KFOR CE.

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Chemistry Connects with Students, State Workforce

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he Chemistry Department has developed some new formulas designed to enhance students’ marketability upon graduation and meet Connecticut’s changing workforce needs.

Commonly referred to as the “Four Plus One” program, the new accelerated B.S./M.S. degree program will allow students to earn both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in five years instead of the typical six. Students may apply for acceptance into the program after their junior year as an undergraduate. If accepted, they will be required to conduct two years of research, eventually leading to their master’s degree thesis. They also take two graduate-level courses in their senior year. A total of 18 credits are completed in their final year in the program. Gerald Lesley, chairman of the Chemistry Department, said the accelerated program offers full-time students the opportunity to pursue an advanced degree in chemistry that focuses on faculty-mentored research, scientific writing and hands-on training with major scientific instruments. “The advantages to students include the condensed time involved to obtain both the B.S. and M.S. degrees; the advanced training that is critical to success in industrial positions; doctoral programs of study and the ability to address advanced educational requirements for education specialists,” he said. Among the benefits are the development of analytical and critical thinking skills needed when interpreting data, and improving communication skills for the dissemination of chemical information to colleagues and the public. The program is intended primarily for students seeking a career in the sciences in business, government or non-profit organizations.

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2013 REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT SOUTH ERN CONNECT ICUT STATE UNIVERS IT Y

AMA NDA TH OMAS WA S HONOR ED A S TH E DIVISION II NATIONA L SW IMMER OF TH E Y EA R FOR THE SECOND TIME.

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Queen of the Pool

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manda Thomas completed a storied four-year swimming career to become one of the most decorated student-athletes in Southern history. Among her accomplishments were 18 All-America titles and four individual NCAA crowns. In addition, she was selected for the second consecutive year as the Division II National Swimmer of the Year. Tim Quill, coach of the men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams, credited Thomas’ “phenomenal career” to a mix of talent and determination. “Many student-athletes have a tendency not to want to make the sacrifice that is needed to take it to the next level,” Quill said. “But Amanda certainly made that sacrifice with hard work, dedication and commitment.” In addition to her title in the 200-yard individual medley at the 2013 nationals, Thomas finished as the runner-up in the 200-yard butterfly, third in the 400-yard individual medley and sixth in the 200-yard backstroke. Thomas was also selected by coaches as Division II National Swimmer of the Year in 2012 after placing among the top three finishers in four events, including a pair of individual victories.

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P UBLIC H EALTH P ROFES S OR W ILL IA M FAR A CL AS , ( CENTER) W ITH SOUT HER N S T UDENTS IN G UATEMA LA.

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Study Abroad a “Transformative Experience”

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ooking at photos of the Eiffel Tower is one thing; actually standing beneath it and gazing up at its immensity, with the musical sound of the French language filling your ears, is quite another. With this in mind, the Office of International Education (OIE) has enhanced its services and expanded its programming to provide a wider range of study abroad opportunities for Southern students. “International study challenges you to rethink and question beliefs you have had all your life,” said director Erin Heidkamp. “It changes everyone in a different way.” During the past year, the office sent more students abroad and welcomed more exchange students and J-1 visiting scholars than ever before, and the trend is continuing into 2014, with long-term study abroad applications submitted for spring, fall and summer programs abroad exceeding last year’s 25 percent gain. Southern’s faculty-led spring break and summer program offerings have seen a 40 percent increase, with Jamaica, Brazil, Armenia and a re-envisioned China program joining the seven existing programs (Bermuda, Guatemala, Iceland, Paris, Rome, Spain and Tuscany). There is also a 40 percent increase in reciprocal exchange partner universities.

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Homecoming 2013

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Southern Choir Performs in Barcelona

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Commencement 2013

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R ESEA RCH OPP ORTUNITIES AWAIT ST UDENTS IN TH E NEWLY DES IG NAT ED C O N N SCU CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY AT SOUT HERN.

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Opening Doors to Cutting-Edge Science

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onnecticut college students interested in pursuing the applied sciences will have more opportunities to engage in cutting-edge research thanks to the new ConnSCU Center for Nanotechnology that will be based at Southern.

Students and faculty members from the 16 other institutions in the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities system are now able to pursue collaborative research at the center and partner with representatives from business and industry. Hands-on training is offered in a field that draws upon several scientific disciplines — including chemistry, biology, physics and engineering. Students use specialized equipment, including a state-of-the-art microscope that uses electrons to image materials on the atomic scale. “It’s a very exciting time for us, especially as we await the opening of a new science building, which will enable us to do more innovative work with a state-of-the-art facility and equipment,” said Christine Broadbridge, chairwoman of the Physics Department and the director of the Center. The center, to be based in Southern’s new science building opening in 2015, will also further research in the nano-medicine field and the environmental applications of nanotechnology. A fellowship program is being developed to provide students with annual research stipends.

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CL OCKWISE FROM T OP: MIA BR OWNEL L’ S PAINT ING , ‘STILL LIVE WITH DENDRITE DREA MS,’ IS ON DIS PLAY IN UCONN’S CELL A ND G ENOME SCIENCES BUIL DING; P ROFESSOR MIA BR OW NEL L; (FROM LEFT) JEFFREY SL OMBA , AS SOCIATE PR OFES S OR OF ART, AND PATRICK HEIDKA MP, AS SOCIATE PR OFES S OR OF G EOG RA PH Y, DISP LAY ONE OF TH EIR 3D MAP S OF CONNECTICUT.

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The Arts: Global and Local

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outhern faculty in the visual and performing arts reached out into the local community and around the world, exemplifying the power of art to inform, support and transform.

Mia Brownell, art professor, received a CSU Research Grant to study over the summer in Berlin, where she prepared for several 2014 exhibitions of her work. Meanwhile, the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., and the Housatonic Museum of Art held summer exhibitions of her paintings. Jeffrey Slomba, associate professor of art, and Patrick Heidkamp, associate professor of geography, joined sculpture and 2010 census data in an innovative project called “Sculpting the Census: Integrating Geographic Information Science, Sculpture and Social Engagement.” The project was funded by a grant from the Arts Council of Greater New Haven, as part of a program called “REINTEGRATE: Enhancing Collaborations in the Arts and Sciences.” Music Professor Mark Kuss was involved in a series of 15 international concerts to commemorate the Year for the Children of Syria, a “global humanitarian concert” that brought together many of the world’s finest orchestral musicians. Proceeds of the yearlong initiative benefitted UNICEF’s humanitarian programs for the Syrian emergency. In April, Sheila Hickey Garvey, theatre professor, served as theater director for the Greater Middletown Chorale’s production of “Letter from Italy, 1944,” a dramatic oratorio comprised of 24 choral and solo pieces, performed by the 80 members of the chorale. The oratorio told the true story of one man’s experiences during wartime.

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SOUT HER N’ S SH OWING AT A COMPET IT IVE EXHIBITION G AME A GAINS T EVENTUA L NAT IONAL CHAMPION UCONN WA S A HAR BINGER OF G OOD T H ING S TO COME FOR THE OW LS.

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Driving to New Heights

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oming off a 2012-13 season in which it won 17 games — the highest singleseason win total in more than a decade — and just missing an at-large bid into the NCAA Division II Tournament, the men’s basketball team was ready for the challenges that awaited this past season.

In an effort to ready itself for tough regular-season competition, Owls’ coach Michael Donnelly scheduled exhibition games against two Division I programs — the University of Connecticut and the University of Rhode Island — and the Owls played competitively in both. “We’ve talked about last year’s success,” Donnelly said. “We have seven guys returning and a 6-foot-10 kid who redshirted last season. We certainly think we can move forward.” That they did. Just prior to the publication of this report, the Owls had completed the finest season ever by a Southern men’s basketball team. On the back of a 19-game unbeaten streak, Southern surged to the Northeast-10 (NE-10) Conference title and into the NCAA championships, where they reached the Elite 8. The team was led by senior and team scoring leader Greg Langston — NE-10 Player of the Year — and junior guard and assists leader Tylon Smith, who excelled in the post-season. Donnelly, who earned accolades as NE-10 and All-East Regional Coach of the Year, led the Owls to a program-record 30 victories in 2013-14, totaling a 73-41 record in four seasons on the Southern sidelines.

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S T UDENTS R ECEIVED A WA RM WELCOME AS T H EY EXITED TH E NEW W INTER G R EEN PA RKING G ARA G E.

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Making Students Feel at Home

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the fall, the Division of Student Affairs launched Welcome Week, a new university-wide initiative, to kick off the academic year in a way that embraced all students.

An expansion of the traditional Welcome Weekend, which served primarily new students, Welcome Week ran for several days and encompassed a variety of programs aimed at both new and returning students. The goal of this initiative was to help students reconnect and reengage with the university after being away for the summer. A number of successful Welcome Week events included open houses and receptions, ice cream socials, the new student convocation, and a pep rally and tailgate to celebrate the first Owls football game of the season. Commuter students were also a focus, with welcome centers set up at entrances to parking garages staffed by helpful volunteers ready to answer questions and offer free breakfast treats. To continue efforts to engage students with the university, the division worked to plan more weekend activities on campus. A new outdoor basketball court was also opened near the West Campus residential hall complex last fall and plans are now being developed to construct a campus recreation center.

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CL OCKW ISE FROM T OP LEFT: NICOL E CA SS IDY, CODY MCCL AVE, A NGELA R EAD, A ND ANNA WALTERS.

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Prowess in Classroom and Community

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wo were academically perfect, while all four of Southern’s 2013 recipients of the Henry Barnard Distinguished Student Award planned to enter the “helping professions” after an impressive collegiate career.

Nicole Cassidy, majoring in elementary/special education and Spanish, was a four-year recipient of the Presidential Merit Scholarship and served as a representative-at-large of the Student Government Association and member of Colleges Against Cancer for four years. She planned to pursue a career in either elementary or special education. Cody McClave, majoring in mathematics, was a member of Colleges Against Cancer and the Future Teachers Organization for the last three years – including a stint as treasurer of both organizations. A member of the National Society of Leadership and Success, he planned to pursue a master’s degree in special education and teach math in high school. Angela Read, majoring in nursing, was a member of the Student Nurses Association and the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing. She created an annual family fundraiser in honor of her late mother to raise money for organizations supporting people with cancer and planned to become an oncology nurse. Anna Walters, majoring in social work, was a member of the League of Extraordinary Veterans Club, which assists with fundraising for the Wounded Warrior Project. She served as a sergeant in the U.S. Army from 1998 to 2005, earning several awards, and planned to pursue a master’s degree in social work with a view toward working with veterans and their families. Twelve students are chosen for the Barnard awards annually from the four Connecticut State University campuses, including a quartet from Southern. Criteria include a 3.7 grade point average and having demonstrated significant participation in university and/or community life.

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P RES IDENT MA RY A. PA PA ZIAN SPEA KS AT A MEMOR IAL G ATH ER ING IN T HE AFTERMAT H OF T H E NEWT OW N S HOOTING S.

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Remembering the Heroes of Sandy Hook Elementary

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ast May’s graduate commencement held a special poignance. Four educators — and Southern alumnae — who died in the December 14, 2012, shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, were recognized at the 7 p.m. ceremony for students of the School of Education.

Principal Dawn Lafferty Hochsprung, M.S. ’97, 6th Yr. ’98; teacher Anne Marie Murphy, M.S. ’08; school counselor Mary J. Sherlach, M.S. ’90, 6th Yr. ’92; and teacher and current master’s degree student Victoria Soto, were all honored with the SCSU Alumni Association’s Distinguished Alumni Award. Soto’s family accepted a posthumous master’s degree in education on her behalf. “The care and compassion shown by these educators demonstrates their strength of character, their total dedication to their students, and also their high moral fiber,” said President Mary A. Papazian. “Indeed Dawn, Mary, Anne Marie, and Victoria showed themselves to be true heroes, for their last actions were attempts to protect the children in their care without concern for their personal well-being. And so we honor their memory; we mourn their loss; and we continue to hold all who were impacted by these terrible events in our hearts and prayers.”

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2013 R EPORT OF T HE PR ES IDENT SOUTH ERN CONNECT ICUT STATE UNIVERSIT Y

IN ST EP WITH T HE UNIVERSITY ’S COMMIT MENT T O COMMUNITY OUTR EA CH , NUMEROUS P ROG RA MS P LA CE S OUTH ER N S TUDENT S IN NEIG HBORING CL A SS R OOMS.

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2013 REP ORT OF T HE P R ES IDENT S OUT H ERN CONNECT ICUT S TAT E UNIVERS IT Y

A Resource for Teachers Statewide

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ven the most experienced teachers can find it challenging to communicate effectively with students whose native language is not English.

As part of an effort to help Connecticut teachers and their students who are still learning English, the university has compiled instructional units (grades K-12) created by Southern students pursuing their master’s degree in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages). Available at SouthernCT.edu/groups/tat, the units provide teachers with lesson plans, an outline of teaching strategies and objectives and student handouts such as worksheets, pictures and easy-to-read summaries of the lessons. Marisa Ferraro, manager of the university’s Training for All Teachers program (which has been coordinating the project), said more than 175 such units have been created since 2002 and are available to any K-12 teacher in the state. “I believe the increased accessibility will make a significant difference in how often these units are used in the schools,” Ferraro said. “The number of students who are classified as English Language Learners has been growing rapidly in Connecticut, and this new resource will improve their quality of education.”

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2013 R EPORT OF THE P RES IDENT SOUTH ERN CONNECT ICUT STATE UNIVER S ITY

P H IL OSOPHY PR OFESS OR T ERREL L BY NUM (LEFT), AND CH INESE S CHOLA R JIN TONG ARE W ORKING T OG ETH ER ON A BOOK ABOUT ‘FLOURISH ING ETHICS.’

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2013 REP ORT OF T HE P R ES IDENT S OUT H ERN CONNECT ICUT STAT E UNIVERS IT Y

A Quarter Century of Computer Ethics Study

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he technology landscape has changed dramatically over the past quarter century, raising many new issues in the field of computer ethics, including intellectual property, privacy, computer security, access to computing resources and downloading music and film off the Internet.

During this time, the Research Center on Computing & Society, based at Southern and headed up by Philosophy Professor Terrell Bynum, has established itself as an international leader in analyzing and promoting the ethical use of computer technology. Bynum, who began the center at Southern in 1987, is one of the world’s foremost computer ethicists. The one-of-a-kind center has also advanced computer ethics as an academic discipline through teaching, networking, research, publications and a website, which offers articles and papers, multimedia materials and links to other computer ethics resources. “The center’s ongoing commitment to exploring the complex issues raised by new technology is a valuable societal contribution,” said SCSU President Mary Papazian. “It has given Southern international recognition in this groundbreaking field.” The center’s anniversary was marked by conferences on computer security and the social and ethical implications of massive open online courses (MOOCs) and other forms of online education.

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2013 R EPORT OF T HE P RES IDENT SOUTH ERN CONNECT ICUT STAT E UNIVERS IT Y

T RA CK AND FIELD S TA R A .J. G UERRA EXCEL LED ON T HE FIELD A ND IN T H E CLA SS R OOM.

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2013 REP ORT OF T HE P R ES IDENT S OUT H ERN CONNECT ICUT S TAT E UNIVERS IT Y

Hammering out a Stellar Season

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ammer thrower and physics major A.J. Guerra elevated his performances to new heights in the classroom and in the Northeast-10 (NE-10) athletic arena.

Guerra was selected as the recipient of the 2013 NE-10 Conference Men’s Indoor Track and Field Scholar-Athlete Sport Excellence Award. He also was named to the NE-10 Men's Indoor Track and Field All-Academic Team for the second straight year after a stellar indoor season that was capped by All-America honors in the weight throw at the NCAA Division II Championships During the outdoor campaign, Guerra collected All-America honors in the hammer throw at the NCAA Championships. In addition, he was the NE-10 champion in that event and set a new conference championship record in the process. “A.J. did a phenomenal job this year,” said Owls coach John Wallin. “Academically, ‘he’s always been very good, but being an athletic All-American is something he’s been working toward for a long time. He works so hard, both academically and athletically. Other athletes also met with success in the classroom. For the fifth year in a row, the Southern field hockey team was recognized with National Academic Team honors from the National Field Hockey Coaches Association. Seven team members were named to the Coaches Association’s National Academic Squad for earning a grade point average of 3.3 during the spring semester.

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2013 R EPORT OF T HE PR ES IDENT SOUTH ERN CONNECT ICUT STAT E UNIVER SIT Y

DONOR S MET WITH MEMBERS OF TH E S OUT H ERN COMMUNITY, INCL UDING TH E S CH OLA RSH IP RECIP IENT S S UP P ORTED BY THEIR G ENEROSITY, AT T H E CELEBR ATION OF PHILA NT HROPY.

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2013 REP ORT OF T HE P R ES IDENT S OUT H ERN CONNECT ICUT S TAT E UNIVER S IT Y

Banner Year for Support

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he Division of Institutional Advancement had another year of strong fundraising results. Gifts and commitments for fiscal year 2013 totaled $1.9 million. Through their generous support, alumni and friends continued to demonstrate their commitment to the university and belief in the value of a Southern education. The latter was clearly evident in gifts from the Oaklawn Foundation — the continuation of a 15-year tradition of giving — along with the establishment of ten new named scholarships. The Southern Connecticut State University Foundation saw changes with a new slate of officers: David R. McHale serves as chairman; Richard F. Tripodi, vice chairman; Michael R. Chambrello, treasurer; and Mary O’Connell Kozik, secretary. In addition, Robert R. Stamp, vice president for institutional advancement, was named executive director of the foundation. The Alumni Association continued its recognition and outreach efforts through a variety of events. During graduate commencement exercises, the Distinguished Alumni Award was presented posthumously to Dawn Lafferty Hochsprung, M.S. ’97, 6th Yr. ’98; Anne Marie Murphy, M.S. ’08; Mary J. Sherlach, M.S. ’90, 6th Yr. ’92, and master’s degree student Victoria Soto. The Celebration of Philanthropy recognized leadershiplevel donors for their contributions to scholarship funds and university programs. Alumni Professionals Day presented students with an opportunity to obtain career information from Southern grads, and receptions and reunions were occasions to celebrate Southern connections.

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2013 R EPORT OF T HE PR ES IDENT SOUTH ERN CONNECT ICUT STAT E UNIVERS ITY

T H E S CHOOL OF BUS INES S ’S NEW FA CILIT Y INCLUDES A S TAT E-OF-THE-A RT HIGH-TECH T RA DING R OOM.

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2013 REP ORT OF T HE P R ES IDENT S OUT H ERN CONNECT ICUT STAT E UNIVERS IT Y

Good Deeds

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or more than four decades, the SCSU Foundation has helped Southern create a climate of excellence by overseeing the management of gifts from private sources. Recently, the foundation funded a number of new initiatives, all designed to help Southern’s talented students succeed.

Lending a helping hand in times of need, the Foundation Student Support Fund was established to provide students with financial assistance outside of the traditional financial aid process. The fund may be used for a variety of purpose, such as covering the cost of books for students in need, or paying costs of off-campus educational programs during summer breaks. Supporting experiential learning at its best, the foundation is funding a new series of Undergraduate Research Grants for summer 2014. The program will provide up to five grants of $3,000 each to undergraduates who are completing research in any academic discipline represented at Southern. The foundation is also supporting the Civic Engagement/Service Learning Initiative, which provides educational benefits while supporting community outreach efforts. The initiative will aid faculty in developing service learning methods — shown to have an impact on student learning and progress toward graduation.

FY 2013 Operating Revenues

FY 2013 Operating Expenditures

State Grant Revenues 0.0%

Auxiliary Enterprises 12.3%

Investment Income 0.1%

Scholarships & Fellowships 12.9%

Indirect Cost Recoveries 0.1%

Operations & Maintenance – Plant 6.7%

Other Sources of Revenue 1.8% Private & Local Grant Revenues 1.0% Federal Grant Revenues 6.8% Auxiliary Sales & Services 11.6%

Tuition and Fees 45.1% State Appropriations 33.5%

Institutional Support 12.6% Student Services 9.7% Library 3.5%

Instruction 37.0%

Academic Support 4.0% Research & Sponsored Programs 1.0% Public Service 0.3%

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Connecticut State Colleges & Universities Board of Regents for Higher Education Nicholas M. Donofrio Chair Yvette Meléndez Vice Chair Richard J. Balducci Eugene L. Bell Naomi K. Cohen Lawrence DeNardis Matt Fleury Sarah Green Merle W. Harris Craig Lappen René Lerer JoAnn H. Price Ex-Officio Members: Stephen Adair Jewel Mullen Sharon Palmer Stefan Pryor Catherine Smith

Senior Administrative Officers for the Connecticut State Colleges & Universities Gregory W. Gray President Michael Gargano, Jr. Provost/Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs Elsa Núñez Vice President for State Universities David L. Levinson Vice President for Community Colleges

Produced by the Office of Public Affairs Patrick Dilger Director Patrick Dilger, Betsy Beacom, Joe Musante Editors and Writers Mike Kobylanski, Villia Struyk Writers Isabel Chenoweth Photographer Graham Hebel, Alisha Martindale, John Vanacore, Matt Williams Additional Photography

Officers for Southern Connecticut State University Mary A. Papazian President

Marianne Kennedy Interim Provost/ Vice President for Academic Affairs James E. Blake Executive Vice President Tracy Tyree Vice President for Student Affairs Robert L. Stamp Vice President for Institutional Advancement Jaye Bailey Chief of Staff/ Vice President for Organizational Development Pamela M. Lassiter Director of Diversity and Equity

Barbara Kagan Designer Tiger Press Printer

Mission Statement Southern Connecticut State University provides exemplary graduate and undergraduate education in the liberal arts and professional disciplines. As an intentionally diverse and comprehensive university, Southern is committed to academic excellence, access, social justice, and service for the public good.


Report of the President 2013