Issuu on Google+

Les Noces (SVADEBKA) (Die Hochzeit) (The Wedding) Russian choreographic tableaux with words and music composed by

Igor Stravinsky German text by K. Gutheim & H. Kr端ger

English text by D Millar Craig

Full Score

Chester Music

Music setting by Stephen Gibson, New Notations, London Cover design by Chloe Alexander

Š 2005 Chester Music Ltd. Published in Great Britain by Chester Music Limited Head office: 14–15 Berners Street, London W1T 3LJ, England Tel +44 (0)20 7612 7400 Fax +44 (0)20 7612 7545

Sales and hire: Music Sales Distribution Centre, Newmarket Road, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk IP33 3YB, England Tel +44 (0)1284 702600 Fax +44 (0)1284 768301 www.chesternovello.com

All Rights reserved Printed in Great Britain No part of this publication may be copied or reproduced in any form or by any means without the prior permission of Chester Music Limited.

CONTENTS

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

v

MARGARITA MAZO

Sources

xxii

MARGARITA MAZO

Dancing Les Noces

xxiv

STEPHANIE JORDAN

Editorial Policy and Filiation

xxvii

MARGARITA MAZO & MILLAN SACHANIA

Critical Commentary

xxxiii

MILLAN SACHANIA & MARGARITA MAZO

Notes on the Texts and Transliteration

liii

MARGARITA MAZO, DINA LENTSNER, MILLAN SACHANIA

Les Noces Acknowledgments MARGARITA MAZO & MILLAN SACHANIA

1 136

IGOR STRAVINSKY’S LES NOCES, THE RITE OF PASSAGE MARGARITA MAZO

Stark, vital, austere, driving and relentless, Igor Stravinsky’s Svadebka, better known by its French title Les Noces, is based on a traditional rite of passage, the ritual of the Russian village wedding. Svadebka (a rarely used diminutive form of Svad’ba, Russian for wedding), evolved into Les Noces villageoises (The Village Wedding) and then, through abstraction, simply Les Noces (The Wedding), a landmark in the cultural landscape of post-Great War Paris and the last of Stravinsky’s so-called Russian compositions. Stravinsky began thinking about Les Noces in 1912, while still working on The Rite of Spring. He did not finish composing it until the autumn of 1917, and it took him another six years to arrive at the final instrumentation. No other work would take him so long to compose, and no other work would have as momentous a meaning for him. Unlike The Rite, revised several times, he never wanted to change a single note of Les Noces throughout his life.1 The Les Noces project was interrupted several times by the composer’s preoccupation with other pieces, by the war, by family upheavals, and by a few temporary fallings-out with Diaghilev. But these were not the only factors that delayed the project. There were some fundamental changes in Stravinsky’s life and compositional aesthetics during the Les Noces years. Stravinsky left Russia and first settled in Switzerland, where he spent the years of his greatest artistic triumph, as well as the worst times of his life, the turbulent wartime years; he then moved to Paris in 1920. There were also factors of a more philosophical nature that delayed the project in fundamental ways: Les Noces’s eleven years were the time when Stravinsky negotiated a radical shift in his artistic identity. No longer interested in being perceived only as a young Russian composer from St Petersburg temporarily settled in small Swiss towns, Stravinsky began moulding a new identity, that of a leading international composer living in Paris, the hub of the world’s artistic avant-garde. Stravinsky was recognised, of course, as the eminent composer of Petrushka, The Firebird and The Rite of Spring; yet he was denied a rank among the French ‘architects’ of the new art, even by his friend Jean Cocteau. Only after the première of Les Noces did Stravinsky become, to quote a Parisian composer and critic, ‘our national Igor’.2 The 1 2 3

4 5 6

various transformations of Stravinsky’s aesthetic orientations and personal ambitions, traceable through different works written between The Rite of Spring and Octet, are encapsulated in the metamorphosis of this single composition from a flamboyant spectacle à la façon de Diaghilev at the time of its conception to the bare-boned and abstract composition we know. The composition is in two acts, four tableaux, each designed as a succession of disjointed sections. Its text is an amalgam of excerpts – sometimes even snippets – from wedding songs, sayings and the spoken rhymes of the Russian village, all put together by the composer. Most of the texts come from a folk-song collection by the renowned nineteenth-century folklorist Pyotr Kireyevsky.3 The music of Les Noces as a whole does not progress as a continuous development; neither can it be conceptualised in terms of any traditional genre. Stravinsky himself had a hard time identifying the genre: ‘Svadebka – Russian song (cantata, oratorio, or what?) with choreographic accompaniment.’4 Eventually, he settled on the designation divertissement. Stravinsky draws the connexion with the Russian village ritual even before the music begins. Already with its subtitle – ‘Russian Choreographic Scenes with Singing and Music’ – Stravinsky alludes to Russian village parlance, since for Russian villagers, peniye, singing, is not considered ‘music’. Only what is played on instruments is considered ‘music’. The text of the entire composition is actually constructed from bits of village songs and verbal expressions. We are instantly struck by the seemingly implausible correlation of Russian village idiom with the work’s instrumental ensemble of four pianos and percussion – an ensemble entirely inconceivable within the context of a Russian peasant wedding. Yet, in its own ineluctable way, this ‘perfectly homogeneous, perfectly impersonal, and perfectly mechanical’ instrumentation5 makes perfect sense. For Svadebka, as much as it is tied to the village ritual, does not recreate it. Faithful to his new rhetoric of non-representation and nondescription, Stravinsky said on numerous occasions that his work neither describes nor represents, but presents a village wedding.6 Les Noces indeed draws a portrait of the village wedding by capturing not only its actions and texts, but also

See ‘Editorial Policy and Filiation’ in the present edition for details of the small revisions Stravinsky made to the instrumentation after the première. Florent Schmitt, ‘Théâtre de la Gaîté-Lyrique’, La Revue de France, June 1923. Emphasis added. Pesni sobrannïya P. V. Kireyevskim. Novaya seriya. Izdanï Obshchestvom Liubiteley Rossiiskoy Slovesnosti pri Imperatorskom Moskovskom Universitete pod redaktsiey deystvitelnïkh chlenov Obchshestva akademika V. F. Millera i prof. M. N. Speranskago. Vol. 1, Ritual Songs (Moscow, 1911). In Kireyevsky’s book, Stravinsky did not overlook a section collected by Alexander Pushkin, the venerated Russian poet whom Stravinsky admired throughout his life and whose Domik v Kolomne became the basis for Mavra (1922). To tease Kireyevsky, Pushkin included one song of his own making among the folk texts he collected, and the opening of the fourth tableau in Les Noces may be based on Pushkin’s text. Letter to Nikolay Struve, 6 April 1919, in the Paul Sacher Foundation, Basle, Switzerland (hereafter PSF), La Copie de lettres, pp. 136–46. Stravinsky and Robert Craft, Expositions and Developments (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1981), p. 118. See, for example, ibid., p. 115.

v

vi

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

its atmosphere and fundamental nature. In Russian villages, the wedding ritual is a rite of passage, of which an essential aspect is the inclusion of a symbolic funeral: young adults cannot enter a new stage of life without also undergoing the symbolic death of their former selves.7 Wedding laments stand for this ritualistic death. Emotionally, the wedding ritual is highly charged, but, as with any communal ritual, it is not meant either to represent or to express the actual feelings of the bride, the groom, or any other participant. Their behaviour and actions embody impersonal responses to the requirements of a ritualised situation. Thus one finds here a peculiar coalescence of high emotional intensity and, at the same time, personal detachment. The idea that an artistic composition did not have to ‘express’ feelings must have intrigued Stravinsky. Not only was it a powerful aspect of the Russian village ritual, it also corresponded to the aesthetics of Stravinsky’s new environment, populated by Parisian leaders in the vanguard of the new arts. No longer interested in charming and passionate tales and in picturesque beaux arts, the generation of Parisian artists who lived through the Great War expressed their need to build, to construct and to manufacture.8 They commended austerity and succinctness, and they strove for machine-like precision. At the time, the idea and the rhetoric of pure art detached from physical reality so as to reach beyond the tangible world were still markedly new, while the art of richness, romanticised sentiment and inflated personalised expression were no longer the primary goal of artistic creation. No wonder, then, that the very concept that in ancient folk ritual – just as in the modern arts – music was not called upon to express the individual feelings of its protagonists was potent for the composer: ‘The bride laments in the opening scene of Les Noces,’ Stravinsky said, ‘not necessarily because of real sorrow at her prospective loss of virginity, but because, ritualistically, she must weep.’9 The Parisian audiences of Les Noces’s première did not fail to recognise that this wedding bears ‘the lugubrious air of a burial’.10 Those who liked the work praised it for being dry, harsh and mechanical. They found its severe simplicity intensely mesmerising. The plain costumes and the colourless décor by Goncharova, as well as the impersonal and abstract choreography by Nijinska, served to enhance the work’s sternness: On the stage without décor, transformed into a vast, cinematographic screen, a simplified humanity bustles

7 8

9 10 11 12 13

about, in black and white, as if it were born out of a projector. […] It is grievous, mechanical, machine-like, burlesque, and touching…like life!11 Les Noces is customarily interpreted as the culmination of Stravinsky’s ‘Russian’ compositions. But as much as it was a farewell to his Russian past, it was also a welcoming salute to his new environment: the whirlpool of new art and the international artists, film makers, musicians, writers, poets, producers and critics living in Paris.

Autograph sources The amount of autograph material for Les Noces spread throughout the world is astounding. No other work by Stravinsky generated as many sketches and other preparatory materials as this twenty-five-minute-long composition. The sketches, drafts (partial and complete) and fair copies of Les Noces add up to well over a thousand pages (almost all undated), not including several copies of corrected proofs and conducting scores with Stravinsky’s annotations.12 The sheer quantity of autograph materials bears witness to the challenges and struggles Stravinsky faced in composing the work. Its tangled course of creation cannot be fully apparent until all of these materials are examined in their entirety and pieced together with copious correspondence, memoirs, contemporary reviews and other writings. The sketches and drafts of Les Noces invite competing interpretations of the work’s compositional process. Viewed in toto and together with other documents, however, they provide invaluable insights not only into the interpretation of the work, but also into Stravinsky’s creative process. (See pp. xxii–xxiii for descriptions, locations and abbreviated names of all autograph sources on Les Noces known to me.) Stravinsky anticipated that ‘other scores and sketches may still be excavated among the manuscripts I gave to people in return for financial help during the war’.13 And so it has come to pass. I have recently come across two manuscripts, long in private hands, and not previously discussed in Stravinsky studies. Both turned out to be crucial sources for Les Noces, as these manuscripts frame the beginning and end of composing the music: uncovered in 2003, Prtc-PML is the first draft of Svadebka’s first tableau in particell, presumably of 1914–15; the other, VS-1, found in 2001, is the first draft of the entire Les Noces in

See Margarita Mazo, ‘Stravinsky’s Les Noces and Russian Village Wedding Ritual’, Journal of the American Musicological Society 43 (1990): 99–142. Cf. Blaise Cendrars,‘Pourquoi “le cube” s’effrite?’ (15 May 1919), in Aujourd’hui: 1917–1929, suivi de ‘Essais et réflexions: 1910–1916’ (Paris, 1987), p. 63; The New Art of Color: The Writings of Robert and Sonia Delaunay, ed. Arthur A. Cohen (New York, [1978]), pp. 68–69. Stravinsky and Craft, Expositions and Developments, p. 116. Henry Malherbe in ‘Chronique musicale’, Le Temps, 19 June 1923. Emile Vuillermoz, ‘Premières. Ballets russes: “Noces” d’Igor Strawinsky’, L’Excelsior, 18 June 1923. Most of the autographs are now housed at the PSF, the permanent home of the Stravinsky Archive since 1983, but many others are dispersed in various public and private archives. See list of sources on pp. xxii–xxiii. Stravinsky and Craft, Retrospectives and Conclusions (New York, 1969), p. 118.

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

piano-vocal score,14 drafted after Prtc-W, probably between 1917 and 1919. Coupled with my earlier discovery of the work’s original version, previously unknown,15 it became possible to trace how its conceptual formation evolved from a linear description to a non-linear abstraction.

A brief biography of Svadebka / Les Noces16 The first mention of the work comes from Stravinsky’s correspondence with Alexander Sanin, a famous Russian stage director and the régisseur of all opera productions presented by Sergey Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes from 1908 to 1914. In early 1913, Sanin had been approved as one of the founding artistic directors of the new Free Theatre in Moscow. In the hope of enlisting Stravinsky’s efforts in making the opening season of his Free Theatre a sensation of Russian avant-garde theatre, Sanin wrote to the composer on 17 February / 2 March 1913 (Julian calendar / Gregorian calendar), requesting ‘a three-act piece’ and encouraging the composer – clearly in the spirit of the ground-breaking development in Russian synthetic theatre, headed by several stage directors, most notably Vsevolod Meyerhold – to combine on stage all kinds of music theatre, ‘opera, and dance, and mimo-drama, all together’. He specifically inquired about the details of Svad’ba, the work Stravinsky mentioned to him in the summer of 1912 in Paris. Instead, Stravinsky, then engrossed in The Rite of Spring, offered the Free Theatre another work, Solovey (Le Rossignol, The Nightingale).17 While Sanin’s request for Svad’ba obviously came to naught, it is not implausible that Stravinsky was initially inspired by Sanin’s idea of a work in three acts, as well as by the remarkable concept of Svadebka as a synthetic spectacle. The latter, Stravinsky recalled, was his original vision of the work’s theatrical form:

14 15

16

17 18 19 20 21

vii

I wanted all my instrumental apparatus to be visible side by side with the actors or dancers, making it, so to speak, a participant in the whole theatrical action. For this reason, I wished to place the orchestra on the stage itself, letting the actors move on the space remaining free. The fact that the artists in the scene would uniformly wear costumes of a Russian character while the musicians would be in evening dress not only did not embarrass me, but, on the contrary, was perfectly in keeping with my idea of a divertissement of the masquerade type.18 In July 1913 in Ustilug,19 Stravinsky met Stepan Mitusov, a poet, pianist and friend from Stravinsky’s gymnasium years in St Petersburg, to finish the libretto of Solovey, commissioned by the Moscow Free Theatre. Mitusov had sung Ne vesyolaya da kompan’itsa (Not a merry company), a village protyazhnaya (long-drawn-out) song, which he recalled from memory (Figure 1).20 The song, which had clearly made an impression on Mitusov, evidently had a similar effect on the composer. He noted it down, and it became the single folk melody quoted in its entirety in Les Noces ([110]+2 to [132]) (hereafter, the Mitusov melody). Stravinsky’s transcription in Figure 1 shows his struggle with text underlay and barring as he attempted to cope with the unusual prosody and complex interplay between stress and duration in sung words. Transcribing the Mitusov song became an early step on the path to what Stravinsky dubbed his ‘rejoicing discovery’ of shifting stress in folk song and flexible relationships between melody and text in Russian village song – the discovery that Richard Taruskin’s in-depth exploration has made so familiar.21 Its conscious realisation came in the autumn of 1914 as the composer worked on Pribaoutki and other songs on folk texts, but in the process of transcribing the Mitusov song, he had already embarked upon the experimentation with prosodic ‘distortions’ typical of Russian folk song.

The latter manuscript contained the final touches applied by the composer to Les Noces’s structure, most notably the extension of the concluding episodes of the third and fourth tableaux (lament of the mothers and the tolling bells respectively). The manuscript FS-1 containing version 1 is part of the Stravinsky Archive at PSF, but it has never been recognised as the original version of Les Noces. In the present essay, I use the term ‘version’ to designate a distinct conceptual stage of the work, in preference to ‘draft’, which refers to a specific continuous manuscript. My labelling of different versions and drafts is constructed as follows: ‘FS’ stands for a draft in full score; the number (1 to 5) identifies one of the Les Noces versions; the ensuing lower-case letter refers to a specific draft of that version (‘a’ being the first draft, ‘b’ the second,’ and so on). For example, ‘FS-3b’ refers to the second draft (‘b’) in full score of version 3. The absence of a lower-case letter indicates that only one full-score draft of a particular version is known. Bold numbers enclosed in brackets refer to rehearsal numbers in the published score. Numerous scholars have examined Les Noces and written its ‘biography’ as part of a general investigation into Stravinsky’s life and music. Robert Craft’s intimate record of the life of the composer and, indeed, his voice in conversation about Les Noces were pioneering (see specifically Stravinsky and Craft, Expositions and Developments, pp. 114–18, Stravinsky and Craft, Retrospectives and Conclusions, pp. 117–22, and Vera Stravinsky and Robert Craft, Stravinsky in Pictures and Documents (New York, 1978), pp. 144–62). The most comprehensive discussion is in Richard Taruskin’s epochal work, Stravinsky and the Russian Traditions: A Biography of the Works through ‘Mavra’ (Berkeley, 1996), pp. 1319–86. See also Stephen Walsh’s biography, Stravinsky: A Creative Spring. Russia and France 1882–1934 (New York, 1999), pp. 243–365. Alexander Sanin, letters to Stravinsky, PSF, Box 36; English translation in Stravinsky: Selected Correspondence, ed. Craft, 3 vols (New York, 1982–85), vol. 2, pp. 197–200. An Autobiography (New York, 1962 [first paperback edition]), p. 106. Ustilug is a small town in the Volhïn’ province in the Ukraine, where Stravinsky built his estate. The song is from Pesni Russkago naroda sobrannye v Arkhangel’skoy i Olonetskoy guberniyakh v 1886 godu, ed. Fyodor Istomin and Georgiy Dyutsh (St Petersburg, 1894), pp. 161–62. See Taruskin, Stravinsky and the Russian Traditions, pp. 1206–36 and 1269–71.

viii

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

One more melodic theme known to Stravinsky before he began composing and which he quoted in the work derives from the composer’s notation of the bells ringing at St Paul’s Cathedral in London in June 1914. Edwin Evans, a London music critic and Stravinsky’s friend, recalled: One Sunday afternoon Stravinsky and I took a taxi and, roaming through the deserted City of London, came upon St. Paul’s just as the bells were ringing. Stravinsky stopped the cab and listened intently to the ‘changes,’ taking occasional notes on a back of an envelope. He was most enthusiastic about the inexhaustible variety of the sequences in which he claimed to hear the most wonderful music. There is something about Les Noces, and particularly about its strange concluding pages, that makes me wonder whether, in all essentials, the substance of the music, or at least the percussive element which animates it, was not born in London on that Sunday afternoon.22 In addition to the link between the bells of St Paul’s and the end of Les Noces pointed out by Evans, there is another and more immediate connexion: one ‘tune’ of the St Paul’s bells actually appears in the first and third tableaux at [14]–[15], [18] and [73]. Stravinsky set it to similar texts about the festive beating of various folk percussion instruments, a rare (though not entirely unique) example of word painting, seemingly entirely out of character with this abstract score (Figure 2). A more general semantic field connected with the sound of bells must have played into Stravinsky’s reaction to the bells of St Paul’s. Bells were part of the habitual soundscape of his youth in St Petersburg; the bells’ rich, elusive and engulfing sound had become an aural icon in Russian culture. The phenomenon known as kolokol’nost’ (the sonority of ringing bells, from kolokol, the bell) has found diverse representations and meanings in Russian music, literature and visual arts. Since Glinka’s Epilogue ‘Slav’sya’ in A Life for the Tsar (1836), rarely has a Russian composer missed a suitable occasion to reference bells, each finding a sound representation according to the individual aesthetic criteria and programmatic ideas: Musorgsky, for example, chose to emulate kolokol’nost’ through rough orchestration and asymmetrical, untraditional chord dispositions; Rimsky-Korsakov, with his inclination towards abstract perfection of musical sound, preferred a balanced and polished representation; whereas for Rachmaninov, Stravinsky’s contemporary, a rich, sensual sound was most important. In contrast, Stravinsky’s tolling of bells at the end of Les Noces was percussive and dry. By June 1914 Stravinsky thus had two musical ideas, the Mitusov song and the bell ‘tunes’, which quickly resurfaced once he started composing the piece. Diaghilev meanwhile 22 23 24

dreamed of a ballet score that would be not ‘simply international’, but which would also have a distinctly Russian national colour.23 He hoped to capitalise on the uproar caused by The Rite of Spring a year before, and wanted Stravinsky’s new Russian ballet immediately. By the turn of the century, performances of episodes from village weddings had become very popular on the concert stage and in theatrical entertainments in Russia, and Diaghilev pushed for this composition, supposedly assuming that composing ‘a wedding’ would be an easy task. At the time when Stravinsky first began to think of Svadebka, the romantic ideal of representing folk songs and rituals truthfully to how they existed in villages – in a word, dostovernost’ – had became an important new trend in Russian intellectual life, put forward by ethnographers and folklorists rather than composers. In fact, during the decade 1900–10, folk religion, mythology and unmediated folklore had already become a crucial focus of Russian modernist culture. Earlier generations of composers had mainly borrowed elements that they deemed suitable for arrangements and quotations, but no one before had envisioned a representation of the folk ritual as a self-sustained composition. Even such enthusiastic proponents of national music as Glinka, Musorgsky, Borodin and Rimsky-Korsakov – notwithstanding their praise of folk song as a rich source of musical innovation – found it necessary to re-conceptualise folk material in terms of Western musical practice in order to elevate it to the status of art music. In short, dostovernost’ in staging a folk ritual was new even to the author of The Rite of Spring, with its invented plots and idealised rituals. As if in the manner of an ethnographer, Stravinsky began working on Svadebka by undertaking a study of the Russian wedding ritual. He learned of the village wedding, not through direct experience and observation, but rather from the scholarly, documented printed sources which he had gathered by July 1914: classic anthologies of Russian folklore by Sakharov, Afanasiev, Tereshchenko, and folk melodies by Rimsky-Korsakov, Prokunin and Tchaikovsky, Lyadov, Istomin and Lyapunov, Lineva, along with Dahl’s Dictionary of the Russian Language. His main source was the anthology of wedding songs and rituals by Kireyevsky. He also studied carefully the wedding section in the Istomin and Lyapunov anthology of folk melodies; he had already quoted a melody from it in Petrushka, and he returned to it as a source for Svadebka, as the early musical sketches show. Looking to design the broader scenario for the work, he attempted to convert the ethnographic materials into scenes and instructions for staging. The idea of preparing a condensed version of a village ritual for the stage was actually similar to what other Russian composers were considering at the time.24 Had Stravinsky not decided to

Music and the Dance (London, [1948]), pp. 89–90. An earlier version of this anecdote is in A. H. Fox-Strangways’s article in the London Observer of 4 July 1926. Sergey Prokofiev, Dnevnik, 1907–1933, 2 vols and a supplement (Paris, 2002), pp. 1 and 480. Anatoliy Lyadov’s unrealised ballet Leyla and Alaley for Diaghilev and especially Alexander Kastalsky’s Kartinï narodnïkh prazdnovaniy na Rusi (Scenes of folk festivals in old Russia, left unfinished) being two examples of works that strove to be dostovernïy.

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

compose Svadebka in a ‘scientifically’ documented way, that is, in the spirit of dostovernost’, he would have had no trouble completing the work without delay. Stravinsky’s desire to base it on ‘authentic’ and scholarly-approved data, however, caused him to confront materials that defied such a streamlined representation. The reason for this lies in the nature of the wedding ritual itself: as the ritual evolves, its episodes, songs, laments, formulaic orations and dialogues form recurring blocks; as they are repeated, they are re-arranged and shift both in time (at different moments of the ritual) and space (the episodes often occur simultaneously at different houses). The ritual is put together anew from these recurring blocks every time it is performed. The ritual is long; local versions are countless; and – despite the strictness of each tradition, immanent in any ritual – it has no single definitive ‘text’ even within the same village. Constant repetitions, spatial and temporal displacements, variations and rearranging of similar episodes, together with the simultaneity of actions taking place at the bride’s and at the groom’s, could not lend themselves to a linear construction of the ritual. It is possible that the redundancies in the folk material prompted the pivotal role of repetition in Les Noces; in any case, Stravinsky favoured repetition, even sought after it as a formal device that he had already put to good use in other works, The Rite of Spring being but one example. * * * At first, Stravinsky aimed at constructing an elaborate scenario, outlining the entire ritual. He did this by selecting episodes he deemed crucial for supporting the ritual’s progress.25 This scenario constituted a long composition in three acts, and the original version of the work was based on it. As if responding to the repetition and non-linearity inherent in the ritual, Stravinsky soon turned away from any attempt to design a streamlined narrative consisting of continuous episodes and songs in favour of a free montage of spliced-together episodes and texts. His ritual would be built from true ethnographic elements, to be sure, but Stravinsky would use them at will, freely repeating, cutting and combining them. He would construct each tableau by breaking longer episodes and full songs into shorter fragments, and inserting between them other episodes and texts – or, indeed, further fragments of these – in a seemingly incongruous way. As he later explained: Les Noces is a suite of typical wedding episodes told through quotations of typical talk. The latter, whether the bride’s, the groom’s, the parents’ or the guests’, is always 25 26 27

ix

ritualistic. As a collection of clichés and quotations of typical wedding sayings it might be compared to one of those scenes in [Joyce’s] Ulysses in which the reader seems to be overhearing scraps of conversation without the connecting thread of discourse.26 Eventually, he did not need to rely on a specific scenario or libretto in order to compose, but could simply go on with the most general framework of the folk ritual in mind. As for the conceptual framework of Svadebka’s ritual, many sketches point to the idea of two parallel plots – that is, the ritual preparations at the bride’s and at the groom’s – and their merging at the ultimate point of the ritual, the consummation. This more symbolic conceptualisation of Svadebka was one of startling completeness and simplicity. From the many rituals surrounding the preparations of the bride and groom, Stravinsky abstracted one parallel: the combing of the bride’s kosa (tress) and the groom’s kudri (curls). As the eventual rebirth of the bride and groom into a single entity is the purpose of the entire ritual, a third symbol was abstracted: krovat’ (bed), an episode in which the young couple are seen off to the bedchamber. The conceptual kernel of the work thus may be formulated metaphorically as KOSA – KUDRI – KROVAT’ or, generalised further, as: SHE

HE

BED This three-pronged abstraction was crystallised in an early sketch with three texts, visually arranged on the page as above: on the left, Chesu pochesu Nastas’inu kosu (I comb, I am combing Nastas’ya’s tress) for the Kosa episode (see [2] of the final score); on the right, Chem chesat’, chem maslit’ / Da Viktorovy kudri (With what shall we comb, with what shall we oil / Viktor’s curls)27 for the Kudri episode (see [29]); and underneath, like a sum total, Ay vï, druzhki, slepï (Hey, you best men are blind), set at [129]+3, when the groom’s svakha (matchmaker) and druzhka (best man) accompany the newlyweds to the bedchamber. Interpreting this sketch as the tripartite conceptual kernel of Les Noces reveals quite surprisingly just how little the essence of the composition actually changed over the years. The concrete forms underwent continuous and sometimes drastic changes, but this symbolic triangle gave continuity to the process. Infusing the kosa / kudri parallel with structural and metaphoric connotations of his own making, Stravinsky constructs it musically by using both similar and contrasting means. For example, both scenes of combing the kosa and combing the kudri juxtapose two distinct genres, lament and song. Stravinsky must have noticed them in the wedding section of the Istomin and Lyapunov collection. His laments

First published in Robert Craft and William Harkins, ‘Stravinsky’s Svadebka (Les Noces)’, The New York Review of Books, 14 December 1972, p. 29. Stravinsky and Craft, Expositions and Developments, p. 115. The groom’s name of Viktor, copied directly from Kireyevsky’s book, exposes the relatively early origins of the particular sketch: Stravinsky had not yet settled on the name of Svadebka’s groom, Khvetis.

x

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

in the first three tableaux (the opening, [34] in the second tableau and [80] in the third) are sung by solo voices in a slower tempo; they are relatively unconstrained in terms of melodic range, flow and metre (as far as possible in this generally rigidly constructed piece); syllable durations vary and fluctuate; and, notably, the laments contain downward glissandi and numerous grace notes – Stravinsky’s invention as an aural representation of sobbing and wailing, which makes his laments sound indeed like village laments. Songs, on the other hand, are given to the chorus, in a faster tempo and with notably more restrained melodic gestures; together with their syllabic and predominantly equidurational setting, the songs sound like choral recitations rather than singable tunes; and they certainly never have glissandi or grace notes (for example, [2] and [10] in the first tableau or [27] in the second). When the opening theme of the bride’s lament recurs at the end of the composition, it conspicuously appears without any aural icons of crying. It is thus a song now, not a lament; in the village ritual, too, the lament belongs to the first part of the ritual, comprising episodes of separation and symbolic death, and cannot cross the ritual’s main watershed into the second part, which comprises celebrations of the new union, the rituals that protect the consummation of the marriage and assure the couple’s proper future. The recasting of the bride’s lament into the groom’s song thus symbolically affirms the ritualistic merging of the parallel plots and the transformation of the young bride into a married woman. By toying with the distinctions and similarities between lament and song, both learned from his sources and invented, Stravinsky deepens the kosa / kudri parallel and creates referential musical interconnexions between its two sides. Further reinforced by verbal and phonetic similarities, the kosa / kudri parallel strongly binds together the first three tableaux, bringing them into a unity like the facets of a single gem, framed by laments and punctuated by music and the changes on the stage. The idea of two parallel plots and their fusion at the end of the work never ceased to remain important to Stravinsky.28 Although his treatment of the three-part kernel is by no means the single feature responsible for the work’s unity, the result is a breathtaking coherence.

Versions 1 and 2 The composer himself admitted his uncertainty regarding the number and sequence of Svadebka’s preliminary versions, confessing, ‘I am no longer certain how many versions I may have begun, or how extensive each fragment may have been. […] Nor am I certain of the chronology.’29 Thus far, three preliminary versions have been known. All are unfinished 28

29

and all begin just like the final score, with the work’s signature lament of the bride about her kosa (tress). A draft in full score of what has been usually considered the earliest version goes up to [4] (FS-2b hereafter). At first, it was planned for the second act of the three-act scenario. The original title, still seen on the first page, reads ‘Second Act, First Tableau’; it was later revised to ‘First Act, First Tableau’ (see Figure 3). The revision of the title indicates that, in the process of working on this draft, Stravinsky abandoned the first act of the three-act scenario and settled on the beginning of the piece in the way we know from the final score. Careful re-examination of all autographs, however, led me to discover an earlier and significantly different original version, pivotal to understanding Svadebka’s creative process and hitherto not mentioned in Stravinsky scholarship (FS-1 hereafter). Entitled ‘Second Act, First tableau’, FS-1 is clearly connected with the three-act scenario (see Figure 4). Moreover, it is based on a short libretto, entitled ‘U nevestï’ (At the bride’s), a descriptive passage Stravinsky copied almost verbatim from an ethnographic narrative in Kireyevsky’s book. According to this libretto, and unlike any other preliminary version, FS-1 begins not with the bride’s lament, but with the chorus Chesu, pochesu Nastas’inu kosu (I comb, I am combing Nastas’ya’s tress), the song which represents SHE on the sketch identified above as the conceptual kernel of the work, and which would become the second episode in all subsequent versions ([2]–[3] in the final score). Already in FS-1, the chorus music is remarkably close to that in the final score. It is important to note, however, the interpretative marking ‘in loud whisper’ (see the first bar in Figure 4) that magnifies the susurrant phonetic qualities of the text. Such an expressive indication would be out of character in the stripped-down score known to us, but it describes well the sound Stravinsky wanted, clarifying the sound colour behind the abstract mezza voce in the final score at [2]. The distinction between FS-1 and FS-2b – which seemingly resides in the deceptively simple insertion of the opening lament – actually bespeaks a significant shift in Stravinsky’s conceptualisation of the work as a whole. For the process that condensed the ritual’s repetitive episodes with the bride’s laments and the combing of the bride’s kosa into a single scene gave rise not only to the new opening of Svadebka, but also reframed the entire composition. The original idea from which the three-act scenario arose was no longer valid. With the next version, as exemplified in FS-2b (Figure 3), Stravinsky thus moved definitively away from the firmly ethnographic representation of the wedding ritual in FS-1 towards a more abstract and symbolic Svadebka. The instrumentation of both versions is the same, however. Both are scored for an ensemble with two string

As late as 1922, while making the final fair copy of the piano-vocal score, Stravinsky titled the first and second tableaux ‘Kosa’ and ‘Kudri’ respectively. They were changed to the original titles, which appear in several sketches as ‘U nevestï’ (At the bride’s) and ‘U zhenikha’ (At the groom’s), only at the time of the third (for the second tableau) and fourth (for the first tableau) proofs. Stravinsky and Craft, Retrospectives and Conclusions, p. 118.

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

quintets, the first always playing pizzicato, the second arco. Each quintet produces a distinct and unified sound colour, one percussive, the other smooth and continuous. Variations of this basic idea permeate all versions of Les Noces, including the final score, in which Pianos I and III play against Pianos II and IV, or sometimes even the left and right hands of the same piano play against each other in a way reminiscent of contrasting pizzicato / arco quintets. The other instruments included are two flutes (one performer doubling on piccolo), two oboes, one cor anglais and two clarinets (one doubling on piccolo clarinet in D); two French horns were added in the second version. The pairs of instruments (the two oboes, for example) play as though they constituted one collective instrument. Other instruments may have been planned, but these scores do not go beyond the opening episode; the percussion instruments notably had little significance in the first two versions. Stravinsky’s recollections about Svadebka’s earliest instrumentation repeatedly suggest that the original scoring was for a ‘super-Sacre orchestra’30 or even for ‘two string orchestras, one playing pizzicato, the other with the bow, … requiring around 150 musicians to perform’.31 The latter statement motivated a long-lived assumption that the two quintets of FS-2b designate a double string section in this giant orchestra. Meanwhile, not a single known draft of the first two versions fits the recollections Stravinsky expressed so assuredly. Not only is the number of instruments small in both scores but also the scoring itself is sparse throughout, giving no hint of a ‘super-Sacre orchestra’. It may have been another of Stravinsky’s infamous memory lapses or he may have indeed initially thought about the work as such, but for now it has to be considered as an early pre-compositional idea that went completely unrealised. Neither FS-1 nor FS-2b is dated, but it seems logical to suggest that Stravinsky had composed FS-1 by early October 1914, when he went to Florence to meet Diaghilev; the composer most likely had something of Svadebka ready to play for him. Diaghilev had already been pushing the composer to finish, as this was to be the only new piece of Stravinsky for the Ballets Russes. That Svadebka would have been at the forefront of their considerations at the meeting therefore seems plausible. Did they then discuss cutting out the first act, for which Stravinsky had no compositional ideas at all, and consider the possibility of a more manageable size of work in four tableaux? At any rate, FS-2b, with the new opening for the now reconfigured first act, was in all likelihood ready for the next meeting with Diaghilev in

30 31 32 33

34

xi

Rome on 8 February 1915, when Stravinsky played more of Svadebka. Diaghilev instantly fell in love with it.32 Stravinsky scholars consider that Diaghilev heard the completed first tableau and parts of the second. It is further contended that Stravinsky played the rest of the second tableau during his next meeting with Diaghilev in Milan on 1 April 1915; with two-thirds of the piece composed by midAugust, the entire work was nearly complete by the end of the year.33 Yet, however logical this chronology appears, it overlooks the work’s circuitous development, evidenced in the sketches and drafts. As indicated above, studying them has led me to believe that Stravinsky did not compose the work by advancing straightforwardly from beginning to end, but rather that he worked in a zigzag fashion. Sections composed with the original intention of being continuous would later be split by the insertion of other music; similarly, parts of the composition belonging to different tableaux could nevertheless be worked on simultaneously. Neither did Stravinsky compose Svadebka according to any single scenario; rather, he refined his plan as he worked, constantly re-thinking what he had already done. Only by moving back and forth between episodes and tableaux, and by making adjustments between segments previously composed and segments newly conceived, did Stravinsky bring his creative conception to its final realisation. Circumstantial evidence suggests that beyond working out the details of the opening episode in FS-2b, by the time of his meeting with Diaghilev on 8 February 1915 in Rome, Stravinsky might have composed the first tableau up to [16] (as in Prtc-PML) or even to [17] (as in two sketches in full score currently stored together with Prtc-PML), and he simultaneously considered some ideas for other episodes in the first, second and fourth tableaux.34

Version 3 The composition as a whole was put together for the first time on 29 September / 11 October 1917. This was version 3, initiated in the spring of 1915, the only completed version of the work that predates the final one (see Figure 5). In late January 1915, Stravinsky heard the Hungarian cimbalom virtuoso Aladár Rácz and his small string ensemble performing at a restaurant in Geneva. Enchanted by the sound of the cimbalom, Stravinsky arranged to purchase the instrument, which he received presumably between February

See, for example, ibid., p. 118. André Schaeffner, Strawinsky (Paris, 1931), p. 70. Diaghilev, letter to Stravinsky, 8 March 1915, PSF, Box 36; English translation in Stravinsky: Selected Correspondence, ed. Craft, vol. 2, p. 20. See all the accounts of the history of Les Noces, from C. Stanley Wise, ‘Impressions of Igor Stravinsky’, The Musical Quarterly 2 (1916): 249–56 (p. 256), and Vera Stravinsky and Craft, Stravinsky in Pictures and Documents, p. 151, to Taruskin, Stravinsky and the Russian Traditions, p. 1321. For example, there are sketches for [4], [16]–[17] and [8] in full score for the FS-2 ensemble, notably with timpani and later insertions of snippets for piano and, still later, cimbalom. In addition, several episodes from the first, second and fourth tableaux can be found among the sketches of various compositions completed between August 1914 and late January 1915.

xii

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

and mid-March of 1915.35 He learned to play the instrument, set himself to composing on it, and used it in the initial draft of Svadebka’s version 3 and every subsequent version except the last. Sergey Prokofiev, after witnessing the first presentation of the new version on 1 April in Milan, gave his report to Vladimir Derzhanovsky, the editor of the Russian journal Muzïka, who published the first detailed essay about Svadebka.36 The article supplies most invaluable information about how Stravinsky verbalised his ideas at the time, however embellished they became in this mixture of Prokofiev’s report and Derzhanovsky’s editorialising and guesswork. We learn from this article that Stravinsky already thought of Svadebka as ‘not an opera and not a ballet’, without a ‘plot in the crudely utilitarian sense’. The composition was in four tableaux, with the first two tableaux defined as in the final work, and with the final scene – the young couple being led to the bedchamber – defined exactly as in the composition we know. The only scene missing was the departure of the bride for church, the third tableau of the final score. The new instrumental ensemble, the result of the composer’s ‘new views on instrumentation’, consisted of about forty instruments, exclusively individualised, ‘an orchestra of soloists’. The chorus, Derzhanovsky said, was conceived as part of the instrumental roster; it had a ‘purely instrumental colouristic role, and it takes part from beginning of the score to end’. A composition in four tableaux for an idiosyncratic ensemble of about forty solo instruments as described in Derzhanovsky’s article is instantly identifiable as Svadebka’s version 3. That version includes twenty-seven wind instruments, fourteen of which are brass, all heavily involved, creating sonority at times resembling a wind band, particularly with tuba, keyed bugles and the B flat baritone on the instrumental roster. The two string quintets of versions 1 and 2 are reduced here to eight string instruments (three violins, two violas, two cellos and a double bass), but the string section, too, is enriched by the new percussive colour of harp, piano and harpsichord (probably used for the first time in a twentieth-century composition), and – above all – cimbalom. The idea of the strings playing pizzicato against arco is retained in version 3, but the instruments are no longer sharply divided into two groups: the scoring often calls for divisi, and at times a single instrument functions as two different soloists. The scoring of version 3 was spurred by Stravinsky’s clear intent to create a unique, pure musical colour for each soloist. He defined soloistic identity here not only by timbre, but also through the way an instrument contributed to the overall

35

36 37

texture, voicing and sonority, even if sometimes it took several instruments to produce the unique character of a ‘soloist’. With such an approach, doubling of the ‘soloists’ could not – and in fact did not – exist: in practical terms, no two parts were exactly the same. In order to protect individual instrumental colours, the front page of the longest fair copy in full score of version 3, FS-3c, carries Stravinsky’s forceful warnings not to double and not to substitute any instrument. The idea of soloistic scoring was of course not new for Stravinsky; he had already experimented with it in Petrushka and the Japanese Lyrics, not to mention all the previous instrumentations of Pribaoutki and Svadebka itself. In version 3, however, the principle finds the fullest and utmost heterogeneous realisation, the lavish sound of which appears even more vibrant and astonishing because it is so diametrically opposed to the austerity and homogeneity of the final product. To keep the work and the spirit of the Ballets Russes active during the first wartime summer of 1915, Diaghilev rented a large villa, Bellerive, in Ouchy, Lausanne, on Lake Geneva, where he reassembled a core group of Russian artists, painters and dancers, who rehearsed regularly and discussed new projects. At Bellerive, Diaghilev invited Natalia Goncharova to design the costumes and the sets for Svadebka, while he began thinking of Leonid Massine, then a young dancer, as a possible replacement for Nijinsky as the choreographer. The Svadebka production team for the 1916 première was assembled, with Stravinsky living in Morges, a short bicycle ride along the lake. There in Ouchy, on a page with the letterhead ‘Bellerive / Ouchy-Lausanne’, Stravinsky jotted down the St Paul’s bells theme as a new musical idea for setting the song Vo gornitse vo svetlitse (In the room, in the bright-lit room), which would be used in the third tableau (see [70] ff). Another idea, most likely initiated at Bellerive, was the unaccompanied chant for two solo basses in the second tableau at [50], the only unaccompanied passage in the whole work. Diaghilev, obsessed with Liturgie, a new ballet after the Passion of Christ, wanted Stravinsky to write some a cappella choruses, based on ancient Orthodox znamennïy chant. Presumably with Liturgie in mind, Stravinsky copied down from Oktoikh (a Russian version of Byzantine Octoechos, The Book of Eight Echoi)37 one chant, Bogorodichen (a hymn to the Mother of God) in fifth glas (echos) and used it as the starting-point for composing [50]–[52], a chant-like episode in the second tableau of Les Noces villageoises, as the composition became known towards the end of 1915. The longest fair copy in full score of version 3, FS-3c, goes

Vera Stravinsky and Craft, Stravinsky in Pictures and Documents, p. 152. Renard was partially composed on the cimbalom. The cimbalom was also part of the eleven-instrument ensemble of Ragtime. In addition, Stravinsky arranged for Rácz the ‘Polka’ from Trois pièces faciles (ibid., p. 177). ‘The Latest Compositions by Igor Stravinsky’, Muzïka, no. 219 (18 April / 1 May 1915), pp. 262–63. Oktoikh contains znamennïy chants in eight glasï (echoi) necessary to support the eight-week cycle of the Orthodox service. Other sections of Les Noces also contain melodic gestures of znamennïy chant (see, for example, [21], [27], [28], [55] ff. and [74]), which are particularly prominent in the second tableau.

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

up to [17], presumably the end of the first tableau at the time (Figure 5). The composed parts of Les Noces villageoises were surely not limited to the first tableau up to [17], where FS-3c stops: the music for [21], parts of the lament for the episode of combing the groom’s curls ([35]–[38]+5), the incantation at [55]–[57], the chant at [50]–[52], and other patchy episodes for the second tableau, were sketched and some partially composed as well, though they cannot be dated precisely. Some blocks for the fourth tableau – the opening chorus Yagoda, the ‘hiccough’ duet at [91] and [127],38 and the Mitusov melody, along with some other bits and pieces – were also sketched by the end of 1915 / beginning of 1916. The non-linear process of composing Les Noces should be clear from this list and the previously stated considerations. Stravinsky worked on version 3 throughout 1915 and played the first tableau for a small gathering of friends at Misia Sert’s apartment in Paris at Christmas. It was the last time Diaghilev heard a note of Les Noces until April 1917. At the beginning of 1916, Diaghilev went to America with the Ballets Russes. Stravinsky, left behind in Switzerland, began to understand that staging Les Noces villageoises would have to be postponed until after the war. His relationship with Diaghilev started to cool. Like many others in Europe during the war, Stravinsky’s financial situation was dire: the activities of the Russian Music Publishers, Stravinsky’s main publisher, were disrupted; the income from his estate in Ustilug ceased (the estate was destroyed during the war); and he could not get a penny from performances in America, where the rights of Russian composers were not protected by international law. He thus became involved in other projects that were commissioned or which had a reasonable prospect of being paid and performed. Meanwhile, Les Noces villageoises was shelved. In composing Renard, for which he had secured a firm commission from the Princess Edmond de Polignac, Stravinsky immersed himself in the sounds of his cimbalom and the mocking folktales about the fox. Like Pribaoutki and other of his ‘Swiss’ songs on Russian folk texts, Renard is an offspring of Les Noces. The liberties taken with folk texts, the focus on de-personified folklore characters detached from the ‘real’ world, the fragmented musical form, comprising juxtapositions of unrelated blocks, characteristic melodic gestures, borrowed from folk song and re-invented anew, rhythmic procedures and harmonic idioms, the octatonic framework, a soloistic and chamber divertimentolike approach to instrumentation, even the handwriting – all point to a close relationship between Renard and Les Noces. The theatrical form envisioned by the composer for Renard was notably similar to his earlier idea of staging Les

38 39 40 41

xiii

Noces (as well as Histoire du soldat in 1918), that is as a synthetic spectacle mixing musicians, dancers, clowns and acrobats on the stage. The idea had travelled all the way from Sanin’s initial letter about Svadebka, reinforced in 1914 by Alexander Benois’s ground-breaking productions of Le Rossignol and Rimsky-Korsakov’s Le Coq d’or for the Ballets Russes. Additional similarities between Renard and Les Noces are many, but I shall pause here to mention Stravinsky’s approach to text setting, because it may be helpful to performers of Les Noces, both vocalists and dancers. Putting into practice his ‘rejoicing discovery’, the composer turned his discovery into a certain technique of shifting verbal stress, depending on the musical durations of particular syllables. The syllables then acquired an additional value as independent sounds and durational units; they were no longer just elements of a verbal construction. Music in Les Noces was often said to be born of the phonetic sound.39 No wonder that the dancers of the Ballets Russes learned their timing not by counting endlessly changing musical metres but by memorising the syllabic durations of musical scansion: ‘We sang along, and that was how we remembered when to do things, by singing and dancing at the same time.’40 * * * With his new commission for a ballet based on Le Rossignol in November 1916, Diaghilev’s relationships with Stravinsky warmed, particularly after he secured the finances for the May 1917 season of the Ballets Russes in Paris, the first full season since the beginning of the war. Diaghilev’s new activities re-energised Stravinsky’s work on Les Noces villageoises, and he played it in Rome in April 1917, when Diaghilev summoned him to take part in the Ballets Russes’s tour. It was during this trip to Italy that Stravinsky became close to Picasso; they spent much time together in Rome and in Naples, developing a lasting friendship that was meaningful for both artists and, in some ways, specifically for the further transformation of Les Noces. A new era in the compositional history of the work began in July, when Stravinsky and Diaghilev signed a contract for several pieces; Diaghilev now had the exclusive worldwide rights for productions of Les Noces villageoises for two years. Stravinsky thus set himself to finish the piece, focusing on the last tableau, from [110] to the end in HMB-2, Les Noces’s second notebook. He possibly even drafted the entire fourth tableau in short score.41 Like so many others in Paris and London at the time, Stravinsky was under the spell of mechanisation and

In late January 1915, Stravinsky heard a curious duet of two drunken Vaudois men – one repeated a short phrase, the other hiccoughed at regular intervals – and jotted it down in alternating 4/4 and 3/4 metres (Schaeffner, Strawinsky, pp. 65–66). For an early account see Boris de Schloezer, ‘La Saison musicale’, La Nouvelle Revue française, 1 August 1923, p. 245. Alexandra Danilova, Choura (New York, 1986), p. 76. The separate pagination and the state of completeness of the fourth tableau in the Winterthur manuscript Prtc-W, discussed below, raise this possibility.

xiv

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

mechanical instruments. He was working on Etude for pianola, and he was interested in the pianolisation of Les Noces villageoises. By early August, when he first had a concrete idea about the length of the entire work, and even before he had finished composing it, he was looking into how to fit the composition on pianola rolls.42 Stravinsky estimated the timing of the tableaux as 4, 8, 4, and 8 to 10 minutes respectively, demonstrating that even if his timing was only approximate, he thought a good deal about the temporal proportions of the parts to the whole (cf. the durations of each tableaux in version 5 on p. xviii). The landmark in the compositional history of Les Noces was the completion of version 3 in particell in a manuscript signed ‘29 IX / 11 X 1917, Morges’ and preserved at the Stadtbibliothek Winterthur (hereafter Prtc-W). The work was finally moulded here as a rigid musical construction, a patchwork forged together by an iron hand: larger episodes were spliced to construct a montage of short blocks, juxtaposed, overlapped, inter-cut and firmly welded together. The compositional principles, on which his works of the next decade would be based, Symphonies d’instruments à vent and Octet among others, were fully developed here, while the instrumentation, as we already know from the earlier drafts of version 3, was altogether different. The way that Prtc-W was compiled – it was not a through-written manuscript – evokes a parallel with the whole non-linear compositional process of Les Noces and its final structure: the manuscript is fragmentary and disjunctive; it consists of blocks of different materials, composed at various times between 1914 and 1917, here inter-cut, stopped and returned. The blocks are different even in their physical appearance: compiled from an assortment of single-page and continuous summary sketches, written on paper of different sizes and quality, with different pens and pencils, only roughly sketched and in cleanly copied segments, the manuscript was assembled with the single aim of putting together the entire piece. For that purpose Stravinsky gathered and reordered the previously composed sections, added those newly composed and made the connecting links, filling in whatever he felt necessary according to the proportions of the envisioned whole. By that time, the Swiss writer Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz had almost finished a ten-month job translating the work into French. Only some instrumentation and textural details were left to complete. Stravinsky considered the composition finished. ‘1917, Morges’ appeared as the date of the completion of Les Noces in later drafts, and even in the first edition of the piano-vocal score of 1922. Les Noces villageoises was thus finally put together just four weeks before the Bolshevik coup in Russia. This peculiar coincidence appears to have been largely due to the 42

43

revival of artistic life in Paris towards the end of the war (and, accordingly, of Diaghilev’s production plans), rather than Stravinsky’s response to the loss of old Russia to the Bolsheviks. Although the historical scope of the event could not leave any Russian expatriate cold, the composer had other immediate losses to deal with. For Stravinsky the loss of Russia on a personal level had occurred long ago, even before the Great War.

Version 4 The immense shifts in how the composer constructed, negotiated, and performed his identity during the Svadebka / Les Noces villageoises / Les Noces years offer a hint for understanding why, after finally coming so close to completion, Stravinsky put the work aside again. By the autumn of 1917, he still had no major new work. Neither did he have an active publisher (negotiations with J. & W. Chester would begin only in 1918). Diaghilev’s payments were not steady. The 1917 season in Paris – the Ballets Russes’s first season since the beginning of the war, the one which regained Paris for Diaghilev – did not include any première of Stravinsky’s music. Although Petrushka and The Firebird were still hits with the public and though he was clearly back as part of the Diaghilev entourage, the main coup of the season, the revolutionary production of Parade (by Satie, Cocteau and Picasso), was planned and carried out without Stravinsky’s participation; he did not even attend the première. To live up to his self-vision as the premier international composer, he had to get to the forefront again. In post-war Paris, Diaghilev’s ornate pre-war productions and their sumptuous Russianness were giving way to constructivism and the mechanical movement of Parade. Simultaneously, the new aesthetic concepts of ‘neoclassicism’ – such as the universalism of the ‘classical’ arts, limitation and restraint as means of gaining new artistic freedom, the vitality of the mask for distancing art from reality – were at the heart of the latest ‘irresistible pull within the arts’, to use the composer’s phrase. Stravinsky was actually well placed to be part of this new movement, since the techniques and ideas of his own ‘neoclassical’ compositions, as Robert Craft suggested and most scholars agree, had been developing since his earliest works.43 With this general artistic ambience and Stravinsky’s personal sensibilities in mind, it is possible to see how the sound opulence of version 3, with its colourful heterogeneity of timbre and richness of scoring, could have been perceived as passé. It could be that he then realised that his major work since The Rite of Spring, the one which he had just almost completed, was still not right, that the concept of

See Gerald Tyrwhitt’s correspondence with Stravinsky and the Aeolian Co., 8–23 August 1917, PSF, Box 37. Les Noces was eventually cut on five rolls, four of which appeared in 1923, with the fifth produced only in 1924–25. (See Rex Lawson, ‘Stravinsky and the Pianola’, in Confronting Stravinsky, ed. Jann Pasler (Los Angeles and Berkeley and London, 1986), pp. 284–301 (p. 300).) Some dance rehearsals for the première used piano rolls. See Craft, Stravinsky: Glimpses of a Life (New York, 1993), p. 338.

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

instrumental timbre – achieved by pure sound colours – he had cherished all these years now seemed stale. Whatever the reason, in the winter of 1918–19 Stravinsky began working on a new instrumentation of Les Noces villageoises for an ensemble of two cimbaloms, harmonium, pianola and percussion, that is the new version 4 (see Figure 6). His love of the cimbalom and his intense involvement with the pianola finally merged in this novel ensemble, drastically different from all the previous versions; the percussion section is relatively large, also a novelty in Les Noces’s evolvement, likely in tie with the newly composed Histoire du soldat. The new version is characteristic of Stravinsky’s re-instrumentations in general, in that it involved a complete rewriting of musical texture, and not merely the reduction of the score to a smaller ensemble or the redistribution of the existing notes between the new instruments. The draft of this version in full score (FS-4) goes up to the third tableau, the longest of all the preliminary drafts in full score. FS-4 is meticulous and even includes careful drawings indicating the placement of the percussion instruments on stage (see Figure 6). Stravinsky’s rhetoric about the instrumental ensemble in FS-4 being ‘the most authentic Russian village band’ comes from his later reminiscences.44 At the time, however, the tenor of his discourse was different. The connexions between music and cinema, the association of the sound of the pianola with silent film, and the non-diegetic relationship between music and the action on the screen intrigued the composer. Presenting his new Les Noces villageoises to Diaghilev and Massine, he talked about music that evokes black-and-white film and ‘cinematographic rhythm’.45 He no longer considered the piece a ballet, but a ‘divertissement’, entitled ‘“Les Noces” (without villageoises), divertissement in two parts with singing [chant] of soloists and choruses accompanied by an ensemble of several instruments’.46 The instrumentation, so loved by Stravinsky, turned out to be completely impractical: it called for a few odd-ball instruments such as the cimbalom, for which no one could find competent players, plus a mechanical pianola and a harmonium, the ability of which to play together and in tune had never been tested in concert. Thus, Diaghilev found it unacceptable: [O]ur advanced artists, however, paint on the canvas just like everyone else; they do not demolish the theatre in order to make something new. But this good fellow

44 45 46 47 48 49

xv

Stravinsky, under the pretext of simplifying my task, leaves unoccupied the musicians that I have, and requires from me only four, but one of these four I need to search for in Honolulu, another in Budapest, the others God knows where!47 In addition, geared for a big production in Paris, he did not like the size of the ensemble: ‘But why always these little orchestras? Victory is achieved; no longer any need to fight against Mahler. Now, I would like to return to grand things.’48 The situation with Diaghilev was getting serious, as he and Stravinsky were in the midst of edgy negotiations for a new contract (the 1917 contract was about to expire). In addition, Stravinsky now had a publisher, J. & W. Chester in London, whose conditions had to enter the negotiations as well. It took a long time, but eventually, with the push of intermediaries – Ernest Ansermet (Diaghilev’s main conductor), Otto Kling (Director of Chester) and Misia Sert (Diaghilev’s and Stravinsky’s patron) – all was settled amicably, and in December 1919 the Stravinsky / Chester and Chester / Diaghilev contracts were signed. The date of Stravinsky’s delivery of partition d’ensemble and réduction pour piano et chant to Chester was stipulated as 1 August 1920, and Diaghilev received the exclusive rights to perform ‘the ballet Les Noces villageoises’ in all countries except the United States of America until 1 August 1923. Diaghilev thus was fully motivated to première Les Noces (Stravinsky now insisted on dropping ‘villageoises’ from the title) in the next season of 1920. But it was not to be. Suddenly, Stravinsky had several commissions for compositions to be completed in 1920, on which he needed to work simultaneously.49 That year brought six premières of Stravinsky’s music in the world capitals of Paris, London and New York. The composer clearly achieved what he wanted: he was back in the Parisian and London spotlights, and he was the centre of attention all over the world. He left Morges for France in April 1920, ready to take a permanent place in the Parisian artistic landscape. The score of Les Noces had meanwhile remained untouched since the summer of 1919. The première was now pencilled in for May 1921 at the Opéra, although Massine, who was until this point the intended choreographer of Les Noces, had parted with Diaghilev and left the company. The instrumentation was still not decided. Under pressure from Kling, Stravinsky considered the

Stravinsky speaking in a documentary film Once, at a Border…Aspects of Stravinsky, directed and edited by Tony Palmer (W. Long Branch, N.J., 1982); also in Stravinsky and Craft, Retrospectives and Conclusions, p. 118. Michel Georges-Michel, Comœdia, 4 December 1919. The all-night meeting when Stravinsky read through his new scores took place in Paris, at the apartment of Georges-Michel, a Parisian critic of note. Stravinsky, letter to Otto Kling, 23 November 1919, in PSF, La Copie de lettres, pp. 197–201 (Stravinsky’s underlining). Ansermet, letter to Stravinsky, 18 July 1919 in Correspondance Ernest Ansermet – Igor Strawinsky (1914–1967), ed. Claude Tappolet, 3 vols (Geneva, 1990–92), vol. 1, pp. 134–35. Ansermet, letter to Stravinsky, 4 May 1919, in ibid., vol. 1, pp. 87–89. These were: a string quartet for Alfred Pochon (Concertino), Le Chant du rossignol, commissioned by Diaghilev earlier, a composition in memory of Claude Debussy commissioned by Henry Prunières (it would eventually become Symphonies d’instruments à vent), and finally Pulcinella for Diaghilev.

xvi

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

possibility of mechanising the cimbalom in the manner of Pleyel’s mechanical piano (January–February 1921), or having four pianolas (two to replace the cimbaloms) with harmonium and percussion (March 1921), or even scoring it for pianolas and wind bands with saxhorns and flügelhorns.50 These turned out to be impractical as well. They were also not welcomed by Kling, who was becoming nervous, still without any score and thus unable to publish in time for the intended première. His message to the composer was straightforward: forsake the odd and mechanical instruments similar to those in FS-4 and come up with some fresh ideas in a hurry. Kling did not receive the piano-vocal score until 23 May 1921. Along with sending the score, Stravinsky informed Kling that he was ‘going to entirely re-orchestrate [Les Noces] for a new ensemble of wind instruments, percussion and one or two parts for piano’.51 Symphonies d’instruments à vent was of course completed by then, but this plan to remove the ‘less cold and more vague’ strings in preference for his new ideal sonority, wind instruments, ‘more apt to render certain rigidity of the form’,52 never materialised. The new concept of instrumentation, however, was a drastic step towards the final transformation of Les Noces into an abstract, stripped-down work. The première, for various reasons, had to be postponed for a year once again, first to the spring of 1922, and then to the following spring. In addition to the undecided instrumentation, a conceptual disagreement between Goncharova and Bronislava Nijinska, who took Massine’s place as the choreographer only in early 1922, may have contributed to the postponement as well. The definitive date for the première was finally set for the May–June 1923 season in Paris at the Théâtre de la Gaîté-Lyrique.

Version 5 About 1921, sound as matter, from which musical form is built, became the focal point of Stravinsky’s discourse. A composer’s job, Stravinsky said, is no different from that of an architect or craftsman who assesses and measures his material at hand before he builds his object; marble and wood, for example, have different densities, volumes and weights, and these determine the construction of the work: 50 51

52

53 54 55 56

The only forms which are worth anything are those which flow (découler) from the musical material itself. We have wind instruments, stringed instruments, percussion instruments, and the human voice – there is our material. From the actual use of these materials the form should arise.53 These ideas began to permeate all his latest works, culminating in Octet, on which Stravinsky worked in the spring of 1923, at exactly the time he finalised the instrumentation of Les Noces. The rhetoric, though, is hard to reconcile with the history of Les Noces: its musical form was built in 1917, but still almost six years later the composer was searching for its matter. Be that as it may, on 18 April 1922, Stravinsky announced Les Noces’s new instrumental ensemble: ‘only 4 pianos and percussion’,54 thus arriving at version 5 of Les Noces, the score for which would be not completed until 5 May 1923, five weeks before the actual première.55(See Figure 8 on p. xxxi.) Now, he had the sound of Les Noces in black and white, reduced to two fundamental matters: ‘blown’, allotted to the voices, and ‘struck’, entrusted to the pianos and percussion.56 The novelty of ‘sound matter’ as a concept notwithstanding, it is revealing to see – with the benefit of hindsight – that a search for Les Noces’s sonorous matter was simultaneously as gradual and as non-linear a process as composing ‘the music per se’. Certain seeds of the sonorous idea (though not as a rhetorical concept of matter) of two contrasting sounds existed already in FS-1, with the percussive and the continuous sound colours playing against each other. Throughout his work on Les Noces, Stravinsky searched for an appropriate embodiment of struck matter, whether in the guise of percussive strings, cimbalom, piano, harpsichord, two cimbaloms, or ultimately four pianos and percussion. One more realisation of Stravinsky’s notion of sound matter in Les Noces’s score is the stripped-down dynamic nuances. He creates sound contrasts, build-up and decrease, not so much through changes in dynamics, which are scarce in the score, but rather through the volume, density and weight of his matter, that is, through the number of instruments and voices in any particular block of music, by the register used, and by the density of the contrapuntal layers in the musical texture. What Stravinsky said about

The latter instrumentation is mentioned in Stravinsky and Craft, Expositions and Developments, p. 118; all the former are mentioned in the correspondence between Stravinsky and Kling (PSF, microfilm 81). Letter to Kling, 26 March 1921, in PSF, La Copie de lettres, pp. 267–70. Stravinsky came up with this instrumentation when he stayed at the house of Coco Chanel in Garches. It is clearly not the final instrumentation, however, and his oft-quoted statement that the final instrumentation ‘suddenly’ dawned on him in Garches must be corrected. (See Stravinsky and Craft, Expositions and Developments, p. 118.) Stravinsky, ‘Some Ideas about my Octuor’, The Arts 5, no. 1 (January 1924), p. 5. In 1919, while working on Piano-Rag for Artur Rubinstein, Stravinsky allegedly told him: ‘You still think you can sing on the piano, but that is an illusion. The piano is nothing but a utility instrument and it sounds right only as percussion.’ (In Rubinstein, My Many Years (New York, 1980), p. 102.) ‘Interview with Stravinsky’ by a special correspondent of The Observer, 3 July 1921. Stravinsky, cable to Ansermet, 18 April 1922, in Correspondance, ed. Tappolet, vol. 2, p. 8. See ‘Editorial Policy and Filiation’ in the present edition for more details. Cf. M. B. [Maurice Brillant?], ‘“Noces” d’Igor Strawinsky à la Gaîté-Lyrique’, Comœdia, 12 June 1923, based upon an interview with Stravinsky.

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

Octet in the 1924 article quoted above also applies to his latest version of Les Noces: I have excluded from this work all sorts of nuances, which I have replaced by the play of these volumes. I have excluded all nuances between the forte and the piano; I have left only the forte and the piano. There is more to the final instrumentation of Les Noces than Stravinsky’s most famous characterisation of its sound as ‘at the same time perfectly homogeneous, perfectly impersonal, and perfectly mechanical’. Along with the machine-like precision – surely a new defining quality of beauty at the time – other concepts central to the Parisian discourse on the modern arts were austerity and bare essence, contempt for affectation and richness of style, reverence of limitation and utmost simplicity. Stripping down the lavish sound of a large ensemble of Les Noces’s version 3 to two clean and elementary aural matters, blown and struck, was one of Stravinsky’s responses to such aesthetic ambience. Nijinska, experienced in experimental dance, did grasp the spirit and significance of Stravinsky’s score. After listening to Stravinsky’s banging on the piano and growling through the score, and after working with him on it, she came up with her own powerful vision of the aloof and impersonal ballet in black and white.57 Nijinska’s choreography apparently responded well to Stravinsky’s own ideas of the relationship between music and action: they, as in cinema, should play alongside each other, rather than express or duplicate each other directly. Goncharova too abandoned her richly folkloric costumes with tall kokoshniki and boots (her ‘folklore’ had horrified Stravinsky already in 1919) and came up with a new design: two costumes only, one for all the women and one for all the men, all in brown and white; the backdrop is plain, deliberately painted in cold blue-grey, with only a small offcentred window placed at two different spots to situate the actions at the bride’s and at the groom’s houses. Stravinsky’s alleged earliest vision of all the performers sharing the stage, as quoted earlier in this essay, did not materialise exactly during the première, since, at Diaghilev’s suggestion ‘on aesthetic grounds’, only the pianos and the dancers were on stage, with the percussion ensemble and all singers in the pit.58 The production was nevertheless highly coherent: the music, the visual aspects and the choreographic movements interacted to bring a unified and wilfully detached aesthetic realisation to perfection. While the absolute sobriety and machine-like precision of the music were considered its great beauty in the eyes of those critics who loved Les Noces at the première, some of the same 57

58 59

xvii

reviewers expressed mixed reactions to the cold, machinelike quality of the movement, the emphasis on unison groups and the austere décor. * * * The non-linear compositional history of Les Noces reflects Stravinsky’s idea of the composition in blocks, the conception that defined both its compositional process and its structure. Each structural block can be repeated exactly, or shifted in musical space (to a different pitch) or in time (to a different beat). It can vary, expand or contract. Each block can be juxtaposed, superimposed or interspersed with other blocks, but it cannot develop into something different as a result of these transfigurations and interactions. In spite of this, Les Noces embodies a startling – if not paradoxical – duality of structural disjunction and coherence, abrupt juxtaposition and connectedness, the duality that converts the self-contained parts into an uninterrupted thrust from the first to the last note. The work’s remarkable coherence is achieved in many ways, two of which relate to Stravinsky’s sharp sense of temporal proportion. This sensibility enhanced his faculty in maintaining the structural control of the piece through the specific placement of musical blocks (space) and through the precise duration (time).

Musical space: the case of the Mitusov melody Even if we look into just the melodic aspects of Les Noces, it is not difficult to see that Stravinsky designed the first appearance of the Mitusov melody in full as the apex of the work’s entire melodic construction. Some sketches show that the idea of using the Mitusov melody in the last tableau was already formed early in the compositional process; a strategy of starting with the end or having known the end from the beginning, as it were, is familiar from other of Stravinsky’s pieces as well, Renard and Symphonies d’instruments à vent being but two famed examples. Stravinsky unplaited the melody into short melodic gestures, pitch collections, even single intervals (the fourth and the minor seventh specifically). He spread them out through the first three tableaux according to his own order, building towards the direct precursor of the Mitusov melody, the song Khmel’ at [78]. He finally tightly plaited them back into one tune at [110]+2, first inconspicuously, then at full blast. The Mitusov melody, then, encapsulates the main melodic vocabulary and melodic design of the work, just as the octatonic scales constitute the work’s harmonic vocabulary and pitch framework.59

Stravinsky’s reaction to the Nijinska choreography varied from accepting it as ‘compatible with my conception of the ritualistic and nonpersonal’ (Stravinsky and Craft, Expositions and Developments, p. 117) to being unhappy for changing his original vision (An Autobiography, p. 106). About Nijinska’s choreography for Les Noces see Stephanie Jordan’s ‘Dancing Les Noces’ in the present edition. Stravinsky and Craft, Expositions and Developments, pp. 117–18. Several scholars have undertaken in-depth analyses of the work: see those, which include discussion of the work’s octatonicism, in Pieter van den Toorn, The Music of Igor Stravinsky (New Haven and London, 1983) and Taruskin, Stravinsky and the Russian Traditions.

xviii

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

The Mitusov melody does not represent the entire scope of Les Noces’s melodic idioms, but it does provide a revealing marker for the understanding of Stravinsky’s technique. He used all other sources in a similar manner, be they folk rituals, texts, folk melodies or chants, without copying anything, but absorbing and then using material according to his own design ‘with absolute freedom’.60 Les Noces’s melodic coherence was thus assured, not by any musical thematic development, but rather by the strategic succession of disjointed melodic blocks, by the calculated interpolation of thematic snippets, and by their juxtaposition, shifting and reassembling.

Musical time: the Golden Section Parisian artists, having rediscovered the concept of the Golden Section in Leonardo da Vinci’s Trattato della Pittura, advocated it as a means of rhythmic organisation of artistic space. For the painters who participated in the 1912 exhibition La Section d’or (Stravinsky knew almost all of them personally), the ancient mathematical law of proportion was an aesthetic idea, rather than a scientific formula applied to the actual painting; they were ‘in a sense mathematicians without knowing it’.61 For Stravinsky, however, the idea of the Golden Section (GS hereafter) may have appealed in a special way, and not only for the reasons of adherence to a fashionable idea: throughout his life, he often likened music to mathematics, an affinity he had gained in his student years in St Petersburg. For an ear trained to recognise it, the GS is palpable in the proportions of Les Noces’s two parts, as well as within each individual tableau. It would be difficult to imagine Stravinsky’s counting the number of beats in each section of Les Noces, calculator in hand, although his sense of temporal proportion is staggering (Table 1):

Calculated according to the metronome markings in the score, the temporal proportion of the two parts deviates from the mathematical GS by only eight seconds. On the level of each tableau, the GS is also consistently marked by a momentous musical section: the culmination Ray! ray! in the first tableau; in the second tableau, the GS falls between the only a cappella episode in the entire composition, the chant at [50], and the incantations at [55], the onset of the tableau’s final drive; in the third tableau, the departure of the couple to church sharply coincides with the GS, with the pivotal moment in preparation of the Mitusov melody – the song Khmel’ at [78] – only a few seconds before it. Finally, in the fourth tableau, the GS falls in the midst of a brisk succession of climactic episodes reiterating the Mitusov melody in full and bringing the return of the melodic gesture that opened the composition. Most striking of all, at [120], squarely in the middle of the culminating activities and shortly before the GS, the Mitusov melody sounds with a pronouncement by the master of ceremony, the great svat Savel’iushka: ‘I put together my svadebka as a wonder to behold’ – a magnificently mischievous calculation by the composer, leaving one to marvel at who is really talking here and about which svadebka.62 * * * Stravinsky had a keen sense of the times in which he lived and a great aptitude for metaphoric thinking. He used these skills in powerful ways to transform any idea or verbal expression that came his way from the outside world into a compositional impulse or technique. He needed these external impulses to feed his imagination. The creative artists at work in contemporary Paris not only fed his ambitions and imagination socially and artistically, but also provided him with a wellarticulated rhetoric with which to create his new identity.

Table 1

60 61

62

Tableau

Length

Calculated GS

[Reh. No.] / Time

Episode

1

319"

198"

[16] / 211"

Climax of first tableau

2

315"

195"

[50] / 171"

Chant a cappella

[55] / 225"

Incantations

3

174"

107"

[80] / 108"

Departure to church

4

504"

312"

[120] / 285"

Svadebka line by the svat

Total

1313"

811"

[87] / 803"

Beginning of Part II

An Autobiography, p. 106. Guillaume Apollinaire, Apollinaire on Art, ed. Leroy C. Breunig, trans. Susan Suleiman (New York, [1972]), p. 198. About Stravinsky’s applications of mathematical proportion and ratio see, specifically, Jonathan Kramer, ‘Discontinuities and Proportion in the Music of Stravinsky’, in Confronting Stravinsky, ed. Pasler, pp. 174–94, and Glenn Watkins, Pyramids at the Louvre: Music, Culture, and Collage from Stravinsky to the Postmodernists (Cambridge, Mass., 1994), particularly pp. 263–64. Stravinsky rationalised the meaning of svat in a typewritten note, probably in preparation for the first edition: ‘We have left in French the Russian word “svat”, which is untranslatable and which designates, in the Russian countryside, the figure [personnage] in charge of, as it were, officially conducting marriages. He is, if you will, the “male matchmaker” just as there is the female matchmaker, and, of course, one of most important people among the guests.’ (PSF, mf 121/1902.)

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

As he worked on Les Noces, Stravinsky became an essential part of the vital and fluid Parisian artistic scene. His individual myth-creation was successful because he recognised the aspirations of the Parisian artists and their own myths. As much as he contributed to shaping the aesthetics and consciousness of the Parisian artists, however, he was also shaped by them. The symbiotic relationships that ensued required a thorough re-examination of his own initial vision of the Russian wedding ritual and how it needed to evolve to fit his new identity, his temperament and his artistic convictions. In Les Noces, the rite of passage of his own making, Stravinsky was able to tap into the symbolic powers of two quite different phenomena: the old

Figure 1. Stravinsky’s transcription of a folk song taken down from singing by Stepan Mitusov and quoted throughout the second half of the fourth tableau. [PSF] Figure 2. Stravinsky’s notation with a note ‘Bells of St Paul’s in London. The most wonderful counterpoint I ever heard’. The ‘tune’ from the bottom line is used in the first and third tableaux. [PSF]

xix

Russian village ritual and the aggressively modern Parisian aesthetic. The eleven years’ work constituted the time of Stravinsky’s struggle with those many converging perspectives that gave the work not only its ultimate shape but also its potent energy. To-day, almost a hundred years after its conception, the austere wedding of Svadebka / Les Noces provokes an emotional immediacy and exercises irresistible fascination for the listener as perhaps no other composition by Stravinsky. Whether presented as a choreographed and staged ballet or as a strictly concert divertissement-cantata, it retains the same vitality and power the composer had envisioned.

xx

Figure 3. The second version of Les Noces, FS-2b. The word ‘First’ in the heading ‘First Act’ is written over ‘Second’, reflecting the transformation of the original scenario. Long bars, slow tempo, and the short opening melody are characteristic of version 2. [PSF] Figure 4. The first version of Les Noces, FS-1, reproduced here for the first time. The heading ‘Second Act / First tableau’ and the opening chorus Chesu pochesu Nastas’inu kosu (I comb, I am combing Nastas’ya’s tress), reflect the original scenario. [PSF]

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage

xxi

Figure 5. The third version of Les Noces, FS-3c. The heading in Russian and French reads ‘Svadebka / Text (after Russian folk songs) / and music by Igor Stravinsky. First part / First tableau’. The epigraph, in Russian only, reads ‘Two rivers have flowed together / Two matchmakers have come together / They thought the thought about a blonde tress / “How shall we unbraid the blonde tress / How shall we divide the tress into two?”’ [PSF] Figure 6. The fourth version of Les Noces, FS-4. Stravinsky’s drawing on p. 54 shows the disposition of the suspended triangle and cymbals. [PSF]

SOURCES MARGARITA MAZO

The sequence of the sources in this list suggests their basic filiation, although most sources contain layers of revisions and annotations written at various times.

Abbreviations in source identifications FS Autograph in full score HMB Hand-made notebook InS Autograph score of the instrumental ensemble without vocal parts PR Printed score Prf Proof Prtc Autograph in particell Skk Sketches VS Autograph of piano-vocal score

Libraries and archives BL The British Library, London BN Bibliothèque nationale, Department of Music, Paris PML Pierpont Morgan Library, New York PSF The Stravinsky Archive, Paul Sacher Foundation, Basle, Switzerland RAL C. F. Ramuz’s Archive, Bibliothèque cantonale et universitaire Lausanne, Manuscript Department, University of Lausanne, Switzerland WSB Stadtbibliothek Winterthur, Switzerland

HMB-1

Les Noces hand-made notebook no. 1, early sketches, mostly verbal; 24 pp. [1914–?]. PSF.

Skk

Single-page musical sketches and short rough drafts of episodes for all versions; about 250 pp. 1914–23. PSF, PML, RAL.

Prtc-PML

First draft of first tableau up to [16] in particell, versions 1–3; lead and mauve pencils, 13 pp. [1914–15]. In addition, two pages are filled later with instrumental sketches in black ink for the third tableau. Vellum folder is hand-painted by Stravinsky. PML, Department of Music Manuscripts and Books, Robert Owen Lehman Deposit, call no. Lehman Deposit, no accession no. Carbon copy of the first 13 pp., with Stravinsky’s revisions, makes up the first section of Prtc-W.

FS-1

Draft of full score, version 1; lead pencil with a carbon copy, 4 pp. [1914]. PSF.

FS-2a

Rough draft in full score of a new opening episode, version 2; lead pencil with a carbon copy, 1 p. plus pp. 2–4 of FS-1. [1915]. PSF.

FS-2b

Rough draft in full score of a new opening episode, version 2; 2 pp. (p. 1 is a carbon copy of p. 1 from FS-2a with additions in mauve pencil, continued on p. 2), plus pp. 2–4 of FS-1. [1915]. PSF.

FS-3a

Draft in full score up to [4], version 3; black ink, 5 pp. [1915]. PSF.

FS-3b

Fair copy in full score up to [7], version 3; black ink, 8 pp. Worked from FS-3a. [1915]. PSF.

FS-3c

Fair copy in calligraphic script, full score of the first tableau up to [16], version 3; black and red ink (French translation), 21 pp. (score plus list of instruments). [1915–17]. Signed retrospectively ‘Leto ot R. Khr. 1914–15–16’ (The Year of our Lord 1914–15–16). PSF.

HMB-2

Les Noces hand-made notebook no. 2, sketches for the fourth tableau, [110] to the end, version 3; lead and mauve pencils and black ink, 69 pp. Signed ‘29 Sept. 11 Oct. 1917. Morges’. PSF.

Prtc-W

Entire work, version 3, in sketches (first, second and third tableaux) and continuous draft (fourth tableau), many sections in particell; lead and mauve pencils, black, red and green ink, 140 pp. plus 5 pp. front matter (including a dedication page to Werner Reinhart). Signed ‘Morges, 29 IX / 11 X 1917’. WSB, Rychenberg-Stiftung.

VS-1

First continuous draft of the entire work in piano-vocal score, worked from Prtc-W; black ink, French text in red ink and lead pencil, 187 pp. [Between 1917 and 1919?]. VS-1 is signed ‘1917. Morges’, but Stravinsky is known to have dated later manuscripts by the date he finished composing. The manuscript contains some indications for instrumentation (for both versions 3 and 4). By comparison with Prtc-W, major structural changes include the expansion of two episodes, the mothers’ lament at the end of the third tableau (by 7 bars) and the bells episode at the end of the last tableau (by 6 bars); the length of these episodes in VS-1 exactly corresponds to those in PR-1 and PR-2. BN, Grande Réserve, ms no. 23176.

xxii

Sources

xxiii

FS-4

Fair copy in full score of version 4, first and second tableaux; black and red ink, 89 pp. 1918–19. PSF.

VS-2

Final fair copy of piano-vocal score; black and red ink, 189 pp. Worked from VS-1; completed in May 1921. Signed ‘Morges, 1917’. BL, Chester Music Loan 75.42.

Prf-1

First proof of piano-vocal score; autograph corrections and annotations by Stravinsky and Nijinska (?); tableau titles not engraved, but Stravinsky penned in the titles for the second and third tableaux; 180 pp. January 1922. PSF.

Prf-2

Second proof of piano-vocal score without any titles; autograph annotations by Stravinsky. February 1922. PSF.

Prf-3

Third proof of piano-vocal score, pp. 1, 28, 71, 90 (first page of each tableau), returned by Stravinsky to J. & W. Chester; titles for the first and fourth tableaux engraved as ‘Kosa / La Tresse’ and ‘Krasnïy stol / Le Repas de Noces’ respectively; titles for the second and third tableaux in Stravinsky’s hand and dedication ‘á [sic] Serge Diaghilew’. April 1922. BL, Chester Music Loan 75.43.

Prf-4a

Fourth proof of piano-vocal score, pp. 1, 2, 28, 71, returned by Stravinsky to J. & W. Chester; all tableau titles and the dedication engraved as corrected in Prfs-3. A mistake in the dedication is corrected in pencil by Stravinsky; the title of the first tableau ‘Kosa / La Tresse’ is crossed out and amended in Stravinsky’s hand to ‘U nevesty / Chez la mariée’. Both corrections are incorporated into PR-1. April 1922. BL, Chester Music Loan 75.43.

Prf-4b

Private copy of the fourth proof in its entirety with some corrections in Stravinsky’s hand and annotations in another hand; most corrections are not incorporated into PR-1. The tableau titles and dedication are as engraved in Prfs-4a, i.e. before Stravinsky’s corrections. April 1922. PML, Mary Flagler Cary Music Collection, Printed Music (PMC), call no. Cary, accession no. PMC 319.

PR-1

Printed piano-vocal score, 180 pp. Russian text on the cover is reproduced directly from Stravinsky’s handwritten page. The date printed on p. 180 is ‘Morges, 1917’. The edition was printed in May 1923 (dated 1922 in copyright notice). J. & W. Chester Ltd., London, plate no. J. & W.C. 9718.

InS-5a

Rough draft of instrumental parts, version 5 (final), up to [35]; lead pencil, 28 pp. 1923. PSF.

InS-5b

Final fair copy of the entire instrumental score, version 5; black ink, 140 pp. Completed on 5 May 1923, signed ‘Monaco, 6 April 1923’. PSF.

InS-5c

Copy of IS-5b, version 5; black ink, not paginated. The first tableau is only partially in Stravinsky’s hand, with second, third and fourth tableaux in the hand of J. Jacob, Stravinsky’s copyist in Paris. April–May 1923. BL, Chester Music Loan 75.45.

FS-5d

Copy of InS-5c, prepared by Chester’s copyist in Paris, Gaston Roy, with vocal parts cut and pasted in from PR-1. May 1923. BL, Chester Music Loan 75.44.

Skk-pnla

Sketches for pianolisation; lead pencil, 25 pp. [1923?]. PML, Mary Flagler Cary Music Collection, Letters and Manuscripts (MFCMS), call no. Cary 0567, accession no. 567.

PR-2

Printed full score, 132 pp. [c. 1923] (dated 1922 in copyright notice). J. & W. Chester Ltd., London, plate no. J.W.C. 45.

PR-2a

Stravinsky copy of PR-2, with autograph annotations, conducting marks and English translation in Stravinsky’s hand. English translation and phonetic transliteration of the Russian text by Gregg Smith; further entries by Robert Craft. PSF.

PR-2b

Stravinsky copy of PR-2, with autograph annotations and conducting marks. BL, Chester Music Loan 75.46.

The principal sources of the new edition are VS-2 and InS-5b.

DANCING LES NOCES STEPHANIE JORDAN

conventional pyramid at the end the effect of an heroic extreme, of a real difficulty’.3 Nijinska’s Noces has also been seen as a post-Russian Revolution comment on the institution of marriage, from a woman’s point of view, with a proto-feminist consciousness underlying it.4 The critic André Levinson called it a ‘Marxist’ ballet,5 no doubt seeing the plain white and brown work clothes as indicative of proletarian wear as much as alluding to peasant uniform dress, and possibly also resonant with the multi-body configurations of Russian avant-garde theatre. Nijinska famously argued her case against Natalia Goncharova’s opulent original designs. Neither did Nijinska’s work conform completely to Stravinsky’s apparent intentions as outlined in his Autobiography: it did not present all the musicians onstage in evening dress alongside dancers in Russian character costumes, in keeping with his idea of a ‘divertissement of the masquerade type’.6 It was a partial realisation of his vision, with the percussionists and singers in the pit. Nijinska holds her own today in two versions of Noces. The work disappeared from the repertory between 1936 and 1966 when Frederick Ashton, then Artistic Director of the Royal Ballet, invited Nijinska to stage it for his company in London. Since then, Irina Nijinska, the choreographer’s daughter, has staged the work, in a version that differs in many small details of movement and timing; this is the version that is now produced around the world. But the architecture and relationships between music and movement remain broadly similar across the two performance traditions. The quest for stability is a major feature of the choreography as well as of the music, and no more obviously than in spatial features. In the opening scene, set in the bride’s house, we see the bride in the centre of her group of friends on one side of the stage, and her parents on the other. Only the front part of the stage is visible. There is one window in the curtain behind the dancers and it is off-centre. Immediately we see asymmetries in terms of size of groups, placement of groups and curtain design. Later, both groups merge by moving sideways into each other, clustering under the window, which has become a kind of off-centre reference point. Finally, there is a moment of huge tension: linked together, the entire ensemble moves to real stage centre, which is stressed for the first time, to form the first volcanic

No editorial commentary on Stravinsky’s Les Noces is complete without consideration of the score as a vehicle for dance. For, although when he was writing the work, Stravinsky would have had concert performance in mind, quite as much as theatrical, the initial conception of the score was as a collaboration with choreography. The music has inspired new choreographic treatments with increasing frequency over the years. But the most notable treatment is undoubtedly the original ballet for the 1923 Paris première by Bronislava Nijinska for Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, now widely considered a choreographic masterpiece of the twentieth century. It is a work held in the same high regard as George Balanchine’s numerous balletic collaborations with Stravinsky, yet, unlike those, it speaks both to people who admire classical ballet and to those who find it retrogressive. This is a work about an arranged peasant wedding, hardly the occasion for rejoicing. Its style has been variously described as neoclassical, constructivist, stark, impersonal, distancing and artificial (many of the same qualities often ascribed to Stravinsky’s score). The neoclassical epithet is appropriate because, anticipating Balanchine, Nijinska uses pointe work and offers a reflection upon the medium of dance – movement and the presentation and reworking of a limited number of movement motifs – rather than on the classical model of narrative through dance. Nijinska said that Noces was for her ‘the first work where the libretto was a hidden theme for a pure choreography: it was a choreographic concerto’.1 But the body attitude is decidedly unclassical, with blunted arms, a characteristic narrow pencil-like shape over parallel legs, and, as the critic Edwin Denby noted in his vivid description of the movement content, a general direction of motion into the floor: ‘ballet dancers, more familiar with the opposite direction, do these movements with a curious freshness… the leaps seem higher… the ‘pointes’ get a special significance and hardness (almost a form of tapping) […].’2 The notion of constructivism borrowed from the visual arts refers to the architecture of abstract geometric forms, phalanxes, wedges, pyramids and walls, horizontal shape created by the distribution of a group, vertical shape by the piling of body upon body. And Denby went on to note that the ‘general downward direction [of movement] gives the heaped bodies a sense beyond decoration and gives the 1 2 3 4 5 6

‘Reflections about the Production of Les Biches and Hamlet in Markova-Dolin Ballets’, trans. Lydia Lopokova, Dancing Times, February 1937, p. 618. ‘Nijinska’s “Noces”’ (1936), Dance Writings (London, 1986), p. 37. Ibid. Lynn Garafola, Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes (Oxford, 1989), pp. 125–29. Ibid., p. 126, quoting André Levinson, ‘Où sont les “Ballets Russes”’, [Comœdia], 18 June 1923, in Les Noces clipping book, Bibliothèque de l’Opéra, Paris. An Autobiography (London, 1936), p. 106.

xxiv

Dancing Les Noces

pyramid of the ballet, the bride at the pinnacle, ready to be escorted towards a new life. The rest of the ballet continues to reinforce this spatial programme, involving too the resolution of opposed male and female presences, forced to mesh together within the last scene of the ballet and literally as they create the ‘heroic extreme’ of the final, much enlarged assemblage of bodies. The same counterpull between balance and off-balance occurs rhythmically, stabilised at the end with the emphatic stasis of the ‘bell’ section, but we can note too how Nijinska adds to the musical tension by counterpointing her dance motifs and accents, not always fitting the musical patterns neatly, but sometimes diverging from them unexpectedly, bound by beat, but not by dynamics. Les Noces was created at a time when choreographers were beginning to experiment with rhythmic autonomy rather than visualisation of music. After all, if the anxious interactions of collage were in style at the time of the première, why not extend the principle into formal construction? The music critic Boris de Schloezer welcomed the new style: Music is at the root of things, but the dance that takes inspiration from it, becomes imbued with it, suddenly detaches itself in order to develop according to its own terms. There is an intimate correlation between dance and music, but not at the level of particularity or detail. This absence of parallelism which sometimes even leads to a kind of discordance, to effects of contradiction, confuses many people who are used to the slavish translation of music through gesture and pose. Nevertheless, there is a link here between the two elements, and it is rhythm that creates it… De Schloezer asks for even more independence than Nijinska gives him: But over the rhythmic foundation supplied by the music, Nijinska builds her movement construction with a freedom that I would only fault for not reaching its maximum potential. Indeed, the only criticism that I can make of the choreographer is that in a few instances she succumbs to the temptation of literal translation.7 Looking beyond the Nijinska Noces, a 2003 database chronology, ‘Stravinsky the Global Dancer’ (which continues to be updated),8 reveals that there is an interesting tradition of more than sixty settings of the score since the original ballet. The flow barely got going until the mid-twentieth century, probably because of the difficulties of the score for 7

8

xxv

musicians and listeners and its unconventional performance resources. Then, in the 1980s and more particularly in the 1990s, we see an acceleration in the rate of new productions (at least thirty-one since 1990), roughly matching the number of new productions of The Firebird and Petrushka of the same period, and no fewer than four in 2000. It helps, of course, that the score is now available in a range of recordings. Statistics would suggest that Les Noces has become something of a woman’s ballet, a higher proportion of women having set this music than probably any other Stravinsky ballet score, even if this still represents only about a third of the total. In taking on the dual challenges of music and marriage as institution, choreographers have enabled us to hear the score in many different ways, reinvigorating it with different treatments. Two settings have done the rounds of the international repertory, that is, where the Nijinska has not already been used. They are the excellent Jerome Robbins Noces (1965), pointing up the contrast between lightheartedness and tragedy – and with the four pianos on stage when this version was premiered – and the Hollywoodexpressionist version by Jiri Kylian (1982), in which bride and groom are madly in love from the start. Béjart (1965) felt he needed to add a pair of classical dancers in unitards as Visions to inspire the folk bride and groom. On a few occasions, choreographers have shifted the meaning of the Stravinsky score by adding music. Reinhild Hoffmann bolstered her Tanztheater comment on sexual conflict and female identity (Hochzeit, 1980) with songs and piano music by Jürgen Tamchina. Stephan Thoss supplemented the Stravinsky with Arvo Pärt’s Fratres for violin and piano, in an account of the contrasting behaviours of two generations of lovers (Les Noces, 1994). Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker embedded the score within a full-evening work, ‘(but if a look should) April me’ (2003), the expression of many different kinds of human relationship, and using a diverse musical collage. De Keersmaeker is a choreographer who, like Nijinska, engages with the rhythmic detail of the score and gave full analyses of the rhythmic structure to her dancers. She also, like Robbins when he revived his version for New York City Ballet (1998), used the notorious Pokrovsky ensemble’s 1994 recording of the work, a passionately raw, whining and screeching interpretation, certainly an idiosyncratic account of the Stravinsky. Returning to the score’s roots in oral Russian village tradition, it has proved controversial, theatrically vivid, but without the reflective distance from original materials that Stravinsky originally intended. Traditionalists may disapprove; some choreographers at least want to hear their Stravinsky that way.

‘La Saison musicale’, La Nouvelle Revue française, 1 August 1923, p. 247. [‘C’est la musique qui est à la racine des choses; mais la danse qui s’en inspire, qui s’en pénètre, s’en détache aussitôt pour se développer selon sa nature propre. Il y a corrélation intime entre la danse et la musique; mais non dans le particulier, non dans le détail. Cette absence de parallélisme qui aboutit même parfois à une sorte de désaccord, à des effets de contraste, dérouta maints spectateurs habitués à la traduction servile de la musique par le geste et l’attitude. Il y a pourtant ici un lien entre les deux éléments: c’est le rythme qui l’établit… Mais sur le rythme fourni, par la musique, la Nijinska construit son édifice plastique avec une liberté à laquelle je reprocherais seulement de n’être pas absolue: en effet, l’unique critique que je puisse faire au chorégraphe, c’est d’avoir cédé en de rares instants à la tentation de la traduction littérale.’] Stephanie Jordan and Larraine Nicholas, ‘Stravinsky the Global Dancer’ (2003) [internet database], www.roehampton.ac.uk/stravinsky.

xxvi

Dancing Les Noces

Yet we need to admit that, whatever choreographers create, they will make us hear the music differently from in concert, as some moments are emphasised more, some less by the dance, as the movement releases or selects particular qualities of sound for our attention, and as the choreographer might even give us a modified sense of large

structure. It remains to be seen, too, how the fresh nuances within a new edition of the score will have an impact on the Les Noces choreographies of the future and on our understanding of those already in the repertoire. For both music and dance, the work has never been more alive.

EDITORIAL POLICY AND FILIATION MARGARITA MAZO & MILLAN SACHANIA

Editorial principles

Filiation and production history 1921–23

The guiding principle of the new edition of Les Noces is to supply a performance score of the composition edited along scholarly lines. Putting this principle into practice is, however, a formidable challenge. For the very concept of a ‘definitive’ text of Les Noces is problematic, even inapplicable; the work actively resists attempts to construct an Urtext. The editorial process is confounded by the work’s non-linear, convoluted compositional history and by Stravinsky’s equivocation during and after its composition over various performance and metrical issues. In the circumstances, the most appealing scholarly approach is to create an edition of the ‘best’ source for the work; this avoids conflating readings from the multiple sources into a completely new version. Yet because Stravinsky completed the piano-vocal score prior to deciding on the final instrumental ensemble, let alone actually writing the instrumental score, it is not possible to identify a single principal source. Accordingly, this edition is founded on two principal sources, which are in Stravinsky’s hand throughout and which are notable for their meticulous preparation, graphic clarity and notational accuracy. The source for the vocal parts is Stravinsky’s final fair copy of the piano-vocal score, VS-2 (see Figure 7). The instrumental parts derive from the final fair copy of the instrumental score, IS-5b (see Figure 8). Because Stravinsky refined details (for instance, in terms of articulation and dynamics) during the proofing stages – presumably often as a result of the ongoing rehearsals – and continued to discover errors after publication, these sources cannot by themselves supply a satisfactory reading for a new edition. The present edition thus routinely incorporates (a) Stravinsky’s corrections or amendments to the vocal parts on the first proof of the vocal score, Prf-1; (b) articulation and dynamic markings in the instrumental parts in the first edition of the full score, PR-2, which plausibly reflect adjustments made during the rehearsal process; and (c) corrections to indisputable errors and clarifications of detail in Stravinsky’s conducting scores PR-2a and PR-2b. Departures from the texts of the two principal sources are recorded in the Critical Commentary, enabling readers to deduce and reconstruct the content of the sources on which this edition is founded. Only obvious misprints and errors are corrected tacitly.

The circuitous and non-linear compositional history of Les Noces has been charted in ‘Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage’ above. The production process leading to publication from the creation of the final autograph of the vocal score to the publication of the full score is equally complex in its non-linear ‘filiation’ – if this is the mot juste – of manuscript copies and proofing materials. Not all the proof copies, for instance, played a part in the transmission of corrections to the published vocal and full scores. Some proofs and preparatory materials were not returned to the publisher but were retained for rehearsal or other purposes, accumulating layers of corrections, amendments and annotations made during or after the production of a later proof or indeed even after the publication of the first editions. Other preparatory materials may have been returned to Stravinsky after having been processed by the publisher, similarly accruing later annotations and amendments. Stravinsky completed the principal source for the vocal parts, the final fair copy of the piano-vocal score, VS-2, in May 1921. PR-1 was engraved from this manuscript. The first proof, Prf-1 (which is misleadingly labelled ‘2e.Epreuve’ on the title page, though not in Stravinsky’s hand), was prepared from VS-2 and was extensively corrected and annotated by Stravinsky in January and February 1922; it also contains other annotations relating to the choreography and scenario, most probably in Nijinska’s hand. It is not clear what role the extant copy of the second proof, Prf-2, played in the production chain. Some of the autograph corrections inscribed in Prf-2 are not transmitted to the first edition of the vocal score, PR-1, and, conversely, many corrections and alterations that were transmitted through the proofing process to PR-1 are not evident in Prf-2. The correspondence between Otto Kling, the Director of J. & W. Chester, and Stravinsky reveals that Kling sent Stravinsky at least two copies of the second proof.1 Stravinsky forwarded his corrected copy of the second proof (now lost) to Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz so that Ramuz could check the French text; Ramuz then sent the proof back to Kling.2 Stravinsky plausibly retained the other copy, Prf-2, for rehearsal and reference purposes; this proof also contains sketches for some possible textures for the instrumentation. The third proof of the vocal score, pages of which are

1

2

See Kling, letters to Stravinsky, 14 and 25 February 1922. The Stravinsky–Kling correspondence quoted here is housed at the Paul Sacher Foundation, Basle, Switzerland (hereafter PSF), Box 16, ‘J. and W. Chester 1916–1939’, and La Copie de lettres, vol. 2, unless indicated otherwise. See Ramuz, letters to Stravinsky, 2 and 6 March 1922 in Stravinsky: Selected Correspondence, ed. Robert Craft, 3 vols (New York, 1982–85), vol. 3, p. 67.

xxvii

xxviii

Editorial Policy and Filiation

preserved as Prf-3, is notable for its autograph annotations supplying the missing titles for the second and third tableaux and dedicatee. Kling received this from Stravinsky on 19 April 1922 and replied saying that he would do all that was necessary to engrave these two titles and dedication, noting that the other corrections were minimal and that they would be done with care. Stravinsky altered the title of the first tableau in the fourth proof, Prf-4a (see ‘Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage’ above (p. x, n. 28) and the first entry in the Critical Commentary); given the rapidity with which the corrections from the third proof were implemented,3 this proof probably comprised only the preserved sheets: the title pages of three tableaux and page 2 of the score with small corrections. Another proof of the vocal score, Prf-4b, can be dated to the time of the fourth proof, but it is bound with the score of the entire work in an earlier proofing stage. Most of the corrections in Prf-4b are not transmitted to the published vocal score, suggesting that Stravinsky might have retained this copy; and accordingly Prf-4b, like Prf-1, stands outside a linear filiation of the sources. Stravinsky was dismayed by the errors in the printed pianovocal score, PR-1. Kling, who had authorised thirty special copies of this score for Diaghilev in May 1922 without waiting for Stravinsky’s latest corrections as annotated on Prf-4a,4 apologised, blaming the excessive rapidity of the work in the light of the intended première date, and undertook to accommodate the corrections in the ‘tirage définitif’. The ‘tirage définitif’5 seems to have gone ahead without their implementation – much to Stravinsky’s displeasure – and Kling consequently suggested that the corrections be incorporated into a future new edition or, if they were not too numerous, itemised on an errata page.6 Stravinsky ignored these suggestions and persisted in the matter, even sending Kling a further corrected copy of the vocal score.7 Kling was not to be moved, however, and asserted that Stravinsky was now forwarding him new corrections.8 PR-1 was thus not corrected and no errata list was issued. The piano-vocal score was printed by 29 May 1923.9 Stravinsky had settled on the final instrumentation of the work in 1922. An undated and incomplete first rough draft of the instrumental parts, InS-5a, paved the way for the final fair copy of the instrumental score (without vocal parts),

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15

InS-5b, completed on 5 May 1923 in Monte Carlo.10 Stravinsky made another copy of the first tableau of InS-5b, and sent it to Kling,11 the copy subsequently being finished by the Parisian copyist J. Jacob (InS-5c). Jacob sent his copy in instalments, between 23 April and 16 May 1923, to Chester’s copyist Gaston Roy, who was also based in Paris, to make a further copy, FS-5d.12 Roy’s manuscript aligns the instrumental score with the vocal parts pasted in from the published vocal score, supplying for the first time a visual juxtaposition of the vocal and instrumental parts (see Figure 9). It is probable that this copy was sent to Stravinsky and subsequently to the publisher for engraving. (FS-5d was clearly in the composer’s possession for some time, since it carries many prominent autograph rehearsal annotations and corrections, which are not implemented in the published full score; most likely they were made at a later date.) On 4 September 1923 Stravinsky asked Kling to implement some changes to the percussion ensemble. The score originally had one large and one small caisse claire à timbre and one large and one small caisse claire sans timbre. Stravinsky required both large-size caisses claires to be replaced by a tambour à timbre and tambour sans timbre respectively and the tamtam part to be expunged.13 (See the remarks on bars 195–205, 368–88, 538 and 682–95 in the Critical Commentary.) On 6 September 1923, Kling sent Stravinsky a proof of the final pages, from [132] to the end, and assured him that these revisions had been made. Stravinsky continued correcting proofs (now lost) during October 1923.14 The full score, PR-2, with newly engraved vocal parts, was printed circa late 1923. In the decades since its first publication, PR-2 has been reprinted several times. The immediate predecessor of the present new edition is dated 1978 and constitutes a reprint of PR-2 with a few minor amendments and corrections.15

Editorial practice • Square brackets and other symbols indicating departures from the texts of the two principal sources and editorial interventions are avoided in the score. The Critical Commentary records significant departures from the texts

Kling’s letters to Stravinsky dated 19 and 21 April 1922 suggest that these corrections were implemented in no more than two days. Kling, letter to Stravinsky, 16 May 1922. Kling, letter to Stravinsky, 17 July 1922. Kling, letter to Stravinsky, 26 March 1923. Stravinsky, letter to Kling, 6 May 1923. Kling, letter to Stravinsky, 9 May 1923. Kling, letter to Stravinsky, 29 May 1923. Stravinsky, letter to Kling, 6 May 1923. See Kling, letter to Stravinsky, 26 March 1923. Jacob, letters to Stravinsky, 23 April, 7 May and 16 May 1923, PSF, mf 96. Stravinsky, letter to Kling, 4 September 1923. See Stravinsky, letter to Ansermet, 2 October 1923 (Stravinsky: Selected Correspondence, ed. Craft, vol. 1, p. 181); Stravinsky corrected the proofs of the first three tableaux (see Kling’s letters to Stravinsky, 1, 3 and 5 October 1923), but did not have time to finish the proof of the last tableau (see Stravinsky’s letter to Kling of 25 October 1923). Several errata compilations have been in circulation among performers, notably Mark DeVoto, ‘Igor Stravinsky, Les Noces (1923)’, Journal of the Conductors Guild 10 (1989): 47–53.

Editorial Policy and Filiation

16 17

e

e

• The use of two principal sources presents a particular difficulty in terms of the discrepancies between their time signatures. These clearly come to light in FS-5d, which juxtaposes the printed vocal parts with the instrumental score as copied by Roy. Stravinsky’s prominent autograph annotations and corrections to FS-5d resolve many of these discrepancies, but readings from this source have not been given as a matter of policy, particularly owing to the absence of the proofs for PR-2. The discrepancies have thus been studied on a case-by-case basis, with reference not only to the principal sources but also to the solutions (or lack thereof) in PR-2. It has often been convenient to adopt the formula ‘x = y’ (for example, 6/8=3/4) where one principal source gives time signature x and the other y, with the Critical Commentary providing the appropriate source documentation. This is not to fudge the issue. Metrical ambiguity is an intrinsic feature of this score, and the sources reveal that sometimes Stravinsky simply could not – or did not want to – decide whether one time signature or another was more appropriate, prompting him to devise ambiguous formulae such as ‘6/8(3/4)’ or ‘6/8=(2/4)’. Much of Stravinsky’s metrical indecision is due to his technique of shifting verbal accent or layering metrically different materials. For this reason, he sometimes indicated different time signatures for parallel passages and constantly revised his time signatures on scores used for rehearsal purposes, such as FS-5d, PR-2a and PR-2b. Tables 2 and 3 indicate an example of the interplay between verbal stress and musical metre. Table 2 gives the text of bars 232–33, 242–43 and 347–48, Kh dee, kh de k nam u khat’ / kh dee k nam oo khat’ 17 (Come, come to our house / come to our house) and compares the regular accentuation of these words in speech with the stress shifts implied by 3/4 and 6/8 metres. Table 3 displays the extent of Stravinsky’s metrical equivocation with regard to these parallel passages and shows the solution given in this edition. • Unless otherwise indicated, the duration of the quaver pulse should remain consistent across time signature changes (i.e. ). e

of the two principal sources and justifies individual decisions. It also reports meaningful variants in other sources. Many cautionary accidentals (for instance, cancelling an accidental from a previous bar) have been inserted tacitly, without a remark in the Critical Commentary. Indisputable errors have also been corrected without comment. The notation has been brought into line with modern practice where possible. Stravinsky, in order to avoid ledger lines in his piano notation, sometimes notated pitches played by the right hand on the left-hand stave, and vice versa. Stravinsky’s notation has been left intact, however, where it might have performance or voiceleading implications. The beaming of notational groups in the vocal parts follows the syllabic divisions of the Russian text. Where the syllabic divisions of the Russian and French texts are identical, the corresponding slurs are above or below the stave according to notational convention. Where the syllabic divisions differ, the slurs for the Russian text are above the stave, those for the French, below. The metrical divisions occasionally given above the system in the present edition are annotated by Stravinsky in one of his conducting scores, PR-2b, which give an insight into his conducting practice and his interpretations of his own metrical patterns. As with some other scores by Stravinsky of the time, dynamics are sparse in the principal sources.16 Vigilance is required, then, in supplying editorial dynamics (see ‘Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage’, pp. xvi–xvii above). To address performers’ needs, the present edition inserts dynamics where they correspond to the markings in other parts and as editorial reminders of prevailing dynamics where a part continues after having been ‘interrupted’ by other parts. Other editorial dynamics are merely suggestions, leaving all decisions regarding their use to the discretion of the performers. All these are inserted tacitly, without square brackets, but all are noted in the Critical Commentary. Care has been taken, however, to leave sufficient space for performers to decide on their own dynamic interpretation.

xxix

Cf., for instance, Igor Strawinsky, Symphonies d’instruments à vent. Faksimileausgabe des Particells und der Partitur der Erstfassung (1920) herausgegeben und kommentiert von André Baltensperger und Felix Meyer (Basle, Switzerland, 1991) See ‘Notes on the Texts and Transliteration’. The syllables affected by stress or metric grouping in Table 2 are shown in bold capital letters.

xxx

Editorial Policy and Filiation

Table 2 Stress in spoken text

Kh -DEE, kh -DEE k NAM oo KHAT’, / Kh -DEE k NAM oo KHAT’

Stress shifts in 3/4

KH -dee, KH -dee k NAM oo / KHAT’, kho-DEE k nam OO khat’

Stress shifts in 6/8

KH -dee, kh -DEE k nam oo / KHAT’ kho-dee K NAM oo khat’

e

e

e

e

e e

e

Table 3 bar 232 [28]+2

bar 233 [28]+3

bar 242 [30]

VS-2

bar 243 [30]+1

bar 347 [45]+2

bar 348 [45]+3 vocal piano

PR-1 IS-5b FS-5d Roy copy

vocal instr.

FS-5d IS annotations

instr. struck out

PR-2

vocal instr.

PR-2b IS annotations PR-2a IS annotations

New edition

3

in 2

struck out; replaced by

struck out; replaced by

Editorial Policy and Filiation

xxxi

Figure 7. Autograph fair copy of the pianovocal score, VS-2, the main source for the vocal parts in the present edition. [Chester Music Ltd.] Figure 8. Autograph fair copy of the instrumental parts, Ins-5b, the main source for the instrumental parts in the present edition. [PSF]

xxxii

Editorial Policy and Filiation

Figure 9. A copy in full score, FS-5d, produced by Chester’s copyist Gaston Roy in May 1923 for the production of PR-2. Roy prepared a new copy of the instrumental parts (from InS-5c) and pasted over the vocal parts cut out from PR-1. [Chester Music Ltd.]

CRITICAL COMMENTARY MILLAN SACHANIA & MARGARITA MAZO

Abbreviations used in the Critical Commentary S MS T B s a t b s1 (etc.) s2 (etc.) P1, P2, P3, P4 Timb. Xyl. T.d.b. Triang. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. Crot.

Bar

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Soprano solo Mezzo-Soprano solo Tenor solo Bass solo Soprano chorus Alto chorus Tenor chorus Bass chorus Divided soprano chorus, upper part Divided soprano chorus, lower part Piano 1, Piano 2, Piano 3, Piano 4 Timbales Xylophone Tambour de basque Triangle Caisse claire sans timbre Tambour sans timbre Crotales

C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t. Cym. G.c. RH LH

lv IS

= = = = = = = =

Caisse claire à timbre Tambour à timbre Cymbale(s) Grosse-caisse Right hand Left hand laisser vibrer Igor Stravinsky

Pitches are specified by the Helmholtz system:

Instrument / voice Remark

Premier tableau IS annotation amending the title of the first tableau from ‘La Tresse’ (as in VS-2) to ‘Chez la mariée’ (in parallel with the title of the second tableau, ‘Chez le marié’). This reverts to the planned titles in Stravinsky’s sketches and preliminary drafts. (See ‘Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage’, p. x, n. 28 above.) PR-2 reverts to ‘La Tresse’, though whether by negligence or design is not clear. 1–2

P1, P3

InS-5b: no LH slur across bar line; here as in PR-2b (IS annotation)

19

P1, P3

InS-5b: RH octave acciaccatura is before bar line; here as S and InS-5a

20, 61, 71

P1, P3

InS-5b: no quaver rests; here as in PR-2

21a, 21b, 72

s, a

dynamics are editorial

22–23, 73–74

S

dynamics are editorial

25–38

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: etc. come sopra in bar 25 denotes the pattern of articulation and dynamics established in bars 24–25 for the remainder of this section; here written in full

30–31

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no hairpins; here as in bars 81–82

35

P1, C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t.

InS-5b: rhythm is ; here the rhythm replicates that of the piano part in VS-2; also by analogy with bar 221

39

S

VS-2: no ff; here by analogy with bar 1

39

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no ff; here by analogy with bar 1

41, 43, 44, 47, 49 P2, P4

InS-5b: no

52

InS-5b: no >, no sf, no p sub.; here by analogy with bar 11

P2, P4

; here by analogy with bars 3, 6, 8, 9

xxxiii

xxxiv

Critical Commentary

62

6/8=3/4 in InS-5b; here as in VS-2, PR-1, FS-5d

62, 72

s, a

dynamics are editorial

62, 72, 73, 74

P2, P4

InS-5b: ff between RH/LH staves; here RH ff and LH

63

P2, P4

InS-5b: come sopra; here >, sf, p sub. by analogy with bars 11, 52

70

P1, P3

InS-5b: no LH slur; here as in PR-2b (IS annotation)

75

C.cl.à.t.

InS-5b: sempre sf; here poco sf sempre, as in bar 24

as in bars 21 ff.

76–80

InS-5b: etc. come sopra denotes the pattern of articulation and dynamics established in bars 24–38, 75; here written in full

80

VS-2: no 3/4; here as in InS-5b

83

MS, s, a, P1, P2, P3, P4

85

f is editorial

VS-2, Prf-1, PR-1: no Tempo I. VS-2: no PR-1). Here as in InS-5b, PR-2.

(present in Prf-1 (IS annotation),

85

S

VS-2: no ff; here by analogy with bar 1

85

P2, P4

InS-5b: no ff, here by analogy with bar 1; no and bar 1

86, 89

P2, P4

InS-5b: no

90

s, a, P1, P2, P3, P4

f is editorial

102–6

s, a, T, B

dynamics are editorial

102

P1, P3

InS-5b: no # to a1 LH dyad 2; here as in InS-5a

108

Timb.

InS-5b: continuation line after p extends to bar 109 note 1

118

S, MS, s, a

f is editorial

128

S, MS, s, a

is editorial

142

B

f is editorial

143, 151

T

f is editorial

151–52

P3

InS-5b: RH part from bar 151 chord 1 to 152 chord 1 erroneously notated an octave lower, owing to missing ottava

152

T.d.b.

InS-5b: no footnote; here as in PR-2, where it is referenced to the T.d.b. part in bar 235; relocated in the present edition to the first instance of frôler in T.d.b.

153

T, B, a, t, b

VS-2: no ff; here by analogy with S, MS, s

153

P1, P2, P4

>s are editorial

153

P3

>s to RH/LH chord 1 are editorial

153, 158

T.d.b.

ff is editorial

154

T, a

VS-2: no > to note 1; here by analogy with S, MS, s

158, 163

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

VS-2: no ff; here by analogy with bar 153

158, 163

P1, P2, P3, P4

>s are editorial

158

P2

InS-5b: no e2 RH chord 1; here as in PR-2

160

C.cl.s.t.

ff is editorial reminder

161

P2

InS-5b: no > to LH chord 2; here by analogy with P4

, here by analogy with P1, P3

; here by analogy with bars 3, 6, 8, 9

Critical Commentary

xxxv

162

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no >s; here by analogy with bars 159–61

163

P1, P2, P3, P4

ff is editorial

167

S

f is editorial

170

MS

f is editorial

170

P1

> to LH octave 2 by analogy with P2, P3

170

P2, P3

InS-5b: no >s to RH octaves; here as in PR-2

171

B

ff is editorial

171

P1

> to RH octave by analogy with bar 170

171

P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: fff sub.; here sub. omitted

171

P4

InS-5b: no RH/LH >s to chord 1; here as in P2

172

P3

InS-5b: no >s; here as in P1

173–81

S, MS, s, a

dynamics are editorial

178–81

s, a

PR-2: alto chorus doubles soprano chorus from bar 178 note 1 to bar 181 note 4 and then takes the D in the divided soprano chorus (no divided soprano chorus in PR-2); here as in VS-2, PR-1. (In PR-2b, IS deletes the alto chorus part from bar 178 to bar 181 note 5 but does not restore the divided soprano chorus in bar 181 note 5.)

183

183

VS-2: no ; here as in PR-1, PR-2. InS-5b has the equivalent , owing to the time signatures 6/8(2/4) in P1, P3; 2/4 in P2, P4 and Cym.; and 2/4(6/8) in C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t. Here as in VS-2, PR-2. S, T, P1, P3

195–205

dynamics are editorial InS-5b, FS-5d, InS-5c contain a tam-tam part. In InS-5b this part is annotated ‘Supprimer le T-T’ followed by the composer’s initials (IS annotation). (See also remark on bars 368–88 below and ‘Editorial Policy and Filiation’, p. xxviii.)

198

B

mf is editorial

198

P4

tre corde is editorial

203

S

VS-2: French text is ‘bord’, not ‘bout’; here as in PR-1, PR-2

205

VS-2: no double bar line at end of bar; here as in InS-5b

206

VS-2: ; omitted in Prf-1, Prf-2; no metronome marking in InS-5b, PR-2. Here as in PR-2a (IS annotation).

206

P2

207

tre corde is editorial InS-5b: etc. come sopra denotes the pattern of articulation and dynamics established in bars 24–38, 75–80, 206; here written in full

215

s, a

VS-2: no hairpins; here as in bar 29

215–16

P2, P4

InS-5b: no LH slur over bar line; here by analogy with bars 29–30, 80–81

216 216–17

VS-2, PR-1, PR-2: 4/8; here 2/4 as in InS-5b. FS-5d has 2/4 above the system (IS annotation). P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no hairpins; here as in bars 30–31, 81–82

224

VS-2: no attacca subito; here as in InS-5b

224

PR-2b:

after final bar line (IS annotation)

xxxvi

Critical Commentary

Deuxième tableau 225, 258

t, b

229

p is editorial

PR-2b: erroneous ‘2 + 2 + 3’ above system (IS annotation); here corrected to ‘2 + 3 + 2’

229

T

FS-5d: > to note 5 (IS annotation)

230

t, b

VS-2: no p sub.; here as in bar 345

232

t, b

VS-2: no p sub.; here as in bar 347

233

Editorial 3/4=6/8 reflects 3/4 in VS-2 and (6/8) in InS-5b. (See ‘Editorial Policy and Filiation’, Table 3, which compares the sources’ metrical treatment of bars 232–33 and parallel passages.)

242

VS-2, PR-1, PR-2: 6/8; here 3/4 as in InS-5b and as in bars 226, 232. FS-5d has 6/8, amended to 3/4 (IS annotation)

242

t, b

243

No p in VS-2; here as in bar 232 and PR-2b (IS annotation) Editorial 3/4=6/8 reflects prevailing 6/8 in VS-2, PR-2 and prevailing 3/4 in InS-5b (see remark on bar 233)

243

t

VS-2: no >s to note 1, 6; here by analogy with b (also in Prf-1, PR-1, PR-2)

243

P1, P3

InS-5b: no > to LH octave 2; here by analogy with RH

243

P2, P4

InS-5b: no > to LH note 2; here by analogy with RH

244

3/4 is editorial (prevailing 6/8 in VS-2, PR-2; prevailing 3/4 in InS-5b)

244, 245

P1, P3

InS-5b: no > to LH octave 1; here by analogy with RH

244, 245

P2, P4

InS-5b: no > to LH note 1; here by analogy with RH

245

t, b

VS-2, Prf-1, Prf-2:

246

Cym.

InS-5b: no f; here as in bar 235

248

T

f is editorial

248

T.d.b., C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t.

InS-5b: no dynamics; here by analogy with bar 235

248, 253

Tmb.à.t.

InS-5b: no p; here by analogy with prevailing C.cl.à.t. dynamics

251

C.cl.à.t.

InS-5b: no p; here by analogy with bar 237

251–52, 256–57

C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t. InS-5b: no dynamics, no >s; here by analogy with bars 237–39

253

C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t. InS-5b: no f; here by analogy with bar 235

254, 255

P2, P4

InS-5b: no

s; here by analogy with bars 251, 252, 253

254, 256, 257

T.d.b.

InS-5b: no

s; here by analogy with bars 248–52

260

t, b

VS-2: no > to note 2; here as in PR-1, PR-2

at end of bar; here as in PR-1, PR-2

262

Editorial 6/8=3/4 reflects (6/8)3/4 in VS-2 and 3/4 in InS-5b. 6/8=3/4 in Prf-1, PR-1, PR-2.

263

VS-2: no double bar line at end of bar; here as in InS-5b

264

VS-2: no Meno mosso; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, InS-5b, PR-2

264

P1

InS-5b: p, not p sub.; here as in PR-2

268

T

mf is editorial

273

P1

InS-5b: open slur from LH note 1; here omitted (see bar 264)

273

P3

InS-5b: p, not p sub.; here as in PR-2

Critical Commentary

xxxvii

278

B

mf is editorial

278, 300

G.c.

(sempre poco sf) is editorial reminder from bar 273

284

MS

VS-2: final note is b1; corrected to g1 in Prf-1 (IS annotation)

286

Timb., Tmb.à.t., PR-2: sf G.c.

290

S

mf is editorial

292

T

mf is editorial

292

Timb., C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t., Tmb.à.t., G.c.

InS-5b: sf annotated in another hand; here (sempre poco sf) as editorial reminder from bar 273

298

B

mf is editorial

298

Timb., C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t., Tmb.à.t., G.c.

PR-2: sf

309 309

VS-2: Poco più mosso at beginning of bar, not half way through; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, InS-5b, PR-2. Broken bar line from InS-5b, PR-2. s, a

313

p is editorial

VS-2, PR-1: 2/4(4/8) in T; (4/8) in s; and 4/8 in a. InS-5b: 2/4. PR-2: all parts have 2/4 (4/8). Here vocal parts 2/4=4/8, reflecting IS’s equivocation between 2/4 and 4/8 in all sources, and instrumental parts as in InS-5b.

313

T

f is editorial

317

T

VS-2, PR-1, PR-2: (4/8)2/4; here 2/4 as in FS-5d, where 2/4 is reaffirmed adjacent to the T stave (IS annotation), though 4/8 is not deleted. f is editorial.

319

B

f is editorial

321

VS-2: no Tempo I (though metronome marking is present); no Tempo I or metronome marking in InS-5b; here as in Prf-2, PR-1, PR-2

321–22

VS-2: this passage is barred 6/8 | 2/8 | 3/8 (the time signatures 2/8 and 3/8 are not indicated); here as in Prf-2, Ins-5b, PR-1, PR-2

321

S

f is editorial

321

P1

InS-5b: > to RH notes 1–5, followed by etc. marcatissimo; here as P3

324

P1

InS-5b: no > to RH note 1; here as in bar 322

326

Triang.

InS-5b: no mf; here by analogy with Cym.

329

B

f is editorial

329

P2, P4

f is editorial

331

MS

f is editorial

332

S, P2, P4

f is editorial

332

P3

InS-5b: no ff; here by analogy with P1

333, 339

T.d.b.

• to note 2 is editorial

334

S

VS-2, PR-1, PR-2: note 2 is g2, not f2; here as corrected in FS-5d (IS annotation), as in bar 323, and by analogy with P1 LH, P3 LH

334

T

f is editorial

336

MS, b

f is editorial

xxxviii

Critical Commentary

337

s, a, t

f is editorial

340

a, t, b

VS-2: no p sub.; pp subito in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1 (in piano part only); here as in PR-2

342

a, t, b

VS-2: no > to note 2; here as in bar 227

342

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no > to LH octave/note 2; here by analogy with RH; also as in bar 227

345

P1, P3

InS-5b: no p sub.; here as in PR-2 and by analogy with P2, P4

345, 347

C.cl.à.t.

(p) is editorial reminder from bar 340

346

B

VS-2: erroneous b to note 1; here as in PR-1, PR-2

347

P1, P2, P3, P4

348

InS-5b: no p sub. in P1, P3; here as in PR-2b (IS annotation) and in P2, P4 by analogy 3/4=6/8 by analogy with bar 233 (see remark on bar 233)

348

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no > to RH/LH chord 2; here as in bar 233

350

S, MS, T, s, a, t

VS-2: no ff; here as in PR-1, PR-2

350

MS, T, s, a, t

VS-2: • s, not tenuto lines, to notes 5, 6; here as S

350

P4

InS-5b: bar begins

350, 354, 358

C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t., Tmb.à.t., G.c.

InS-5b: no ff; here by analogy with P1, P2, P3, P4

351

S, s

VS-2: no > to note 7; here by analogy with MS, T, a, t (also in PR-1, PR-2)

351

P2

>s to RH/LH chords 2–6 from PR-2 and by analogy with P1, P3, P4

352

b

VS-2: p, not pp; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

355

P4

InS-5b: no G# to LH chord 2; no Bb to LH chord 3; here as P2 (also cf. bar 359)

356

b

VS-2: no pp; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

356–57

P1

InS-5b: LH part an octave higher, owing to omission of 8 bassa; here as in bars 352–53

356

Timb.

InS-5b: no p; here as in bar 352

356–57, 360–61

Timb.

InS-5b: no •s; here as in bars 352–53 (indicated by simile in PR-2)

358

S, MS, T, s, a, t

VS-2: no f; here by analogy with bar 354

358

P1

InS-5b: no >s to LH chords; here by analogy with RH

358

P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no >s; here by analogy with P1

359

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no >s; here by analogy with bar 358

360

b

VS-2: no pp; here as in PR-1, PR-2

360

P1

InS-5b: no p sub.; here as in PR-2b (IS annotation)

362

S, MS, T, s, a, t

VS-2: no ff; here as in PR-1, PR-2

362

T.d.b.

InS-5b: • to note 2, not ; here as in bars 363 ff.

365, 366, 367

Tmb.à.t.

InS-5b: erroneous fr, not tr

, not

; here by analogy with P1, P2, P3

366

VS-2: 4/8(2/4); here 4/8=2/4 as in Prf-1, PR-1, InS-5b, PR-2

367

PR-2b:

368

B, b

after final bar line (IS annotation)

VS-2: no p; here from Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2; ma sonore is editorial

Critical Commentary

368–88

xxxix

InS-5b, FS-5d, InS-5c contain a tam-tam part which corresponds to the pedal note on E in these bars in VS-2, PR-1. In InS-5b, this part has been crossed out. (See also remark on bars 195–205 above and ‘Editorial Policy and Filiation’, p. xxviii.)

375, 386

S, MS, s, a

VS-2: no mf; here as in PR-1, PR-2

375

P1, P2, P3

InS-5b: no p; here as in PR-2b (annotation)

375–79

P2, P3

InS-5b: IS erroneously gives P2 the music of P3 and vice versa

380

S, MS, s, a

VS-2: no mf; PR-1, PR-2 have mf only in S, MS; here by analogy with bars 375, 386

380

P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no p; here as in bar 375

380–88

Triang., Cym.

InS-5b: no lv slurs; here by analogy with bars 375–77

386

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no p; here as in bar 375

386

Triang., Cym.

p is editorial reminder

388

Timb.

InS-5b: no p; here as in bar 382

389

G.c.

f is editorial

393

FS-5d: 3/4 (IS annotation) until bar 395, where 6/8 is annotated

393

S, MS, s, a

VS-2: no f; here as in Prf-1 (annotation, probably IS), PR-1, PR-2

393

P4

InS-5b: meno f above RH quaver 2; here omitted

395

B

ff is editorial

399

P4

InS-5b: no >s; here by analogy with bars 396–97

400

VS-2: no double bar line at end of bar; here as in InS-5b

400

P2

InS-5b: no RH >s; here as in PR-2

400

Tmb.s.t.

InS-5b: no music for Tmb.s.t. Absence of a whole-bar rest for this instrument and ‘?’ (IS annotation) suggest that the content of bar 399 should be repeated in this bar, as in the present edition

401

to vocal parts from PR-2b (IS annotation). An annotation (not IS) below the system in PR-2a suggests elongating the bar: ‘6/8 without fermata in original[:] ’.

401

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

ff is editorial

401

P1, P3

InS-5b: no p; here as in PR-2

404

P1, P3

InS-5b: no > to LH chord 2; here by analogy with RH chord 2

404, 407

C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t., Cym.

InS-5b: no f; here by analogy with Tmb.à.t. in bar 404

405, 408

Timb.

p is editorial

407

P1, P3

InS-5b: no > to RH/LH chord 2; here as in bar 404

409–12

S, MS, s, a, t, b

dynamics are editorial

411

PR-2a: IS bifurcates the bar to articulate a 6/8 pattern in S and MS, reinforcing this with annotated > to S note 4. Simultaneously, he metrically divides s, a into three groups of two quavers, reinforcing this with annotated ‘3/4’ on the s, a staves. Conducting indication in PR-2b is

414

P3

p is editorial

415

P4

p is editorial

xl

415, 419

Critical Commentary

T.d.b.

418

ff is editorial

Editorial 6/8=3/4 reflects (6/8)3/4 in InS-5b (where (6/8) is erroneously omitted in P3 owing to space taken by ‘sub. mf’), (6/8)3/4 in PR-2, 3/4 in PR-2a (IS annotation), 6/8 in FS-5d (IS annotation)

418

Timb.

p is editorial reminder

419

P1

InS-5b: LH note 1 is in square brackets, as here

419

G.c.

(mf secco) is editorial reminder

420

P3

InS-5b: no fff sempre; here by analogy with P1, P2

421

B

ff is editorial (f in PR-1, PR-2)

422–23, 425–26

P1

InS-5b: no LH ottava; here as in PR-2b (annotation, possibly IS)

423

S, MS, s, a

VS-2: no f; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

423

Triang., Cym.

ff is editorial; InS-5b: no ‘baguettes de Triang.’; here as in PR-2

425

T

No fff in VS-2; here by analogy with bar 420 (ff in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2)

426

S, MS, s, a

VS-2: no f; here by analogy with T, B

426

B

No f in VS-2; here by analogy with bar 421 (also in PR-1)

426–28

P3

InS-5b: no ottava; here by analogy with bars 423–24

426, 427

C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t. InS-5b: no >s; here by analogy with bar 423, 424

427

P2

InS-5b: RH/LH note 6 enclosed in square brackets, as here

428

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

ff is editorial

428

Xyl.

sff is editorial

429, 431

t, b

VS-2: no p to note 2; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

429

P1, P2, P3

mf is editorial (p in piano part in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1)

429

P2

InS-5b: no

429, 431

P3

InS-5b: no lv slur to LH note 1; here by analogy with RH

429

Xyl.

mf is editorial

430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435

to RH chord 1; here by analogy with bar 431

InS-5b: 3/4, 6/8, 3/4, 6/8, 3/4, 2/4 indicated above the system (IS annotations, probably made after the completion of the manuscript), conflicting with the prevailing 6/8 indicated on the staves in bar 430

430

T, B, t, b

VS-2: no mf; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation) PR-1, PR-2

430

P3, Xyl.

InS-5b: no

430–34

at end of bar; here by analogy with P1, P2

The diagram on the following page compares the sources’ metrical treatment of this passage; here 6/8 as in VS-2, InS-5b:

Critical Commentary

bar 430 [59]+1

xli

bar 431 [59]+2

bar 432 [59]+3

bar 433 [59]+4

bar 434 [59]+5

VS-2 PR-1 InS-5b

(staves) (above system)

(above system)

(above system)

(above system)

(above system)

FS-5d Roy copy

FS-5d IS annotations

PR-2 PR-2b IS annotations

PR-2a IS annotations

struck out in vocal parts; replaced by

430, 432

P2

InS-5b: no •s; here by analogy with P1

430, 432

P3

InS-5b: no •s; here as in bar 434

always

431, 433, 436, 438 C.cl.à.t.

InS-5b: no sf; here as in bar 429

432

T, B, t, b

VS-2: no mf; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation)

432, 436

G.c.

(mf) is editorial reminder

433

t, b

VS-2: no poco sf, p; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotations), PR-1

433, 436, 438

P3

InS-5b: no lv slurs to RH/LH chord 1; here by analogy with bars 429, 431

433, 434

Timb.

InS-5b: no lv slurs to note 3; here by analogy with bars 429 ff.

433, 436, 438

T.d.b.

InS-5b: no dynamic markings; here as in bars 429, 431

433, 436, 438

C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t. InS-5b: no f; here as in bars 429, 431

433, 435, 436, 438, 439

G.c.

InS-5b: no lv slurs; here by analogy with bars 429 ff.

434

S, MS, s, a

VS-2: no f, no > to note 1; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

434

T, B

VS-2: no f; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

434

t, b

VS-2: no >; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2; no f in t1; here by analogy with t2, b1, b2 (also in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1)

436, 438

t, b

VS-2: no poco sf, p; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotations), PR-1

436

P1, P2, P3, P4, Timb., T.d.b.

dynamics are editorial reminders from bar 429

xlii

Critical Commentary

437, 439

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

f is editorial

437

P3

InS-5b: no •s; here as in bars 430, 432, 434

441

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

ff is editorial

441

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no sempre sff in P1, P2, P3; here as in piano part of VS-2; ff in P4 by analogy

441

Xyl.

InS-5b: no sempre sff; here by analogy with P1, P2, P3

441

T.d.b., C.cl.s.t., C.cl.à.t., G.c.

dynamics are editorial

444

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

ff is editorial

447

t, b

VS-2: no p; here as in PR-1, PR-2b (IS annotation)

447

P1, P2, P3, P4, Timb.

InS-5b: no p; here as in PR-2b (IS annotation)

448–68

P1, P2, P3

InS-5b: inconsistent application of to paired chords beamed over bar line; here consistently applied in accordance with pattern established in bars 448–49

448

Xyl., C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t., G.c.

p is editorial

449

Triang., Cym., C.cl.à.t.

p is editorial

451

s, a

VS-2: no p; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

455–56

t, b

VS-2: no cresc.; here as in t in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2 and in b by analogy

455–68

P1, P2, P3, P4, Timb.

InS-5b: no poco a poco cresc.; here as in piano part in PR-1, which has a crescendo hairpin; there should be a gradual but intense build-up to the end of the tableau

457

s, a

VS-2: no mf; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2; cresc. is editorial

457

t, b

cresc. is editorial

458

C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t.

(p) is editorial

459

Triang., Cym., Cl.cl.à.t., G.c.

(p) is editorial reminder

463, 464

S, MS, T, s, a, t, b

VS-2: no cresc.; inserted above system at bar 463 in Prf-1 (IS annotation) and printed in PR-1, PR-2; here applied individually to each voice for clarity

465

Xyl.

InS-5b: no cresc.; here by analogy with C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t., P1, P2, P3, P4

467

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

VS-2: no ff; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

468 468 468

InS-5b: above P1 plausibly applies to entire system; thus here to all voices continuing into third tableau Triang., Cym.

ff is editorial

PR-2b:

after final bar line (IS annotation)

Critical Commentary

xliii

Troisième tableau 469

VS-2: no L’istesso tempo; here as PR-1, InS-5b, PR-2

469–530

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

dynamics are editorial

482

T

VS-2, PR-1, PR-2: note 2 is a1; here b1 as corrected in PR-2b (IS annotation)

486

P1, P3

tre corde is editorial

487

P1, P3

InS-5b: no f; here by analogy with P2, P4

487

P2, P4

tre corde is editorial

488

B

VS-2: no > to note 2; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

488

Timb.

InS-5b: no

489, 503

P2, P4

(f) is editorial reminder

491–514

P4

InS-5b: articulation denoted by etc. sim. in bar 491 RH/LH note 2; here written in full

496

P1, P3

f by analogy with bar 491

503

at end of bar; here as in PR-2

VS-2: 6/8=3/4; here 3/4 as in InS-5b. IS deletes 6/8 from 6/8=3/4 in FS-5d. IS’s equivocation between 6/8 and 3/4 reflects the layering of two metrically different melodies (cf. T with P1)

503

P3, P4

(f) is editorial reminder

504–6

P1

InS-5b: no dynamics; here by analogy with bar 503

505, 506

P1

InS-5b: no >s; here by analogy with bars 503, 504

507

P1

f is editorial

507

P2

InS-5b: no f; here by analogy with bars 488–502

515

InS-5b: no 2/4(4/8); VS-2, PR-1, FS-5d have 2/4(4/8); here 2/4=4/8 as in PR-2

516–20

P2

InS-5b: >s until and including bar 520 RH/LH chord 1 denoted by etc. simile at end of bar 515

516–18

P4

InS-5b: >s denoted by etc. simile at end of bar 515

517–20

P1, P3

InS-5b: no >s; here by analogy with P2, P4

519

P4

InS-5b: no >s to RH, LH octaves, no > to LH octave 1; here by analogy with bars 515–18

520

P4

InS-5b: no > to RH octave; here by analogy with bars 515–19

524 525

InS-5b: 2/4; (4/8)2/4 in VS-2, PR-1; here 4/8=2/4 as in PR-2 P3, P4

(ff) is editorial reminder

529

Prf-1 (IS annotation), InS-5b, PR-1, PR-2: 6/8=(2/4); here 6/8=2/4 as in VS-2

533

Prf-1 (IS annotation), InS-5b, PR-1, PR-2: 9/8=(3/4); here 9/8=3/4 as in VS-2

534

Prf-1 (IS annotation), InS-5b, PR-1, PR-2: 6/8=(2/4); here 6/8=2/4 as in VS-2

534

S, MS

VS-2: f, not ff; here as in PR-2

534

T

VS-2: no ff; here by analogy with S, MS

534

B

VS-2: no ff; here as in PR-2

534

b2

VS-2: no # to F note 5; here as in PR-1, PR-2

536

t, P1, P2, P3, P4 f is editorial

xliv

Critical Commentary

538

S, MS, s, a

f is editorial

538

C.cl.à.t.

InS-5c: ‘petite taille’ indicated at beginning of stave (in Jacob’s hand). Roy copied this erroneously to the triangle stave in FS-5d, in which source IS has deleted the instruction and re-written it adjacent to the C.cl.à.t. stave. (See remarks on bars 195–205, 368–88, 682–95 and ‘Editorial Policy and Filiation’, p. xxviii.)

543–44

VS-2, InS-5b: no

; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

544

G.c.

InS-5b: no f; here as in PR-2

545

Tmb.à.t.

InS-5b: no f; here as in PR-2

546

FS-5d: 6/8 (IS annotation) under system, restored to 3/4 in bar 547 (IS annotation)

548–56

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

dynamics are editorial

549–55

P1, P3

InS-5b: RH/LH >s denoted by etc. sim. in bar 549

551

P4

InS-5b: no

556

P2, P4

InS-5b: no ff; here by analogy with P1, P3

559

Timb., Xyl.

InS-5b: no ff; here by analogy with P1, P2, P3, P4

559

C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t., C.cl.à.t., Tmb.à.t.

f is editorial

560–64

P3

InS-5b: no RH/LH

560, 562, 564

P4

InS-5b: no

560–64

Xyl.

InS-5b: no >s from e2 bar 560; here by analogy with bars 559–560 dyad 1

562, 564

P2, Timb.

InS-5b: no >s; here by analogy with bar 560

565

Xyl., T.d.b.

InS-5b: ff as a reminder; here omitted

s; here by analogy with P2

s; here by analogy with bar 559

to RH dyad 1; here by analogy with bar 559

PR-2b: large from beginning of bar to the beginning of bar 571, where p is given (IS annotations); the size and position of these dynamic markings suggest that they apply to the whole score

566

566–69

Xyl.

InS-5b: no >s from bar 566 note 2; here by analogy with bar 565

571

S

VS-2: no lamentando; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2. p is editorial.

580

MS

VS-2: no lamentando, no p; here by analogy with S, bar 571

583, 596, 610

P2

InS-5b: no p; here as in bar 571

588

P1, P3

(p) is editorial reminder

589, 603

P4

InS-5b: no p; here as in bar 577

595–96

MS

VS-2: no

597

S

VS-2: no lamentando; here as in bar 571

615

PR-2b:

across bar line; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

after final bar line (IS annotation)

Quatrième tableau 616

VS-2, InS-5b: no Allegro; here as in PR-1, PR-2

616

t

VS-2: no > to note 6; here as in s (also in PR-2)

616

P3, P4

InS-5b: no ff; here by analogy with P1

Critical Commentary

xlv

618

s, t

VS-2: no > to note 6; here as in bar 616

620

S, MS

f is editorial

620

P2, P4

(ff) is editorial reminder

622

T

ff is editorial

622

P4

InS-5b: no > to LH c# 3; here as in bar 624

623

P3

InS-5b: no b to b1 LH note 1; here by analogy with bar 625

624

P3

InS-5b: no >s; here as in bar 622

624

P4

InS-5b: no > to RH e2; here as in bar 622

624

Xyl.

InS-5b: no >s; here by analogy with bar 622

625

P1

InS-5b: no

625

P3

InS-5b: no > to LH note 4; here as in PR-2

627

P1

InS-5b: no >s to RH f 4, LH f 1; here as in PR-2

627

P2

InS-5b: no >s; here as in PR-2

628

S, MS, T, s, a, t

ff is editorial

628–30

P1

InS-5b: >s from bar 628 LH quaver 6 to bar 630 LH quaver 4 denoted by etc.

628

P1, P2, P3, P4, Xyl.

dynamics are editorial reminders

628–31

P3

RH

628

P4

InS-5b: no >s; no très sonore; here by analogy with P1

629–30

P4

InS-5b: no >s; here by analogy with P1

630

B, b

ff is editorial

630

Cym.

(f) is editorial reminder

631

P2, P3

InS-5b: no >s to semiquavers 7–12; here by analogy with >s to semiquavers 4–6

632

b

f e ben marcato is editorial

632

P1, P2, P3, P4

FS-5d: > to chords struck on RH/LH quaver 4 (IS annotation)

632

P2

InS-5b: no fff; here by analogy with P1, P3, P4

632

P2, P3

InS-5b: no >s; here by analogy with bar 631

632

G.c.

InS-5b: no f; here as in PR-2

637, 639

B

VS-2: no port.; here as in Prf-1 (annotations), PR-1, PR-2

637

P2

InS-5b: no > to LH note 1; here as in bar 639

638, 640

P1, P3, Xyl.

InS-5b: no f; here as in the piano part in bar 638 of VS-2, PR-1

638

P2

InS-5b: no f; here as in bar 640

638, 639, 640

P4

InS-5b: no LH >s; here as in PR-2

639–49

S, MS, B, s, a, t, b

dynamics are editorial

641–44

B

Prf-2: marginal annotation ‘à l’8b’ adjacent to bar 641 of stave (the final bar of the page); bars 642–644 note 2 annotated ‘à l’8 basse’ above stave. The final figure of bar 644 is circled and a marginal note indicates:

to note 7; here by analogy with bar 623

ottava is editorial

xlvi

Critical Commentary

which facilitates the octave transfer back to the printed pitch level. (All IS annotations.) IS clearly toyed with the idea of taking the bass solo part of bars 641–644 note 3 down an octave, perhaps for a specific soloist or as an ossia. 645

s

PR-2b: tenuto lines to notes 1, 2 (IS annotations)

645, 646

s, a, t

Tenuto lines are editorial

645

P2

InS-5b: • to final RH chord; here as in PR-2

645

P3

InS-5b, PR-1: RH slur extends over bar line to bar 646 RH chord 1 (also in the piano part of VS-2); here by analogy with P1 in InS-5b

647

P4

InS-5b: RH slur ends RH quaver 4; here as in PR-2

649

P4

InS-5b: no b to a RH chord 5; here as in the piano part of VS-2, PR-1

651

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

VS-2: no f; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotations), PR-1, PR-2

651

s

VS-2: no > to note 1; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

651

P1

InS-5b: no > to final RH dyad; here as in PR-2

651

P3, P4

InS-5b: no ff; here ff as suggested by très fort et détaché in P3

652

P2

InS-5b: f 2, not g b 2, in RH chord 3; here as P1 and PR-2

653

P1

InS-5b: no >s to final RH/LH chord; here as P2 (also in PR-2)

653

P1, P2

InS-5b: no > to g b 1 LH note 6; here as in PR-2

653

T.d.b.

InS-5b: no dynamics; here as in bar 651

655

a, b

VS-2: no ff; here by analogy with s, t

655

P3

InS-5b: no • to LH octave; here as P4

656, 657, 660, 663, 664

P1, P2, P3

InS-5b: no articulation; here by analogy with P4

657

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

VS-2: no sff; here as in bar 656

660

S, MS, B, s, a, t, b

VS-2: no

660, 663, 664

Xyl.

sf is editorial

660

T.d.b., C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t., C.cl.à.t., Tmb.à.t., Cym.

dynamics are editorial reminders

663

S, MS, B, s, a, t, b

VS-2: no sff, no s; here as in bar 660

663

P1, P2, P3, P4

(sempre sfff) is editorial reminder

664

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

VS-2: no sff, no s; here as in bars 656, 657

665

S, MS, T

f is editorial

665

P2, P3, P4

f is editorial

667

P3

InS-5b: no sff to c3 RH note 2; here by analogy with sff to c3 RH note 1

668

P1, P3, Xyl., Timb., T.d.b.

f is editorial

s; here as in bars 656, 657

Critical Commentary

668

P3

InS-5b: no sff to c3 RH note 1; here by analogy with bar 667

670

S, MS

VS-2: no f; here by analogy with s, a

673

P2

InS-5b: no >s to RH/LH chord 1; here as in bar 670

673

P4

InS-5b: no > to RH note 1, no LH slur, no • to final LH octave; here as in bar 670

675

xlvii

PR-2b: poco rall. above system (IS annotation)

675

B

VS-2: f; here ff in order to procure a reduction in the choral volume in bars 677, 678

675

b

ff is editorial

675

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no ff; here as in PR-2

676–78

S, MS, T, s, a, t, b

dynamics are editorial

678–79, 681

MS

VS-2: passage marked ad libitum; deleted in Prf-1 (IS annotation)

678

Timb.

InS-5b: no ; here as in PR-2

680

T

VS-2: no f; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

682–88

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t

dynamics are editorial

682

P1, C.cl.s.t., G.c. p is editorial

682

P3

p ma sonore is editorial

682–95

C.cl.s.t.

InS-5b: Tmb.s.t. replaced by a second C.cl.s.t. in this passage (see remark on bar 538)

683

P1

InS-5b: no

685

P1, P2

InS-5b: no s; here as in bar 683

690

b, P1, P2, P3, P4, Timb.

f is editorial

690

P1, P3

InS-5b: no > to final LH chord; here as in PR-2

691

s

f is editorial

691, 692, 693

P1, P3

InS-5b: no >s; here as in PR-2

691

C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t. InS-5b: no f; here by analogy with C.cl.à.t., Tmb.à.t. in bar 690

692

s, a, t, b

Russian Shchee (cabbage soup) consists of only two letters, a consonant (transliterated as ‘shch’) and a vowel (transliterated as ‘ee’). Since the word is given the durational value of a quaver, this vowel ought to be pronounced. In addition, the ending ‘ee’ rhymes with the previous lines (zamashkEE, rubashkEE), and it is part of the local assonance pattern. It is not clear what Stravinsky meant by placing ‘ee’ in parenthesis.

696

P1, P2, P3, P4

f is editorial

697

a

VS-2: no notes 2–5; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

to LH octave 1; here by analogy with P3

698, 700, 701, 702 P1, P3

InS-5b: no LH slur; here by analogy with bar 697

698

P2, P4

InS-5b: no

699

P2, P4

InS-5b: no articulation to RH/LH chord 2; here by analogy with bar 703

699

Timb.

InS-5b:

702

P2, P4

InS-5b: no

702

Xyl.

(sff sempre) is editorial reminder

703

P1, P3

InS-5b: no > to P1 RH chord 1; here as in PR-2b (IS annotation) and to P3 by analogy

to final RH chord; here as in PR-2

, not

; here as in adjacent bars

to LH octave 1; here as in PR-2

xlviii

Critical Commentary

703

C.cl.s.t.

f is editorial reminder

704

B

p is editorial

704–9

P1, P2, P3, P4

dynamics are editorial

708

VS-2, InS-5b: no Poco meno mosso; here as in PR-1, PR-2

708

S

p is editorial

710–11

S

VS-2: no port., no slide line across bar line; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

710

P1

InS-5b: no slur to demisemiquavers 1–12; here by analogy with bars 708, 709

710

P2

InS-5b has:

Notes 3 and 4 are a later insertion and consequently the bar does not add up metrically. PR-2 corrects this as:

Here as in PR-2a (IS annotation). 710

P4

InS-5b: ff; here f to match B in bar 711

711

S

VS-2: no colla parte; here as in PR-1, PR-2

711

P2

f is editorial

711, 712

P2

InS-5b: no >s; here as in P4

711, 712

P4

InS-5b: no >s to triplet semiquavers bar 711, no > to LH octave bar 712; here by analogy with bar 711 notes 1–4

712, 713, 714

P1

InS-5b: no slurs; here by analogy with bars 708, 709, 710 (also in PR-2b (IS annotations))

715

VS-2, InS-5b: no Tempo I; here as in PR-1, PR-2

715

s, a

f is editorial

715

P1, P2, P3, P4

f is editorial

715

P2, P4

InS-5b: no

715, 717, 718

Timb.

InS-5b: no • s; here by analogy with bars 698 ff. and bar 720

715

G.c.

InS-5b: no f; here as in bar 696

716

b

VS-2: no f; here by analogy with T, B

719

P4

InS-5b: no

719

C.cl.à.t.

f is editorial

721

t

f is editorial

723

C.cl.s.t.

InS-5b: no

to LH octave 1; here as in PR-2

to LH note 3; here by analogy with bars 715 ff.

; here by analogy with T.d.b.

Critical Commentary

724–61

S, MS, T, B, s, a, b

dynamics are editorial

727

P4

InS-5b: no p; here by analogy with P2, bar 724

736

P1, P3

InS-5b: no sfff; here as in bar 734

741–42

B

VS-2: no fausset; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

742, 743

P2, P4

InS-5b: no LH s; here by analogy with RH

742

C.cl.à.t.

InS-5b: no p; here by analogy with Tmb.à.t., bar 741

743

P1

InS-5b: no tenuto line; here as in PR-2b (IS annotation)

744, 746, 748

B

VS-2: no fausset; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

744–49

P2, P4

InS-5b: no s; here as in bars 742, 743

750

Xyl.

InS-5b: no f; here by analogy with P1, P2, P3, P4

750

T.d.b.

InS-5b: no f; here by analogy with C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t., Tmb.à.t., Cym.

752

P1, P2, P3, P4

Open slurs are editorial

755–56

P1

InS-5b: no RH slur over bar line; here by analogy with P2, P3

755–64

P1

InS-5b: no •s; here as in P2, P3, P4

755

P1, P3

LH

755

P2, P4

InS-5b: no b to final RH note; here as in PR-2

756

xlix

slur is editorial

See ‘Igor Stravinsky’s Les Noces, the Rite of Passage’, p. xviii, n. 62, for Stravinsky’s understanding of svat

756

P1

InS-5b: no sempre legatissimo; here by analogy with P2

756

P2, P4

RH

763

B

‘- (a) -’ in Russian text to note 2 from the sketches, owing to the tenuto line to note 2

765

P2

InS-5b: no s to LH notes 6, 7; here as in PR-2

767, 769, 772, 774, 775

T

VS-2: no >s; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotations), PR-1, PR-2

767

P3

InS-5b: RH note 4 is dyad f 2, a2; here a2 in keeping with prevailing texture

782

T

VS-2: no Russian text and consequently no rhythm for Russian text; the rhythm of the French text in VS-2 is different from that in PR-1, PR-2; Russian text and rhythm inserted in Prf-1 (IS annotation). Here T as in PR-1, PR-2, except editorial to T note 1 to match s in instrumental parts. (VS-2: no in T, no in piano part; FS-5d has senza pause after final bar line and deleted s in P1, P2, P3, P4 (IS annotations).)

782

T.d.b.

PR-2: no second T.d.b., no

783

p is editorial

on note 1; >s to notes 3, 4 of first T.d.b.

VS-2, InS-5b: no A tempo; here as in PR-2b (IS annotation)

783

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no p; here as in PR-2b (IS annotation), where its size and position indicate that it applies to the whole score

794

s

f is editorial

794

P3

InS-5b: no > to final RH dyad; here as in PR-2b (IS annotation)

794

P4

InS-5b: no ff; here by analogy with P1, P3; no # to c2 RH crotchet 2; here as in P1, P3

799

S, MS, a

f is editorial

816

P2

InS-5b: no f; here by analogy with P4

l

Critical Commentary

816

Timb.

InS-5b: forte above note 1, followed by continuation dashes until middle of bar 817

821–33

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

dynamics are editorial

822

P2

InS-5b: no sff; here as in P4

825

b1, b2

VS-2: note 3 in b1 is d, not c; note 5 in b2 is c, not d; here as in PR-1, PR-2

829

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no p; here as in bar 783

831, 832, 833, 834, 835

a

VS-2: no > to note 1; here as in bars 829, 830

833

T, B, s

VS-2: no >s to notes 3, 4; here as in PR-2

833

t, b

VS-2: no >s to notes 3, 4; here by analogy with T, B, s

835

s

VS-2: no >s to notes 3, 4; here as in PR-2

840

P1, P3

InS-5b: no s to LH chords 1, 2; here by analogy with RH

840–47

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

dynamics are editorial

840

P2, P4

InS-5b: no ff; here by analogy with P1, P3

841

VS-2: (4/8)2/4; InS-5b has 2/4; here 4/8=2/4 as in PR-2

843

P1

InS-5b:

to RH chord 4 erroneously to RH chord 5

845

P3

InS-5b: no >s to RH/LH notes 1–6; here by analogy with P1, P2, P4

845

Xyl.

f is editorial reminder

846

P4

InS-5b: no

847

P2

InS-5b: no § to g1 RH chord 7, no § to g LH chord 7

847

P3

InS-5b: no § to g1 LH chord 7

848–62

T, B, s, a, t, b

dynamics are editorial

848

Timb.

InS-5b: no dynamics; here by analogy with bar 843

849

Timb.

dynamics are editorial

855

P2

InS-5b: no

855

P2, P4

InS-5b: no fff; here by analogy with P1, P3

856

P1, P3

InS-5b: no p; here as suggested by sub. dolcissimo, legatissimo

859

P2

p is editorial

862

T

(En chantant) is editorial

862

P3

InS-5b: no >s; here as in P1, P2, P4

865

P1, P3

InS-5b: no >s to RH/LH quaver 2; here as in PR-2b (IS annotations)

865

P2, P4

InS-5b: no > to LH quaver 2; here as in PR-2b (IS annotation)

865–66

P2, P4

InS-5b: RH ottava erroneously omitted, owing to commencement of a new page

867

B

ff is editorial

867

P2, P4

f is editorial

868

S, MS, s, a

f is editorial

868

P1, P3

f is editorial

870

B

f e leggiermente is editorial

to LH note 1; here by analogy with bar 848

s to notes 5–10; here as P4 (also in PR-2b (IS annotations))

Critical Commentary

li

(f) is editorial reminder

870

P2, P4

873

C.cl.s.t., Tmb.s.t. (sempre forte e secco) is editorial reminder

873

G.c.

(secco e p sempre) is editorial reminder

874

B, b

VS-2: no ; here as in B in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2 and in b by analogy. f e leggiermente in b is editorial.

878

t

VS-2: no

879–82

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

dynamics are editorial

879

b

VS-2: no b2 part; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2

879

P3

InS-5b: no s to RH dyads 1, 2; here as in PR-2

880

P1

InS-5b: no > to RH chord 3; here by analogy with bar 870 ff.

880

P2

InS-5b: no ff; here as in P4, bar 879

880

P3

InS-5b: no s to RH dyads 1, 2; here as in PR-2; with bar 870 ff.

884

T

VS-2: no ff; here as in PR-1, PR-2

885, 886

S, MS

ff is editorial

886

B

VS-2: f; here editorial ff

886

s, a

ff is editorial

887

b

VS-2: no >s to notes 3, 4; here as in PR-2

887

P4

InS-5b: no

888

S, MS, s, t

ff is editorial

888

P2, P4

InS-5b: no fff sub.; here by analogy with P1, P3

888

T.d.b.

InS-5b: no f to note 1; here as in bar 903

; here as in Prf-1 (IS annotation), PR-1, PR-2. f is editorial.

to RH dyads 3, 4 by analogy

; here by analogy with P2

888, 895, 903, 907 C.cl.à.t., f is editorial Tmb.à.t., Cym. 889

a, b

ff is editorial

890, 907

T.d.b.

InS-5b: no

892, 896, 909, 911 et seq.

P1, P2, P3, P4

The ‘bells’ chord (struck simultaneously with Cloche and Crotales) should be played with sustaining pedal in these bars (see also remarks on bars 911, 913 and bars 928, 932, 934, 937, 941 below)

895

s, a, t

VS-1: French text is ‘et tout à côté’, not ‘et sous l’oreiller’; here as in PR-1, PR-2 and as S, MS

895

P1, P2, P3, P4

(fff) is editorial reminder

895

P1, P3

InS-5b: no to LH quaver 2; here by analogy with RH octave 1; no here as in PR-2b (IS annotation)

895

P4

InS-5b: no lv slur to LH octave 2; here by analogy with P1, P2, P3; no lv slur to RH a; here as in PR-2; no to RH note 1, LH octaves 1, 2; here as P2

896–904

S, MS, T, B, s, a, t, b

dynamics are editorial

896

P1, P3

f is editorial

897

P3

p is editorial (mp in piano part in VS-2, PR-1)

; here by analogy with bar 894

to LH quaver 2;

lii

Critical Commentary

899

P1, P4

p is editorial

901

a

VS-2: fin front of note 1; here omitted, as in Prf-1, PR-1, PR-2

903

C.cl.à.t.

InS-5b: no notes 9–12; here as in PR-2

907

P1, P2, P3, P4

PR-2: lv slur to final RH/LH quaver in P2, P3, P4; lv slur also to final RH/LH quaver in P1 in PR-2b (IS annotation); here omitted as in InS-5b. (fff) is editorial reminder.

907

P2, P4

InS-5b: no s to RH/LH note 8; here by analogy with bar 895

909–10

T

VS-2, Prf-1, Prf-2: b2, not b1; here as in PR-1, PR-2

911

VS-2: no annotation).

; here as in InS-5b, PR-1. Meno mosso from PR-2b (IS

911

B

VS-2: no f; here as in PR-1, PR-2

911, 913

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b, InS-5c, FS-5d, PR-2 and subsequent reprints: no piano chords. The omission of all four pianos in the chord struck in synchronisation with the cloche and crotales in bars 909, 916 et seq. in these sources reflects Stravinsky’s original idea of scoring the ‘bells’ sound for cloche and crotales only, without pianos, from bar 892 (where the ‘bells’ sound occurs for the first time) to the last bar of the composition, as seen in the copies InS-5c and FS-5d. The pianos in the ‘bells’ chord in bars 892, 896, 909, 916, 919, 921, 927, 929, 933, 936, 938, 944, 946 and 949 are clearly a later addition to InS-5b: bars 915–26 are squeezed into the top margin of the penultimate page of the manuscript on small-size staves ruled by the stravigor, a special device invented by IS for drawing musical staves, and the insertion of the pianos’ chord in other bars (892, 896, 909, 927, 929, 933, 936, 938, 944, 946 and 949) has entailed erasures, some clearly visible, of earlier rests. It is highly plausible that IS overlooked bars 911 and 913 when adding the pianos to the sonority of the ‘bells’ chord from bars 892 onwards. It seems logical to suggest, then, that Stravinsky altered the instrumentation, possibly as the result of the rehearsal process, after Jacob and Roy had completed making their copies. The pianos do play this chord in bars 911 and 913 in Stravinsky’s 1934 recording of the work with the BBC Chorus [CAX 7205-10; reissued on EMI CDS 7 54607 2].

928, 932, 934, 937, 941

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: extension dashes after each indication. These dashes stop short of the ‘bells’ chord in bars 929, 933, 936, 938, 944, because they predate IS’s insertion of these chords in this manuscript (see remark on bars 911, 913 above), misleadingly suggesting that the pedal should be raised before the ‘bells’ chord is struck. Dashes omitted in present edition.

941, 942

P1, P2, P3, P4

InS-5b: no s; here by analogy with bars 928–29 ff.

NOTES ON THE TEXTS AND TRANSLITERATION MARGARITA MAZO, DINA LENTSNER & MILLAN SACHANIA

Russian text

and for this reason the present edition provides a transliteration that aims at facilitating the performance of the work by non-Russian speakers, without their embarking on an extensive study of Russian diction. The approach to the transliteration here is therefore pragmatic: it is based not on written or spoken words, but on the words’ aural qualities when sung. The difference may be demonstrated by the pronunciation of the Russian unstressed i, which is always longer in singing, and which is consequently transliterated here as ee. To this end, we have designed transliteration procedures that do not entirely conform to any specific existing model; though we have employed some elements of various known transliteration systems, we have combined and modified them to suit our purpose. As always, however, consultation with a specialist in Russian diction or a native speaker is highly desirable, since, despite our efforts, certain sounds can only be fully grasped aurally. The table below explains our transliteration of those vowels and consonants that are pronounced differently in English. They are listed in the order of the Roman alphabet with examples of sounds in English that convey the desired Russian equivalents as closely as possible.

Stravinsky’s final draft of the piano-vocal score, VS-2, serves as the source for the Russian text in this new edition, which presents the text in both Cyrillic and transliteration. Stravinsky’s text uses rural forms of Russian words, dialect vocabulary and speech idioms, all of which contribute to the remarkable sonority of Les Noces. Different spellings and pronunciations of the same word in VS-2 are thus retained in this edition: at [123], for instance, oolitse is first spelt OOlitsE, then YUlitsE, and finally, YUleetsÏ. We have also preserved the composer’s adjustments to punctuation and capitalisation according to his musical phrasing. The Russian orthography and punctuation in VS-2 have been altered so that they conform to current standards. Obvious errors in the Russian text have been tacitly corrected; such corrections have been made in consultation with Stravinsky’s sources of folk songs. The transliteration of Russian text is always a demanding task, since no single existing system can fit different purposes satisfactorily. Stravinsky clearly stated that he preferred Russian as the language for the performance of Les Noces,

Transliteration

Similar sounds in English pronunciation

Russian

a

As a in fAther.

ch

As ch in peaCH.

e

As e in sEt. (For use after soft consonants indicated by an apostrophe, see Nota bene in Additional symbols.)

ee

As ee in indEEd.

g

As g in Go.

ï

No exact English equivalent; a thick back-throat sound, somewhat close to i in Ill or dIll.

kh

As ch in BaCH in German, or j in José in Spanish.

o

As o in pOrt.

oo

As oo in kangarOO.

r

Always rolled.

shch

No exact equivalent. The sound is close to sh in SHeet or sh ch in freSH CHeese, if said as one word: freSHCHeese.

ts

As ts in caTS.

y

As y at the end of daY or boY.

ya

As ya in YArd. (For use after soft consonants indicated by an apostrophe, see Nota bene in Additional symbols.)

ye

As ye in YEllow. (For use after soft consonants indicated by an apostrophe, see Nota bene in Additional symbols.)

yo

As yo in YOga. (For use after soft consonants indicated by an apostrophe, see Nota bene in Additional symbols.)

yu

As YOU or eau in bEAUtiful. (For use after soft consonants indicated by an apostrophe, see Nota bene in Additional symbols.)

zh

As s in pleaSure.

liii

liv

Notes on the Texts and Transliteration

Additional symbols

e (schwa)

(apostrophe)

A sign for a mid-central neutral vowel, used for the unstressed vowels a and o; its sound is between a and o, close to o in mOther or to a in sofA. Softness sign; used to soften the preceding consonant and to allow a short glide of the following vowel to be heard, as n in News or t in Tune. Soft consonants result from raising the tongue higher than for a corresponding ‘hard’, non-palatalised sound. Nota bene: after the softness sign, the Russian e sounds similar to e in yEsterday, but with a shortened and almost imperceptible glide. The same principle applies to ya, ye, yo, and yu after the softness sign. M.M., D.L.

French text The French text of Les Noces is a careful adaptation of the Russian, rather than a direct translation, undertaken by Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz in close collaboration with the composer. The French text in the present edition corresponds to that in VS-2, with four provisos. In the first place, punctuation has been added where required (even though Ramuz, while proofreading, indicated that he liked the lack of punctuation and left the text uncorrected intentionally).1 Secondly, the versification has been clarified, where necessary, through the use of capital letters to denote the beginning of new lines. Then, where there is a discrepancy between the text in VS-2 and that in PR-1, the text from PR-1 has been given (with a remark in the Critical Commentary), which almost certainly reflects later changes made by Ramuz. The fourth point concerns the unstressed

1

final syllable of French words such as comme, which may or may not be fitted to an individual note in the vocal parts; frequently this syllable is ‘mute’. VS-2 treats the text in these instances in a variety of ways: a one-syllable comme, for instance, may be given as comm(e), comm’ or in full, comme. In the present edition, an apostrophe generally replaces a mute syllable where the next word begins with a consonant, but not if the ensuing word begins with a vowel. The ‘mute’ syllable is generally given where the word ends a line or phrase on a sustained note. Finally, a remark on the notation. Stravinsky sometimes had to rewrite the melody of the vocal parts in order to accommodate the French text. In this edition, any notes that belong only to the French text are cue-sized. M.M., M.S.

See Ramuz, letter to Stravinsky, 3 March 1922 (Stravinsky: Selected Correspondence, ed. Robert Craft, 3 vols (New York, 1982–85), vol. 3, p. 67).

lv

A photograph from a rehearsal of Les Noces on 3 February 1930 at Westminster Central Hall, London (BBC Concerts of Contemporary Music), conducted by Ernest Ansermet. Stravinsky liked this placement of the performers. [PSF]

L’ENSEMBLE INSTRUMENTAL

1. Quatre parties de Piano 2. Timbales (au nombre de quatre) 3. Xylophone à marteaux et Cloche en pour la fin de la pièce

(son réel)

4. Tambour de basque, Triangle, Cymbale 5. Caisse claire sans timbre, Tambour sans timbre, un second Tambour de basque, et deux Crotales en pour la fin de la pièce 6. Caisse claire à timbre, Tambour à timbre 7. Grosse-caisse et Cymbales

(sons réels)

à Serge Diaghilev

DIE HOCHZEIT

THE WEDDING

I. TEIL

PART I

I. BILD

SCENE I

BEI DER BRAUT

THE BRIDE’S CHAMBER

= 80

Igor Stravinsky

Soprano Solo Zopf, Tress

o my

mein tress,

schö ner O

Zopf!... thou

O fair

mein blon der tress of my

lo hair,

se O

ge my

flocht’ lit

ner tle

Zopf!... tress.

Mezzo-Soprano Solo Ténor Solo 8

Basse Solo

CHŒUR

Soprano Alto Ténor 8

Basse 8

Piano I

sempre

8

Piano II

sempre

8

Piano III

sempre

8

Piano IV

sempre

Timbales Xylophone Cloche Tambour de basque

baguette en bois

Triangle Cymbale Caisse claire sans timbre/ Tambour de basque Tambour sans timbre Crotales Caisse claire à timbre Tambour à timbre Cymbales Grosse-caisse

© 1922, 1925 Chester Music Limited, 14-15 Berners Street, London, W1T 3LJ, United Kingdom, worldwide rights except the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, Canada, South Africa and all so-called reversionary territories where the copyright © 1996 is held jointly by Chester Music Limited and Schott Music GmbH & Co. KG, Mainz, Germany. This edition © 2005 Chester Music Limited.

rev. 6/2010

2

1 Voshaugant – Curtain = 160

11

=

S. 1) Ganz 1) My

lang mo

her ther

ab hän brush’d thee,

2) In 2) My

mei mo

nen ther

un be twin’d thee

gend hab mo ther schwer ten with a

ich brush’d

dich ge thee at

tra eve

gen ning,

Jung ring

mäd chen of

ta sil

gen ver.

8

= P. I, III

=

m.d.

= sub.

P. II, IV

=

secco

=

Cym. 2da volta tacet

(Die Braut)

(The Bride) 21

S.

1

=

=

=

ach, ach, ach! Im woe is me, O

mer a

=

1) Ü

berm kur zen Kleid ther brush’d my tress.

1) Mo

a.

=

2

Ach, O

s.

* 2+3

=

2) Ü 2) Mo

berm kur zen Kleid ther brush’d my tress.

=

1) Ü

berm kur zen Kleid ther brush’d my tress.

1) Mo

2) Ü 2) Mo

8

berm kur zen Kleid ther brush’d my tress.

8

=

=

=

=

=

=

8

8

P. I, III

P. II, IV

5

=

5

5

=

[* The metrical divisions occasionally given above the system are annotated by Stravinsky in one of his conducting scores, PR-2b. (See ‘Editorial Policy and Filiation’.)]

5

wie der ach! las poor me.

(Die Freundinnen)

2

3

(The Bridesmaids) = 80

mezza voce

24

3+2

s. Wir käm men und sträh len I comb her tre ses, her

Na stjin kas Flech ten, fair gol den tres ses,

wir Nas

flech ten und le gen das ta sia’s bright hair, Ti mo

Haar uns rer Freun din; feev na’s fair tres ses.

Na I

stjin kas blon des Haar, comb and plait it, with

mezza voce

a.

P. I

8b

8b

P. III

sub. meno

8b

sub. meno

8b

sub. meno

8b

P. II, IV

sub. meno

8b

sub. meno

sub. meno

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. poco

sempre

3 29

3+2

M.s. Schlin I

get will

ro tes Band hin ein! twine her gol den hair. sub.

s. fest rib

ge floch ten soll es bon red I twine

sein. it.

Wir I

käm men und sträh len comb her fair tres ses,

Na stjin kas Flech ten, bright gol den tres ses,

sub.

a. 8

P. I

8b

8

8b

P. III

sub. meno

8b

P. II, IV

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t.

8b

8b

8b

sub. meno

wir I

4

34

3+2

s. flech ten und le gen das Haar uns rer Freun din, comb and I twine Ti mo feev na’s fair tres ses,

Na I

stass jusch kas Haar, bind her tres ses,

Ti I

fe je wnas Haar, mo comb them and plait them,

uns rer With a

Na stjin fine comb

ka Blond haar. I dress them.

a.

P. I

8b

P. III

sub. meno

8b

sub. meno

8b

P. II, IV

8b

sub. meno

sub. meno

sub. meno

8b

8b

sub. meno

sub. meno

sub. meno

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t.

Braut) 4 (Die (The Bride)

Tempo I

= 80

39

S. Ei nes Cru el, 8

P. I

8

P. III

8

P. II, IV

Partie de Triang.

Xyl. (baguette en bois)

Cym.

Ta ges heart less,

kam came

die the

Hei match

rats ver ma ker,

mitt Pi

le ti

rin, less,

hat te nur eins pi ti less cru

im el

Sinn, one,

müh lo pi ti

sen less

5

5

50

= 160

S. Geld cru

ge el

winn. one.

Sie She

stürz tore

te my

sich tres

kur ses,

zer tore

hand my

auf bright

8

P. I, III

sub.

P. II, IV

Cym. secco

[

59

=

6

]

S. mei nen gol den

Zopf, hair,

teil She

te tore

s. Auf pull’d

it

ih tear

ren Zopf... ing it.

a.

8

P. I, III

come sopra

sub.

P. II, IV

5

ihn und my

legt’ hair

zwei that

6

66

S. ste fe she might

pfe

Zö plait

um it

mei in

nen Two

Kopf. plaits,

s. Um plait

ing

ih it

ren Kopf... in two.

a. 8

P. I, III

5

P. II, IV

2+3

7

73

= 80

S. Ach, O

ach, ach, ach! Im woe is me, O

mer a

wie der ach! las, poor me.

(Die Freundinnen)

(The Bridesmaids) mezza voce

s. Wir käm men und sträh len Na stjin kas Flech ten, wir flech ten und le gen das I comb her tres ses, her fair gol den tres ses, Nas ta sia’s bright hair, Ti mo mezza voce

a. 8

8

8

8

P. I

8b

P. III

8b

sub. meno

8b

P. II, IV

5

8b

sub. meno

5

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. poco

sub. meno

sempre

sub. meno

7

78

8

2+3

3+2

M.s. Schlin get With a

ro tes Band hin ein, rib bon of bright red,

und twine

ein it

blau es with a

Und twine

ein it

blau es with a

s. Haar uns rer Freun din, feev na’s fair tres ses,

Na I

stjin kas blon des Haar, comb and plait it, I

fest ge floch ten soll es comb it and bind up her

sein. hair,

a. 8

P. I

8b

P. III

8

8b

sub. meno

8b

P. II, IV

8b

sub. meno

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t.

(Die Braut)

(The Bride) Tempo I

84

9

= 80

= 120

S. O mein Gold en

lan tres

ger ses

Zopf, bright,

o O

mein my

schön tres

er ses

Zopf... fair.

M.s. o rib

ben bon

drein! blue.

s.

o rib

ben bon

drein! blue.

Grä me Weep not,

dich O

nicht, dear

mein one,

a.

o rib

ben bon

drein! blue.

Grä me Weep not,

dich O

nicht, dear

mein one,

8

P. I, III

8

m.d.

P. II, IV

Partie de Triang.

Xyl. (baguette en bois)

Cym. secco

8

92

s.

gel Vö weep,

chen, not,

jamm Let

re no

nicht, mein grief af

Gold kehl flict thee,

chen, my

klag’ dear

nicht, one,

wei Weep

ne no

nicht, Na more, Nas

stass jusch ta sia,

ka, O

a.

gel Vö weep,

chen, not,

jamm Let

re no

nicht, mein grief af

Gold kehl flict thee,

chen, my

klag’ dear

nicht, one,

wei Weep

ne no

nicht, Na more, Nas

stass jusch ta sia,

ka, O

P. I, III

P. II, IV

10

98

T. 8

um Of your

s.

klag’ weep

nicht, no

wei long

ne er,

nicht, my

klei heart,

ne my

Ti Ti

mo mo

fe feev

je

wna, na.

a.

klag’ weep

nicht, no

wei long

ne er,

nicht, my

klei heart,

ne my

Ti Ti

mo mo

fe feev

je

wna, na.

8

9

P. I, III

9

P. II, IV

9

T.d.b.

C.cl.à.t.

avec le pouce

dein fa

9

11

3+2

103

T. 8

ge ther

lieb think,

tes your

Et mo

tern ther’s

haus. care,

dein your

El mo

tern ther’s

haus. care,

B. Schau, dein Schwie ger Your fa ther in

s.

Und And

sei of

ne the

lieb li che Nach ti nigh tin gale in the

gall! trees.

a.

Und And

sei of

ne the

lieb li che Nach ti nigh tin gale in the

gall! trees.

8

8

poco meno

P. I, III

5

1

poco meno

P. II, IV

6

Timb.

109

S. dei too

Und She

ne Schwie ger will bid you

mut wel

ter come

ist And

gü ten

tig der

wie ly

dein will

deine Schwie ger will bid you

mut wel

ter come

ist And

gü ten

tig der

wie ly

dein will

B. va law,

P. I, III

P. II, IV

Timb.

ter he

wird will

zu wel

dir wie ein come you, Your

Va ter moth

er

sein. in

Und law

10

12

115

S. Müt love

ter you

lein, e’en as

gü though

tig wie dein you were their

Müt own

ter dear

lein. child.

Und No

bei ble

Fe Fe

tis Pam tis Pam

fil fi

je witsch lie vitch,

ist ja in your

Und No

bei ble

Fe Fe

tis Pam tis Pam

fil fi

je witsch lie vitch,

ist ja in your

Und No

bei ble

Fe Fe

tis Pam tis Pam

fil fi

je witsch lie vitch,

ist ja in your

Und No

bei ble

Fe Fe

tis Pam tis Pam

fil fi

je witsch lie vitch,

ist ja in your

M.s.

B. Müt love

s.

ter lein, you e’en as

gü tig though you

wie were

dein their

Müt own

ter dear

lein. child.

a.

P. I

sempre staccatissimo

P. II

sempre staccatissimo

P. III

P. IV

sempre staccatissimo

Timb.

11

13

123

S. auch ei ne gar den a

Nach ti gall, die night in gale is

mit ge sing ing,

walt’ In

gem the

Ju pa

bel schall, dich bei lace gar den all

ihm will day he

kom men whis pers

hei coo

ßen ing

wird. notes,

auch ei ne gar den a

Nach ti gall, die night in gale is

mit ge sing ing,

walt’ In

gem the

Ju pa

bel schall, dich bei lace gar den all

ihm will day he

kom men whis pers

hei coo

ßen ing

wird. notes,

auch ei ne gar den a

Nach ti gall, die night in gale is

mit ge sing ing,

walt’ In

gem the

Ju pa

bel schall, dich bei lace gar den all

ihm will day he

kom men whis pers

hei coo

ßen ing

wird. notes,

ihm will day he

kom men whis pers

hei coo

ßen ing

wird. notes,

M.s.

s.

unis.

a. auch ei ne gar den a

Nach ti gall, die night in gale is

mit ge sing ing,

walt’ In

gem the

Ju pa

bel schall, dich bei lace gar den all

P. I, II

P. III

P. IV

14

133

S. Sie At

schlägt night

den fall

gan hear

zen him

Tag, und sing ing

ihr a

Lied klingt loud his

durch song

die of

Nacht. love.

Nie ’Tis

mals for

wird you,

ihr Nas

Sie At

schlägt night

den fall

gan hear

zen him

Tag, und sing ing

ihr a

Lied klingt loud his

durch song

die of

Nacht. love.

Nie ’Tis

mals for

wird you,

ihr Nas

Sie At

schlägt night

den fall

gan hear

zen him

Tag, und sing ing

ihr a

Lied klingt loud his

durch song

die of

Nacht. love.

Nie ’Tis

mals for

wird you,

ihr Nas

Sie At

schlägt night

den fall

gan hear

zen him

Tag, und sing ing

ihr a

Lied klingt loud his

durch song

die of

Nacht. love.

Nie ’Tis

mals for

wird you,

ihr Nas

M.s.

s.

a.

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

12

15

141

S. lei ta

ses

Flö sia,

ten his

uns sing

re ing,

Na my

stass jusch dear one,

ka, For

uns you

re a

Ti lone

mo his

fe sing

je ing,

wna for

aus your

ßem de

lei ta

ses

Flö sia,

ten his

uns sing

re ing,

Na my

stass jusch dear one,

ka, For

uns you

re a

Ti lone

mo his

fe sing

je ing,

wna for

aus your

ßem de

Die For

klei you

ne a

Ti lone

mo his

M.s.

T. 8

fe sing

je

wna. ing.

B.

s.

Uns ’Tis

re for

klei you,

ne Na

Na sta

stjin ka. si a.

lei ta

ses

Flö sia,

ten his

uns sing

re ing,

Na my

stass jusch dear one,

ka, For

uns you

re a

Ti lone

mo his

fe sing

je ing,

wna for

aus your

ßem de

lei ta

ses

Flö sia,

ten his

uns sing

re ing,

Na my

stass jusch dear one,

ka, For

uns you

re a

Ti lone

mo his

fe sing

je ing,

wna for

aus your

ßem de

a.

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

8b

13

147

S. Schlum mer schrec ken; light, your hap pi

doch am ness,

Mor He

gen shall

wird not

sie dis

dich turb

mit you

er neu sleep

Kraft ing,

zur in

heil’ time

gen for

Mes Mass

se he’ll

wek wake

ken. you.

Schlum mer schrec ken; light, your hap pi

doch am ness,

Mor He

gen shall

wird not

sie dis

dich turb

mit you

er neu sleep

Kraft ing,

zur in

heil’ time

gen for

Mes Mass

se he’ll

wek wake

ken. you.

zur in

heil’ time

gen for

Mes Mass

se wek he’ll wake

ken. you.

zur in

heil’ time

gen for

Mes Mass

se wek he’ll wake

ken. you.

M.s.

T. 8

B. ...wird light

s.

aus your

ih hap

rem pi

sü ness,

ßen Schlaf das He shall

Mor not

gen lied dis turb

der you

Nach sleep

ti ing,

gall, in time,

Schlum mer schrec ken; light, your hap pi

doch am ness,

Mor He

gen shall

wird not

sie dis

dich turb

mit you

er neu sleep

Kraft ing,

zur in

heil’ time

gen for

Mes Mass

se he’ll

wek wake

ken. you.

Schlum mer schrec ken; light, your hap pi

doch am ness,

Mor He

gen shall

wird not

sie dis

dich turb

mit you

er neu sleep

Kraft ing,

zur in

heil’ time

gen for

Mes Mass

se he’ll

wek wake

ken. you.

a.

8

P. I

8

P. II

8

.

gliss

P. III

gliss.

P. IV

8b

* avec le pouce

T.d.b.

*

signifie frôler la membrane avec le pouce.

8

14

16

17

153

S. Hei! Come,

Hei! come

Sin let

ge, du us make

hold mer

der Sän ry from

ger one

im vil

Jas lage

min to

a

zwei no

ge! ther.

Hei! Come,

Hei! come,

Hei! Come,

Hei! come

Sin let

ge, du us make

hold mer

der Sän ry from

ger one

im vil

Jas lage

min to

a

zwei no

ge! ther.

Hei! Come,

Hei! come,

Hei! Come,

Hei! come

Sin let

ge, du us make

hold mer

der Sän ry from

ger one

im vil

Jas lage

min to

a

zwei no

ge! ther.

Hei! Come,

Hei! come,

Hei! Come,

Hei! come

...Im from

Jas one

min to

a

zwei no

ge! ther.

Hei! Come,

Hei! come,

Hei! Come,

Hei! come

Sin let

ge, du us make

hold mer

der Sän ry from

ger one

im vil

Jas lage

min to

a

zwei no

ge! ther.

Hei! Come,

Hei! come,

Hei! Come,

Hei! come

Sin let

ge, du us make

hold mer

der Sän ry from

ger one

im vil

Jas lage

min to

a

zwei no

ge! ther.

Hei! Come,

Hei! come,

Hei! Come,

Hei! come

Hei! Come,

Hei! come,

Hei! Come,

Hei! come

Hei! Come,

Hei! come,

M.s.

T. 8

B.

s.

a.

t. 8

b.

8

P. I

11

8

gliss.

P. II

8

gliss.

P. III

P. IV

8b

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. Tmb.à.t. [ordinairement]

Cym. Grosse-c.

8b

15

3+2

159

S. Sing, daß uns dear Na sta

re sia

Na shall

be

stjin hap

ka py,

ver gnügt und She must be

froh gay and

blei be! joy ful.

Hei! Come!

Sing, daß uns dear Na sta

re sia

Na shall

be

stjin hap

ka py,

ver gnügt und She must be

froh gay and

blei be! joy ful.

Hei! Come!

ver gnügt und She must be

froh gay and

blei be! joy ful.

Hei! Come!

M.s.

T. 8

sub.

B. Stets ver gnügt und She should al ways

s.

Sing, daß uns dear Na sta

re sia

Na shall

be

stjin hap

ka py,

ver gnügt und She must be

froh gay and

blei be! joy ful.

Hei! Come!

Sing, daß uns dear Na sta

re sia

Na shall

be

stjin hap

ka py,

ver gnügt und She must be

froh gay and

blei be! joy ful.

Hei! Come!

a.

t. 8

Hei! Come!

b. Hei! Come! 8

P. I

sub.

P. II

sub.

8

P. III

sub.

P. IV

sub.

8b

Timb. secco

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t.

froh be of

blei be! good cheer.

16

18 165

3+2

S. ...Un Un

ser sonst der neath

B. Un ser sonst ’Neath the lit

so tle

trä stones

ges a

Bäch lein... brook flows.

molto

b. Un ser sonst ’Neath the lit

so tle

8

P. I

P. II

sempre

P. III

P. IV

sempre

senza Ped.

Timb.

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

Grosse-c.

so the

trä stones

ges a

Bäch lein, lit tle

plät brook

schert mun is flow

ter ing,

17

19

170

S. durch Un

die der

Wie neath

sen the

hin, stones,

durch Un

die der

Wie neath

sen the

hin, stones,

pl채t Loud

schert and

M.s.

B. ...Un mak

8

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

Timb.

Triang.

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

Grosse-c.

ser ing

sonst so loud and

tr채 hap

ges py

B채ch lein... mus ic.

8

mun gay

ter it

durch sounds

die like

Wie beat

sen, ing

18

175

S. bun drums,

ter Like

ist beat

das ing

Feld, drums,

grü gai

bun drums,

ter Like

ist beat

das ing

Feld, drums,

grü gai

ner ly

der loud

Wald, ly

schö mak

ner ing

der loud

Wald, ly

schö mak

ner ing

die mus

Welt, ic.

M.s. ner ly

die mus

Welt, ic.

8

P. I

P. II

8

3

P. III

P. IV

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Triang.

20 178

unis.

3+2

s. Weil So

die Nas

lie ta

be sia

klei Ti

ne mo

Na feev

stja, na,

uns so

re in

Ti marr

mo iage

fe do

jew we

na heut’ give thee,

Hoch zeit hier hält. So we give thee.

...Heut’ thee,

Hoch zeit hier hält. So we give thee.

a.

8

P. I

9

6

P. II

6

8

P. III

9

6

P. IV

6

T.d.b.

19

(Die Braut und die Mutter) 21 (The Bride and the Mother) = 80

183

S. Kämmt, Plait,

flech tet plait my

mir mein lit tle

hoch ge come to

be us

blon des tres ses,

Haar, Plait

rich my

T. 8

Hei O

lige Ma

Mut ry

ter thou

Got Vir

tes, gin,

ne and

deit, aid

hil freich al us, come to

le our

3

P. I

3

etc. sim.

P. II

una corda

3

P. III

3

P. IV 8b

una corda = m.dr.,

= m.g.

C.cl.s.t. sempre

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Tmb.s.t. 2 bag. molles

Cym. sempre

22

190

S. es and

tet hair

so bind

wie es it with

Sit te rib bon

ist red,

Brauch. plaits

und In

Fest ge bind it

T. 8

zeit, aid.

uns

hilf Ah,

auch,

wenn aid

wir jetzt Na stjas us, Plait her

Haar hair,

rich ten,

wie’s von je aid us as

te her Sit we wed

ist und Hoch zeits her, Na sta sia

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

8b

C.cl.s.t. 3

Tmb.s.t.

Cym.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

20

23

197

S. floch tight

ten ly,

soll O

es plait

sein, my

und hair

schlin and

get bind

ein it

T. 8

brauch. fair.

Wie’s Ah,

von aid

je us,

her un

Sit plait

te her

ist hair,

und aid

Wie’s Ah,

von aid

je us,

her un

Sit plait

te her

ist hair,

und aid

B.

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

8b

tre corde

C.cl.s.t. 3

Tmb.s.t.

Cym.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

21

24 =

204

(80)

S. ro with

tes a

Band hin rib bon

ein! red.

Hoch us

as

zeits we

brauch. wed

her.

Hoch us

as

zeits we

brauch. wed

her.

T. 8

B.

(Die Freundinnen) (The Bridesmaids) mezza voce

s. Wir käm men und sträh len I twine her tres ses, I

Na stjin kas Flech ten, plait her fair tres ses,

wir I

flech ten und le gen das bind the fair hair of my

a. mezza voce

P. I

8b

8b

sub. meno

P. II

sub. meno

tre corde

sub. meno

P. III

8b

8b

sub. meno

P. IV

C.cl.s.t. 3

3

3

3

Tmb.s.t.

C.cl.Ă .t. poco

Cym.

sub. meno

sempre

sub. meno

22

209

25

3+2

2

2

2

S. O Blue,

du a

ro rib

ses bon

Band, blue,

du and

s. Haar Ti

uns mo

rer Freun din. fe ev na,

Wir I

käm men und sträh twine her tres ses,

len a

Na gain

stjin I

kas Flech ten, will twine them,

wir With

flech ten rib bons

und le gen en twine it,

das my

a.

P. I

8b

P. III

8b

sub. meno

sub. meno

8b

P. II, IV

8b

sub. meno

sub. meno

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t.

3+2 2

213

2

2

2

2

S. nes bon

schö rib

Band, red,

du bright

schö red,

nes as

ro my

sen own

ro lips

tes are piena voce

s. Haar Ti

uns mo

rer Freun din; fe ev na,

Na Once

stjin more

kas I

blon comb

des Haar, it and

fest bind

ge it

floch with

ten rib

soll bon,

es A

sein. Schlin rib bon piena voce

a.

8

P. I

8b

8b 8

P. III

sub. meno

8b

P. II, IV

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t.

8b

sub. meno

get en

23

26 217

3+2

2

2

S. Und A

Band! red.

du rib

mein bon

mezza voce

s. ro twin’d

tes a

Band hin bout her

ein! hair,

Wir A

käm men gain I

und sträh will comb

len Na

Na ta

stjin sia’s

kas fair

Flech ten, tres ses,

wir I

flech ten comb them

und and

le gen twine them,

das my

a. mezza voce

8

P. I

8b

8

P. III

8b

sub. meno

sub. meno

8b

P. II, IV

8b

sub. meno

sub. meno

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t.

221

2

2

2

S. wie as

Band, blue,

Veil blue

chen as

so my

blau. eyes.

s. Haar Ti

uns mo

rer Freun din, fe ev na,

Na I

stass jusch twine her

kas Haar, fair hair,

Ti with

mo a

fe rib

je bon

wnas Haar, I bind

uns it,

rer A

Na rib

stjin bon

kas Blond Haar. of bright red.

a.

P. I

8b

8b

P. III

sub. meno

sub. meno

8b

8b

P. II, IV

8b

sub. meno

sub. meno

8b

sub. meno

sub. meno

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t.

attacca subito

24

27 225

8

t.

ZWEITE BILD

DEUXIÈME TABLEAU

BEIM BRÄUTIGAM

CHEZ LE MARIÉ

= 120

Jung frau Vir gin

3+2 be Ma

ne ry,

deit, come,

die come

du and

hilf reich aid our

al wed

le ding,

zeit Come,

und barm her Ma ry, hear

zig our

bist, pray’r,

hilf aid

uns us

jet as

zo we

und barm her Ma ry, hear

zig our

bist, pray’r,

hilf aid

uns us

jet as

zo we

8

3+2 Jung frau Vir gin

b.

be Ma

ne ry,

deit, come,

die come

du and

hilf reich aid our

al wed

le ding,

zeit Come,

P. I, III

P. II, IV

C.cl.à.t.

229

28

2+3+2

3+2

=

T. 8

...Ihm das Haar The fair curls

zu of

rich ten, Fe tis.

Und The

al ter Hoch zeits brauch. fair locks of Fe tis,

B.

=

a.

= ...Ihm das Haar The fair curls

zu of

rich ten, Fe tis.

Und The

al ter Hoch zeits brauch. fair locks of Fe tis,

sub.

sub.

= 8

t.

auch, comb

ihm the

das Haar fair curls

zu of

rich ten, Fe tis.

Und The

al ter Hoch zeits brauch. fair locks of Fe tis,

sub.

Die du hilf reich al le While we comb and brush the sub.

= 8

sub.

sub.

= b.

auch, comb

ihm the

das Haar fair curls

zu of

rich ten, Fe tis.

Und The sub.

al ter Hoch zeits brauch. fair locks of Fe tis,

Die du hilf reich al le While we comb and brush the sub.

= = P. I

= = P. III

= = P. II, IV

= C.cl.à.t.

=

25

29

3+2

233

=

T. 8

Wo Where

mit with

glät shall

ten, we

wo brush

mit le and comb

gen and

wir oil

des the

Fe fair

=

B.

Wo Where

= 8

t.

zeit, curls

sei in of Pam

son der heit fi lie vitch.

hier bei hilfs be reit! Vir gin Ma ry, come.

zeit, curls

sei in of Pam

son der heit fi lie vitch.

hier bei hilfs be reit! Vir gin Ma ry, come.

= 8

= b.

=

= P. I, III

=

= P. II, IV

=

T.d.b.

=

C.cl.s.t.

= baguettes en bois

Tmb.s.t.

=

C.cl.Ă .t.

= baguette en bois

Cym.

tis locks

=

mit with

26

30

238

=

T. 8

Lok of

ken Fe

haar? tis?

=

B. glät shall

ten, we

wo brush

mit and

le comb

gen and

wir oil

Pam the

fil fair

jitschs locks

Lok of

ken Fe

haar? tis?

= 8

Die du hilf reich al Come, come to aid us,

t.

le O

= 8

= Die du hilf reich al Come, come to aid us,

b.

le O

=

= P. I, III

sub.

=

8

= sub.

P. II, IV

=

secco

Timb.

=

T.d.b.

=

C.cl.s.t.

=

Tmb.s.t.

=

C.cl.à.t.

sub.

=

étouffez

Cym.

=

27

243

31

3+2

=

B.

Kommt wir Quick ly

ge let

ven for

ça Fe

hen, us

kommt go

wir lau to the town

fen and

, = 8

zeit, come,

t.

sei in Vir gin

sond er heit Ma ry, O

hier bei hilfs be reit, come, Ma ry, aid us,

Jung frau be ne deit! un curl his fair locks.

,

= 8

, = zeit, come,

b.

sei in Vir gin

sond er heit Ma ry, O

hier bei hilfs be reit, come, Ma ry, aid us,

Jung frau be ne deit! un curl his fair locks.

,

= = P. I, III

=

= P. II, IV

=

C.cl.à.t.

=

Cym.

= 32

248

T. 8

Kommt Let

wir us

lau fen, has tenthere

kommt and

wir let us

kau buy

fen pure

fei o

nes live

Pro oil

ler tis’

öl, locks.

und le o live oil

gen and

B. auf buy

un some

sern pure

Krä o

mer live

markt! oil,

Kommt Let

wir us

P. I, III

8

P. II, IV

Timb.

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

kau buy

fen some

Öl pure

28

253

T. 8

und Let

wir us

glät buy

ten, some

und pure

wir le o live oil

gen and

da curl

mit his

Pam locks,

fil his

jitschs fair

Haar! locks.

B. da curl,

mit and

Pam curl

fil his

jitschs fair

Haar! locks.

8

ancora più

P. I, III

8

P. II, IV

Timb.

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t. Cym.

33 258

3+2

34

3+2

=

T. 8

Jung Come,

= 8

t.

Jung frau be ne deit, Come, Vir gin Ma ry,

die du hilf reich al le zeit, sei in son der heit Come to aid our wed ding, aid us now as we un

hier bei hilfs be reit! curl the bride grooms’s locks.

= 8

= b.

Jung frau be ne deit, Come, Vir gin Ma ry,

die du hilf reich al le zeit, sei in son der heit Come to aid our wed ding, aid us now as we un

hier bei hilfs be reit! curl the bride grooms’s locks.

= 8

= P. I, III

sub.

= = P. II, IV

sub.

= trem.

Xyl.

=

T.d.b.

= =

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t.

= =

frau hilf reich al O come and aid

le us

35

29

Meno mosso

(Der Vater)

= 104

263

(Le père)

M.s. Je Last

den, night

je Fe

den tis

A sat,

bend sat

saß un with in

ser his

Söhn chen house all

zu the

T. 8

deit, to

hilf un

reich curl

al his

le fair

zeit! locks.

8

sub.

P. I

sempre legatiss.

8

P. III

P. II, IV

Xyl.

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t.

36 (Die Eltern abwechselnd) (Les parents tour à tour)

269

M.s. Hau while.

se,

Wem, Now

ihr to

Lok whom,

ken wer det ihr jetzt an ver to whom will these curls be

T. 8

ser Pam Pam fi

fil lie

jitsch vitch

mit sei nem Lok ken his fair locks sat brush

haar, ing.

legatiss.

P. I

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

P. II

8b

legatiss.

P. III

sub.

legatiss.

arraché

P. IV

Timb. sempre poco

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

sempre poco

Tmb.à.t. sempre poco

Grosse-c.

sempre poco

traut? long?

30

37

278

M.s. wohl now,

Wem Now,

ihr to

Lok whom,

wer det ihr jetzt whom will these

ken, to

an ver curls be

traut? long?

Wem, ihr Lok Do they now,

ken, now,

wer det ihr be long to

B. Ei Now

nem they

wer det ihr jetzt ro sy lipp’d

schö nen Mäd chen will be long to a

an ver traut. mai den.

P. I, III

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché arraché

arraché

P. II

8b

arraché

arraché

P. IV

Timb. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. Tmb.à.t.

Grosse-c. (sempre poco

)

285

S. Lieb kos’ und Do you pour

hät schle oil on

M.s. an ver her, to

traut? Klei the tall

ne one

Na Now,

stass Nas

jusch ka, lieb ta sia, pour

ko oil

se on

sie! them.

B. Der Na To Nas

stass ta

ja sia,

Ti to

mo Ti

fe mo

je wna. feev na.

[legatiss.]

P. I, III

[legatiss.]

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

P. II

8b

arraché

P. IV

Timb. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. Tmb.à.t.

Grosse-c.

sie! them;

31

38

292

S. Klei You,

ne Ti

Na mo

stass fe

ja, ev

lieb na,

kos’ und you pour

hät schle oil on

sie! them.

Sei O

ne the

blon den fair, the

Sei O

ne the

blon den fair, the

M.s. Lieb kos’ und The fair and

hät schle cur ly

sie! locks.

T. 8

Sei Oil

ne the

Haa fair,

re the

wur den mit Ka cur ly locks of

mil len Pam fi

tee li

ge pflegt. e vitch,

B.

P. I, III

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

P. II

8b

arraché

P. IV

Timb. (sempre poco

)

(sempre poco

)

(sempre poco

)

(sempre poco

)

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

Tmb.à.t.

Grosse-c.

32

39

300

S. Lok cur

ken ly

ha ben sich locks of

lieb lich Fe tis,

ge the

rin fair

gelt, and

sich ge cur ly

kräu locks

selt of

und sich ge Pam fi li

M.s. Müt

ter

chen hat sie Thy mo ther

ein ge curl’d them

dreht oft,

und ge say ing

wik

kelt, then

B. Lok cur

ken ly

ha ben sich locks of

lieb lich Fe tis,

ge the

rin fair

gelt, and

sich ge cur ly

kräu locks

selt of

und sich ge Pam fi li

[legatiss.]

P. I, III

[legatiss.]

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

P. II

8b

arraché

P. IV

Timb.

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

Tmb.à.t.

Grosse-c. (sempre poco

)

33

40 Poco più mosso

307

= 112

=

S. gelt. vitch.

krin e

=

M.s. Und da bei while she was

sag curl

te ing

sie: them.

=

T. 8

Und da bei while she was

sag curl

te ing

sie: them.

Wie My

du jetzt lit tle

bist, child,

so my

=

B. krin e

gelt. vitch.

=

s. Mein Lit tle

herz son,

lie bes Sähn chen wie du be you white and ro sy

jetzt bist, so cheek’d, lit tle

bleib. son,

=

a.

P. I, III

arraché

arraché

arraché

arraché

P. II

8b

P. IV

Timb.

, Xyl.

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

Tmb.à.t.

Grosse-c.

34 315

T. 8

bleib! son.

Wie And

du a

im no

mer ther

warst, one will

so bleib, love you.

B. bleib And

ge a

sund no

an ther

Seel’ curl

und your

s. Blei And

be a

stets no

ge ther

sund an one will

Seel’ curl

und your

Leib! locks.

a.

P. I

meno

P. II

P. III

meno

P. IV

Xyl.

41 Tempo I 321

= 120

!:tyobys@ (Les femmes)

S. hat denn ing locks

Wer Shin

die schön sten and cur ly,

B. Leib! locks. 8 marcatissimo

P. I

non

8

P. II

staccato leggiero 8

8

P. III

marcatissimo

P. IV

staccato leggiero

T.d.b. poco

Cym. Grosse-c.

simile

(ordinairement)

blon den whose

Lok are

ken? they?

Der Shin

Fe ing

tis locks

hat ganz and cur

ge ly,

die wiß whose

schön are

sten, they?

35

325

S. der Pam O Pam

fil fi

jitsch hat die al li e vitch, love

ler ly

al locks

ler schön cur ly,

sten, ja the locks

die of

schön sten Fe tis,

hat ge well

wiß oil’d

der and

blon lov

de ing

Fe ly

8

P. I

8

P. II

8

8

P. III

P. IV

T.d.b. Triang.

Cym. Grosse-c.

329

42

S. tis. curl’d.

M.s. Klug, A cle

wei ver

pru

se, dent

rat up

ten their

B. Eh Glo

re ry

sei to

8

P. I

8

P. II

8

8

P. III

P. IV

Solo

Timb. (non

T.d.b.

Cym. Grosse-c.

ma marcato e secco)

den the

El fa

tern, ther,

Va glo

ter

und ry

Mut to

ter, the

weil mo

das ther,

Kind Well

so have

gut ge they brought

36

43

332

S. Nie Let

mals fallt my fair

ihr mehr curls be

ihr in

blon or

sam, dient,

ja, o

den

Lok der,

ken u

in pon

sein milch wei my white

Ă&#x;es face,

An in

voll and

ist wise

der one

Sohn o

ge

ra be

ten. dient.

Nie And

mals you

fallt Na

ihr sta

mehr in sein sia now

or

ge der

sicht, And

denn grow

M.s. auf’s Wort wise one

ge o

hor be

wun der be dient

T. 8

Ge do

sicht, you

denn grow

B. ist. child.

P. I

Mei Ah,

8

P. II

P. III

P. IV

Timb.

Xyl.

T.d.b. simile

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. sempre

Cym. Grosse-c.

37

336

S. wer to

jetzt used

det my

ihr mit young man’s

Öl ways,

ge my

glät ha

tet, bits,

wie dan

es dy

the

dert, ci

daß ty,

man dan

so dy

ge my

glät ha

tet, bits,

wie dan

es dy

the

dert, ci

daß ty,

man dan

so dy

So For

wie dan

So For

daß ty,

al tem young ha

Hoch bits

zeits are

brauch u su

ent al

da u

su

von al

brauch u su

ent al

da u

su

von al

M.s. ...wer Ah,

den in

so Mos

be cow,

wun in

gar young

in ha

Mos bits

kau are

T. 8

jetzt used

wer to

det my

Lok

ken

ihr mit young man’s

Öl ways,

al tem young ha

Hoch bits

zeits are

B. ne

wer Ah,

den in

so Mos

be cow,

wun in

gar young

in ha

Mos bits

kau are

es dy

al tem young ha

Hoch bits

zeits are

bruach u su

ent al

wie dan

es dy

al tem young ha

Hoch bits

zeits are

bruach u su

ent al

man dan

so dy

da u

von al

s.

a.

t. 8

...wer Ah,

b.

P. I

P. II

8

P. III

P. IV

Timb.

Xyl. più

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

den in

so Mos

be cow,

wun in

the

dert, ci

gar young

in ha

Mos bits

kau are

su

38

340

44

3+2

S. spricht. there.

M.s. sprint. there.

T. 8

spricht. there.

...Das The

sprint. there.

...Das The

B.

s. spricht. there.

spricht. there.

a.

sub.

Jung frau be Vir gin Ma

ne ry,

deit, come,

die du hilf reich al le come and aid our wed ding,

zeit und barm her zig Aid us to brush the

bist, locks,

hilf uns aid us

jet to

zo auch, das un curl the

ne ry,

deit, come,

die du hilf reich al le come and aid our wed ding,

zeit und barm her zig Aid us to brush the

bist, locks,

hilf uns aid us

jet to

zo auch, das un curl the

ne ry,

deit, come,

die du hilf reich al le come and aid our wed ding,

zeit und barm her zig Aid us to brush the

bist, locks,

hilf uns aid us

jet to

zo auch, das un curl the

sub.

sub.

8

spricht. there.

t.

Jung frau be Vir gin Ma sub.

8

sub.

b.

sprint. there.

Jung frau be Vir gin Ma sub.

8

P. I

sub.

P. II

sub.

8

P. III

sub.

P. IV

sub.

Timb.

Xyl. T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.Ă .t. Tmb.Ă .t. Cym. Grosse-c.

sub.

39

344

3+2

45

3+2

3+3

=

T. 8

Haar ihm zu rich ten, fair locks of Fe tis,

Und The

Brauch ist zur Hoch zeit! fair locks of Fe tis.

Haar ihm zu rich ten, fair locks of Fe tis,

Und The

Brauch ist zur Hoch zeit! fair locks of Fe tis.

=

B.

sub.

sub.

= Haar ihm zu rich ten, fair locks of Fe tis,

a.

wie es Aid us

Sit te hier to un curl

und the

Brauch ist zur Hoch zeit! fair locks of Fe tis.

sub.

Die du hilf reich al le Vir gin Ma ry, come and

zeit, aid

sei us

in son der heit to un curl the

zeit, aid

sei us

in son der heit to un curl the

zeit, aid

sei us

in son der heit to un curl the

sub.

=

sub.

sub.

= 8

Haar ihm zu rich ten, fair locks of Fe tis,

t.

wie es Aid us

Sit te hier to un curl

und the

Brauch ist zur Hoch zeit! fair locks of Fe tis.

sub.

Die du hilf reich al le Vir gin Ma ry, come and sub.

= 8

sub.

sub.

=

b. Haar ihm zu rich ten, fair locks of Fe tis,

wie es Aid us

Sit te hier to un curl

und the

Brauch ist zur Hoch zeit! fair locks of Fe tis.

Die du hilf reich al le Vir gin Ma ry, come and

= P. I

sub.

sub.

=

= P. III

sub.

sub.

=

= P. II, IV

sub.

sub.

=

C.cl.Ă .t.

=

Tmb.Ă .t.

=

40

349

3+2

46 2+2+3

, 3+2

S. Heil’ Ho

ge Him mels kö ly Mo ther, come

ni to

gin, us,

die Thy

du self

Got come,

tes we

Mut ter bist, pray Thee.

, M.s. Heil’ Ho

ge Him mels kö ly Mo ther, come

ni to

gin, us,

die Thy

du self

Got come,

tes we

Mut ter bist, pray Thee.

, T. 8

Heil’ Ho

ge Him mels kö ly Mo ther, come

ni to

gin, us,

die Thy

du self

Got come,

tes we

Mut ter bist, pray Thee.

, s. Heil’ Ho

ge Him mels kö ly Mo ther, come

ni to

gin, us,

die Thy

du self

Got come,

tes we

Mut ter bist, pray Thee.

, hier bei hilfs be reit! fair locks of Fe tis.

a.

Heil’ Ho

ge Him mels kö ly Mo ther, come

ni to

gin, us,

die Thy

du self

Got come,

tes we

Mut ter bist, pray Thee.

, ,

8

hier bei hilfs be reit! fair locks of Fe tis.

t.

Heil’ Ho

ge Him mels kö ly Mo ther, come

ni to

gin, us,

die Thy

du self

Got come,

tes we

Mut ter bist, pray Thee.

,

8

b.

hier bei hilfs be reit! fair locks of Fe tis.

Kom Come

8

sub.

P. I

più

P. II

più

8

P. III

più

P. IV

più

Timb. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

Grosse-c.

me to

zur the

Hoch zeit, wed ding,

41

47 3+2

353

, (3+2)

S. Und And

ihr heil’ gen with Thee, all the

zwölf ho ly

A ap

pos tel, os tles.

, M.s. Und And

ihr heil’ gen with Thee, all the

zwölf ho ly

A ap

pos tel, os tles.

, T. 8

Und And

ihr heil’ gen with Thee, all the

zwölf ho ly

A ap

pos tel, os tles.

, s. Und And

ihr heil’ gen with Thee, all the

zwölf ho ly

A ap

pos tel, os tles.

,

a.

, t. 8

b.

Und And

komm to

zur the

Hoch wed

ihr heil’ gen with Thee, all the

zwölf ho ly

zeit! ding.

A ap

pos tel, os tles.

Kom Come

8

sub.

P. I

più

P. II

più

8

P. III

più

P. IV

più

Timb. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. Tmb.à.t.

Grosse-c.

met to

zur the

Hoch zeit, wed ding,

kommt zur to the

Hoch wed

zeit! ding.

42

48 358

49 3+2

,

3+2

S. Che And

ru with

bim Thee

und come

Se all

ra the

phim, an gel.

Che And

ru with

bim Thee

und come

Se all

ra the

phim, an gel.

Che And

ru with

bim Thee

und come

Se all

ra the

phim, an gel.

Che And

ru with

bim Thee

und come

Se all

ra the

phim, an gel.

Che And

ru with

bim Thee

und come

Se all

ra the

phim, an gel.

Che And

ru with

bim Thee

und come

Se all

ra the

phim, an gel.

,

Gott woll’ Now may

uns seg nen, God bless us,

Gott woll’ Now may

uns seg nen, God bless us,

Gott woll’ Now may

uns seg nen, God bless us,

Gott woll’ Now may

uns seg nen, God bless us,

Gott woll’ Now may

uns seg nen, God bless us,

Gott woll’ Now may

uns seg nen, God bless us,

M.s.

,

T. 8

,

s.

a.

, , ,

t. 8

Kom Come

b.

met to

zur the

Hoch wed

zeit, ding,

Kommt zur to the

Hoch wed

zeit! ding.

8

sub.

P. I

più

8

P. II

più

8

P. III

più

P. IV

più

Timb. Xyl.

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. Tmb.à.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

bois

43

3+2

363

=

=

S. Gott woll’ God bless

uns us

seg nen! all and

Gott His

Va Son,

ter,

kom Come

me to

zur the

Hoch zeit, wed ding,

komm to

zur the

Hoch wed

zeit, ding,

komm to

zur the

Hoch zeit! wed ding.

komm to

zur the

Hoch wed

zeit, ding,

komm to

zur the

Hoch zeit! wed ding.

komm to

zur the

Hoch wed

zeit, ding,

komm to

zur the

Hoch zeit! wed ding.

komm to

zur the

Hoch wed

zeit, ding,

komm to

zur the

Hoch zeit! wed ding.

komm to

zur the

Hoch wed

zeit, ding,

komm to

zur the

Hoch zeit! wed ding.

komm to

zur the

Hoch wed

zeit, ding,

komm to

zur the

Hoch zeit! wed ding.

=

M.s. Gott woll’ God bless

uns us

seg nen! all and

Gott His

Va Son,

ter,

kom Come

me to

zur the

Hoch zeit, wed ding,

=

T. 8

Gott woll’ God bless

uns us

seg nen! all and

Gott His

Va Son,

ter,

kom Come

me to

zur the

Hoch zeit, wed ding,

Gott woll’ God bless

uns us

seg nen! all and

Gott His

Va Son,

ter,

kom Come

me to

zur the

Hoch zeit, wed ding,

=

s.

= Gott woll’ God bless

a.

uns us

seg nen! all and

Gott His

Va Son,

ter,

kom Come

me to

zur the

Hoch zeit, wed ding,

= = 8

Gott woll’ God bless

t.

uns us

seg nen! all and

Gott His

Va Son,

ter,

kom Come

me to

zur the

Hoch zeit, wed ding,

= 8

= P. I

= 8

= P. II

= 8

= P. III

= 8

= P. IV

= =

Xyl. più

T.d.b.

=

C.cl.s.t.

=

Tmb.s.t.

=

Tmb.à.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

più

più

= =

44

(Der Bräutigam)

50 Le marié =

368

= 80

ma sonore

Meno mosso

=

B. Va ter und Bless me, my

Mut ter, fa ther,

o my

Mut ter, fa ther,

o my

seg mo

net ther,

jetzt bless

eu ren Lieb ling, me, Your child who

daß er proud ly

sieg goes

reich die Burg be zwingt a gainst the strong

und im Stur me die Braut er wall of stone to break it

sieg goes

reich die Burg be zwingt a gainst the strong

und im Stur me die Braut er wall of stone to break it

ma sonore

une basse profonde du chœur

Va ter und Bless me, my

seg mo

net jetzt ther, bless

eu ren Lieb ling, daß me, Your child who proud

er ly

51

52 Più mosso

= 375

=

Tempo I

=

Più mosso

S. Daß sein See him,

E Fe

he stand tis, the

blüht no ble

und Fe

ge tis

deiht. there,

Al So

le the

Ker can

zen

Daß sein See him,

E Fe

he stand tis, the

blüht no ble

und Fe

ge tis

deiht. there,

Al So

le the

Ker can

zen

Al So

le the

Ker can

zen

dles

soll’n are

dles

soll’n are

dles

soll’n are

M.s.

B. ringt, down,

jetzt und al There to win

le his

künft’ ge bride, his la

Zeit. dy.

s. Daß sein See him,

E Fe

he stand tis, the

blüht no ble

und Fe

ge tis

deiht. there,

a.

basse profonde ringt, down,

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

Partie de T.d.b.

Timb. baguettes de Triang.

Triang. Cym.

jetzt und al There to win

le his

künft’ ge bride, his la

Zeit. dy.

45

Tempo I

Più mosso

=

382

,

=

=

S. bren ligh

nen, ted.

Um sich To in

nie mals mehr zu voke our La dy’s

tren bless

nen. ing.

, M.s. bren ligh

nen, ted.

Um sich To in

nie mals mehr zu voke our La dy’s

tren bless

nen. ing.

, B. Wenn das Paar im We go now

Dom to

sich neigt und dem Kreu ze the church and we kiss there

die Ehr’ be the sil ver

zeigt. cross.

, s. bren ligh

nen, ted.

Um sich To in

nie mals mehr zu voke our La dy’s

tren bless

nen. ing.

,

a.

,

basse profonde Wenn das Paar im We go now

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

Timb.

Triang. Cym.

Dom to

sich neigt und dem Kreu ze the church and we kiss there

die Ehr’ be the sil ver

zeigt. cross.

46

53 (Einer der Freunde) (The first friend)

389

=

S. Bit tet Gott Give you bless

um ing,

Bit tet Gott Give you bless

um ing,

M.s.

B. Ihr All

da, ihr you that

Lung rer und come to see

Gaf the

fer, bride

ihr neu gier ’ges pas ing by, did

Lum pen pack mit nichts im stay to see her ta’en a

Sack, way.

s. Bit tet Gott Give you bless

um ing,

Bit tet Gott Give you bless

um ing,

a.

8

P. I

tremolo

5

très rythmé et bien martelé

2

P. II 2 5 8

P. III

tremolo

P. IV

sub. meno

Timb. sempre

Xyl. trillo

Triang. Cym.

Tmb.s.t.

Tmb.à.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

(roul.)

(roul.)

47

54

394

S. Se gen und Glück für bless the prince u pon

das his

bräut li che Paar! way, The bride groom

Se gen und Glück für bless the prince u pon

das his

bräut li che Paar! way, The bride groom

M.s.

B. seg net Who is

sie gone

auf dem a way

Hoch zeits to meet his

weg, bride,

s. Se gen und Glück für bless the prince u pon

das his

bräut li che Paar! way, The bride groom

a.

8

P. I

P. II

8

P. III

P. IV

Timb.

Xyl.

Triang. Cym.

Tmb.s.t.

Tmb.à.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

,

To

wenn wed

sie zur her whose

48

(Alle) 55 (All)

399

3+2

2+3

S. Und On

un his

ter der brow to

Und On

un his

ter der brow to

Braut kro set a

ne gol

ste hen. den crown.

Hei! Ah!

ne gol

ste hen. den crown.

Hei! Ah!

M.s. Braut set

kro a

T. 8

Hei! Ah!

B. Hei! Ah!

s. Und On

un his

ter der brow to

Braut kro set a

ne gol

ste hen. den crown.

Hei! Ah!

a.

8

t.

Hei! Ah!

Wie ein See there

Schwa nen fe der chen fällt zur Er falls a white fea ther, now the flow’r

de, fades,

Hei! Ah!

Wie ein See there

Schwa nen fe der chen fällt zur Er falls a white fea ther, now the flow’r

de, fades,

8

b.

8

P. I

P. II

8

P. III

P. IV

Timb. secco

Xyl. Triang. Cym. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. Tmb.à.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

reprenez le T.d.b.

49

404

2+3

3+2

56 2+3

2+3

S. fällt Fades

zur the

Er flow’r

de, too,

sich fea

her ther

ab fall

neigt, eth,

fällt Fades

zur the

Er flow’r

de, too,

sich fea

her ther

ab fall

neigt, eth,

fällt Fades

zur the

Er flow’r

de, too,

sich fea

her ther

ab fall

neigt, eth,

fällt Fades

zur the

Er flow’r

de, too,

sich fea

her ther

ab fall

neigt, eth,

fällt Fades

zur the

Er flow’r

de, too,

sich fea

her ther

ab fall

neigt, eth,

fällt Fades

zur the

Er flow’r

de, too,

wie ein Blü ten zweig Now fades the flow’r too,

sich her fea ther

ab fall

neigt, eth,

sich fea

her ther

ab fall

neigt, eth,

fällt So

Fe did

tis vorm Fe tis

fällt Fades

zur the

Er flow’r

de, too,

wie ein Blü ten zweig Now fades the flow’r too,

sich her fea ther

ab fall

neigt, eth,

sich fea

her ther

ab fall

neigt, eth,

fällt So

Fe did

tis vorm Fe tis

M.s.

T. 8

B.

s.

a.

8

t.

8

b.

P. I

sub.

sub.

P. III

8

8

P. II, IV

Timb. .

.

gliss

gliss

Xyl.

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. Tmb.à.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

(bois)

,

50

57 409

3+2

3+2

3+2

S. Fällt Pam So did

fi Fe

lje tis

witsch vor kneel be

der fore

Mut his

ter Mo

auf’s ther

Knie nie gra cious

der ly,

Fällt Pam So did

fi Fe

lje tis

witsch vor kneel be

der fore

Mut his

ter Mo

auf’s ther

Knie nie gra cious

der ly,

Fällt Pam So did

fi Fe

lje tis

witsch vor kneel be

der fore

Mut his

ter Mo

auf’s ther

Knie nie gra cious

der ly,

Fällt Pam So did

fi Fe

lje tis

witsch vor kneel be

der fore

Mut his

ter Mo

auf’s ther

Knie nie gra cious

der ly,

M.s.

s.

a.

8

t.

Vä ter chen auf kneel down be fore

die his

Knie own

nie fa

der, ther,

und Ask

bit ing

tet their

in bless

nig ing

lich, u

lie pon

be the

El son

tern, who

Vä ter chen auf kneel down be fore

die his

Knie own

nie fa

der, ther,

und Ask

bit ing

tet their

in bless

nig ing

lich, u

lie pon

be the

El son

tern, who

8

b.

P. I

P. III

8

P. II, IV

Timb.

51

414

3+2

=

S. zu saints

der go

fro with

hen him,

Hoch guard

zeits fahrt, ing him,

zu saints

der go

fro with

hen him,

Hoch guard

zeits fahrt, ing him,

=

M.s.

= zu saints

s.

der go

fro with

hen him,

Hoch guard

zeits fahrt, ing him,

= = zu saints

a.

der go

fro with

hen him,

Hoch guard

zeits fahrt, ing him,

= = 8

bit goes

t.

te to

seg be mar

net ried,

mich zur Fahrt, And may the

zu saints

der go

fro with

hen him,

Hoch guard

zeits fahrt, ing him,

die, wenn die Dom glok May the saints go with

ke him

die, wenn die Dom glok May the saints go with

ke him

= 8

= b.

bit goes

te to

seg be mar

net ried,

mich zur Fahrt, And may the

zu saints

der go

fro with

hen him,

Hoch guard

zeits fahrt, ing him,

= 8

= P. I

sub.

= = P. II

= = sub.

P. III

= = P. IV

= sol muta in fa

=

Timb.

=

Xyl. gliss.

T.d.b.

=

C.cl.s.t.

=

Tmb.s.t. Tmb.Ă .t.

= =

Cym. Grosse-c.

= secco

52

58

419

S. uns zum Trau and keep him

al tar bringt. in their care.

Kos mas und Saint Da mien,

M.s.

T. 8

Stimmt Lord,

nun O

le al bless

ein, us all

ob ihr from old

alt est

seid, ob to the

jung o der klein, young est chil dren.

B. Stimmt O

nun Lord,

al bless

le us

ein, all.

s.

uns zum Trau and keep him

al tar bringt. in their care.

Kos mas und Saint Da mien,

a.

uns zum Trau and keep him

al tar bringt. in their care.

Kos mas und Saint Da mien,

uns zum Trau and keep him

al tar bringt. in their care.

uns zum Trau and keep him

al tar bringt. in their care.

8

t.

8

b.

8

P. I

8

P. II

sempre

8b 8

P. III

sempre

8b

P. IV

mi muta in mi rĂŠ muta in do

Timb.

Xyl. gliss.

trillo

T.d.b.

baguettes de Triang.

Triang. Cym. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.Ă .t. Tmb.Ă .t. Cym. Grosse-c. (

secco)

53

424

S. Da bless

mian

be us

sin al

get! so.

Wen woll’n The old

wir est,

noch the

al young

les est,

be O

sin bless

gen? us.

Da bless

mian

be us

sin al

get! so.

Wen woll’n The old

wir est,

noch the

al young

les est,

be O

sin bless

gen? us.

noch the

al young

les est,

be O

sin bless

gen? us.

M.s.

T. 8

Lobt Bless

al us,

le Lord,

Gott, bless

den the

Sohn und den Va ter! bride and the bride groom,

B. Sohn und den Va ter! bride and the bride groom,

s. Da bless

mian

be us

sin al

get! so.

Wen woll’n The old

wir est,

a.

8

P. I

8

P. II

8b

8b

8

8

P. III

8b

P. IV

Timb.

Xyl.

Triang. Cym. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

54

59 3+2

428

2+2+2

S. Hei! Ah!

M.s. Hei! Ah!

T. 8

Hei! Ah!

Gott Bless

Sohn now

und our

Va wed

ter ding

too.

Hei! Ah!

Gott Bless

Sohn now

und our

Va wed

ter ding

too.

B.

s. Hei! Ah!

a. poco

poco

8

Hei! Ah!

t.

Singt und Bless us,

lob prei O Lord,

set and

Gott Bless

Sohn now

und our

Va wed

ter ding

too.

poco

8

b.

Singt und Bless us,

lob prei O Lord,

set and

Gott Bless

Sohn now

und our

Va wed

ter ding

too.

, , ,

P. I

P. II 8b 8

, ,

P. III

très sonore!

P. IV

8b

T.d.b. Triang. Cym. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

singt und lob Bless us, Lord,

prei send

set Thy

poco

8

Xyl.

set Thy

poco

poco

Timb.

prei send

poco

poco

Hei! Ah!

singt und lob Bless us, Lord,

,

55

2+2+2

432

S. Den mo

Erz ther

en and

gel the

Mi fa

chael! ther,

Mi fa

chael! ther,

Mi fa

chael! ther,

M.s. Den mo

Erz ther

en and

gel the

T. 8

den Bless

Heil’ ings

gen up

Geist! on us

all

al fa

le ther

die and

Hei the

li mo

gen. ther,

den Bless

Heil’ ings

gen up

Geist! on us

all

al fa

le ther

die and

Hei the

li mo

gen. ther,

Den mo

Erz ther

B.

s.

a. poco

8

den Bless

t.

Heil’ ings

gen up

Geist! on us

all

Singt und Bless us,

lob prei O bless

set the

al fa

le ther

die and

Hei the

li mo

gen. ther,

lob prei O bless

set the

al fa

le ther

die and

Hei the

li mo

gen. ther,

poco

8

poco

b.

den Bless

Heil’ ings

gen up

Geist! on us

all

Singt und Bless us, poco

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

8b

Timb.

Xyl. T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. C.cl.à.t.

Grosse-c.

en and

gel the

56

60 2+2+2

436

3+2

S. un sis

se ter

un sis

se ter

un sis

se ter

un sis

un sis

res and

Herrn Ge burt! the bro ther,

die bless

E all

van who

ge are

li sten faith ful,

Ge burt! bro ther,

die bless

E all

res and

Herrn Ge burt! the bro ther,

die bless

E all

van who

ge are

li sten faith ful,

se ter

res and

Herrn Ge burt! the bro ther,

die bless

E all

van who

ge are

li sten faith ful,

se ter

res and

Herrn Ge burt! the bro ther,

die bless

E all

van who

ge are

li sten faith ful,

M.s. res Herrn and the

van who

ge are

li sten faith ful,

T. 8

B.

s.

a. poco

poco

8

Singt und Bless us,

t.

lob O

prei bless

set the

un sis

se ter

res and

Herrn Ge burt! the bro ther,

Singt und Bless us,

poco

poco

poco

poco

lob we

prei pray

set Thee,

die bless

E all

van who

ge are

li sten faith ful,

lob we

prei pray

set Thee,

die bless

E all

van who

ge are

li sten faith ful,

8

Singt und Bless us,

b.

poco

P. II

P. III

(très sonore)

8b

Timb.

Xyl.

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. C.cl.Ă .t.

Grosse-c.

prei bless

set the

un sis

se ter

res and

Herrn Ge burt! the bro ther,

Singt und Bless us, poco

P. I

P. IV

lob O

57

61

440

S. und All

al who

le fear

Psal and

mi love

sten! him.

Gott, God

du pro

al tect

ter us,

gü aid

tig us

ster, now,

Gott, God

du be

all mächt’ with us

ger, now.

mi love

sten! him.

Gott, God

du pro

al tect

ter us,

gü aid

tig us

ster, now,

Gott, God

du be

all mächt’ with us

ger, now.

mi love

sten! him.

Gott, God

du pro

al tect

ter us,

gü aid

tig us

ster, now,

Gott, God

du be

all mächt’ with us

ger, now.

mi love

sten! him.

Gott, God

du pro

al tect

ter us,

gü aid

tig us

ster, now,

Gott, God

du be

all mächt’ with us

ger, now.

mi love

sten! him.

Gott, God

du pro

al tect

ter us,

gü aid

tig us

ster, now,

Gott, God

du be

all mächt’ with us

ger, now.

mi love

sten! him.

Gott, God

du pro

al tect

ter us,

gü aid

tig us

ster, now,

Gott, God

du be

all mächt’ with us

ger, now.

M.s. und All

al who

le fear

Psal and

T. 8

und All

al who

le fear

Psal and

B. und All

und All

s.

al who

al who

le fear

le fear

Psal and

Psal and

a. und All

8

t.

al who

le fear

Psal and

und All

al who

le fear

Psal and

mi love

sten! him.

Gott, God

du pro

al tect

ter us,

gü aid

tig us

ster, now,

Gott, God

du be

all mächt’ with us

ger, now.

und All

al who

le fear

Psal and

mi love

sten! him.

Gott, God

du pro

al tect

ter us,

gü aid

tig us

ster, now,

Gott, God

du be

all mächt’ with us

ger, now.

8

b.

8

P. I

sempre

P. II

sempre

8b 8

sempre

P. III

P. IV

8b

Timb. Xyl. sempre

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. C.cl.à.t.

Grosse-c.

58

62

444

S. Komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit! Bide with us, a bide with us, a bide with us now.

M.s. Komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit! Bide with us, a bide with us, a bide with us now.

T. 8

Komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit! Bide with us, a bide with us, a bide with us now.

B. Komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit! Bide with us, a bide with us, a bide with us now.

s. Komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit! Bide with us, a bide with us, a bide with us now.

Komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit! Bide with us, a bide with us, a bide with us now.

a.

8

t.

Komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit! Bide with us, a bide with us, a bide with us now.

Hei Saint

li Luke,

ger do

Lu thou

kas, be

komm zur with us,

Hoch bless

zeit. us,

Komm, Saint

Komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit! Bide with us, a bide with us, a bide with us now.

Hei Saint

li Luke,

ger do

Lu thou

kas, be

komm zur with us,

Hoch bless

zeit. us,

Komm, Saint

8

b.

8

P. I

8

P. II

8b

P. III

P. IV

8b

Timb. Xyl. T.d.b. Triang. Cym. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.Ă .t. Tmb.Ă .t.

Grosse-c.

baguette en bois

59

63

450

s.

a.

Heil’ Be

ger thou

Lu with

kas, us,

komm Saint

zur Hoch zeit! Luke, be with us.

Heil’ Be

ger thou

Lu with

kas, us,

komm Saint

zur Hoch zeit! Luke, be with us.

cresc.

t. 8

komm auch Luke, Saint

du! Luke.

Heil’ Bless

ger our

Lu mar

kas, riage

ger our

Lu mar

kas, riage

cresc.

komm auch Luke, Saint

b.

du! Luke.

Heil’ Bless cresc.

P. I, III

poco a poco cresc.

8

8

8

poco a poco cresc.

P. II

8b

P. IV

poco a poco cresc.

8b

Timb. poco a poco cresc.

Xyl.

Triang. Cym. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

Grosse-c.

60

457

3+2

cresc.

s. Sei Bless

Be the

schüt zer, cou ple

Sei whom

Schutz pa tron thou hast cho sen.

Be the

schüt zer, cou ple

Sei whom

Schutz pa tron thou hast cho sen.

cresc.

Sei Bless

a.

cresc.

(cresc.)

t. 8

komm, rites,

komm auch we pray

du! thee,

Sei der Schutz Bless the pair,

pa Saint

tron Luke,

al ler bless them

komm auch we pray

du! thee,

Sei der Schutz Bless the pair,

pa Saint

tron Luke,

al ler bless them

reu’ gen ar men Sün whom thou, thou hast cho

der, sen.

(cresc.)

komm, rites,

b.

reu’ whom

gen ar men Sün thou, thou hast cho

der, sen.

(cresc.)

(cresc.)

P. I, III

8

8

P. II

(cresc.)

8b

P. IV

(cresc.)

8b

Timb. (cresc.)

Xyl.

Triang. Cym.

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

Grosse-c.

8

8

61

463

64

=

cresc.

S. Sei Schutz pa tron Grant, O grant thy

res jun ing

uns bless

gen for

Paa res al ways,

und And

ih to

rer their

Kin der! chil dren.

zer des jun gen ing for

Paa res al ways,

und And

ih to

rer their

Kin der! chil dren.

und And

ih to

rer their

Kin der! chil dren.

und And

ih to

rer their

Kin der! chil dren.

cresc.

M.s. cresc.

T. 8

...Sei Be grant thy

schüt bless

B.

cresc.

,

s. ...Sei Be grant thy

zer des jun gen ing for

schüt bless

Paa res al ways,

,

cresc.

Sei Schutz pa tron Grant, O grant thy

a.

uns bless

res jun ing

gen for

Paa res al ways,

und And

ih to

rer their

Kin der! chil dren.

cresc.

,

cresc.

t. 8

al ler ar men Bless them their

Sün mar

der, riage,

Schutz pa give thy

tron bless

uns ing

res to

jun gen them for

Paa res und al ways, And

ih to

rer their

Kin der! chil dren.

Sün mar

der, riage,

Schutz pa give thy

tron bless

uns ing

res to

jun gen them for

Paa res und al ways, And

ih to

rer their

Kin der! chil dren.

cresc.

al ler ar men Bless them their

b.

cresc.

, (cresc.)

P. I, III

8

P. II

(cresc.)

,

8

(cresc.)

(cresc.)

,

8b

P. IV

(cresc.)

(cresc.)

8b

Timb. (cresc.)

Xyl. cresc.

Triang. Cym. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. sub. e poco a poco cres

cen

do

allo

C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t. Grosse-c.

attacca subito

62

DRITTE BILD

TROISIÈME TABLEAU

DAS BRAUTGELEIT

LE DÉPART DE LA MARIÉE

L’istesso tempo

= 469

65

s. Wie der Mond am Bright ly shines the

Fir moon

ma on

men high,

te be

durch den Strahl der side the glow ing

hel sun,

len Ev’n

Son so

ne the

selbst ein prin cess

Him mels liv’d with

licht in

ge the

wor den, pa lace

a.

P. I, III P. II, IV una corda

475

66

67

T. 8

Jetzt O

s. so hap

ist pi

uns ly

re be

klei ne side her

Na stja a ged

in fa

dem Lich ther and

te her

ih rer El tern mo ther, Hap pi

auf ly

ge wach sen, be side her

al fa

len Men schen ther and her

zur Freu mo ther

de. dear.

a.

P. I, III P. II, IV

(Der Vater und die Mutter)

(The father and the mother) 3+2

482

68 3+2

S. Auf die ser for now I

Rei se go to

in a

frem des fo reign

Land! land.

M.s. T. 8

leuch grant

te

ihr me

dein your

Se bless

gen ing,

Vä fa

ter ther,

chen, dear.

B. Wie die See how

s.

Auf die ser for now I

Rei se go to

in a

frem des fo reign

Land! land.

a.

Auf die ser for now I

Rei se go to

in a

frem des fo reign

Land! land.

Ker ze bright the

gliss.

P. I, III tre corde

P. II tre corde

P. IV 8b

tre corde

Timb. secco

,

63

(Die Freunde)

69 (The friends)

489

S. so the

Al So

steht mit prin cess

heiß em stood a

Her zen while and

uns re quick ly

klei ne Na then a way

stjin she

ka. went.

M.s. Und So

die El tern they gave their

seg bless

nen jetzt ihr ing to their

T. 8

In So

Trä she

nen be

auf fore

ge her

B. von can

der Hit ze dles burn be

weich wird, fore

da the

hin schmilzt i kon,

und so

sich I

vor der I have stood be

ko ne fore it

neigt, long,

P. I, III

P. II

P. IV

8b

496

S. Weil sie in die wei te Fer Hold ing the i kon, hold ing bread

ne and

zie het. salt

Mit too,

Salz und Brot und Hold ing bread and

ei nem hold ing

Heil’ gen salt

bild. too.

Weil sie in die wei te Fer Hold ing the i kon, hold ing bread

ne and

zie het. salt

Mit too,

Salz und Brot und Hold ing bread and

ei nem hold ing

Heil’ gen salt

bild. too.

M.s. Her zens daugh ter

kind, fair,

T. 8

löst vorm Vä ter fa ther stood weep

chen, ing.

B. Weil And

sie in die to ev’ ry

wei te quar ter

Fer ne of the

zie hen world I

wird, go.

P. I, III

P. II

P. IV

8b

simile

64

70 (Alle) (All)

503

S. In To

der the

Stu room

be, where

hier the

in two

uns lit

mo

li and

ger Da

Da mien,

rer tle

gu doves

ten are

Stu sit

be ting,

T. 8

Heil’ Thou

ger Saint

Kos Cos

mas, mo

zur Hoch zeit, with us,

komm come

hei Cos

mian, O

komm come

zur with

Hoch zeit! us,

P. I

P. II 8

P. III

P. IV

8b

Xyl.

507

71

3+3

S. be Two

tet lit

un tle

ser doves

sanf in

tes a

komm mo

zur O

Täub chen. small room,

a. Heil’ ger Kos mas, Ho ly Saint Cos

Hoch zeit, grant that

heil’ the

ger wed

2

Kos mas, ding may

schmie de die E pros per, En

2

he! Heil’ ger dur ing from

Kos mas, schmie de sie halt youth un to age, do

2

2

bar, thou

2

b. Kos Ho

ly

mas Cos

mo

und and

Da Da

mien

mian walked

a

sind bout

durch

den the

8

très fort

P. I

P. II

8

P. III

P. IV

8b

Xyl.

65

72 511

=

=

T. 8

...Daß sie al le From youth to

=

a. halt bar bis grant that the

ins ho he wed ding may

Al ter, halt pros per, En 2

2

2

bar, daß sie dur ing from

noch die hal be youth un 2

2

E wig to

keit ü age

ber en

dau re, dur ing.

2

=

b. Hof hall

ge and

gan come

gen back.

und To

our

ha chil

ben dren

Nä e

gel ven

auf un

ge to

sam them.

melt.

8

= P. I

=

= P. II

=

= P. III

=

= P. IV

= 8b

Xyl.

=

Zei ten ü ber old age, to

66

73

517

3+2

=

S. In In

der the

Stu lit

be, tle

Hier in room, the

uns hap

rer py

gu ten room, the

Stu small

be. room.

=

T. 8

dau re, old age.

=

s. Auch die To

Zeit our

ih rer chil dren

Nach kom men e’en un to

schaft! them.

Sitzt in ih rem There are sit ting

=

a.

=

t. 8

Auch die To

Zeit our

ih rer chil dren

Nach kom men e’en un to

schaft! them.

=

b.

8

= P. I

fort, très martelé

=

= P. II

excessivement fort

=

= P. III

=

= P. IV

=

=

Timb.

=

Xyl. meno

67

=

S.

= schla gen auf die ines sound ing,

Ti sche clash ing,

und cym

sind schon ganz bals are be

ver ing

Und sie Tam bour

schla gen auf die ines sound ing,

Ti clash

und cym

sind schon ganz bals are be

ver ing

= sche ing,

=

T.

=

8

Und die There is

Gäs sing

te ing,

trin danc

ken Glas ing, drink

um Glas, ing too.

=

= schmu cke two lit

a.

Und sie Tam bour

=

M.s.

s.

=

3+2

524

die tle

Braut, doves.

=

=

8

=

, =

très fort

P. I

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

P. II

P. III

P. IV

Xyl.

68

74 = 529

=

3+3

=

S.

=

=

=

=

=

=

gnügt. played.

=

M.s.

gnügt. played.

=

a.

Heil’ May

ger the

Kos mas, komm zur Hoch zeit! wed ing en dure from their

Daß die E he al le youth, from their

=

t. 8

ber dau re, to old age.

= Heil’ Long

ger and

Kos mas, komm hap py u nion

Die E wig keit ü En dure from youth un

2

2

=

zur Hoch zeit! grant thou them.

2

2

2

2

=

2

2

= Kos Ho

b.

Zeit ü youth un

mas

und ly 2

=

Da Cos

mian mo

and 2

ha Da

ben mit mien walked 2

den a

2

auf bout

ge the

= les’ hall,

2

nen Nä geln They walked a 2

2

die bout

se the 2

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

P. I

P. II

P. III

2

2

2

2

=

=

=

legato

P. IV

=

2

2

2

2 2

2

2

2

2

=

2

2

2

=

69

75 =

534

=

S.

Und auch die And un

Zeit to

ih rer Nach kom men their chil

schaft! dren,

Un be fleck te, die du Vir gin Ma ry, Mo ther

Und auch die And un

Zeit to

ih rer Nach kom men their chil

schaft! dren,

Un be fleck te, die du Vir gin Ma ry, Mo ther

Und auch die And un

Zeit to

ih rer Nach kom men their chil

schaft! dren,

Und auch die And un

Zeit to

ih rer Nach kom men their chil

schaft! dren,

=

M.s.

=

T. 8

=

B.

=

s.

Un be fleck te, die du Vir gin Ma ry, Mo ther

= Un be fleck te, die du Vir gin Ma ry, Mo ther

a.

= =

t. 8

ber dau re. to old age.

Jung Vir

2

frau gin

vol Ma ry,

ler give

Gna Thy bless

den, ing.

2

= E hall

b.

he and 2

fest then

ge they

schmie came

det. back.

2

= 8

= P. I

= = P. II

= 8

= P. III

= 2

= 2

P. IV

= Triang.

=

Cym.

=

C.cl.Ă .t.

=

2

2

baguette en bois

70

77 2+3

76

539

=

=

S. Gott of

ge our

bo blest

ren hast, Sa viour,

komm zur Hoch zeit, grant Thy bless ing,

komm zur Hoch zeit! on this u nion.

Gott of

ge our

bo blest

ren hast, Sa viour,

komm zur Hoch zeit, grant Thy bless ing,

komm zur Hoch zeit! on this u nion.

A

M.s. Bring uns die The a po

A stles

Bring uns die The a po

A stles

Bring uns die The a po

A stles

T. 8

B.

s.

a.

Gott of

ge our

bo blest

ren hast, Sa viour,

komm zur Hoch zeit, grant Thy bless ing,

komm zur Hoch zeit! on this u nion.

Gott of

ge our

bo blest

ren hast, Sa viour,

komm zur Hoch zeit, grant Thy bless ing,

komm zur Hoch zeit! on this u nion.

A

Bring uns die The a po

A stles

Bring uns die The a po

A stles

Bring uns die The a po

A stles

8

Komm zur Hoch zeit, komm zur Hoch zeit! grant Thy bless ing on this u nion.

t.

8

b.

8

8

ss.

gli

P. I

P. II

8

8

ss.

P. III

gli

P. IV

Timb. cresc.

Triang. Cym. C.cl.Ă .t. Tmb.Ă .t.

Grosse-c.

71

545

78

=

S. Erz en and all

gel mit! an gels,

Ach die Ab scieds stun de as the hops en twine to

schlägt ge

im Nu, ther,

die stles

Erz en and all

gel mit! an gels,

Ach die Ab scieds stun de as the hops en twine to

schlägt ge

im Nu, ther,

und bring auch The a po

die stles

Erz en and all

gel mit! an gels,

und bring auch The a po

die stles

Erz en and all

gel mit! an gels,

Erz en and all

gel mit! an gels,

die stles

Erz en and all

gel mit! an gels,

und bring auch The a po

die stles

Erz en and all

gel mit! an gels,

und bring auch The a po

die stles

Erz en and all

gel mit! an gels,

po stel and all

auch mit, an gels,

po stel and all

auch mit, an gels,

und bring auch The a po

po stel and all

auch mit, an gels,

po stel and all

auch mit, an gels,

po stel and all

auch mit, an gels,

po stel and all

auch mit, an gels,

und bring auch The a po

po stel and all

auch mit, an gels,

po stel and all

auch mit, an gels,

M.s.

T. 8

B.

s.

a.

8

t.

Ach die as the

8

b.

ss.

gli

P. I

,

P. II

ss.

gli

P. III

,

P. IV

, Timb. cresc.

Tmb.Ă .t.

Grosse-c.

sol muta in si

Ab schieds stun de hops en twine to

72

79

551

S. Al le Wa gen sind So our new ly mar

zur Stel le, Kut scher schnel ried cou ple cling to ge

le, ther,

fahr As

zu, one

fahr they

zu, too,

zu they

u too

Al le Wa gen sind So our new ly mar

zur Stel le, Kut scher schnel ried cou ple cling to ge

le, ther,

fahr As

zu, one

fahr they

zu, too,

zu they

u too

M.s.

T. 8

...im They

Nu! too

Al le Wa gen sind zur cling to ge ther, as the

Stel le, Kut scher schnel le fah re hops en twine to ge ther. So they

Al le Wa gen sind zur cling to ge ther, as the

Stel le, Kut scher schnel le fah re hops en twine to ge ther. So they

B.

s. Al le Wa gen sind So our new ly mar

zur Stel le, Kut scher schnel ried cou ple cling to ge

le, ther,

fahr As

zu, one

fahr they

zu, too,

zu they

u too

Al le Wa gen sind So our new ly mar

zur Stel le, Kut scher schnel ried cou ple cling to ge

le, ther,

fahr As

zu, one

fahr they

zu, too,

zu they

u too

a.

8

schl채gt ge

t.

Nu! im ther.

Al le Wa gen sind zur cling to ge ther, as the

Stel le, Kut scher schnel le fah re hops en twine to ge ther. So they

Al le Wa gen sind zur cling to ge ther, as the

Stel le, Kut scher schnel le fah re hops en twine to ge ther. So they

8

b.

P. I

8

P. II

P. III

P. IV

,

,

Timb. secco

secco

Xyl.

T.d.b. (bois)

Cym. Grosse-c.

, ,

, ,

73

(Die Braut wird hinaus geleitet. Alle entfernen sich.) 80 (The bride departs. Everyone leaves the stage accompanying her.) 559

S. zu u they two

zu u they two

zu they

u two

zu they

u two

zu they

zu u they two

zu u they two

zu they

u two

zu they

u two

zu they

zu u they two

zu u they two

zu they

u two

zu they

u two

zu they

zu u they two

zu u they two

zu they

u two

zu they

u two

zu they

zu u they two

zu u they two

zu they

u two

zu they

u two

zu they

zu u they two

zu u they two

zu they

u two

zu they

u two

zu they

M.s.

T. 8

B.

s.

a.

t. 8

b. 8

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

Timb.

Xyl.

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

très fort

74

81

(Die Szene ist leer)

(The stage remains empty)

565

S. u... two...

M.s. u... two...

T. 8

u two

zu they

u two

zu thwy

u two

zu thwy

u two

zu they

u two

zu they

u two

zu they

u two

zu they

u two

zu thwy

u two

zu thwy

u two

zu they

u two

zu they

u two

zu they

B.

s. u... two...

a.

t. 8

u... two...

b.

8

P. I

3

2

3

2

3

2

simile

8 3

2 2

3 3

2 2

3 3

2 2

3 3

simile simile

P. II 3

8

P. III

2

3 3

2

2

3 3

2

2

3 3

2

simile simile

8 3

2 2

3 3

2 2

3 3

2 2

3 3

simile simile

P. IV 3

2

3

2

3

2

3

simile

, Timb. très court

Xyl.

, T.d.b.

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

75

82 571

(Die Mßtter des Bräutigams und der Braut treten von verschiedenen Seiten auf.)

(The mothers of the bride and groom enter on each side of the stage.) lamentando

S. Kind, own

Mein My

o dear

du mein one, child

ge lieb of mine,

tes lit

Kind, du mein tle one, my

T. 8

u... two...

B. u... two...

sub.

P. I, III

e legato

P. II

P. IV

83

579

S.

Her zens

kind,

Geh!

nicht

fort,

ach

ver laĂ&#x; die

Mut

ter

nicht!

leave

me,

my dear one,

lit

tle

one,

(for the English)

lit

tle

one,

Do

not

lamentando

M.s. Mein My

P. I, III

P. II

P. IV

Kind, own

o my

du child,

mein ge dear

lieb child

tes Kind, of mine.

an mei ner Brust hab ich dich Ah, do not leave me lone ly,

76

84

586

Komm zu

S.

rück,

komm zu

rück,

du mein

leave

me,

Her zens

kind!

Komm zu

one.

Come a

rück,

du mein

Her zens

kind!

(for the English)

child of

mine,

Do

not

my

lit

tle

gain

to

me,

my

lit

tle

one.

M.s. lange child

ge nährt, come back,

komm come

wie back

der my

du mein dear one, my

Her zens lit tle

kind! one,

Was Child

gingst you

P. I, III

P. II

P. IV

85 593

lamentando

...die

S.

du

im mer

bei dir

trugst?

gol den

keys hang

ing

Mein

lamentando

(for the English)

Hang

ing

there,

M.s. du vom have for

P. I, III

P. II

P. IV

Müt got,

ter chen dear one,

fort, have

und for

lie ßest dei ne Schlüs sel got the gol den keys hang

hier, ing,

mein My

My

77

86

601

S. mein ge My own

Kind, child

lieb lit tle

child,

tes dear

Kind! one.

M.s. Kind own

mein ge lit tle

lieb child,

tes dear

Kind one.

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

Xyl.

(Die M端tter entfernen sich. Die Szene ist leer.) 609

(The mothers leave. The stage is empty.)

S.

M.s.

laissez vibrer

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

Xyl.

attacca subito

78

II TEIL

PART II

VIERTE BILD

FOURTH TABLEAU

DER HOCHZEITSSCHMAUS

THE WEDDING FEAST

87 Allegro

= 120

616

s. Zwei knall ro Ber ries two

te Äp there were

fel, on

die a

fie len branch,they

vom fell

Stam me. to the

Zwei, knall ro ground, One ber

te Äp ry bows

fel, die to an

roll ten o ther

zu ber

unis.

sam men. ry one. unis.

a.

t. 8

Zwei knall ro Ber ries two

te Äp there were

fel, on

die a

fie len branch,they

vom fell

Stam me. to the

Zwei, knall ro ground, One ber

te Äp ry bows

fel, die to an

b.

P. I

8

P. II

8

P. III

P. IV

Timb. très rythmé et court

, Xyl. tremolo

T.d.b. meno

(bois)

Cym.

meno

roll ten o ther

zu ber

sam men. ry one.

79

88

620

S. Rol le, roll, roll,roll, roll, roll, zwei Äp Ai, lou li, lou li, lou li! lou chen

fel, rol le, ki, ai lou

roll, li,

rol le ai, lou

roll, li,

Rol le, roll, roll,roll, roll, roll, zwei Äp Ai, lou li, lou li, lou li! lou chen

fel, rol le, ki, ai lou

roll, li,

rol le ai, lou

roll, li,

M.s.

T. 8

Jetzt A

da die Äp fel red, a ve ry

reif red

sind, one,

Freu’n sie and a

B.

s. rol le, ai lou

roll, li,

rol le ai, lou

roll, li,

rol le, ai lou

roll, li,

rol le ai, lou

roll, li,

a.

t. 8

b. 8

8

6

très fort

P. I

P. II

8

P. III

très fort

gliss.

P. IV

Timb.

Xyl.

T.d.b.

Cym. Grosse-c.

gliss.

sich, daß sie zu straw ber ry did

80

89

625

S. Zwei Ai,

Äp lou

fel, chen

rol ki,

le, lou

roll. li.

Da And

die one

bei ber

Zwei Ai,

Äp lou

fel, chen

rol ki,

le, lou

roll. li.

Da And

die one

bei ber

Da And

die one

Da And

Da And

den Äp ry

fel to

so an

Äp

fel to

so an

bei ber

den Äp ry

fel to

so an

die one

bei ber

den Äp ry

fel to

so an

die one

bei ber

den Äp ry

fel to

so an

M.s. den ry

T. 8

zweit ri

sind, pen.

rol ai,

le, roll. lou li.

zweit ri

sind, pen.

rol ai,

le, roll. lou li.

B.

s. Zwei Ai,

Äp lou

fel, chen

rol ki,

le, lou

roll. li.

a.

t. 8

zweit ri

sind, pen.

rol ai,

le, roll. lou li.

b. 8

5 6

P. I

5

très sonore 8 5

P. II

8

5

8

8 5

P. III 5

P. IV très sonore 8b

Timb.

Xyl.

T.d.b. meno

Cym. Grosse-c.

(bois)

81

=

629

S. nah o

bei ther

sam spoke

men la gen, sweet ly.

konnt’ Close

der one

ei ber

ne ry

Ap grew

fel to

den a

an no

dern ther,

nah o

bei ther

sam spoke

men la gen, sweet ly.

konnt’ Close

der one

ei ber

ne ry

Ap grew

fel to

den a

an no

dern ther,

nah o

bei ther

sam spoke

men la gen, sweet ly.

konnt’ Close

der one

ei ber

ne ry

Ap grew

fel to

den a

an no

dern ther,

Ei So

seht, gai

ne ry

Ap grew

et close

was fra to

gen. it,

was fra to

gen. it,

was fra to

gen. it,

M.s. et close

T. 8

et close

B. ei ly,

seht gai

Fe ly

dor goes

Tich he,

no Theo

witsch dor

s. nah o

bei ther

sam spoke

men la gen, sweet ly.

konnt’ Close

der one

ei ber

fel to

den a

an no

dern ther,

et close

was fra to

unis.

gen. it,

unis.

a.

t. 8

nah o

bei ther

sam spoke

men la gen, sweet ly.

konnt’ Close

der one

ei ber

ne ry

Ap grew

Ei So

seht, gai

fel to

den a

an no

dern ther,

et close

was fra to

gen. it,

b. ei ly,

seht gai

Fe ly

.P. I

8

P. II

8

8

P. III

P. IV

Timb. più

Xyl.

T.d.b. meno

Cym. Grosse-c.

dor goes

Tich he,

no Theo

witsch dor

82

= 632

3+2

90

=

S. Und der And one

ei ber

ne ry

Ap

fel re

ist pre

Und der And one

ei ber

ne ry

Ap

fel re

ist pre

Und der And one

ei ber

ne ry

Ap

fel re

ist pre

der sents

Und der And one

ei ber

ne ry

Ap

fel re

ist pre

Und der And one

ei ber

ne ry

Ap

fel re

ist pre

der sents

Fe the

tis no

Pam fil jitsch, ble bride groom,

und der Fe tis,

der Fe sents the

tis no

Pam fil jitsch, ble bride groom,

Fe the

tis no

Pam fil jitsch, ble bride groom,

und der Fe tis,

der sents

Fe the

tis no

Pam fil jitsch, ble bride groom,

der sents

Fe the

tis no

Pam fil jitsch, ble bride groom,

an And

dere Ap the o

fel ist ther, Nas

M.s. und Fe

der an dere tis, And the

Ap o

fel ist ther, Nas

an And

dere Ap the o

fel ist ther, Nas

und der Fe tis,

an And

dere Ap the o

fel ist ther, Nas

und der Fe tis,

an And

dere Ap the o

fel ist ther, Nas

T. 8

B. ist Tich

fröh no

lich, vitch,

s.

a.

t. 8

e ben marc.

b. ist Tich

fröh no

lich, vitch,

weil I

er found

.P. I

8

P. II

8

P. III

P. IV

8b

Timb.

Xyl.

Cym. Grosse-c.

(bois)

heut’ ein a ring,

gold found

nes a

Ring lein gol den

mit ring,

ei ring

nem Tür of gold

83

2+3

636

S. uns ta

re sia,

A ’tis

na the

sta white

ssia. one.

Pa Pa

la la

gee Spa gy Sta

no no

witsch, vitch,

ssia. one.

Pa Pa

la la

gee Spa gy Sta

no no

witsch, vitch,

Pa Pa

la la

gee Spa gy Sta

no no

witsch, vitch,

M.s. uns ta

re sia,

A ’tis

na the

sta white

T. 8

uns ta

re sia,

A ’tis

na the

sta white

ssia. one.

fausset

port.

B. Pa Who

uns ta

s.

re sia,

A ’tis

na the

sta white

ssia. one.

la comes

gee here

ist so

trau gai

rig, ly?

a. uns ta

re sia,

A ’tis

na the

sta white

ssia. one.

t. 8

b. kis set

ge with

fun den hat. pre cious stones. 8

P. I

1

8

8

P. II

8

gliss.

P. III

assez fort

P. IV

8b

Timb.

Xyl. gliss.

T.d.b.

Cym. Grosse-c.

gliss.

84

2+3

639

91

S. Pa Pa

la lo

gee gy

Spa Sta

no no

witsch, vitch,

Pa Pa

la lo

gee gy

Spa Sta

no no

witsch, vitch,

M.s.

fausset

port.

meno

B. Pa la gee Who is’t comes

s.

ist here

so so

trau gai

rig, ly?

Weil I

Pa Pa

la lo

gee gy

Spa Sta

no no

witsch, vitch,

8

.P. I

8

gliss.

subito meno

P. II

8b

gliss.

P. III

subito meno

P. IV

8b

Timb.

Xyl. gliss.

T.d.b.

Grosse-c. secco

er have

ein lost,

85

92

642

B. gold lost

nes the

Ring lein gol den

mit ring

ei with

nem T端r jew els

kis set,

ver with

lo ren hat. pre cious stones.

s. Trau Oh,

rig oh,

ist er, poor me,

ist oh,

der poor

Pa la gee, Pa la gy.

Trau Oh,

rig oh,

ist er, poor me,

ist oh,

der poor

Pa la gee, Pa la gy.

a.

t. 8

.P. I

P. II

8b

P. III

P. IV

8b

Grosse-c.

86

647

s. ist Oh,

der poor

Pa la gee, Pa la gy

ist no

der more

Spa nitsch, is gay,

ist No

der more

Pa la gee is he gay,

ist oh,

der poor

Spa nitsch, Pa la gy.

ist Oh,

der poor

Pa la gee, Pa la gy

ist no

der more

Spa nitsch, is gay,

ist No

der more

Pa la gee is he gay,

ist oh,

der poor

Spa nitsch, Pa la gy.

er ein lost the

gold nes Ring gold ring,

ei nem TĂźr kis ring with pre

ver lo ren hat. cious stones and jew’ls.

a.

t. 8

b. Weil has

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

lein mit lost the

87

93 651

S. Schoß ein Fly ing

Hund comes

her a

an in grey, a

schnel lit

lem tle

Lauf, goose.

scheu Fly

chte ing

Schoß ein Fly ing

Hund comes

her a

an in grey, a

schnel lit

lem tle

Lauf, goose.

scheu Fly

chte ing

Schoß ein Fly ing

Hund comes

her a

an in grey, a

schnel lit

lem tle

Lauf, goose.

scheu Fly

chte ing

Schoß ein Fly ing

Hund comes

her a

an in grey, a

schnel lit

lem tle

Lauf, goose.

scheu Fly

chte ing

ro ber

te ry

fel, to

die a

fie no

fel, to

die a

schnel comes

lem a

Lauf, goose.

M.s.

T. 8

B.

s. Zwei knall One red

Äp bows

len ther

vom red

Stam me ber ry,

Zwei One

knall red

ro ber

te ry

Äp spoke

a.

t. 8

Lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, You, you, you,you, you, you,

lu, lu, lu, lu, ein Hund, you, you,you,you,you, you,

Lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, You, you, you, you, you, you,

b. lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, you, you, you, you, you, you,

...schnel comes

lem a

Lauf, goose,

lu, lu, you,you,

lu, lu, lu, lu... you, you, you, you,

8

P. I

8

P. II

très fort et détaché

P. III

P. IV

Timb.

Xyl. très fort

T.d.b. meno

meno

lu, lu, you, you,

88

94

654

S. ei comes

ne a

jun grey,

ge a

Wild lit

gans tle

auf... goose,

Wau! Oi!

ei comes

ne a

jun grey,

ge a

Wild lit

gans tle

auf... goose,

Wau! Oi!

ei comes

ne a

jun grey,

ge a

Wild lit

gans tle

auf... goose,

Wau! Oi!

ei comes

ne a

jun grey,

ge a

Wild lit

gans tle

auf... goose,

Wau! Oi!

roll no

ten ther

zu red

M.s.

T. 8

B.

s. sam ber

men. ry.

lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, you, you, you, you, you, you, you,

Wau! Oi!

a. ...Wild comes

gans a

auf... goose,

lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, you, you, you, you, you, you, you, you,

Wau! Oi!

t. 8

lu, lu, ein Hund, you, you, you, you,

lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, you, you, you, you, you, you,

lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, you, you, you, you, you, you, you, you, you, you, you,

Wau! Oi!

b. ...Wild comes

gans a

auf... goose,

lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, lu, you, you, you, you, you, you, you, you,

Wau! Oi! 8

8

P. I

sempre

8

P. II

sempre

8

P. III

sempre

8

P. IV

8

gliss.

gliss.

sempre

Timb. Xyl.

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.Ă .t. Tmb.Ă .t. Cym. Grosse-c.

(bois)

89

657

S. Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

M.s.

T. 8

Wau! Oi!

Schoß ein Hund her Fly ing comes a

an grey

in goose,

schnel lem lit tle

Lauf, goose,

B. Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

s.

a.

t. 8

b.

8

.P. I

P. II

8

P. III

P. IV

Timb. Xyl.

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t. Cym. Grosse-c.

scheu chte ei Fly ing comes

ne a

jun grey

ge goose,

90

663

95

S. Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Hel Now

le Fe dern trug sie, its wings are beat ing,

lu, ai

lu, lu

lu, lie!

lu, lu, ai lu

lu, lie!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Hel Now

le Fe dern trug sie, its wings are beat ing,

lu, ai

lu, lu

lu, lie!

lu, lu, ai lu

lu, lie!

M.s.

T. 8

Wild gans auf... lit tle goose,

Wau! Oi!

Und its

mit den Flü geln schlug sie, ti ny feet are scrat ching,

Hei das Mak ing

B. Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! Oi!

s.

a.

t. 8

b. 8

8

P. I

(sempre

)

P. II

(sempre

)

8

P. III

(sempre

8

m.g.

)

gliss.

P. IV

(sempre

)

muta in ré

Timb.

Xyl.

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t. Cym. Grosse-c.

,

préparez le sol aigu

91

96

669

S. lu, oi

lu, lai.

Wau, Oi,

wau, la,

wau, wau, oi, la,

wau, wau! oi, la,

lu, oi

lu, lai.

Wau, Oi,

wau, la,

wau, wau, oi, la,

wau, wau! oi, la,

M.s.

T. 8

war ein Ja gen. clouds of dust, rise,

Wau! Oi

Wau! lai!

Wau! Oi

Wau! lai!

’s ging ihr mak ing

an den all the

Kra gen. no bles.

Wau! Oi!

Wau! lai!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! lai!

B.

unis.

unis.

unis.

s. lu, oi

lu, lai.

Wau, Oi,

wau, la,

wau, wau, oi, la,

wau, wau! oi, la,

a.

unis.

unis.

t. 8

Wau! Oi

Wau! lai!

Wau! Oi!

Wau! lai!

unis.

b. 8

8

8

5

P. I

8

6

6

8 3

P. II

8

1

glis

s.

P. III

gliss.

P. IV

si muta in sol

Timb.

Xyl.

T.d.b. baguettes en mĂŠtal

Triang. Cym.

Cym. Grosse-c.

(bois)

, ,

92

(Der Vater des Bräutigams) 675

(Die Männer)

97 (The men)

(The bride’s father)

(Die Frauen)

(The girls)

S. Siehst du wohl, da And what did we

sha tell

ben wir dir you, dear Nas

Siehst du wohl, da And what did we

sha tell

ben wir dir you, dear Nas

Siehst du wohl, da And what did we

sha tell

ben wir dir you, dear Nas

M.s. T. 8

Die dir whom God

port.

be stimm te hath gi ven

Frau. you.

B. Hier Now

ist dei be hold

ne your

Frau, wife,

s.

a.

8

t.

Die Frau hat Müh’ und Your wife must sew and

Plag’. spin,

Die Frau hat Müh’ und Your wife must sew and

Plag’. spin,

8

...ne your

b.

Frau, wife,

8

.P. I

8

gliss.

P. II

8

P. III

8

P. IV

Timb. Xyl. très fort

T.d.b.

poco

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

bois secco

,

Cym. Grosse-c. poco

poco

93

679

(Die Männer)

(Die Frauen)

(The men)

(The girls)

S. auch ge sagt. ta si a?

Siehst du wohl, das ha ben wir And what did we tell you, dear

dir auch ge sagt. Nas ta si a?

M.s. T. 8

s.

...den and

lie sew

ben and

lan spin

gen the

Tag. flax.

auch ge sagt. ta si a?

Siehst du wohl, das ha ben wir And what did we tell you, dear

dir auch ge sagt. Nas ta si a?

auch ge sagt. ta si a?

Siehst du wohl, das ha ben wir And what did we tell you, dear

dir auch ge sagt. Nas ta si a?

a.

8

t.

denn im Haus schafft sie den lie ben lan gen she must keep the li nen white and sew it

Tag. too.

denn im Haus schafft sie den lie ben lan gen she must keep the li nen white and sew it

Tag. too.

8

b.

8

.P. I

8

P. II

2

gliss.

8

8

8

P. III

8 2

P. IV

muta in sol

Timb. Xyl.

T.d.b.

poco

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t. secco

Cym. Grosse-c. poco

8

,

gliss.

94

(Die Mutter der Braut führt ihre Tochter dem Schwiegersohne zu.)

(Ein Freund, die Mutter des Bräutigams, Bräutigams, der Heiratsvermittler und die Vermittlerin abwechselnd.)

98 (The mother of the bride leads her to her son-in-law.)

(The friends, the mother of the groom, the marriage-broker and his wife in turn.)

682

S.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

M.s. Hier To

mein you

lie ber Schwie ger sohn, ü I en trust her, my son

ber ge be ich dir mein ge in law, I en trust her, my

lieb tes Kind. daugh ter dear.

3

Sie schafft im Haus al le Ta Food you shall give her and clothe

3

ge. her,

3

T. 8

Die Let

Frau her

hat viel Pla sew the li

ge, nen,

B. Der Give

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

P. I

8b

P. II

(sonore)

P. III

ma sonore 8b

P. IV

très sec

Timb.

C.cl.s.t.

avec 2 m. très bref et sec

Tmb.s.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

95

99

686

3 3

3

3

3

3

S. Der Mann be And set

stel her

let to

Flur Work,

und Feld und ver dient auch das you feed her and clothe her and

nöt’ bid

ge Geld. her work.

cresc. 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

M.s. DerMann be stel let Flur und Feld give her to eat and to drink

ver dient and clothe

das nöt’ ge her and send her

lie out

be Geld. to work.

3 3

3

3

3

3

T. 8

Der Mann be And set 3

3

3

stel her

let to

Flur Work,

und Feld und ver dient auch das you feed her and clothe her and

nöt’ bid

ge Geld. her work.

3

B. Mann

be her

stil food

let Flur and clothe

und her

Feld. too. 3

3

3

s. Und ver dient auch das You shall feed her and 3

nöt’ bid

3

ge Geld. her work. 3

a. Und ver dient auch das You shall feed her and 3

nöt’ bid

ge Geld. her work. 3

3

t. 8

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

.P. I 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

P. II 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

P. III

8b (sonore)

P. IV

8b muta in fa

Timb.

Xyl. gliss.

T.d.b. frolez

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. (bois)

Cym. Grosse-c.

96

(Der Vater) 690

100

(The father)

=

port.

T. 8

Er Love

spart nicht, her

spart nicht mit Lie ben, and shake her like a

port.

B. Er You

hackt saw

Holz. logs.

das the

spart nicht O love,

Har tes Holz. Ask a gain.

s.

Bum! (Clap)

a. Bum! (Clap)

t. 8

Bum! (Clap)

b. ...das the

Holz. long.

Bum! (Clap)

Er O

8

P. I, III

P. II, IV

muta in do

Timb. gliss.

Xyl.

T.d.b.

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

C.cl.Ă .t. Tmb.Ă .t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

gliss.

spart nicht love her

mit Lie ben, shake her like a

97

= 696

101

3+2

T. 8

spart nicht mit pear tree and

Lie love

ben. her.

spart nicht mit pear tree and

Lie love

ben. her.

Die They

Bo are

Lie love

ben. her.

B.

s. ren ja come, our

ste no

hen bles,

auf fill

von the

ih flow

ren ing

Bän gob

ken, lets,

a.

t. 8

spart nicht mit Shake her and

auf Round

b.

gliss.

gliss.

P. I, III

P. II, IV

préparez le si

Timb.

Xyl. sempre

T.d.b. sempre

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

von the

ih ta

ren bles

Bän go

ken, ing,

98

102

700

s. um fill

den the

lie flow

ben ing

G채 gob

sten lets,

noch Go

mal ing

ein zu round a

schen ken, auch mong the guests

der and

Frau toast

Ma ing

ri Ma

a. ry.

a.

t. 8

Auch Shake

b.

gliss.

gliss.

gliss.

P. I, III

P. II

P. IV

Timb.

Xyl. (

T.d.b.

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

Grosse-c.

sempre)

der Frau Ma her like a

ri pear

a. tree.

99

Poco meno mosso

704

S. eß do

„Ich “I

und not

B. „Trink doch Drink thou,

aus lit

tle

Müt mo

chen,

ter ther,

iß eat

doch, thou,

Cha Ma

ri ri

to

no tov

wa“ na.”

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

709

103

port.

colla parte

S. trin drink,

ke I

nicht, und do not

euch eat,

ge I

horch lis

ich ten

nicht!” here.” allarg. e pesante

„Ja, dann „Lis ten accel. 3

a tempo

B. „Und wen nes dein Mann “If our Si mon

P. I

3

P. II

P. III

P. IV

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. Grosse-c.

3

3

ver langt?” were here!

eß to

und the

100

104 713

Tempo I

3

= 120

S. trin no

ke bles

ich, as

und they

dann eat

ge and

hor drink,

che their

ich.” wine.”

T. 8

Du Where

B. Du Where

s. „Wer “O

dir’s you

glaubt, gay,

al noi

te sy

Schwät chatt

ze ’ring

rin! goose,

a.

b. Du Where

gliss.

gliss.

gliss.

gliss.

P. I

P. II

leggiero

P. III

P. IV

Timb.

Xyl. sempre

T.d.b. sempre

Grosse-c.

101

105

717

T. 8

Schwatz have

ba you

se! been?

Schwatz have

ba you

se! been?

B.

s. Was Noi

hast du denn sy goose, where

wie der have you

mal been

ge

sehn? what

Und did

was you

hast du see there?

denn and

wie der what did

mal you

er see

lebt?” there?”

a.

t. 8

Was hast Where have

b. Schwatz have

ba you

se! been?

Du A

gliss.

gliss.

gliss.

gliss.

Schwatz Chi

ba na

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

Timb.

Xyl.

T.d.b. C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t. Grosse-c.

sub.

se! man?

Was hast Where have

du denn you been,

wie der what did

102

106

722

S. „Ich war am Meer, am “I have been far a

blau en way at

Meer, sea,

in the

frü her Mor gen stund am blue sea and the lake of

Meer. blue.

s.

a. Am Meer, Lou li,

t. 8

du denn wie you been, what

der did

mal you

er lebt?” see there?”

b. mal you

er see

lebt?” there?”

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

muta in do fa

Timb.

T.d.b.

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

am lou

103

107

728

S. Und dort im Meer beim frü hen A swan neck’d mai den in the

Mor gen rot, sea was bath

da ba de te ein wei ßer Schwan. ing, wash ing there her Sun day dress.

s. Du meinst wohl hier am Teich! A way u pon the sea.

Das Was

war doch höch stens ei ne wash ing there her Sun day

Meer?Du meinst wohl hier am Teich! li, A way u pon the sea.

Ein Schwan? Das Lou li, Was

war doch höch stens ei ne wash ing there her Sun day

a.

P. II

P. IV

Timb.

734

108

M.s. ...Viel leicht schwammdoch ein Schwan im Mee re? ...A lit tle white swan, did you see it there?

Hast du die Schwä nin auch ge se hen? and did you see a lit tle white swan?

T. 8

Wa And

rum soll how should

Ma not

ri a nicht I have seen

B. Hast du die Schwä nin auch ge se hen? and did you see a lit tle white swan?

s. Gans! dress,

a.

b. Hei! Lui,

Hei! Lui,

8

8

P. I

P. II

très fort

8

8

P. III

P. IV

Xyl.

très fort

am blau en the sea, not

104

109

739

S.

T. 8

Meer I

ge have

we seen

sen the

sein? sea? fausset

B. Si Ay,

s. Viel leicht hat How should not

I

sie doch am have seen the

a.

8

5

P. I

P. II

lâchez

8

P. III

P. IV

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

et toujours lâchez

Meer sea,

ei nen Schwan ge seen the lit tle

sehn. swan?

cher hielt der Schwan die be neath his wing the

105

743

S. Zwei Two

wei ße Schwä ne schwam men swans, two white swans in the

dort sea,

zwei Schwä ne schwam men were swim ming in the

T. 8

fausset

fausset

B. Schwä nin bei sich fest, swan doth hide his mate.

si Ay,

cher hielt er sie mit be neath his wing the

sei swan

nen Flü geln fest, doth hide his mate.

...wie Ay,

Fe and

tis Fe

die Braut nicht tis holds Nas

s.

a. Zwei Oi,

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t.

C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

Schwä lou

106

110 (Einer der Freunde zur Braut)

(One of the bride’s friends)

747

S. auf dem sea, two

Meer. swan.

T. 8

Ei And

wie you,

Ei And

wie you,

fausset 3

3

B. von ta

sei si

a

ner Sei right ten

te läßt. der ly,

Wie Ay,

Fe and

tis Fe

Na sta ssja tis holds his

an bride

sei nen Bu sen preßt.” to him ten der ly.”

s. Sie Two

schwam men auf dem swans were swim ming

Meer. there.

sie Two

schwam men auf dem Meer. swans were swim ming there.

a. ne schwam men dort, li, oi, lou li

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

Timb. gliss.

Xyl.

T.d.b.

C.cl.s.t. Tmb.s.t. C.cl.à.t. Tmb.à.t.

Cym. Grosse-c.

(bois)

Œi and

107

(Die Braut)

(The bride)

2+3

751

S. Bis zum Gür tel I have donn’d a

te ich den

steck gol

in belt,

lau ter it is

Gold, plai

ted with

Per len ket ten hin gen bis zum pearls that trail and hang down to the

T. 8

Na sta Nas ta

ssja, ge lang die das? sia, what have you done?

B. wie? you.

subito e legato

P. I, III

subito e legato

P. II, IV

Timb.

(Der Heiratsvermittler) (Einer der Freunde)

(The marriage-broker)

111

755

(One of the friends) =

(sempre)

3+2

S. Saum ground,

he rab. the ground.

(schreit) (shouting)

3

3

3

3

T. 8

He, Now,

Herr Kup pel petz, all you who are

al rogue,

ter Säu Nas ta

tu was für’s Geld, come to the feast,

bring die lead the

Braut! bride

Der Herr in, the

B. Braut O

va you

ter, du mer ry old

du fa

al

tes ther,

Loch, you,

Hast dein Kind ver He has sold his

b.

sempre legatissimo

(sempre

P. I

8

)

sempre legatissimo

P. II

sempre legatissimo

P. III

, P. IV

fer, sia’s

sempre legatissimo

108

112 (Der gleiche Freund)

(The same friend) 760

3

T. 8

Bräu ti bride groom

gam is

mopst sich schreck lich! wait ing lone ly.

He! You

Ihr fair

B. für ein klei Hold ing

scha child

b.

chert for

für wine,

ein Fläschel chen for flow ing

Brannt gob

nes a

Flä gob

schel chen let of

Für rare

ein old

win zig wine, a

Schlük rare

kel gob

chen! let.

wein, lets!

P. I

8

P. II

sub.

P. III

sub.

P. IV

sub.

T.d.b.

766

T. 8

P. II

P. III

P. IV

T.d.b.

Wei maids,

ber and

volk! you

He! pas

Ihr try

al ten cooks, and

und you

ihr plate

jun wash

gen! ers,

He! You

Ihr good

da for

hin no

ten, ting,

ihr good

da for

109

113

772

T. 8

vorn! no

Jung thing,

fern you

mit chat

und ter

oh box

ne es,

Kind! All

He! you

Ihr la

ver zy

schlamp wives,

te you

Brut, sil

ihr ly

ma Reds,

ge you

ren, fool

ihr ish

8

staccatissimo

P. I

8

P. II

P. III

P. IV

T.d.b.

† clamando

777

3

3

T. 8

kräf ones,

ti And

gen, all

ihr you

zar nau

te ghty

ren, ones

ihr who

def are

ti a

gen, mong

ihr the

Wei wed

ber ding

volk! guests,

Sing teinLied chen! Raise your voi ces!

(8)

P. I

(8)

P. II

P. III

P. IV

colla parte 3 3

T.d.b. main = Prendre un second tambour de basque

C.cl.s.t.

[† Clamando: from Latin clamare, meaning to call, to convene.]

genou =

colla parte 3

3

110

114 783

(Ein Freund des Bräutigams wählt aus den Gästen einen Mann und dessen Frau aus und füht sie zum Bett, damit sie sich hineinlegen und es für das junge Paar vorwärmen.) (One of the friends chooses a man and his wife from the guests and sends them to warm the bed for the bridal pair.)

A tempo

S. “Ich “I

will would

schla sleep

fen.” now,”

“Und “Take

ich me

mit dir.” with you.”

“Doch das Bett “Is the bed

“Ich “I

will would

schla sleep

fen.” now,”

“Und “Take

ich me

mit dir.” with you.”

“Doch das Bett “Is the bed

M.s.

T. 8

s. Der Pam fil jitsch sagt: Hear the bride groom say ing:

Die Mas tas And the bride

ja re

sagt: ply ing:

Der Pam Hear the

fil jitsch sagt: bride groom say ing:

a.

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

788

S. ist schmal.” nar row?”

“Uns “Not

zwein reicht es.” too nar row.”

“Die Dek “How cold

ke are

ist the

kalt.” blan kets?”

”Uns “They

ist schmal.” nar row?”

“Uns “Not

zwein reicht es.” too nar row.”

“Die Dek “How cold

ke are

ist the

kalt.” blan kets?”

”Uns “They

M.s. T. 8

s. Die Nas tass And the bride

a.

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

ja re

sagt: ply ing:

Der Pam fil jitsch sagt: Hear the bride groom say ing:

Die Nas tass And the bride

ja re

sagt: ply ing:

111

115

793

S. wird shall

warm sein.” warm them.”

wird shall

warm sein.” warm them.”

M.s. T. 8

s.

Dem Fe ’Tis to

P. I

très fort

tis Pam fil thee, Fe tis

ji tsch sin sing we now

gen this

wir ein lit tle

Lied dem stol song, And to

zen Fal ken und der wei ßen Schwä nin, the lit tle dove, the white one, to Nas

P. II

très fort

P. III

P. IV

116

798

S. Ihr Dost

bei hear

den us,

A hear

na est

sta thou

ssju schka und Fe tis, dost

Fe hear

tis us,

Pam Pam

fil fi

je lie

witsch? vitch,

wna. Ihr too. Dost

bei hear

den us,

A hear

na est

sta thou

ssju schka und Fe tis, dost

Fe hear

tis us,

Pam Pam

fil fi

je lie

witsch? vitch,

den us,

A hear

na est

tis us,

Pam Pam

fil fi

je lie

witsch? vitch,

M.s.

s.

a.

P. I, III

P. II

P. IV

der ta

Na sia,

sta to

ssja our

Ti Ti

mo mo

fe feev

je na,

Ihr bei Dost hear

sta thou

ssju schka und Fe tis, dost

Fe hear

112

(Der Vermittler und die Gäste)

117 (The marriage-broker and guests)

802

B. Lieg Do

nicht not

län lie

ger thus

dort am by the

U steep

fer her um. ri ver bank,

...dort am by the

U steep

fer her ri ver

unis.

s. Hört doch her, We are hon

hört doch her, wir sin our ing you, we sing

gen euch zur our song to

Ehr’. you.

unis.

a.

b.

um. bank,

P. I, III

P. II

e sempre legatissimo

P. IV

e sempre legatissimo

118

808

B. He! Ay

b.

P. II

P. IV

Steh auf, sit down,

Sal Sa

wel jusch ka, ve lyouch ka.

rum? und weißt du auch wa In a sum mer house,

Zu a

Bier wed

und ding pre pare

Zu a

Bier wed

und ding pre pare

113

(Die Gäste)

119 (The guests)

814

T. 8

Man ver gnügt sich präch tig No bles sat at ta ble

B. Wein now

lädt for

man dich Fe tis.

ein. Oy!

s. Hoch zeit wird ge In the farm house

fei see

ert, how

wird heut’ ge jol ly a

fei feast

is

ert, held,

a.

8

Man ver gnügt sich präch tig No bles sat at ta ble

t.

8

b.

P. I, III

P. II

P. IV

Timb.

Wein... now

114

820

120

2+3

3

T. 8

und ge trun ken wird mäch tig, drink ing ho ney and wine, And

und man hält auch all the while made

Re spee

den. ches.

und man hält ach all the while made

Re spee

den. ches.

und man hält auch all the while made

Re spee

den. ches.

und man hält auch all the while made

Re spee

den. ches.

B. Hei da gib tes Sa Mer ri ly, oh

3

8

und ge trun ken wird mäch tig, drink ing ho ney and wine, And

t.

3

8

b.

P. I, III

P. II

legatissimo

P. IV

legatissimo

Timb.

chen,da mer ri

wirst du Au gen ma ly, our wed ding went

chen. tru ly.

115

121 825

S. Uns re Our Nas

A ta

na sia

sta ssja goes a

Uns re Our Nas

A ta

na sia

sta ssja goes a

A ta

na sia

sta ssja goes a

M.s.

T. 8

Und But

es gibt ein the tenth is

Fäß fi

chen vom be sten nest, the best of

Wein. all.

eund es gibt ein But the tenth is

Fäß fi

chenvom be sten nest, the best of

Wein. all.

B. Neun Nine

Kes sel Stark kinds of beer,

bierbrau te man hier the good wife had pre

ein, pared,

Uns re Our Nas

a.

t. 8

es gibt ein the tenth is

Fäß fi

chen vom be sten nest, the best of

Wein. all.

ein, pared,

eund es gibt ein But the tenth is

Fäß fi

chenvom be sten nest, the best of

Wein. all.

und But

es gibt ein the tenth is

Fäß fi

chen vom be sten nest, the best of

Wein. all.

Und But

Neun Nine

Kes sel Stark kinds of beer,

bierbrau te man hier the good wife had pre

b.

Neun Nine

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

Timb.

Kes sel Stark kinds of beer,

bier brau te man hier ein, the good wife had pre pared,

116

830

S. kommt jetzt way, to

in dwell

die a

Frem de. far off,

Doch auch in a

in dis

der tant

Frem de coun try.

wird Wise

es ly

Na shall

stja she

gut geh’n; live there

es and

wird in

Na hap

stja pi

gut geh’n; ness.

kommt jetzt way, to

in dwell

die a

Frem de. far off,

Doch auch in a

in dis

der tant

Frem de coun try.

wird Wise

es ly

Na shall

stja she

gut geh’n; live there

es and

wird in

Na hap

stja pi

gut geh’n; ness.

M.s.

T. 8

...Na and

stja hap

wird pi

es ness,

...Na and

stja hap

wird pi

es ness,

Na hap

stja pi

gut ness,

geh’n,

B.

Auch Wise

s.

kommt jetzt way, to

a.

in dwell

die a

Frem de. far off,

Doch auch in a

in dis

der tant

Frem de coun try.

in

der ly

Frem shall

de she

wird Wise

es ly

Na shall

stja she

wird live

es in

gut geh’n; live there

es and

wird in

Na hap

stja pi

gut geh’n; ness.

t. 8

...Na and

b.

P. I

meno

P. II

simile

P. III

P. IV

stja hap

wird pi

es ness,

117

122

834

S. weil sie Let her

ja be

ver sub

st채n dig mis sive,

und ge hor sam let her be o

ist. be dient.

weil sie Let her

ja be

ver sub

st채n dig mis sive,

und ge hor sam let her be o

ist. be dient.

Bist She

du who

M.s.

T. 8

im hap

mer pi

gut gehn. ness.

im hap

mer pi

gut gehn. ness.

B.

weil sie in hap

s.

weil sie Let her

a.

ja be

ver st채n pi ness,

ver sub

dig in

st채n dig mis sive,

und hap

ge pi

hor sam. ness.

und ge hor sam let her be o

ist. be dient.

t. 8

im hap

mer pi

gut gehn. ness.

b.

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

meno

poco

sempre sim.

stets knows

wohl how

ge to

mut, be

sind o

dir be

al le dient, al

118

=

2+3

839

(Die Gäste abwechselnd)

(The guests in turn)

=

S. Men ways

schen is

gut. hap py.

Vor den Al ten und Bow then cour teous ly,

Jun both

gen woll’n to the

wir old

uns and

ver nei gen, the young ones.

Und dem jun gen Paa re To the ve ry young est

Wohl mai

ge dens

Und dem jun gen Paa re To the ve ry young est

Wohl mai

ge dens

Und dem jun gen Paa re Wohl To the ve ry young est mai

ge dens

=

M.s.

=

T. 8

B.

123

Vor den Al ten und Bow then cour teous ly,

Jun both

gen woll’n to the

wir old

uns and

ver nei gen, the young ones.

= Durch Gas sen, durch Stra A smart young dan dy,

8

= P. I

=

= P. II

=

= P. III

=

= P. IV

très fort

= 8b

Timb.

=

Xyl.

=

119

844

S. fal you

len must

be bow

fal you

len must

be bow

fal you

len must

be bow

ßen, a

wei dan

zei low

gen. er,

Ü In

ber the

grü gar

zei low

gen. er,

Ü In

ber the

grü gar

zei low

gen. er,

Weg, went

wohl a

ne den

Flu green

ren there,

Flu green

ren there,

M.s. ne den

T. 8

Da A

ging ein smart young

B. ten dy

ü ber schma len Steg walk ing down the street,

ging ein Down the

jun long

ger wide

Bau street

Ü In

ber the

grü gar

ern walk

bursch. ing.

s.

a.

b. ...ten a

Weg, dan

wohl dy

ü ber schma len Steg walk ing down the street,

8

P. I

P. II

P. III

P. IV

8b

Timb.

Xyl.

ne den

Flu green

ren there,

120

847

S. er tis

Na stood

er tis

Na stjas stood

schmu cker dan dy

jun ger went a

folgt Fe

stjas and

Spu look’d

ren u

Spu look’d

ren u

der pon

Fe the

tis marks

sisch of

Fe the

tis sisch marks of

ka his

folgt Nas