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LOCAL WOMAN WRITES CHILDREN’S BOOKS ABOUT BULLYING PAGE 7A

MHS Students Dress the Part During Spirit Week PAGE 8A

W E S T O A K L A N D ’ S N E W S W E E K LY BECAUSELOCALMATTERS.

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WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 20 2013

VOL 51/ISSUE 8

HIGHLAND • MILFORD •WHITE LAKE • WIXOM • WALLED LAKE • WOLVERINE LAKE • COMMERCE

WEST OAKLAND COUNTY

SHOP LOCAL•THINK LOCAL•LIVE LOCAL

MILFORD BEAST FEAST

Walled Lake Western/Northern High School Students Sign College Scholarships Walled Lake Northern High School hosted a College Signing event for seven student athletes that plan to pursue athletics at the collegiate level on February 13. These seven athletes are Jenny McKenna (track – Northwood University,) Nicole Jablonski (soccer – Metro State University of Denver,) Taylor Nutting (soccer – University of South Alabama,) Gabrielle Bauer (volleyball – Olivet College,) Peyton Lang (volleyball – University of Cincinnati,) Brett Davis (baseball – Aurora University) and Brady Schafer (baseball – Tiffin University.) Walled Lake Western High School hosted a College Signing event for five student athletes that plan to pursue athletics at the collegiate level on February 6. These five athletes are Noah Bednarek (football – Elmhurst College,) John Hollowell (soccer – Olivet College,) Josh Jones (football - North Carolina State University,) Alessandra Murphy (swimming and diving – University of Lousiville) and Jacob Schiavi (lacrosse – Lawrence Technological University.)

On February 23 from 6 pm to 9 pm, Oak Pointe Church, located at 1250 South Hill Rd. in Milford, will be hosting a Beast Feast. Bring a wild or tame game dish. Enjoy raffles, competitions, and personal hunting stories. Tickets are $5 and can be reserved by calling Donny at 248-685-3560.

QUARTET PERFORMS UNIQUE TWIST ON CHOPIN Huron Valley Council for the Arts Presents Swingin’ Chopin, a quartet of top Detroit-area musicians, performing unique arrangements of Chopin at the second Huron Valley Council for the Arts Classical Series concert starting at 7:30 pm. Saturday, Feb. 23, at the Council, located at 205 W. Livingston Road in Highland. Tickets $15, available at HVCA and Main Street Art 432 N. Main St, Milford. Call 248-684-1004 for additional information.

MOTHERS & MORE - QUARTERLY MEETING Join us on February 27 at Huron Valley Sinai Hospital in Commerce from 7 pm. to 9 pm. Ground Floor Conference Room for discussion topics on household finances presented by a financial planner. Chapter #135, Oakland County Lakes Area is a local chapter of Mothers & More, a national nonprofit organization in support of mothers —because moms need playgroups too! This is a free event, open to the public. Adults only, please. Register by calling 248-360-7702 or visit our calendar of events: http://groupspaces.com/MMOCLA INSIDE One Minute Interview ...2A Education.......................3A Obituaries ......................4A Commentary..................6A Entertainment ...............7A Community News ..........8A Real Estate ...............3B-5B Classified .................6B-7B 248.360.7355

Above, Walled Lake Western students from left to right: Jacob Schiavi, John Hollowell, Alessandra Murphy, Josh Jones and Noah Bednarek. Right, Walled Lake Northern students front row from left to right: Peyton Lang, Gabrielle Bauer, Jenny McKenna and Nicole Jablonski. Back row from left to right: Brady Schafer, Brett Davis and Taylor Nutting.

Highland Township in Negotiations with School Board to Save Middle School Gymnasium BY ALI ARMSTRONG EDITOR editor@scnmail.com

It’s no secret that Highland Middle School has been in the wrecking ball’s site for a while now, but Highland Township Supervisor, Rick Hamill, is currently in negotiations with the Huron Valley School Board to help preserve a part of the building for the entire community to enjoy. Envisioned is a partnership between the school district and the township that would spare the demolition of the school’s gymnasium. If saved, Highland Township plans on using the property for community events and gatherings as well as local athletics with the building being available on a rental basis with renters to cover costs like heating and cooling. There has been a strong desire from the township to save the building for athletic activities. Jeff Muck, Director of Recreation and Community Education for the Huron Valley School District, said he thought the pres-

ervation of the gymnasium would be valuable to the school system to use as additional space for their sports activities. “I thought that would be an interesting element to save that part of the building because it could still be used by community and by schools if they wanted to and its something that could be put back to use,” Hamill said. For the building to be fit for operations, it would require the central heating and cooling system to be reinstalled as well as other protective measures to protect the interior of the building during the demolition process. Rough estimates of $130,000 to $180,000 were made on the minimum cost required to make the gymnasium operable. “The school system didn’t want to be involved in anymore cost, so that was the offer they wanted to make us. They would save the gym, but the township as a community would be required to refit it and this was a project that I felt the community could accomplish,” Ha-

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Highland Township and the Huron Valley School District are currently in negotiations regarding the future of the Highland Middle School gymnasium.

mill said. Hamill began creating ways to raise money from the community to support the cost of restoring the building and began negotiations with the Huron Valley School Board to move the project forward. If approved, Hamill plans to have a fundraising campaign to raise investments and donations to support the start-up operations of the building. He would then have

to provide the school district with a plan on when the gymnasium can be uplifted and how it will be temporarily preserved. “Claims were made that there was $150,000 due by February 1 which came as a surprise to our board. We stated all along that the township by law cannot invest in a property they don’t own, but we can support the process and help drive the campaign for funding forward and not let it fall on it’s

face,” Hamill said. For now, negotiations are still in process between the Huron Valley School District and Highland Township and the fate of the Highland Middle School gymnasium remain unknown. “The school board hasn’t completed the process of deciding what they need to do to negotiate, and it’s all up in the air. Until they respond, I cant take it any further,” Hamill said.

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