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skaters are poised to become punk rock gods photo by chad moore photo by andre vippolis text by Ma x Kessler “In London, we were invited to this Marc Jacobs party in Shoreditch. There’s lots of substances around,” SKATERS front man Michael Ian Cummings remembers. “Suddenly, this guy says, ‘Drink this!’ It was really sweet and tasty. Then he revealed that it was breast milk, which was disgusting, because, honestly, it was good.” Cummings may consider London to be the craziest party city he has been to recently, but he and bandmates Noah Rubin and Joshua Hubbard think of New York as their true home. Based in Chinatown, the trio gained a widespread online audience, without the help of a label, by posting catchy punk singles perfect for thrashing in those last hours before dawn. “It’s unreal to see venues full of people when you’ve started grassroots,” Cummings says. “There’s such a community aspect.” Already hailed as the new Strokes, SKATERS are now signed to Warner Bros., and the boys are putting the final touches on their “Already hailed as the new Strokes, the boys are put ting the final touches on their first full-length album.” first full-length album featuring more aggressive, party-vibe songs. They were especially psyched to record at Electric Lady Studios, the hallowed ground built by Jimi Hendrix where Patti Smith, The Clash and a host of punk gods recorded seminal albums. With a skateboarder’s attitude and major party credentials, we’re sure SKATERS felt right at home. Opposite page: Derek Mattison in Los Angeles; Above: the three members of SKATERS v i s i t u s o n l i n e a s s c e n e i n n y.c o m sc.SEPT13.upnext.indd 5 33 8/30/13 2:03 PM

SCENE Magazine September 2013

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