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American institute of Architects south Carolina

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AIASC CELEBRATES 100 YEARS DEsign AWARDs MEDAL OF DisTinC TiOn

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tABle OF CONteNtS

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Up FIrSt

5 Board of Directors ............................................................... 6 president’s page ..................................................................

8 AIASC History timeline .................................................... 11 In Memory of ...................................................................... 12 Clemson Architecture, 2012 Happenings .................. 22 Archi-toon ..............................................................................

10 A Centennial Birthday Card to AIASC .......................... 13 100 Years of Advocacy .....................................................

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• Frederick + Frederick Architects, llC ...................

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Dogtrot, Browns Island, Beaufort County, SC • Matt tindall, AIA, leeD Green Assoc. ...................

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Honor

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Keough House, Brays Island, SC COte Awards

College of Charleston

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South Carolina produce Stand • liollio Architecture ....................................................

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robert Mills residential Awards

• thomas & Denzinger Architects .............................

Craig Hall Office of Admissions, • Catalyst Architects, llC ............................................

Jury.......................................................................................

Blue House at edisto, edisto Island, SC

watson tate Savory Offices • liollio Architecture ....................................................

Claussen Bakery Building Study

• Stubbs Muldrow Herin Architects, Inc. ................

Design Awards

AIASC Merit Awards

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Maggie Valley Modern, Maggie Valley, NC

AwArDS

• watson tate Savory Architects ...............................

AIASC Unbuilt

Merit

ArtICleS

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Greenville Humane Society • McMillan pazdan Smith Architecture ...................

FeAtUreS

SAr Honor Award

• McMillan pazdan Smith Architecture ...................

Special Citation • McMillan pazdan Smith Architecture ...................

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Boeing Hub renovation & Addition

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Cynthia Knight – leed Consultant

preservation to the US Customs House • McMillan pazdan Smith Architecture ...................

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Boeing Hub renovation & Addition AIASC Citations • lS3p ASSOCIAteS, ltD. ........................................... Clemson University – the Baruch Institute of Coastal ecology and Forest Science

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

Medal of Distinction • Chuck Hultstrand, AIA ...............................................

DIreCtOrIeS

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Firm profiles ....................................................................... Advertisers Index ............................................................

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CONtrIBUtOrS MAGAzINe COMMIttee CHAIr Meg Terry, AIA Dp3 Architects, ltd., Greenville, SC mterry@dp3architects.com

Art DIreCtOr S. Kevin Greene SC Biz News, Greenville, SC kgreene@scbiznews.com

CONtrIBUtOrS John Bryan, Hon. AIA, writer rick Bynum, AIA, Architoons

ON tHe COVer liollio Architecture

James Hubbard, AIA, Awards Adrienne Montare, AIA, writer Mike ruegamer, AIA, writer

preservation to the US Customs House FOr SpONSOrSHIp INFOrMAtION

2012 AIA SOUtH CArOlINA

ANNUAl StAte SpONSOrS

Adrienne Montare, AIA 803.252.6050 adrienne@aiasc.org

GOlD

Brick Industry Southeast region ADC engineering pella windows and Doors SIlVer

ADVertISING SAleS & reprINtS Holly Sanders 803.252.6050 holly@aiasc.org

Carolina Architectural products Carolina Ceramics Insurance Management Consultants, Inc. BrONze C.F. evans Georgia/Carolinas precast Concrete Institute

South Carolina Architecture is the annual publication of the American Institute of Architects, South Carolina Chapter. Copyright 2013 by the American Institute of Architects / South Carolina Chapter. All rights reserved. the opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the AIASC Board of Directors or the editorial staff of South Carolina Architecture. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form. All photographs are copyrighted for the one time use of this publication only.

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

AIA South Carolina 1522 richland Street, Columbia, SC 29201 803.252.6050, 803.256.0546 (fax) www.aiasc.org

preSIDeNt’S letter

2013

marks a very important milestone for our Chapter. One hundred years ago, a group of local architects gathered in Charleston and formally created the South Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. The focus of the Chapter was to be education, both of architects and the public; advocacy for fair and regulated practice; and the promotion of fellowship among our members. Today, our organization is more than 800 members strong, we have developed a unified voice on the local, state and national level, and the letters “AIA” have come to signify the standard for licensed architects across the nation. As part of the 100-year celebration, our Board of Directors developed a plan to archive the Chapter’s history through an oral history video. Videographers have been traveling the state, talking to past and present leaders of AIASC, architects and educators. Their goal is to capture the evolution of architecture in South Carolina. In conjunction with the preservation of history, we also wanted to look toward the future. A traveling children’s exhibit will be making its way to museums across South Carolina in 2013. Each section has been challenged with developing a program that will inspire future young architects by teaching them the history of architectural practice and engaging them in interactive design charrettes. Both projects will be launched to the public at our annual spring conference, May 2-4, in Charleston. This conference proves to be one for the record books as we commemorate our anniversary and explore the future of the profession in the city where it all began. Clemson University School of Architecture is also celebrating its centennial. Last year, the Chapter held a successful spring conference in conjunction with the dedication of Lee Hall III, highlighting the relationship we have developed since both organizations’ inception. It has always been a mission of AIASC to cultivate young designers and mentor the next generation of architects. This process has become even more critical as the economic conditions have been stressful for our younger members and recent graduates. In upcoming years, studies predict more professionals will be retiring than entering our profession, potentially at a rate of five to one. History has shown that the economy will recover, and, as the leaders in our industry, we must continue to be at the forefront by encouraging young designers to become licensed architects. One of the highlights of AIASC’s Board calendar is the annual meeting at Clemson University, where we are invited to participate in studio discussions. There are few things more rewarding, both for students and architects, than to spend an afternoon discussing design and theory. We continue to investigate ways to strengthen the link between education and practice and support Clemson as South Carolina’s only architecture program. Being an election year, 2012 has been especially important for advocacy. SCArchiPAC is South Carolina’s only state organization dedicated to representing the political interests of architects. By pooling our financial resources we are able to make a larger impact on the state level. The SCArchiPAC

Board consists of representatives from each region of the state and operates collaboratively with the AIASC Board. If you would like to learn more about the legislative process, we encourage you to contact the cottage or your local representative. AIASC and SCArchiPAC continue to fight to uphold our members’ values, protect their financial well-being and promote the architecture profession. At the very core of this endeavor must be a respectable financial base. Without monetary contributions we cannot begin the conversations with our legislators. But the reality

Luke McCary, AIA Stevens and Wilkinson 1501 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29201 803.765.0320 | lmccary@stevens-wilkinson.com

is we will never compete with some of the larger, more profitable organizations financially. In order to truly be successful at advocacy we must rely on our greatest resource: our members. On a state and local level the Chapter is continuing to develop programs to support and educate our communities on the value of an architect. Through this outreach I believe we can have the biggest impact on our cities, our state and our legislators. For those of you who have been involved and volunteered your time through AIA, we truly thank you for your service. And for those who maybe haven’t been involved lately, or maybe never have, why not make this the year? I am honored to serve as your president in such a momentous year for the South Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Where our organization stands today is a true testament to the outstanding leaders who came before me, a hardworking and dedicated staff and the extraordinary support of the Board members and volunteers who really are the backbone of this organization. As architects we share the privilege and responsibility to provide more than just a service to our clients. We have the opportunity to make lives better, to improve environments for healing and learning, and to create places where families thrive and communities come together. On our 100-year anniversary, we should all take time to reflect upon what it really means to be an architect, be thankful for the efforts of those before us, and remember why it was we all chose this profession. Thank you for this wonderful opportunity and I look forward to our continued success for the next 100 years!

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BOARD Of DIRECTORS exeCUtIVe COMMIt tee

MIDlANDS DIreC tOrS

luke McCary, AIA, president

Josh Boltinhouse, AIA

Stevens & wilkinson 1501 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29201 803.765.0320 lmccary@stevens-wilkinson.com

Stevens & wilkinson 1501 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29201 803.765.0320 jboltinhouse@stevens-wilkinson.com

emma Souder, AIA, Vice president

Steven Goggans, AIA

red Iron Architects, llC 147 wappoo Creek Drive, Suite 305, Charleston, SC 29412 843.224.4794 emma@red-ironarchitects.com

SGA Architecture 245 Business Center lane Suite 4B, pawleys Island, SC 29585 843.237.3421 steve@sgaarchitecture.com

tripp riley, AIA, Secretary/treasurer

Jim Hubbard, AIA

Studio 2lr Architecture + Interiors 801 Gervais Street, Suite 201, Columbia, SC 29201 803.233.6602 triley@studio2lr.com

pegram Associates, Inc. 1131-B 48th Avenue North, Myrtle Beach, SC 29577 843.449.5202 jhubbard@pegramassociates.com

David Moore, AIA, past president McMillan pazdan Smith Architecture 200 east Broad Street, Suite 300, Greenville, SC 29601 864.242.2033 dmoore@mcmillanpazdansmith.com

reGIONAl DIreC tOrS Jane Frederick, FAIA Frederick + Frederick Architects 38 Meridian road, Beaufort, SC 29907 843.522.8422 Jane@f-farchitects.com

Dr. william Carpenter, FAIA lightroom Studio 115 North McDonough Street, Decatur, GA 30030 404.377.6889 bill@lightroom.tv

lOwCOUNtrY DIreC tOrS Dennis Blaschke, AIA lindbergh & Associates 2170 Ashley phosphate, Suite 504, North Charleston, SC 29406 843.553.6670 dennis.blaschke@lindbergh-assoc.com

Dan Scheaffer, AIA lS3p ASSOCIAteS ltD. 205 1/2 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401 843.577.4444 danscheaffer@ls3p.com

rob tedford, AIA robert S. tedford, AIA 24 Sparwheel lane, Hilton Head, SC 29926 843.681.9161 robtedford@roadrunner.com

UpStAte DIreC tOrS reGIONAl YAF DIreC tOr robert Barfield, AIA Caddell Architecture 4425 longwood Drive, Charlotte, NC 28209 704.458.4946 rgbarfield@carolina.rr.com

reGIONAl ASSOCIAte repreSeNtAtIVe

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Michael Chewning, AIA McMillan pazdan Smith Architecture pO Box 5331, Spartanburg, SC 29304 864.585.5678 mchewning@mcmillanpazdansmith.com

Scott Crichton, AIA lS3p ASSOCIAteS ltD. 110 west North Street, Suite 300, Greenville, SC 29601 864.272.1242 scottcrichton@ls3p.com

J. Michael Atkinson, Assoc. AIA

Geordan terry, AIA

AJ Architects 538 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403 843.577.7030 michael@ajarch.net

Batson Associates, Inc. 415 w. washington Street, Greenville, SC 29601 864.233.2232 Gterry@bainc.com

AIA South Carolina Architecture

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CleMSON UNIVerSIt Y lIAISON lynn Craig, FAIA Clemson University 111 Fort rutledge road, Clemson, SC 29631 864.656.3905 clynn@clemson.edu

IDp StAte COOrDINAtOr Brad Benjamin, AIA, CSI, leeD Ap BD+C radium Architecture 420 e park Avenue, Suite 102,Greenville, SC 29601 864.242.9027

eMerGING prOFeSSIONAlS DIreCtOr r. Justin patterson, Assoc. AIA 36 Briar Cliff Drive, Greenville, SC 29607 803.673.6130 rjustinpatterson@gmail.com

SeC tION preSIDeNtS Don Baus, AIA • AIA CHArleStON SGA Architecture 1535 Hobby Street, Suite 204 Charleston, SC 29405 843.853.4506 Don@sgaarchitecture.com

David Sickinger, AIA • AIA COlUMBIA Garvin Design Group 1209 lincoln Street, Columbia, SC 29201 803.212.1032 Dsickinger@garvindesigngroup.com

Ben ward, AIA • AIA GrAND StrAND Curtis Group Architects 11270 Ocean Highway, pawleys Island, SC 29585 843.979.2210 Bward@cga-arch.com

Hillary Andren-wise, AIA • AIA GreeNVIlle

AIA SOUtH CArOlINA StAFF Adrienne Montare, AIA

exeCUtIVe DIreCtOr 1522 richland Street, Columbia, SC 29201 803.252.6050 adrienne@aiasc.org

McMillan pazdan Smith Architecture 200 e. Broad Street, Suite 300, Greenville, SC 29601 864.242.2033 Handren@mcmillanpazdansmith.com

Stephen Carter, AIA • AIA HIltON HeAD ISlAND

tracey waltz

Stephen J Carter Consultants 17 Sparrow Hawk Ct., Hilton Head Island, SC 29926 843.681.9887 sjcartertwo@gmail.com

Holly Sanders

Glen Boggs, AIA • AIA SpArtANBUrG

1522 richland Street, Columbia, SC 29201 803.252.6050 holly@aiasc.org

Glen Boggs Architect 3550 Glenn Springs rd., pauline, SC 29374 864.582.5508 Glen@glenboggsarchitect.com

BUSINeSS & eVeNtS DIreCtOr 1522 richland Street, Columbia, SC 29201 803.252.6050 traceyw@aiasc.org

COMMUNICAtIONS & MeMBerSHIp DIreCtOr

There Are A vArIeTy of opporTunITIes To AdvoCATe on behALf of The ArChITeCTurAL professIon. Your involvement does make a difference! AIA South Carolina members can participate in one or more local Committees: Become active with the AIASC Government Affairs & practice Committee (GAp) + Get Involved with issues that matter to you and your practice + Stay Current + Attend Section programs + Advocate your profession

Get INVOlVeD

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ArCHItOONS

by rick Bynum, AIA

AdMInIsTrATIon GAp or GenerATIon GAp

The fAMILy GAudI AT The beACh

23rd CenTury frobeL bLoCKs

desperATe TIMes CALL for desperATe MeAsures Copyright 2012 by Rick Bynum, AIA

rick Bynum, AIA is principal of Bynum Architecture in Greenville, SC. the firm offers architectural services for private residences, historic properties, commercial offices, and retail projects. rick has graciously provided “Architoons” for this magazine since 2003. See more of rick’s Archi-toons on his website: www.archi-toons.com

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

AIASC

100 YeArS OF HIStOrY

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100 YeArS OF ADVOCACY: the Chapter’s History of “Improving the profession”

> Adrienne Montare, AIA

F

rom its founding, AIASC has been involved in local politics and engaging the public in an effort to advance the study and practice of the field of architecture. In 1917, the Chapter through one of its members, Albert W. Todd, the Chapter’s second president and a state senator from Charleston, worked to pass Act 106 which defined the qualifications

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

for the practice of architecture in South Carolina, provided for the examination and registration of architects, and established the State Board of Architectural Examiners. The establishment of the BAE was of course a benchmark for the profession as it created in the mind of the public a definition of what an “architect” was and a beginning of an understanding of what one did. It also began an ongoing

View of the front portico of the State House in Columbia designed by Charles Coker wilson while serving as its last Architect from 1903-1907.

“Our profession has changed and continues to change… going forward the firms that managed their business as a business are going to survive and flourish. we’re still in a very fragile economy…so we have to understand our place and how we fit into the marketplace and we have to try and enhance that position. we’ve got to add value to what we do. we have to provide our clients more and more with expertise and become thought leaders in the things we do. If we’re able to do that, then architects will continue to be a valuable part of the development, design and construction process.” BrAD SMItH, AIA

height of the Great Depression, the conditions he described then continue to be on the Chapter’s legislative agenda to this day. “In normal times,” he told the students, “competition is keen and it requires constant vigilance and constant struggle to maintain a self-supporting practice…” He warned them that in addition to how hard it is to get work, it is often difficult to be properly compensated for it. “To most people architectural service is architectural service with little discrimination as to adequacy or quality; it is often bought like pig iron on a strictly price basis.” He ended his address with this not so tongue-in-cheek plea, “What [South Carolina] does need more than all else in this field is public education in the appreciation of architecture… For after all it is the people who really make architecture, who pay for it and who must endure it.” It wasn’t until the late 1940s however that the Chapter took head-on the issue of compensation and formed a committee comprised of Bill Lyles, Jack Freeman and John Weems to update the architectural fee schedule. A draft of the “chapter fee booklet” that included office size and project phase, as well as building type, was eventually approved by the State Budget & Control Board. It was generally accepted as the go-to resource for architects

AIASCtIMelINe

dialogue with lawmakers. For the first 60 years of the Board’s existence, members were appointed by the Governor based on recommendations of the Chapter. (Governor Carroll Campbell put an end to this practice in the mid-1980s, when he refused to renew the terms of sitting board members and did not seek AIASC’s recommendations on nominees to replace them.) In 1923, just ten years after its founding, the Chapter was successful in convincing lawmakers to pass the School Building Code, and ten years after that, thanks to the diligent work of AIASC members, the first State Building Code was adopted. Also in 1933, AIASC President, Albert Simons, was one of only four architects in the country appointed to lead the Historic American Buildings Survey - an effort that led to the creation of the National Register of Historic Places and eventually to the establishment of historic preservation movements throughout the country. The issue of poor compensation and educating the public on the value of an architect was foremost in the mind of the Chapter’s first president, Charles Coker Wilson, when he addressed students at the University of South Carolina in the early 1930s. Though he was speaking during the

1913 Charles Coker wilson, with 5 other AIA members residing in SC, forms the South Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. He is elevated to the College of Fellows the following year for his work in establishing and promoting standards of practice. Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia

1923

AIA members from the region gather in Charleston, SC for the first “Southeastern Architects Convention” at which AIASC president Nat Gaillard walker pleas for a stronger relationship between the Institute and its “far distant” chapters and for the establishment of regional directorships. the following year, he becomes the first regional Director from the South Atlantic region. Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia

1933 Governor Blackwood requests three AIASC members be appointed to “a State building congress of architects, engineers, general contractors, sub-contractors and materialmen”, commissioned to formulate a state building code. Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia

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FreeMAN

lApHAM

and owners until 1981 when the Office of the State Engineer was established and eventually produced its own guidelines. In 1970, the Chapter initiated discussions with state officials on adopting a qualifications-based selection (QBS) system for the procurement of architectural services on state projects. Yet again, it seemed, AIASC architects were ahead of their national peers. Working with Governor John West, the Chapter was instrumental in making South Carolina one of the first states in the country to adopt QBS. There are several other issues, of course, in which the Chapter is involved as part of its mission to advocate on behalf of its members. We continue to monitor the encroachment of other occupations and professionals on our scope of work. Incidental practice, as it’s called, continues to be a source of concern. One of the national interior designer member organizations introduces legislation each session that would regulate the practice of interior design in South Carolina and allow interior designers to practice architecture within the limits of a building’s envelope. Construction Managers have expanded the services they provide to include, in some cases, services that are regulated by the Board of Architecture. But not all our recent advocacy efforts have been reactive - where we fight legislation that seeks to erode our practices. In 2005 as part of a coalition of other business-minded parties, we were successful in getting our first Tort Reform bill passed which, among other benefits, lowered the Statute of Repose from 13 years to eight. Then in 2011, our

lYleS

SIMONS

second Tort Reform bill passed which removed a loophole that would have allowed a claim that a possible building code violation is gross negligence or recklessness per se and would therefore have eliminated the limitation set by the statute of repose. One of our most successful legislative efforts has been the passage in 2012 of the Architects and Engineers Volunteer Act. This new law gives immunity to architects providing voluntary services during a declared state of emergency, and its passage places South Carolina among the ranks of the other 26 states that have similar “Good Samaritan” laws. Looking forward, the Chapter’s advocacy efforts will continue to be proactive. There are several issues that members and even legislators have discussed with the Government Affairs team that they would like to see us work on. One, for instance, is work on introducing a bond bill for capital improvement projects in the next legislative session. We also will continue working on legislation that increases the energy efficiency of new and existing buildings throughout the state. Like our predecessors, we know we must be actively engaged in advocating for our profession and our communities. As Samuel Lapham wrote in his introduction to A History of The Practice of Architecture in the State of South Carolina, published in 1938 on the eve of the Chapter’s 25th Anniversary, there are “those architects of South Carolina who have striven for the interests of the profession in our native State.” It is in their honor, we continue advocating to improve our profession.

IN MEMORY OF AIASC would like to extend its warmest condolences to the families and loved ones of the following: Mary Helen Bissett, AIA | James “Peder” Earl Bruce, AIA John A. Fisher, AIA Emeritus | J. Harrell Gandy, Jr., AIA Joe William Hiller, Jr., AIA | George L. Porcher, Sr., AIA Aaron Adger Rice, Sr., AIA | Gary L. Ricker, AIA

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

weeMS

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1943 with eighty percent of the membership serving overseas during world war II, a Chapter meeting is held in Columbia where members vote to both waive dues for architects serving in the Armed Services and to suspend all future meetings until the war is over.

HABS team in 1934.

A Centennial Birthday Card to

AIASC

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> John M. Bryan, Hon. AIA

t

he South Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects marks its centennial this year. In 1913, Charles Coker Wilson (1864-1933) and six architects practicing in South Carolina formed the chapter. These charter members were already individual members of the national AIA, and Wilson, elected to the AIA in 1905, was the first South Carolinian to join the national organization. Writing years later, he recalled, “There were few architects in South Carolina in the last decade of the nineteenth century, and no work for the few... The conditions of practice were very bad; competition was keen among the architects of the state and from surrounding states. There were few buildings on which architects were employed, and these few, in every case from the smallest residence to the State Capitol, invariably went through the process of competitive sketches from all architects who cared to submit them. The chief occupation of architects was the preparation or purchase of gaily colored pictures, and the winners were generally those showing in the foreground the fines team of horses and the gayest Gibson Girls.” Wilson should be celebrated as the founder of modern architectural practice in South Carolina. Like many architects who came of age in the 19th century, he trained as a civil engineer. He received a civil engineering degree from South Carolina College in 1886. He worked for the Columbia Newberry and Laurens and the Carolina Southern railroads before

Drawing by Victor Lundy, an architect stationed at Fort Jackson from the Victor A. Lundy Archive (Library of Congress)

1953 AIASC president william A. Carlisle, FAIA presents the “Document of Services and Charges” at the annual meeting. this fee schedule will serve as a model for the North Carolina and Georgia Chapters, and is used by the SC Budget & Control Board for several decades. Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia

1963 walter F. petty, FAIA edits “A Semi-Centennial History” of the Chapter and signs it, “to that architect, perhaps unborn, who will write the Centennial History in the year of our lord, 2013 - GreetINGS.” For decades to come, petty’s volume will be given to newly licensed architects at annual Chapter meetings. Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia

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rudolph pop lee, on right, with w. w. Klugh.

opening an architectural office in Roanoke, Va., in 1891. In 1895, he moved to Columbia, and for the next 38 years maintained one of the most active practices in the state. Working with various partners, his office completed at least 193 projects. More than anyone else, he molded the profession in South Carolina during the early 20th century. In establishing a chapter of the AIA in South Carolina, Wilson and his peers joined a well-established, national organization, for the AIA had been founded in New York in 1857, and had amended its constitution in 1867 to encourage the creation of local and regional chapters. Additional chapters soon formed in Baltimore, Chicago and Philadelphia (1869); Cincinnati (1870); Boston (1871); Albany, N.Y. (1874); Rhode Island (1875); San Francisco (1882); and Washington, Detroit, Indiana and central New York (1887). The early activities of AIASC mirrored the experiences of other chapters as architects across the country worked together to improve

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

the profession. Throughout the early 20th century, the AIA and its chapters focused primarily on establishing standards of education, construction and professional practice. AIASC was instrumental in the passage of legislation (1917) requiring a license to practice architecture in South Carolina. In 1933, AIASC helped create the first statewide, comprehensive building code. Albert Simons was president of the chapter at the time, and the same year he was one of four architects appointed to direct the national Historic American Buildings Survey — a federal program still active today. The following year Simons became the administrator of the federal housing program in South Carolina. Another milestone for the profession was the unprecedented wave of hospital and school construction following World War II. The federal Hill-Burton Act (1947) provided subsidies for construction related to health care and education, and AIASC helped the state develop the administrative guidelines re-

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1973 pledges from AIASC members enable the Clemson College of Architecture to purchase a villa in Italy for the Charles e. Daniel Center for Building research and Urban Studies in Genoa. Acrylic on canvas by D. Wayne Rogers, AIA

1983

Harlan McClure

quired to participate in this program and began providing information to its members about regulations and the complexities of modern hospital design. During our centennial, we also should remember the growth of architectural education in South Carolina. If Wilson molded professional life in the early 20th century, Pop Lee and Harlan McClure shaped the Clemson University curriculum that molded many architects. Rudolph Edward Lee was born in Anderson, S.C. He attended The Citadel briefly, then

“there was a certain amount of gentrification that took place as part of [the rebuilding] process. this leads in to something that I think is important- the role of an architect on the board of architectural review because other members are not architects – a lot of lawyers – and people with other community interests. these people very often have very limited knowledge or understanding of architecture. So while you’re an experienced architect sitting on that board you are also filling the role of educating and guiding the other board members to understand what they’re looking at and understanding the review and approval process as it happens.”

Major General Clifton D. wright, Jr. and Charles e. Fraser become the first South Carolinians to receive the AIA Honorary Membership award, conferred on non-architects whose contributions are judged to be of national significance – the latter for his pioneering work developing planned communities on Hilton Head Island. Courtesy of SeaPines50thAnniversary.com

1993

the Chapter bestows its first Medal of Distinction Award to Harlan e. McClure, FAIA.

CHrIS SCHMItt , FAIA Hurricane Hugo changed Charleston forever. Schmitt comments on the importance of architects’ influence on the city’s Board of Architectural Review in post Hugo. aiasc.org

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

AIASCtIMelINe

2003

John Gates

transferred to Clemson and was a member of the first graduating class in engineering (1896). His professional life was subsequently intertwined with the development of Clemson’s architectural curriculum. After graduating from Clemson, he studied at the Zanerian Art School in Columbus, Ohio, and the University of Pennsylvania. He returned to Clemson as an associate professor of architecture and drawing (1900-1912). Lee became the Clemson College Architect and was active throughout the state. In 1917, he was appointed a charter member of the new South Carolina Board of Architectural Examiners and served continuously until he retired in 1948. John Gates succeeded Lee as head of the Department of Architecture. Gates had graduated from Yale’s School of Architecture and had been supervisor of Government and War Housing in the Carolinas. The faculty expanded during Gates’ tenure (1948-1955), and their affiliation with the Beaux Arts Institute evinced a determination to adopt national standards of educational excellence. Harlan McClure succeeded Gates, and as dean (1955-1983), McClure obtained national accreditation and shaped the curriculum we know today.

Architectural Practice: The South Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects is published. written by USC professor John M. Bryan, this volume celebrates 90 years of the Chapter and serves as its “history book” for more than a decade. this year also marks the first time an architect from South Carolina, thompson e. “thom” penney, FAIA, serves as president of AIA National. Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia

2013

the Chapter unveils its “Oral History project”, which captures videotaped interviews with AIASC members and leaders throughout the state, as part of the year-long 100th Anniversary celebration. Logo designed by Tripp Riley, AIA

“Our first trip we didn’t get to the island. we’d seen an ad in the Columbia paper mentioning the island and [the fact that] to get there you had to make arrangements. I told my wife we’re not going to make any so-called arrangements, we’ll just go down and see what it’s like. So we drove down and when we came to the landing I asked someone where the island was. He said ‘it’s over there.” And I said ‘how do you get there?’ And he said, ‘well, you have to make arrangements.’ So we gave up on that trip. pete MCGINtY, FAIA 1913 2013

McGinty (AIA SC Pres 1973), began his practice on Hilton Head Island in 1954 long before the bridge was built.

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VIDeO It has been a tradition for AIA South Carolina to co m m em o rate milestones of the Chapter through written documentation. there are fantastic publications detailing the humble beginnings, successes and work of South Carolina’s designers. For our 100 year Anniversary, we decided to undertake a different way of cataloging history; through our members’ voices and stories. Seagate productions has been working alongside the Chapter interviewing past AIA presiJames F. Barker, FAIA with Clemson student.

Reminiscing about the evolution of the profession, older architects often cite the tendency toward larger and larger firms and the increasing use of specialized consultants. These influences are not new, for firms incorporating many disciplines were

tects lead in collaboration… It’s the very nature of what we do.” As much as things have changed, I think Charles Chassereau would recognize his colleagues and peers today. In 1735 he placed what may be the earliest

dents, educators and Architects young and old. the interview team visited every region of the state over the past year. the product is close to 30 hours of raw footage that will be transformed into a feature DVD as well as several short Youtube videos that will be released throughout the year. the movie will be unveiled at the 100 year Celebration in

“Half of the students of architecture are women. 20 percent of licensed architects are women. In the next decade we’ll see that 20 percent go up significantly. I’m hoping that in a decade it will be a tired conversation - that we won’t have to talk about the under representation of women in the profession any longer.” KAte SCHweNNSeN, FAIA

Charleston in May.

KIDS IN ArCHIteCtUre AIASC in conjunction

with

Clemson School of Architecture is developing an interactive children’s exhibit that will allow children to

introduced by the textile industry in the late 19th century; prominent examples include Lockwood, Greene and Co., and J.E. Sirrine and Co. And as early as 1930, Wilson noted that the increasing use of steel and reinforced concrete was promoting the use of consultants. Indubitably, new materials and technologies have prompted the acceleration of these trends, but there is nothing new in the architect’s role as choirmaster or conductor. Speaking directly to this point, James F. Barker, now president of Clemson, says: “I see the architect’s contributions as presenting creative and collaborative solutions… Archi-

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

advertisement of architectural services in South Carolina. He offered to “draw plans and elevations of all kinds of buildings, both civil and military, like wise perspective views of prospects of towns or gentlemen’s houses or plantations, he calculates estimates for buildings or repairs, inspects and measures artificer’s works, [and] sets out grounds for gardens or parks.” Arguably, that’s still the nub of it. 1 This essay is adapted from my book, Architectural Practice: The South Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Columbia: AIASC, 2003.

explore the creation of architecture through a tactile and spatial experience. each section has partnered with a local Children’s Museum to develop and implement programs during the month of October. the program also provides a unique learning experience for the students of Clemson who will be coordinating the design and fabrication process between the Genoa and Charleston studios. the students will then join local architects in engaging young designers in the history and future of Architecture.

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aiasc.org

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AIA pASt preSIDeNtS 1913-1914 ……………………… Charles C. wilson 1915-1916 ………………………… Albert w. todd 1917-1918 ……………………… e.D. Sompayrac 1919-1920 ………………………… H. Olin Jones 1921-1922 …………………………… N.G. walker 1923-1924 …………………………J.D. Newcomer 1925-1927 ……………………… Haskell H. Martin 1928 …………………………… George e. lafaye 1929 ……………………………… J.B. Urquhart 1930-1934 ………………………… Albert Simons 1935-1936 ……………………… Samuel lapham 1937 ………………………whitney Cunningham 1938-1939 …………………………… H.D. Harrall 1940 ………………………… G. thomas Harmon 1941-1945 …………………… Heyward S. Singley 1946 ………………………… James C. Hemphill 1947-1948 ………………………… walter F. petty 1949 …………………………… william G. lyles 1950 ………………………………C. Hardy Oliver 1951-1952 …………………william e. Freeman, Jr. 1953 ………………………… william A. Carlisle 1954 …………………………… Herndon M. Fair 1955 …………………………… John M. lambert 1956 …………………………… robert I. Upshur 1957 ……………………………… louis M. wolff 1958 …………………………John M. Mitchell, Jr. 1959 ………………………… A. Hugh Chapman

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986

………………………… Homer D. Blackwell …………………………… william S. Dowis ………………………… ralph Mcpherson …………………………… H. reid Hearn, Jr. …………………………… John w. weems …………………………… F. earle Gaulden …………………………… Harold J. riddle ………………………… phelps H. Bultman ……………………… ladson D. tankersley ……………………………………t.J. Bissett ……………………………… Frank e. lucas …………………………… Joseph l. Young ………………………… Frank D. Hemphill ………………………… richard A. McGinty ………………………… H. Harold tarleton ………………………… robert B. Cannon ………………………………… Kirk r. Craig …………………………… peter A. McKellar …………………………… James l. thomas …………………………… Don e. Golightly ………………………… w. Daniel Beaman …………………………… wrenn M. Creel …………………… Howard D. Moormann ………………………………… Jakie H. lee ………………………robert H. Kennedy, Jr. ……………………………Marshall F. Clarke …………………………… william t. Davis

1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

…………………… Gayland B. witherspoon ……………………… Jeffrey M. rosenblum ……………………………Sidney w. Stubbs …………………………w. Douglas Corkern ……………………………… James A. Neal ……………………… Samuel l. McCleskey ……………………………… Myles t. Glick ……………………… thompson e. penney ……………………………… lynn G. Craig ……………………… Charles J. Hultstrand …………………………… Brooks r. prince …………………………… thomas J. Hund ………………………… Michael p. Keeshen …………………………… Barbara M. price …………………………… D. wayne rogers ……………………………edward t. zeigler ………………………p. Doug Quackenbush ……………………… Mary Beth Branham ……………………………… eric C. Aichele …………………………… Samuel B. Herin …………………………… J. Michael taylor …………………………… Michael watson ……………………………………Steve Coe ……………………………… Jane Frederick ……………………………… todd reichard ……………………………… David Moore

preSIDeNtIAl CItAtIONS Presidential Citations are awarded for outstanding efforts by individuals in service to the profession in the areas of Advocacy, Knowledge, and Community. This award began in 2005. 2005

John H. Bryan, Hon. AIA, phelps Bultman, AIA, earle Gaulden, FAIA, James l. thomas, FAIA, peter McKellar, AIA, for their work in the AIA History Book task Force; Stephen A. russell, AIA for his leadership in the AIA Charleston/Habitat for Humanity House; lynn Craig, AIA, rIBA, H. Clayton Gandy, AIA for their work in the AIA Greenville Kids in Architecture program.

2006

Mike ruegamer, AIA for service to the Chapter as editor of the South Carolina Architecture Magazine; Michael watson, AIA, robbie McClam, AIA for service to the Chapter through successful negotiations with the Office of the State engineer; AIA Columbia for Section excellence; richard t. Bynum, Jr., AIA for excellence in Architectural publications.

2007 Jose Caban, AIA for his long-standing work with the SC Architectural licensing Board; lindsey Gertz Moore, Director of the South Carolina Mayor’s Institute for Community Design, for her work on AIA 150. 2008

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eric Aichele, AIA for dedicated efforts on Chapter and Section Bylaws; lynn Craig, AIA, rIBA for exemplary work with AIAS, Clemson Chapter and CAF/AIASC events Coordination; tracey waltz for her 15 years of loyal service to AIA South Carolina; Jeffrey rosenblum, AIA for his work as regional Director and his service on the national board of directors; thomas B. Benjamin, Assoc. AIA for his work with the successful emerging professionals programs and his service to AIA as the regional Associate representative; Frank lucas, FAIA, for his work as Chancellor of the College of Fellows.

AIA South Carolina Architecture

2009

AIA Hilton Head for tour of Homes, in conjunction with the Society of Design Administrators, contributing over $150,000 in architecture scholarships over past 23 years; AIA Grand Strand for lego’s Fun in the Sun Contest educating over 200 children each summer; robin prince, AIA for years of service to the profession and representing AIASC; ed zeigler, AIA for serving as regional Director and Chairperson of 2009 SAr Conference.

2010

Keith l. Sanders, AIA for dedicated service as chair of the Government Affairs & practice committee; Alexander C. James for exemplary service to the profession as director of the South Carolina Office of School Facilities.

2011

AIA Charleston for exemplary service to the members of the Institute in establishing the Charleston Section of the CrAN Knowledge Community; AIA Greenville for outstanding programming of Architecture Month in Greenville, SC; Gregory A. Soyka, AIA for dedicated service as Co-Chair of the AIASC/CAGC Joint Committee.

2012

Scott w.G. Crichton, AIA for his work chairing the 2012 Spring Meeting and exceeding the budgeted revenue; James M. Hubbard, AIA for all of his work on the 2012 Design Awards program and taking it Digital; tracey B. waltz, for dedicated service to the Institute through twenty years of exemplary service to the Directors and Members of AIA South Carolina.

AllIANCe AwArD reCIpIeNtS Recognizing allied professionals that have consistently demonstrated the spirit of strategic cooperation/contributions to the profession. Awarded in three categories: Non-Architect, Architectural Reporting and Government Affairs. 1995 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… John Bryan, HAIA, University of South Carolina 2001 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… robert Behre, the post & Courier 2001 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Doug Harper, Harper Corporation, General Contractors 2005 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………philip Simmons 2006 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Dr. Gene luna and Michael Koman 2007 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………J. lawrence elkin, pe 2008 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Historic Columbia Foundation 2009 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… John B. parks

FIrM AwArD reCIpIeNtS The FIRM award is given in recognition of a firm’s design excellence, significant body of work and/or continuity of service to the public that has made a lasting influence on the practice of architecture in South Carolina. 1993 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Craig Gaulden Davis 1995 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… lS3p Associates ltd. 1997 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Neal prince Architects 2001 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Stevens & wilkinson 2004 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Stubbs Muldrow Herin, Architects, Inc. 2006 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Schmitt walker Architects, Inc. 2008 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… thomas & Denzinger Architects

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aiasc.org

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CLeMson ArCHIteCtUre

LooKING To 2013

and 100 Years of Architecture at Clemson

O

ple of Clemson’s architecture program have made lasting, designed contributions to the communities of the region and the world, a legacy our current stu-

ne hundred years ago, instruction in architecture first began on the Clemson campus. throughout the century since, the peo-

+

SOUTHERN ROOTS GLOBAL REACH

100

Celebrating a century of architecture education at Clemson University

SOUTHERN ROOTS + GLOBAL REACH Celebrating a century of architecture education at Clemson University 2013: Yearlong series of lectures (listings on website)

ANNUAL CAF/ARCHITECTURE LECTURE SERIES All lectures in the 2013 series will be given by individuals who have a connection to Clemson’s School of Architecture — alumni, former teachers and friends. Sponsored by the Clemson Advancement Foundation for Design and Building and the School of Architecture

March 25, 2013: Symposia and receptions in Genoa, Clemson, Charleston and Barcelona

THE VILLA AT 40 Celebrating four decades of life-changing education at the Charles E. Daniel Center for Building Research and Urban Studies in Genoa May 3, 2013: CAC.C-hosted sessions of the SCAIA Annual Conference

ARCHITECTURE + COMMUNITYBUILD IN CHARLESTON, S.C. Celebrating 25 years of teaching, research and community outreach at the Clemson Architecture Center in Charleston

August 22–23, 2013: Symposium, reception and address

2013 AIA SAR ARCHITECTURE FOR HEALTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE AND SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE CENTENNIAL SYMPOSIA: LOCAL ROOTS AND GLOBAL REACH Chautauqua 4.0 — Health Care Architecture in the Public Realm Featured Speaker: Michael Murphy with MASS September 30–October 30, 2013: Exhibition

SOUTHERN ROOTS + GLOBAL REACH: 100 YEARS OF CLEMSON ARCHITECTURE A monthlong exhibition in the Lee Gallery to explore and honor the people, themes and stories of the past century October 18, 2013: Symposium

SOUTHERN ROOTS + GLOBAL REACH A daylong symposium featuring a keynote lecture by Alexander Tzonis and Liane Lefaivre, Ph.D., on “The Architecture of Regionalism in the Age of Globalization” October 18, 2013: Celebration

GET YOUR BEAUX ARTS ON! A formal reception in Lee III, the new Thomas Phifer addition to Lee Hall clemson.edu/architecture/celebration

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

dents and faculty will no doubt continue. this academic year, starting in the spring of 2013, we will hold a year-long celebration of Clemson’s Centennial of Architecture, with the theme of southern roots + global reach. In a host of related events, we will honor the people, programs, and places of the School of Architecture’s past and present, while envisioning the design of its future. In preparation, we have been “cleaning out our closets”, finding a treasure-trove of artifacts and memories, including hundreds of student projects and boxes of school publications from over the years. Many of these artifacts will find their way into a centennial exhibit and publication. A cursory review of these artifacts reveals how much things have changed, but more importantly, how much things stay the same. the means of communication have changed, from watercolor or graphite on paper, to ink on mylar, to digital projections. the styles of the architecture have changed, from beaux-arts, to modern, to post-modern, to deconstructivism, to green critical regionalism. But, through all this change there are powerful consistencies in this school, with its souThern rooTs + GLobAL reACh. • We are innovators. we incorporate visionary ideals into our work, and are engaged with the critical issues of our time. • We are global citizens. Our graduates have a cultivated understanding of global issues, and are prepared for design leadership, having experienced a geographically rich and distributed Fluid Campus. • We work hard, together. Our faculty and students are engaged and collegial,

happenings t weNt Y

a family that shares and supports its members, excited about its work and passionate about making a difference. • We are a design program. we value the conceptual and the technical. we like to get our hands dirty, have a strong appreciation for making and doing, and a determined entrepreneurial spirit. • We value our reputation. Our program is widely acknowledged as a highquality program and an educational value, in exceptional facilities, with graduates who are top performers. As we mark this important milestone and grow from these roots, we depend on our students, faculty, staff, alumni and AIASC members to continue to extend and enrich our reach. It’s going to be a great year! Kate Schwennsen, FAIA, Hon. FKIA, Hon. RAIC, Hon. RAIA, Hon. JIA, SFDFC Professor and Chair

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Clemson’s graduate program in architecture named one of America’s best CLEMSoN — DesignIntelligence magazine has named Clemson University’s graduate program in architecture one of the nation’s top 10 programs among all public universities in its annual publication “America’s Best Architecture and Design Schools”, (November 2012). Clemson ranks fourth among public universities in the South. the publication also named Clemson architecture professor Daniel Harding one of the “30 Most Admired educators for 2013.” the program rankings are based on a survey of leading practitioners with direct experience in hiring and supervising the performance of recent graduates in the architecture and design fields. Now in its 13th year, the survey is conducted annually by DesignIntelligence for the Design Futures Council, an interdisciplinary network of design, product and construction leaders. Nearly 400 professional practice firms participated, answering the question “In your firm’s hiring experience in the past five years, which of the following schools are best preparing students for success in the profession?” the participants were asked other related questions, such as how programs rate in teaching various skills. In naming Harding as an exemplary role model in architecture education, the publication praised his use of design-build techniques in addressing community issues. Clemson also ranked as one of three programs named as a “top Brand in Architectural education” for construction leadership.

CLEMSON ARCHITECTURE

CLEMSON.EDU/ARCHITECTURE

CLEMSON

GENOA

CHARLESTON

APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE PROGRAMS IS JANUARY 15. OPEN HOUSES ARE IN OCTOBER AND MARCH.

BARCELONA

CONCENTR ATIONS AND CERTIFICATE PROGR AMS IN ARCHITECTURE + HEALTH, ARCHITECTURE + COMMUNIT YBUILD, DIGITAL ECOLOGIES t UP TO T WO SEMESTERS OF OFF-CA MPUS STUDY IN CHARLESTON, BARCELONA AND GENOA aiasc.org

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CLeMson ArCHIteCtUre

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ANNUAlSCHOlAr S HI pS

AIA South Carolina and the Clemson Advancement Foundation (CAF) are proud to announce the 2012 recipients of the AIASC Annual Scholarship program. Scholarships go each year to Master of Architecture candidates enrolled at the Clemson University School of Architecture. this year’s seven recipients represent residence at each of the four locations of Clemson’s Fluid Campus and were selected to receive scholarships for the fall semester of 2012. the scholarships were funded by local, State and National Components of the American Institute of Architects.

12

CAF

Reisha Allport AIA Hilton Head

Jackie Batanglo AIA Greenville

Sara Cheikelard AIA Spartanburg

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: trafalgar, Dominica

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: windsor, MA

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Clearwater, Fl

Chen Fang AIA Grand Strand

Daniel Han AIA SC

Wesley Hassell AIA SC

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Hangzhou, China

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Seoul, South Korea

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Apex, NC

Yuxiang Jiang AIA Spartanburg

MinJi Kim AIA Charleston

Julie Knorr AIA Spartanburg

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Shenzhen, China

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Seoul, South Korea

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Glencoe, Il

Mary Roberts AIA Charleston

Haiming Tan AIA Grand Strand

Ryan Woods AIA Hilton Head

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Kennesaw, GA

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Shenzhen, China

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Austin, tx

Jingjie Zhao AIA Columbia

Xuefei Zheng AIA Grand Strand

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Beijing, China

Currently in: Clemson Hometown: Guangzhou, China

Matching funds have been given through AIASC and its six local sections by the national AIA component to provide scholarship opportunities to architecture students currently enrolled in a professional degree program. Stipulations are that each student receive $1000 in order to qualify for the matching funds. For school year 2012-2013, AIA National, AIA South Carolina and its sections will award Clemson Graduate Architecture Students with a total of $17,000! 24

AIA South Carolina Architecture

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may be available!

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d e s I G n AwA r D S

First conferred in 1962, the AIASC Design Awards are the state’s highest recognition of excellence in design. the Design Awards program recognizes projects, architects and owners from throughout the state that exemplify vision, creativity and design innovation. All entries were designed by registered architects that are members of AIASC in good standing. projects could have been executed anywhere in the United States or abroad and must have been substantially completed after January 1, 2006.

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the South Atlantic region (SAr) Design Awards program recognizes the best in architectural design in Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina. All projects were judged based on their architectural excellence, sustainability and historic preservation/adaptive re-use as they reflect upon the merits of each submission. this year’s awards were juried by David Miller, FAIA and Scott wolf, FAIA both of the Miller Hull partnership; Susan Jones, FAIA of Atelier Jones; rick zieve, FAIA of the SrG partnership and Kirsten Murray, AIA of Olson Kundig.

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WATson TATe sAvory offICes A I A SC1 00

s A r h o n o r AwA r D

wAtSON tAte SAVOrY ArCHIteCtS

AIA South Carolina Architecture

H

aving successfully renovated an old wholesale warehouse for a client in Columbia’s historic Vista into retail and office spaces, these architects were eager to do the same for themselves. The search led to 1316 Washington St., a 1939 two-story office building originally designed for a local insurance company and later serving as a Selective Service office during World War II. In a state of neglect and significantly subdivided, with windows bricked

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up, many layers of ceilings added over the years and mold present, this modernist structure was vulnerable to demolition. In 2006, the architects purchased the building and immediately started renovating it for their own use. In addition to responding to a need for office space, it was the architects’ intent to save this building as an example of the “next wave� of structures worthy of consideration for local landmark status. They also decided to design the project for Leader-

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

ship in Energy and Environmental Design certification, recycling existing resources and introducing renewable resources. Simple materials and details were utilized in response to the straightforward tectonic of the original structure. Built-in systems were held away as much as possible from the existing shell, in order to further accent the contrast between old and new. A minimalist aesthetic was employed to bring natural light into the space and clarity to the design.

In order to maximize an open plan, a central stair with a clerestory above was introduced, organizing circulation and creating a strong link between first and second floor functions. Workstations were aligned with the structural grid, with shelving and cabinets held away from the existing shell. Translucent glass panel dividers were integrated into the bookcases to maximize the flow of natural light through the space. Where acoustical isolation was necessary, broad expanses of interior storefront were used to maximize visual openness. The building facade was left entirely intact with the exception of new entry sconces, a glass “visor” announcing the entry and new thermal, operable windows. The hope — and design intent of this project — is to provide a minimalist, contemporary design in dialogue with the existing early modern facade, which serves as an example of sustainability and encourages consideration of local modernist structures for landmark status.

FIrM CreDItS Michael Watson, AIA, LEED AP Sanders Tate, AIA, LEED AP Tom Savory, AIA, LEED AP Brian Balzer, Assoc. AIA Jason Cosby

ClIeNt 1316 Washington, LLC

prOJeCt Watson Tate Savory Offices

DeVelOper 1316 Washington, LLC

INterIOr DeSIGN Watson Tate Savory

CONtrACtOr McClam Construction

lOCAtION Columbia, SC

pHOtOGrApHY G Matson Photographic aiasc.org

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CrAIG hALL offICe of AdMIssIon CoLLeGe of ChArLesTon

A A I A SC1 00

A I A s C M e r I T AwA r D

lIOllIO ArCHIteCtUre

AIA South Carolina Architecture

s the point of first contact for prospective students, the College of Charleston’s Craig Hall and the Office of Admissions creates an instant impression representative of the school, the people and the campus as a whole. Craig Hall draws visitors in through an arcade, which continues into the interior beyond the frameless glass entry. Two materials define the renovated spaces: sleek white surfaces and rich wood. A refined level of detail is present in custom millwork such as the reception desk, benches and podium. Multiple sustainable features yield a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold certified interior renovation. Corridors are realigned with exterior windows to draw natural lighting deep inside the interior and inside offices through transparent walls.

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via corridors. Housed in one location for the first time, admissions officers are organized in pods, while shared spaces are placed throughout — and large corridors provide the spontaneous conversation and encourage interaction. As a tool by which the Office of Admissions communicates information to visitors and prospective students, Craig Hall provides an intimate experience representative of the campus and school as a whole.

It is here that the narrative of the college begins. Large LCD monitors provide graphic displays to visitors in a series of “information zones,” which cycle through current events, student life and historical moments at the college — all as visitors progress toward the multipurpose presentation space. Upon entering the space, prospective students encounter a large, glowing rendition of the college’s seal, which captures the school’s 240-year history. Craig Hall emphasizes the connec-

tion between the College of Charleston’s rich past and the students that are its future; and it becomes a vehicle of communication for the admissions staff to address the school’s vision as the visitors proceed on campus tours. Supporting these initial impressions of the College of Charleston, the backof-house program for the Office of Admissions focuses on creating efficiently organized and collaborative workspaces. These areas are united by natural light, which penetrates deep within the building

FIrM CreDItS C. Dinos Liollio, AIA, LEED AP Jay White, AIA, LEED AP Jennifer Charzewski, AIA, LEED AP Mary Mac McFadden, LEED AP Jennifer Sanders, LEED AP

ClIeNt College of Charleston

lANDSCApe ArCHIteCt DesignWorks

INterIOr DeSIGN Liollio Architecture

CONtrACtOr Palmetto Construction Group

lOCAtION Charleston, SC

pHOtOGrApHY Jay White, AIA, LEED AP

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souTh CAroLInA produCe sTAnd

t

A I A SC1 00

A I A s C M e r I T AwA r D

CAtAlYSt ArCHIteCtS, llC

AIA South Carolina Architecture

he state departments of agriculture and commerce joined forces to promote Certified South Carolina, a program that encourages the consumption of local produce. To further the program’s mission, the state’s Secretary of Commerce called for the design of a produce stand that would enable local residents and farmers to sell their goods. The produce stand, in accordance with project guidelines, was required to provide shelter for vendors and customers, include a display area for produce and be secured when not in use. The vernacular architecture of South Carolina’s old tobacco barns inspired the building’s design. It features a simple gable roof, and building materials such as treated lumber and standing seam metal. Retractable awnings shelter the stands from sun and rain and close to secure the building overnight. Each produce stand is manufactured by S.C. Prison Industries and distributed by truck to rural locations statewide.

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FIrM CreDItS Heather B. Stallworth, AIA, D. Wayne Rogers, AIA, and Colonel O. Rogers, AIA

ClIeNt State of South Carolina

CONtrACtOr State of South Carolina

lOCAtION Multiple locations in South Carolina

pHOtOGrApHY Catalyst Architects

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preservATIon To The u.s. CusToM house

S A I A SC1 00

A I A s C M e r I T AwA r D

lIOllIO ArCHIteCtUre

AIA South Carolina Architecture

ince the early 1870s, the United States Custom House has played a significant role in the historic fabric of Charleston’s architecture. On the National Register of Historic Places, this structure is a landmark on the city’s harbor and often serves as the backdrop to community events. And just like Ellis Island, it welcomed many immigrants coming to America. It was within the historic walls of the cortile that their oath and pledge was recited. The primary focus of the structure’s preservation was the restoration of the cortile and staircases to its original circa 1871 Victorian appearance, including the removal of incompatible materials and the restoration of the plaster detailing and interior columns. Through extensive paint analysis, the original Victorian painting scheme was identified. Age, saltwater exposure and moisture infiltration defined many of the design problems. Historic materials and methods difficult to find or are no longer available also presented challenges.

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But the end goal was to respectfully restore the exterior while renovating the interior. The preservation also encompassed the task of maximizing usable area on the ground floor for the federal property manager and its tenant agencies while creating comfortable office environments with contemporary amenities. The historic structure is now meticu-

lously preserved to its circa 1871 appearance through multiple construction phases. Work included slate and granite restoration, wood and steel preservation, and door and window conversion. Moisture infiltration on the ground floor required extensive research in removing granite slabs, installing moisture barriers and resetting granite. This allowed the occupancy of nearly 16,000 square feet of space on the ground floor. Bronze doors and grillwork tarnished over years were restored. Eight years and four phases of construction, the project also included exterior improvements such as copper conservation; installing waterproofing beneath the exterior granite stairs and then resetting the historic granite; restoring the bronze doors, hardware and grill at the entry points; and repairing and refinishing of all exterior doors, windows, hardware and shutters, including its operability. Interior restoration to the circa 1871 appearance was the central focus of phase III, where in-depth paint analysis revealed the rich Victorian-era colors of the interior. The richness of these colors is evident in the public entry lobbies, stairwells and the historic cortile, and in other private interior spaces. Each produce stand is manufactured by S.C. Prison Industries and distributed by truck to rural locations statewide.

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FIrM CreDItS Rick Bousquet, AIA, LEED AP; Geoff Mohney, AIA, LEED AP; Jay White, AIA, LEED AP, Julie Voisin, RA

ClIeNt General Services Administration

INterIOr DeSIGN Liollio Architecture

StrUCtUrAl eNGINeer Larkin Engineering, Inc.

UNDerwAter eNGINeer Collins Engineering

Mep eNGINeer Rosser

CONtrACtOr Phase 1: JW Poole, Inc. Phase 2: JW Poole, Inc. Phase 3: ABBA Construction Phase 4: JW Poole, Inc.

lOCAtION Charleston, SC

pAINt CONSerVAtOr: Building Conservation Associates

pHOtOGrApHY Exterior Photograph: Rick Rhodes Photography Interior Photographs: Jay White

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boeInG hub renovATIon & AddITIon

l A I A SC1 00

A I A s C M e r I T AwA r D

MCMIllAN pAzDAN SMItH ArCHIteCtUre

AIA South Carolina Architecture

ocated within The Boeing Co.’s North Charleston campus, this building’s site is surrounded by enormous industrial structures and expansive stretches of pavement. Around 1,300 square feet of space was converted from training rooms into administrative offices, a medical clinic and a small retail store. An additional 17,000 square feet of space was added to include a cafeteria, serving area and a large commercial kitchen. Working within the confines of the indoor manufacturing process, an employee likely will have little contact with the outside world for an entire eight-hour shift. The design intent for the dining area was to provide a respite for the worker — an uplifting, dynamic space that allows for a strong connection to the exterior. The building strives to act as a civic structure on campus that symbolizes the importance of the employee.

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FIrM CreDItS Eddie Bello, AIA, Project Architect Toren Andersson, AIA, Jim Daniel, Nick Galizia, Design Team Brian Fessler, AIA, Construction Administration Cynthia Knight, LEED Consultant

The building takes its cues from the traditions of Charleston architecture, utilizing simple forms and materials, and vertical proportions. The exterior covered walkways serve as “porches” for outdoor dining and shade the interior glass-enclosed dining areas. In a nod to Charleston’s historic Single House, its ceilings are painted the traditional piazza blue color. The exposed steel and polished concrete relate to the industrial context, while a stained wood ceiling and wall finish soften the interior dining experience. Outside, the vegetative mesh fence will screen the existing building and provide a green focal point within the existing industrial environment. Working under an extremely strict schedule, the project went from initial design conception to construction documents in just three months and the building was constructed in nine months. The project is currently certified as Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold.

ClIeNt The Boeing Company

lANDSCApe ArCHIteCt ENVIRO AgScience, Inc

CIVIl eNGINeer URS Corporation , B.P. Barber

Mep eNGINeer RMF Engineering, Inc

StrUCtUrAl eNGINeer MMSA

CONtrACtOr Turner – BEK Joint Venture

lOCAtION North Charleston, SC

pHOtOGrApHY Coleman Photography

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CLeMson — The bAruCh InsTITuTe of CoAsTAL eCoLoGy And foresT sCIenCe

t

A I A SC1 00

A I A s C C I TAT I o n AwA r D

lS3p ASSOCIAteS ltD.

AIA South Carolina Architecture

his Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold project is a sustainable expansion of Clemson University’s research and academic facilities within a 17,550-acre historical preserve. The 10,575-square-foot project includes office space for faculty and researchers, a smart classroom, conference facilities and a small assembly space, all surrounding a central two-story atrium. The “eureka” moment for the project planning and design efforts occurred during the green charrette with the owner. At the workshop, it was discovered faculty, researchers and administrators thought it would be a good idea to separate the new office, classroom and support building from the renovated research lab building. An outdoor walk through a demonstration garden would be a pleasant distraction, they said, even in inclement weather. This allowed the arched walkway to act as the unifying visual element between buildings, including the future outdoor classroom and the new

and renovated research buildings. It also allowed the new building to be set up on an east-west axis to increase both day lighting and solar orientation strategies. Turning the building about 13 degrees maximized solar orientation efficiencies, and opened up more views to and from the building. The building massing — derived from several original buildings on site — includes large roof overhangs and porches. The organizing concept of the facility was to create two “bar” buildings rotated to capitalize on passive solar strategies. The building forms create a twostory interior commons area containing large clerestory glazing on the north facade. Almost every space in the building links directly to this commons area. This strategy provides ample opportunities for unplanned interactions between users — critical in research institutions to stimulate and develop ideas. Visitors entering the facility are greeted with a large art wall above the reception desk. It features the preserve’s natural environs in a super-graphic collage of images. To introduce the visitor to the research undertaken on site, the vaulted entry foyer includes a casual seating area with digital teaching displays. The two-story atrium includes maple “tree” columns that not only allude to the forestry research and science that takes place within the building but also the surrounding preserve. South-facing faculty offices are accessed through the double-height commons. To promote interchange between researchers, a breakout area is included

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within the commons. The north-facing clerestory wall brings gentle light to these spaces throughout the day. Many innovative systems and strategies are integrated into the fabric of the facility. Water use is expected to be 30% less than comparable buildings. The site selection and construction schedule of the building accommodate the nesting season of the red-cockaded woodpecker, an endangered species native to the site. Innovative materials are used throughout the building including products with high-recycled content, environmentally safe adhesives and paints, and rapidly renewable materials such as agri-fibers and soy-based products. A series of public demonstration gardens and bio-swales are included around the site for both academic and public education of xeriscaping and sustainable landscapes.

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FIrM CreDItS Byron Edwards, AIA, Lauren McCord, Chip White, AIA

ClIeNt Clemson University

lANDSCApe ArCHIteCt Seamon Whiteside

CONtrACtOr Brantley Construction

lOCAtION Georgetown, SC

pHOtOGrApHY Matt Silk Photography

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GreenvILLe huMAne soCIeTy

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A I A SC1 00

A I A s C C I TAT I o n AwA r D

MCMIllAN pAzDAN SMItH ArCHIteCtUre

AIA South Carolina Architecture

he Greenville Humane Society, which relocated within the city, commissioned the design team to assist in the research, planning and renovation of an existing 10,000-square-foot warehouse to shelter and support animal adoption. Rebranding itself as a no-kill facility, goals for the project included accommodating approximately 60 cats and dogs in a warm family atmosphere and enhancing the revenue generating aspects of the business to support the loss leader, the adoption process. Working in tandem with a local public relations firm, the organization wished to reinvent the brand, the experience, and the process of care and adoption. Because this was the first construction project for many of the staff and the volunteers, it was realized that education and communication were imperative to good decision making, especially with an aggressive eight-month design and construction schedule. The architects led brainstorming sessions and used Revit models rather than two-dimensional floor plans and elevations to help explain design ideas.

The designer shadowed the client to fully understand the day-to-day operations and looked for space inefficiencies and opportunities to streamline processes. Dramatic results were made through the redesign of the veterinary clinic, providing two surgery suites instead of one, and finding floor plan efficiencies to reinvent the adoption process and increase the sale of retail pet supplies. Now, clients are taken directly to the kennels with an adoption counselor using a wireless device to start the adoption process, eliminating the need for private offices. Retail goods are highlighted in portal windows and cubbies, saving space by eliminating the need for stand-alone retail racks. As a nonprofit with limited financial resources, the Greenville Humane Society had an extremely tight budget and asked the design-build team to help solicit and use donated materials, plumbing and lighting fixtures, and to incorporate these into the design. An expedited schedule also meant any materials needed to be readily available and local in nature. Acoustics had been a formidable issue in the past and was a deterrent to adoption. The team carefully oriented adult dog cages facing the outside and chose acoustical materials to absorb noise. The environment has enhanced the dogs’ well-being and the

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kennels are peaceful for visiting children and adults, who previously were annoyed or frightened by the noise. The building uses a separate entrance to accommodate varying hours of operation. The veterinary clinic lobby connects to the adoption lobby via a large sliding glass door, creating flexible space for large functions and fundraising events. The exterior of the building has a deep, wrap-around porch with a covered canopy where people can assemble for the monthly dog clinic or a special event. The remaining 4 acres has been master planned for the future addition of a dog park, covered pavilion and walking trails. The overarching goal of the design has exceeded expectations — a more functional, friendly and enticing facility that supports a community of pet lovers.

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FIrM CreDItS Joseph M. Pazdan, II, AIA, Principal In Charge Lisa M. Lanni, AIA, Project Architect Cary Perkins, Project Manager

ClIeNt Greenville Humane Society

INterIOr DeSIGNer Dailey & Associates

StrUCtUrAl eNGINeer Fuller Consulting Engineers

CIVIl eNGINeer EAS Professionals, Inc

Mep eNGINeer Southern Mechanical, Inc

eleCtrICAl eNGINeer Walker & Whiteside, Inc.

CONtrACtOr Harper Corporation

BrANDING & GrApHICS CONSUltANt Erwin Penland

lOCAtION Greenville, SC

pHOtOGrApHY Kris Decker/Firewater Photography

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the Unbuilt project Award recognizes design excellence by members of AIASC in good standing in unbuilt architectural designs of any project type. projects could have included purely theoretical projects and unbuilt client-sponsored projects (commercial or residential buildings, interiors, transportation infrastructure, monuments, etc.). projects under construction or otherwise apparently assured of construction were not eligible.

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CLAussen bAKery buILdInG sTudy

A A I A SC1 00

A I A s C u n b u I LT A w A r D

MCMIllAN pAzDAN SMItH ArCHIteCtUre

AIA South Carolina Architecture

local developer chose the creative resources of a design competition to determine potential uses for an empty 1930s building on the Historic Register. Located along a commercial corridor to a once vibrant community, the facility is currently surrounded by economically depressed neighborhoods, yet situated between two successful commercial redevelopment areas. The masonry and heavy timber building had originally employed many local residents and was the hub of the community. The goal for the design team was to develop an adaptive reuse opportunity, keeping the historic shell that was respectful to the sense of place and original use, yet would serve as a catalyst for growth for surrounding neighborhoods. The design team chose a diverse employee group to participate in a charette about the building’s possibilities. As they studied the demographics and amenities within a 2-mile radius, they realized the site was served by public transportation, but was in the center of the city’ poorest neighborhoods and lacked connectivity and walkable amenities. Identified goals included the ability to teach adults and children gardening and cooking skills, address the need for accessibility to fresh produce within walking distance, and the idea of a “cooperative incubator” to support entrepreneurship skills.

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be enhanced by the community room and open-air garden that adjoin the corridor. Another important aspect of the building was the inclusion of an interactive community garden. The building sits approximately 20 feet from the road with no protection from local traffic, so the team recommended removing the planted area to provide a much wider sideway. Planting trees at the street edge buffer the traffic from the pedestrian way. Though conceptual in nature, the project would respond to a critical shortage of support services and amenities to the surrounding community, yet pay credence to the historical nature of the building’s former role as an economic hub and vibrant neighborhood.

For the first level, a variety of functions were incorporated to support the neighborhood and create a destination for others outside the neighborhood — a new hub. These include a food cooperative, a grocery store, a local grown restaurant and training kitchen. Other hub functions are a credit union to provide lowinterest loans to startup businesses, and a training center to provide educational opportunities such as small-business leadership courses, parenting classes or study

sessions for the GED exam. A storefront space for startup businesses such as a tailor, a music teacher or an artist was offered as part of the cooperative spirit, encouraging the tenants to offer lessons of their craft to neighborhood children. The upper level was planned for affordable housing. Twelve households, averaging 1,000 square feet, can be accommodated on the street side with privacy, yet easy access to the cooperative amenities below. Residential life would

FIrM CreDItS Lisa Lanni, AIA, Project Architect

ClIeNt Furman Company, Steve Navarro

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AwArDS prOGrAM the 2012 Design Awards included a Student’s Choice Awards. with the 2012 AIASC Conference being hosted by Clemson University, there was a unique opportunity to gather the student’s opinion. Clemson students selected their favorites from all design award entries and the program was administered by AIAS and lynn Craig, FAIA.

AwArDS JUrY 2012 DeSIGN AwArDS: Thomas Phifer, FAIA - Chairman Jury Members: Mark Carroll, Mario Gooden, and Joeb Moore, AIA

rOBert MIllS AwArDS: Brian Bell, AIA - Chairman Jury Members: Sheri locke, and timothy Harrison DeSIGN AwArDS: McMillan pazden Smith Architecture for Jackson County Courthouse and library

rOBert MIllS AwArD: lS3p Associates, Inc. for Blue ridge Mountains Home

pUrpOSe AIASC has a long tradition of recognizing individuals, organizations, and projects for exemplifying the very best in architecture. the AIA believes that awards programs should be carefully structured so that selection and recognition of honorees serve two distinct purposes: one directed to the profession, and the other, to the public. By focusing attention on activity within the profession, the general quality of architectural practice is elevated. By informing the public on the breadth and value of architectural practice, the entire profession is held in higher esteem. AIASC achieves this purpose by establishing and sponsoring the awards.

HONOr AND MerIt DeSIGN AwArDS rOBert MIllS reSIDeNtIAl DeSIGN AwArD COte: COMMIttee ON tHe eNVIrONMeNt INterN ArCHIteCt AwArD UNBUIlt prOJeCt AwArD SC StUDeNt prOJeCt AwArD MeDAl OF DIStINCtION FIrM AwArD

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

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design@daileyassociates.com 864-370-9676

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preferring an integrated delivery approach for optimized value, better-managed projects, shorter timetables, and increased quality.

contact Margaret Tonkin 1050 Shop Road Suite A Columbia, SC 803.765.2940 www.hoodconstruction.com mtonkin@hoodconstruction.com

aiasc.org

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

Named in honor of Charleston-born robert Mills, the nation’s first native trained architect, the robert Mills Award was initiated in 2002 to recognize design excellence in residential architecture throughout South Carolina. All entries were executed single-family residential projects designed by registered architects that are members of AIASC in good standing. projects could have been executed anywhere in the United States or abroad and must have been substantially completed after January 1, 2006.

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AIAsC roberT MILLs resIdenTIAL AwArDS aiasc.org

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doGTroT

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n their barrier island waterfront lot, these clients desired a sustainable retreat that maximized views. The architects turned to the vernacular dogtrot form to reduce the amount of conditioned space while creating comfortable outdoor living. In dogtrots, also known as “two pens and a passage,� one room was typically used for sleeping and the other for cooking. The open center passage was the main sitting area that was cooled naturally through the Bernoulli effect. In this contemporary dogtrot, the center hall is the foyer and sitting room. There is a perforated wall and door on the front and a folding perforated wall on the rear that can be closed and locked for security. The master bedroom suite is to the east of the center passage with the great room to the west.

A I A SC1 00

M e r I T AwA r D

FreDerICK + FreDerICK ArCHIteCtS, llC

AIA South Carolina Architecture

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The large terrace is curved around a live oak tree, with a lap pool and spa centered on the entry. The porch with retractable screens is angled to capture the long view down the river. The boardwalk encircles the terrace to break the distance to grade, and thus eliminates the need for guardrails. Through the use of folding walls the house seamlessly transitions from inside to outside. The light-filled great room has operable windows and transoms for cross ventilation. The south facing windows are protected by the bracketed overhang that is designed to block the sun. Other sustainable strategies include a reflective “cool roof,� cypress reverse board and batten siding, river recovered cypress ceilings, low-impact resistant glass, cellulose foam insulation, a conditioned crawl space, reclaimed heart pine floors, a super high-efficiency heat pump with an energy recovery ventilator, instantaneous water heaters, three-form cabinet inserts, and low VOC paint and finishes. This private retreat connects a young family to the joys of nature.

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FIrM CreDItS Jane Frederick, FAIA Michael Frederick, AIA

ClIeNt Jennifer & Ronnie Crosby

StrUCtUrAl eNGINeer Britt Peters & Associates, Inc.

CONtrACtOr Brunson Construction

lOCAtION Browns Island, SC

pHOtOGrApHY John McManus Photography aiasc.org

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MAGGIe vALLey Modern

S

mall, economical, unique and comfortable were the goals the architect set out to achieve in this cabin project for his family. The cabin is a base camp for ski trips to Cataloochee, N.C. The project was simple — design a home that lived much larger than its footprint and purposefully eliminated waste, both spatial and environmental. “I found this a unique opportunity to design solutions that everyday practice might not afford,” explained the architect. Constrained by a tight budget, it proved challenging to utilize many of the same manufacturers and materials that he would typically recommend for his clients. As a result, the design was created from discounted, reclaimed and industrial materials. The interior wood panel-

A I A SC1 00

M e r I T AwA r D

MAtt tINDAll, AIA

AIA South Carolina Architecture

ing, exterior cedar columns, water heater and the pedestal sink were all reclaimed. In addition to being an environmentally responsible effort, this became a very economical solution. To further the notion of reuse, many of the interior fixtures were purchased at a local Habitat for Humanity store. All of these items were gathered and stored prior to the start of construction. This allowed for the design to evolve around the found materials. This project was a design-build effort out of necessity. The architect had the opportunity to conceive and fabricate much of the cabin’s interior himself, including the stair railing, heart pine paneling, concrete tiles, sliding barn doors and ladder to the third-floor loft. The design and construction of these elements helped to achieve an overall design statement that complimented all of the found items and materials throughout the home. It was important that the home become a reflection of the green initiatives in residential design that specifically minimizes energy consumption and waste. As a foundation for the overall concept, the house was designed on a 4-by-4 grid. Much of the scrap construction materials have been used for other projects, including a tree house for the children. The cabin is orientated on the site to take advantage of passive solar energy. Its orientation and design also considers the natural breezes for passive cooling in the summer. While local codes required a thermostatically controlled heating system, the wood burning stove was selected as

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a primary heat source for the home in the winter. In order to further reduce energy use and allergens in the home, electric radiant heating is used as supplemental heat.

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FIrM CreDItS Matt Tindall, AIA, LEED Green Assoc.

ClIeNt Matt and Julie Tindall

CONSUltANt Majestic Lighting Design

CONtrACtOr Bruce Greene, Greene Construction

lOCAtION Maggie Valley, NC

pHOtOGrApHY Beth Brown Photography

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bLue house AT edIsTo

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he addition of new construction to existing historic structures always presents a challenge. The owners of the house, built on rural Edisto Island in the early 1800s, requested an addition to their historic home to allow for more living and storage space while still embodying the old plantation ambiance. The challenge here was to develop a strategy to incorporate the significant addition in a way that maintains the home’s integrity. The growing family wished to incorporate a ground-floor master bedroom suite, an office retreat and gathering space into their historic weekend retreat. Two distinct wings were added; a master suite and a private study. While the wings provide overall visual balance,

A I A SC1 00

M e r I T AwA r D

StUBBS MUlDrOw HerIN ArCHIteCtS, INC.

AIA South Carolina Architecture

its form broke away from the existing home’s symmetry. The added challenge of how to connect these wings was solved through the use of narrow corridors framed in full height glass. This approach allowed a light connection between the additions and existing home while introducing abundant amounts of natural light into the home’s interior. The scale and transparency of the connectors also serve to accentuate the separation between old and new. The connectors create an axis which runs the length of the house, starting at the study and terminating as a separator between the master suite and utility spaces. This axis strengthens the natural flow of space within the home. The study room was modeled after a prayer house located at a nearby historic church. The form both complements the home’s period while providing an appropriate scale. The new family room replaced an existing porch that had fallen into disrepair. Full height windows open up the space to take advantage of views of marsh and live oak groves. Detailing on the additions complements, through modern interpretation, detailing found on the existing home. This approach added strength to the visual line between old and new.

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FIrM CreDItS Sam Herin, AIA, Principal In Charge (SMHa) Chris Altman, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect (SMHa)

ClIeNt Mr. Ron and the Reverend Ina Hoover

StrUCtUrAl eNGINeer Atlantic Engineering

CONtrACtOr Troy Mahan

lOCAtION Edisto Island, SC

pHOtOGrApHY Chris Altman

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KeouGh house

e

dged by salt marsh and plantation ponds, this site is a pastoral field bordered by ancient oaks. Vistas are framed by muscular tree forms and high green canopies. This home meanders along the edge of the field, nestled below the dominant trees. The idea of the home as an integration with the garden evolved from the romantic garden setting and the clients’ horticultural interests. Each space developed a relationship with the surrounding marsh, pond, paddock and trees. The owners’ desire to live closely with the outdoors created the character of each area of the house. The house is constructed with simple elements: concrete floors, stuccoed Hebel block and a timber framed roof. This durable approach has yielded a low-maintenance highly energy efficient home. The owners embraced the LEED building objectives,

A I A SC1 00

h o n o r AwA r D

tHOMAS AND DeNzINGer ArCHIteCtS

AIA South Carolina Architecture

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but did not desire the documentation. The project began as a vision of a garden on the site with classic brick walls creating rooms among the trees and surrounding vistas. As the spatial design evolved into the house form, a material exploration began. Concrete, stucco, and Hebel block emerged as sturdy building materials for a seamless garden house that could be energy conscious and age like true garden walls.

A timber that covers the interior rooms, and cedar doors and cabinets warm up the indoor-outdoor stucco concrete material palette. Insulated building panels on the roof and PVC ductwork buried in the soil beneath the slab have made the building energy efficient. The simple inside-outside material choices were made to compliment the garden and the owners’ eclectic collections throughout the house.

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FIrM CreDItS Joel C. Newman, AIA

ClIeNt Bruce and Jane Keough

CONSUltANtS Andy Richardson, Structural, Carolina Air - HVAC Savannah Hardscapes, Hebel block

lANDSCApe ArCHIteCt Beaufort Landscaping

INterIOr DeSIGN Jeanne Duval

CONtrACtOr Gollihugh and Hull Builders

lOCAtION Brays Island, SC

pHOtOGrApHY Kevin Spicer, Thomas and Denzinger Architects aiasc.org

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Whitmire Ballington associates WHITMIRE BALLINGTON ASSOCIATES

104 Harmon Street, Lexington, SC 29072 Gregb@whitmireballington.com

Whitmire Ballington Associates is a Commercial Foodservice Design & Consulting business serving the Carolinas and Georgia since 1972. We have experience with many types of Foodservice projects including restaurants, school cafeterias, hospitals, correctional facilities, military dining facilities, corporate foodservice, and church kitchens.

803.787.4516 | www.whitmireballington.com

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

AIASC COte recognizes that a well-designed project includes environmental, technical, and aesthetic excellence. Stewardship, performance, and inspiration are, therefore, essential and inseparable to great design. the AIASC COte Award honors outstanding projects that integrate and incorporate sustainable principles by members of AIASC in good standing. projects could have been executed anywhere in the United States and must have been substantially completed after January 1, 2006.

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AIAsC CoTe AwArD aiasc.org

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boeInG hub renovATIon & AddITIon

A A I A SC1 00

C I TAT I o n AwA r D

MCMIllAN pAzDAN SMItH ArCHIteCtUre

AIA South Carolina Architecture

rchitecture can not only shape space and place but expands our awareness of time and culture. This is the foundation of the AIASC COTE award and the result of the Boeing Co.’s North Charleston campus project. With clear design intention, the building emulates the simplicity of the industrial structures which it surrounds. A creative use and elegant expression of structure and building systems is displayed in exterior covered walkways, glass-enclosed dining, piazza blue ceilings, and vegetative mesh fence. The need for an employee-driven space results in a lightness and directness of materials that accurately represents the value of the employee—taking something ordinary and making it extraordinary. The project, currently certified as Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold, integrates sustainable strategies not simply in terms appearance or aesthetics, but in its performative systems and logics that help us ameliorate our ecological and social situation and heighten our awareness of their interdependence.

the Medal of Distinction is the highest honor that AIASC can bestow upon an AIASC member. It is conferred by the AIA South Carolina Board of Directors in recognition of a significant body of work and/or service that has had a lasting influence on the practice of architecture in South Carolina. recipients of the Medal of Distinction have demonstrated the spirit of strategic cooperation through their teamwork and partnership in the design and building process.

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PASSION+VISION+ CHArleS JOHN HUltStrAND, AIA

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huck Hultstrand, AIA, discovered his passion for architecture during his first year of college. In an introductory course on architectural history, Hultstrand was confronted with the power of architecture to impact people’s lives. This led to his design approach focused on the collaborative involvement of a building’s users. Hultstrand’s central tenet is to work with people to understand their vision and interpret it in the form of architecture. The challenge of this approach is to listen to others and find ways to bring their disparate viewpoints together in a holistic design. He has realized the focus of a building is not on itself or on the ego of the architect, but on creating places for people to live and work, to play and to worship, to create a fabric of community places that encourage vitality. “Chuck is a great source of wisdom on the practice of architecture in general, as well as great people skills that allow him to discern a client’s true vision for a project,” said Scott May in nominating Hultstrand for the 2012 Medal of Distinction Award. “All who have come in contact with Chuck or had the pleasure of working with him had been enriched by the experience.” Hultstrand completed his structural engineering degree from Princeton in 1974, and began graduate work at the Rice University School of Architecture. After completing his Master of Architecture degree, Hultstrand moved from Houston to Columbia to work as director of design at Architects Boudreaux. Under his leadership, the firm grew to be recognized for excellence in design. He served as president of the Columbia Council of Architects, where he worked to bring the board together

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around a vision for strengthening the profession and impacting the community. This organization eventually became the Columbia Section of AIA South Carolina. Hultstrand participated with the board of the Community Design Center of Columbia, a group providing pro bono design services to nonprofit organizations in the area. After his election to the board of AIA South Carolina, he served as government affairs director and worked with the state Legislature to address key issues that affect the architecture profession. Hultstrand was

subsequently elected president of AIA South Carolina in 1996. Hultstrand has provided leadership for the profession and community through a number of directions, including roles in his church, the Princeton Alumni Association of South Carolina, Architecture for Ministry, Ben Lippen School Board, AIASC ArchiPAC and various committees of AIASC. He currently acts as the president of the board of Faith & Form, a national organization committed to excellence in the art and architecture of religious facilities.

l to r 1. CU-ICAr Autopark 2. Design process 3. Anderson recreation Center

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LEADERSHIP

MEDAL OF DISTINCTION RECIPIENTS The highest award bestowed by AIASC upon an AIA member. The recipient will have made contributions to architecture that relate to other areas of community service, achievements that extend beyond community boundaries, promoting the cause of architecture, and/or outstanding commitment to AIASC.

1993....................................... Harlan McClure,

L to R 1. Michelin on Main 2. Clemson University Sandhill Research & Education Center 3. Office collaboration

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In 2003, Hultstrand joined Neal Prince Architects as director of design. Having worked with Jim Neal and Robin Prince in the leadership of AIA SC, Hultstrand recognized the integrity of the firm leadership and their commitment to excellence in architectural practice. “Chuck exhibits a great respect for people and the power of design to influence their lives,” May said. “He has an unquenchable enthusiasm for design, which has resulted in an elevation of the design excellence that our firm has been constantly pursuing.” In 2010, Hultstrand worked with the other Neal Prince partners to engineer a merger with LS3P Architects, creating the largest firm in South Carolina recognized for excellence.

FAIA Dean Emeritus 1995............................... Earle Gaulden, FAIA 1997 .................................. Frank Lucas, FAIA 1999.......................................... Jim Neal, FAIA 2001................................... Kirk R. Craig, FAIA 2004...................... James Lee Thomas, FAIA 2005............................... Sidney Stubbs, FAIA 2006................Gayland Witherspoon, FAIA 2007................. Thompson E. Penney, FAIA 2008........ Professor Emeritus Peter R. Lee, AIA Emeritus 2009............... Jeffrey M. Rosenblum, FAIA 2010.................... Edward T. Zeigler, Jr., AIA 2011..................... John David Jacques, AIA

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fIrM prOFIleS 1x1 Design, inc. 221 Pickens Street, Columbia, SC 29205 803.834.4048 | 803.834.4082 (fax) www.1x1design.com | 1x1design@1x1design.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Asheley Scott, AIA, LEED AP BD + C 1x1 Design provides architecture, interior design and planning services for a wide range of residential and commercial clients, focusing on innovative design and delivery services, strong client relationships, and the development of the professionals which it employs.

AAg AssociAtes 37 Marshellen Drive, Beaufort, SC 29902 843.986.0031 | 843.986.1079 (fax) www.accessAAG.com | ben@accessAAG.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Grayson (Ben)nett Thompson, AIA | S. Shane Lather, Assoc. AIA | Christopher M. Caudle, Assoc. AIA AAG Associates is dedicated to developing big ideas into a better built environment, regardless of scope, scale, or complexity. AAG holds to the belief that responsive design is achieved through committed partnership and collaboration while remaining accountable to project expense. Delivering on this philosophy, our professionals bring energy and experience to each client with unique design solutions that produce meaningful results.

ADePtus ARchitectuRe, inc. 121 Manly Street Suite C, Greenville, SC 29601 864.242.2514 | 864.235.3047 (fax) www.adeptusarchitecture.com | info@adeptusarchitecture.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: W. Barry Agnew, AIA | Michael D. Zibert, Associate AIA Adeptus Architecture is a national design-oriented collaborative providing Architecture, Master Planning and Interior Design services successfully for over 25 years. While providing comprehensive design of large urban projects in major cities, Adeptus Architecture continues to serve the upstate. Project types include collegiate/university, governmental/institutional, mixed-use complexes, master plans and individual design oriented structures, such as churches and restaurants.

AnDeRson stuDio of ARchitectuRe AnD Design 355 Bayview Drive, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843.884.0444 www.theandersonstudio.com designers@theandersonstudio.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Scott W. Anderson, AIA, ASID, CRAN

87 Salthouse

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The Anderson Studio is a team of experienced residential architects and interior designers who have designed, renovated, and furnished a range of projects including private homes, speculative residences, commercial offices, restaurants, historic structures, and luxury resorts. Current projects extend beyond the Carolinas, reaching California and the Caribbean. Scott Anderson was honored with three Robert Mills Residential Design Awards by the American Institute of Architects, South Carolina Chapter in 2011.

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ARD WooD holcoMBe & slAte ARchitects AnD PlAnneRs 50 South Richardson Street, Greenville, SC 29601 864.242.5450 www.awhsarchitects.com | gmholcombe@awhsarchitects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: George M. Holcombe, AIA | Charles W. Slate, AIA | Danny N. Ard, AIA Ard Wood Holcombe & Slate Architects and Planners project types include Health Care, Industrial, Educational, Commercial, Retail, Military, Renovation, Restoration and Sustainability in multiple areas across the United States as well as Mexico, St. Lucia and Indonesia.

BAtson AssociAtes, inc. 415 West Washington Street, Greenville, SC 29615 864.233.2232 | 864.235.5318 (fax) www.batsonassociates.com | SayHello@bainc.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Louis P. Batson III, AIA | Jeff R. Fogle, AIA Founded in 1981, Batson Associates staff includes 6 Registered Architects and 3 LEED APs. Regional healthcare experience includes facilities for University Hospital, Memorial Health and Athens Regional in Georgia; Angel Medical, Pender Memorial, and Rutherford Hospital in North Carolina. Clients in South Carolina include Rock Springs Baptist Church, BMW Manufacturing, Self Regional Hospital, and Bon Secours/St. Francis.

BetschAssociates, inc. 101 North Main Street, Suite 1505, Greenville, SC 29601 864.527.4700 | 864.527.4705 (fax) www.betschassociates.com | kbetsch@betschassociates.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Kenneth M. Betsch, AIA BetschAssociates is a full-service planning/architectural firm providing traditional design services and complete pre-design and post-design services to its Clients. These services include strategic planning, land planning, programming, financial feasibility, and market analysis. The firm’s areas of expertise include master planning, airports, arenas, convention centers, hotels, office buildings, and retail development. U.S. Cellular Center, Asheville, NC

glen Boggs ARchitect Townhouse Stairway, Spartanburg SC

3550 Glenn Springs Road, Post Office Box 13, Pauline SC 29374 864.582.5508 | 864.582.5508 (fax) www.glenboggsarchitect.com | glen@glenboggsarchitect.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Glen B. Boggs, II, AIA Residential, Retail, Renovation, Restoration

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FIRM PROFILES The Boudreaux Group 1330 Lady Street, Suite 500, Columbia, SC 29201 803.799.0247 | 803.771.6944 (fax) www.boudreauxgroup.com | info@boudreauxgroup.com aIa MeMBer prIncIpals: Heather A. Mitchell, AIA, LEED AP BD + C | Randall Huth, AIA | John A. Boudreaux, AIA

St. Anne Catholic Church

Building on 35-years of design success, The Boudreaux Group continues to strengthen its reputation as a dynamic, socially-responsible firm that is dedicated to excellence in architecture, interior design, and planning. The firm is committed to social responsibility through the incorporation of sustainable design in new construction and renovation projects.

o. douGlas Boyce, Jr. ARCHITECT O DOUGLAS BOYCE JR 713 WOODWARD ROAD

CHARLESTON SOUTH CAROLINA 29407

MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS

713 Woodward Road, Charleston, SC 29407 843.573.9949 | 843.607.9949 www.douglasboycearchitect.com | douglasboyceaia@bellsouth.net aIa MeMBer prIncIpal: O. Douglas Boyce, Jr., AIA A Design Firm, est. 1979 having designed in various Architectural Firms in Raleigh and Charlotte, NC; Atlanta, GA; Denver, CO, since 1962; and Charleston, SC since 1973. Registered in SC, NC, and Ga. Designs have been custom houses, churches, education spaces, private schools, medical, dental and law offices; historic restoration & additions, tenant upfit, forensic architecture in construction and slip & falls. Also does small designs in residential, commercial, kitchens & baths, porches, family spaces and modern architecture. Attention to detail, listening to clients’ needs (in bold). “What type of design do I do? What do you want?”

BoykIn & Munnerlyn archITecTs & assocIaTes 1305 Monument Square, Camden, SC 29020 803.432.3233 | 803.432.8451 (fax) boymunn@bellsouth.net aIa MeMBer prIncIpal: Joseph C. Munnerlyn, AIA, NCARB Boykin & Munnerlyn was established in 1963 and celebrates numerous years of distinguished architectural service in South Carolina. Our firm offers quality, substantial, comprehensive architecture with innovative planning and strategic interior design with our client’s objective forefront. Courtroom, Lancaster Co. Historic Courthouse, Robert Mills Design

BynuM archITecTure 233 North Main Street, Suite 200, Greenville, SC 29601 864.235.2724 | 864.990.3070 (fax) www.bynumarchitecture.com | www.archi-toons.com | rick@bynumarchitecture.com aIa MeMBer prIncIpals: Rick Bynum, AIA Bynum Architecture is a regional architecture practice with projects throughout the Southeast, placing a primary focus on North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. The small private practice is managed by Rick Bynum, AIA and offers architectural services for private residences, historic properties, commercial offices and retail projects.

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cAtAlyst ARchitects llc 212 West Main Street, Lexington, SC 29072 803.358.6565 | 803.358.6566 (fax) Georgetown, SC | 843.520.0140 www.catalystarch.com | wrogers@catalystarch.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: D. Wayne Rogers, AIA LEED AP | Heather B. Stallworth, AIA Catalyst Architects is dedicated to working closely with clients who seek an active engagement in the design process. Over the last twenty five years, the firm’s body of work has evolved into a specialization in the design of unique homes (often along the SC coast) and other ‘hands on’ project types, including religious architecture, renovations, adaptive reuse, and urban infill.

cDA ARchitects 1122 Lady Street, Suite 810 Columbia, SC 29201 803.799.6502 | 803.799.2014 (fax) www.cdacolumbia.com | mcook@cdacolumbia.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Curt Davis, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP CDA Architects is a team of design professionals creating insightful solutions to clients’ design needs. For almost 30 years, CDA has provided exemplary architectural, interior and sustainable design services to commercial, government and institutional clients, emphasizing stewardship of client resources, including their facility goals, budget, schedule and vision. LEED Silver Certified BCI Building

ceMs engineeRing | ARchitectuRe 3509 Iron Horse Drive, Ladson, SC 29456 843.875.3637 | 843.875.4509 (fax) www.cemsengineering.com | kchafin@cemsengineering.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Kevin R. Chafin, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP | John T. Pharis, JR AIA, LEED AP CEMS Engineering|Architecture is a full service multidisciplinary A/E firm offing Architecture, Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, Fire Protection and Structural engineering. We have extensive experience in providing quality design services for a variety of Federal, State, and Municipal clients as well as a broad range of private sector partners.

chilDs ARchitectuRe, llc PO Box 2372, Greenville, SC 29602 864.242.6977 | 864.242.6557 (fax) www.childsarchitecture.com | info@childsarchitecture.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Suzanne R. Childs, AIA, LEED AP Childs Architecture is an OSMBA certified woman-owned design firm. Suzanne Childs is a registered architect in the Carolinas and Georgia and has over 20 years of experience. Our creative efforts include design, planning, renovation, restoration, and expansion projects for residential, institutional, educational, religious, hospitality, office, retail, distribution, mixed-use, and healthcare.

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fIrM prOFIleS chRistoPheR Rose ARchitects, PA Private Residence, Kiawah Island

3509 Meeks Farm Road, John’s Island, SC 29455 843.559.7670 | 843.559.7673 (fax) www.christopherrosearchitects.com | crose@chrisrosearchitects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Christopher A. Rose, AIA, ASID Christopher Rose Architects individualizes a design to each person and place. Refraining from lending every house a common style, endeavoring instead to give a home its unique identity. Through a dialogue and an understanding between the client and the architect, we create a home that evokes emotions in its family and guests.

cJMW ARchitectuRe 201 West Main Street, Lexington, SC 29072 803.957.9373 | 803.957.4748 (fax) www.CJMW.com | Michael.Kohn@CJMW.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Michael Kohn, AIA, LEED AP | Larry Wilund, AIA Michael Frick, AIA, LEED AP

North Charleston Regional Intermodal Center

With talented design teams in 4 regional offices and over 100 years of service in the Southeast, CJMW Architecture is a design-oriented firm with particular expertise in senior living, K-12 and higher education, religious, performing arts, historic renovation, and institutional projects. Integrity is a core value at CJMW Architecture, and the firm strives to advance each client’s vision with creative, cost-efficient, and environmentally-responsible design solutions.

clAncy Wells ARchitects inc. 2010 Wappoo Drive, Charleston, SC 29412 843.795.3151 | 843.795.6860 (fax) www.clancywells.com | mclancy@clancywells.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Mark Clancy, AIA, LEED AP | Steve Wells, AIA, LEED AP We strive to inspire “quality architecture, economically conceived, with beautiful results.” Clancy Wells Architects, celebrating life in the Carolinas, is committed to helping our clients turn their visions into reality.

context Design gRouP, Pllc 4 Washington Park, Greenville, SC 29601 864.233.3230 | 864.233.3220 (fax) www.contextdg.net | davidlewis@contextdg.net AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: David W. Lewis, AIA Context Design Group, PLLC provides clients with totally integrated design and planning services to align their facility and business objectives. At Context, no detail is insignificant as we develop targeted solutions to create user focused commercial buildings. Dräxlmaier Automotive of America North American Headquarters

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Services: • Design • Programming • Planning

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cRAig gAulDen DAvis Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center

19 Washington Park, Greenville, SC 29601 864.242.0761 | 864.233.2319 (fax) www.cgdarch.com | kpoole@cgdarch.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Edward T. Zeigler, Jr., AIA | David L. Dixon, AIA Scott E. Powell, AIA, LEED AP | S. Scott Simmons, AIA, LEED AP Community. Creativity. Integrity. Committed to these ideals, Craig Gaulden Davis meets the challenge of designing beautiful, functional and sustainable spaces where people gather to be enriched and enlivened. CGD has a vibrant history focusing on architecture, planning and interior design for the arts, government, ministry, libraries and education.

cuMMings & MccRADy inc. 44 D Markfield Drive, Charleston, SC 29407 843.577.5063 | 843.723.4951 (fax) www.cummingsandmccrady.com danbeaman@cummingsandmccrady.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: W. Daniel Beaman, AIA, LEED AP BD + C | Jerome R. English, AIA Benjamin S. Whitener, AIA, LEED AP BD + C

Sullivan’s Island Elementary School

Cummings & McCrady Inc., one of the oldest firms in SC, was established in 1957. Our company founders’ design philosophy that visual delight is worthless without firmness and commodity remains constant today. We design buildings that will stand the test of time.

cuRtis gRouP ARchitects 11270 Ocean Highway, Suite B, Pawleys Island, SC 29585 843.979.2210 | 843.979.2214 (fax) 5000 Quorum Drive, Suite 500, Dallas,TX, 75254 214.378.9810 | 214.378.9811 (fax) www.cga-arch.com | info@cga-arch.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Tom Curtis, AIA, President/CEO | Mark Roman, AIA, Associate Principal

Waccamaw Community Hospital

Curtis Group Architects, established in 1996, is a full-service, healthcare-specialized architecture, planning and interior design firm. We provide these services for virtually all types of medical facilities including new hospitals, renovations, outpatient facilities (surgery centers, cancer centers, wellness, rehab, pain management), medical office buildings, long-term care and assisted living.

DA ARchitects, llc 128 South Main Street, Suite B, Summerville, SC 29483 843.873.7019 | 843.873.7086 (fax) www.daarchitects.com | dianne@daarchitects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Dennis Ashley, AIA Thoughtful solutions for purpose driven projects.

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fIrM prOFIleS DolPhin ARchitects AnD BuilDeRs, inc. 3730 Bohicket Road, Suite 6, Johns Island, SC 29455 843.768.2404 | 843.768.1137 (fax) www.dolphindesignbuild.com | info@dolphinbuilders.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Kevin E. Whalley, AIA, NCARB, President At Dolphin Architects and Builders everyone works together as one team with a singular vision‌yours! Our team of Custom Residential Architects and Builders ensures the final product, your completed custom home or renovation, is exactly as you dreamed it would be and equally as important, that it meets your budget!

DP3 ARchitects, ltD. 211 East Broad Street, Greenville, SC 29601 864.232.8200 | 864.232.7587 (fax) www.dp3architects.com | mtaylor@dp3architects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: J. Michael Taylor, AIA, LEED AP | Margaretta L. Terry, AIA, LEED AP Brian S. Thomas, AIA, LEED AP | Benjamin R. Urueta, AIA DP3 Architects, established in 1984, is an architectural firm committed to providing innovative, functional, and sustainable design for our clients nationwide. The firm utilizes a studio approach in higher education, community, and restaurant project niches for the design of new projects, renovations, historic adaptive reuse, space planning, and upfit.

eARl ARchitects llc 301 North Main Street, Suite 1730, Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7555 | 864.271.0180 (fax) www.earlarchitects.com | rick_earl@earlarchitects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Richard R. Earl, AIA | Todd D. Reichard, AIA, LEED AP Earl Architects specializes in Healthcare Strategic Visioning, Architecture and Interior Architecture throughout the southeast. Each of our projects is lead by a firm Principal and supported by a team of dedicated healthcare design professionals.

evAns & schMiDt ARchitects 284 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29401 843.723.5495 | 843.723.5706 (fax) www.evansandschmidtarchitects.com | evansandschmidt@gmail.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Joseph D. Schmidt, AIA | William D. Evans, AIA Evans & Schmidt Architects, established in 1984, is committed to design excellence and client service for retail and office design, tenant design, custom residential, renovation, rehabilitation and adaptive re-use projects.

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fReDeRick + fReDeRick ARchitects 38 Meridian Road, Beaufort SC 29907 843 522 8422 www.f-farchitects.com | jane@f-farchitects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Jane Frederick, FAIA | Michael Frederick, AIA Residential specialists for hot, humid climates.

fuRMAn ARchitects, inc. Church of the Resurrection Addition Rendering

201B Waller Avenue, Greenwood, SC 29646 864.388.0905 | 864.943.5714 (fax) www.furmanarchitects.com | courtney@furmanarchitects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Courtney T.R. Furman, AIA, LEED AP BD+C | Watson Lee Dorn, AIA Furman Architects is a full service design firm dedicated to meeting the goals of our clients. Our team approach provides our clients personal and responsive service. Through dynamic insight...innovative ideas...real world application...timely delivery...we turn ideas into reality.

f W ARchitects, inc. Greer High School

1550 West Evans Street, Florence, SC 29501 843.662.9961 | 843.665.5065 (fax) www.fw-architects.com | hfuller@fw-architects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Dennis S. Ward, AIA, NCARB | Hal E. Fuller, AIA, NCARB F W Architects, Inc. is committed to providing clients with projects of quality, distinctive designs that functional in their use; budget conscious in their construction; and lasting in their service to the community. We specialize in Educational, Commercial, Civic and Healthcare planning and design.

g2 Design, llc PO Box 23496, Hilton Head Island, SC 29925 843.682.2077 | 843.682.2287 (fax) www.g-2design.com | mgentemann@g-2design.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Michael C. Gentemann, AIA | Stephanie B. Gentemann, AIA From the master plan to the minute detail, g2 Design, LLC is an innovative architectural and design firm with local and international experience specializing in residential, commercial and mixed-use projects..

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fIrM prOFIleS gARvin Design gRouP Coastal Carolina Student Recreation & Convocation Center

1209 Lincoln Street, Columbia, SC 29201 803.212.1032 | 803.212.1074 (fax) www.garvindesigngroup.com | mtimbes@garvindesigngroup.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Scott Garvin, AIA, LEED AP BD+C | Mark Timbes, AIA, LEED AP BD+C Terry Buchmann, AIA, LEED AP BD+C Garvin Design Group fosters a passion for excellence and client-centered service. Our employees enjoy a team-oriented studio environment supportive of opportunities for professional and personal growth. Located in Columbia’s historic Vista, we are committed to strategic delivery models focused on strong, innovative design

Bo gARlAnD ARchitects Greenville, SC 864.277.3300 www.jbgarch.com | bo@jbgarch.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: James B Garland, AIA, NCARB Bo Garland Architects is a high energy award winning design firm with broad commercial and residential project experience. The firm’s focus is re-visioning architecture in order to achieve ultimate flexibility and engagement for the end-user. Project experience includes: commercial medical and dental office - retail - restaurant - hospitality - religious - veterinary - office - home design and renovation master planning - new opportunities.

gJs ARchitects, llc 401E Seacoast Parkway, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843.722.4334 | 843.722.4135 (fax) www.gjs-architects.com | robertgerber@gjs-architects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Robert V. Gerber, AIA | Michael L. Janaskie, AIA

St. Timothy Lutheran Church

GJS Architects celebrates 10 years as a full service multi-disciplined firm specializing in church, office, retail, institutional, educational and residential architecture. We serve clients nationally providing solid planning and programming tools, creative designs, budget conscious decisions, leadership from conception, closeout and beyond. BIM modeling is integral in our design process.

South Carolina architecture firms participating in the AIASC “Intern Friendly Firm” program acknowledge the value and contribution their intern architects make to their firms by supporting their education as

emerging professionals. these firms certify that they support all of their interns to develop into competent design professionals through broad based professional experiences, internal education programs, and personal

mentoring. Firms qualify for the IFF program by meeting minimum criteria in the following three categories: NCArB requirements, Supplementary education & professional Development, and the Architect’s registration exam.

For more information on theprogram, visit www.AIASC.org.

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gMk AssociAtes Raleigh Orthopedic Clinic & Surgery Center

1201 Main Street, Suite 2100, Columbia, SC 29201 803.256.0000 | 803.256.9610 (fax) | lkogut@gmka.com 3200 Beechleaf Court, Suite 901, Raleigh, NC 27604 919.781.0026 | 919.881.0999 (fax) | jramsay@gmka.com 864 Broad Street, Suite 201, Augusta, GA 30901 706.826.1127 | 706.826.4615 (fax) | jbaker@gmka.com www.gmka.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Valentine A. Satko, AIA | Lawrence E. Kogut, AIA, LEED AP | Thomas M. Weiland, AIA, LEED AP Jerome K. Simons, AIA, LEED AP | David J. Reichard, AIA, ACHA, LEED Green | Megan C. Day, AIA GMK is a 46-year-old, multi-disciplinary planning, design and construction services firm focusing on the healthcare, education, energy and government arenas. Working throughout the Carolinas and Georgia, GMK offers master facility planning, architecture, engineering, CON/cost analysis assistance, energyefficiency assessments, design-build, construction services, interior design and LEED-certified design.

goff D’Antonio AssociAtes ltD. 34 Radcliffe Street, Charleston, SC 29403 843.577.2163 | 843.577.9754 (fax) www.goffdantonio.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: R. Garey Goff, AIA, LEED AP | Hank D’Antonio, AIA | Tony Giuliani, AIA | Brian Boone, AIA Goff D’Antonio Associates is an architectural, planning and interior design firm specializing in senior living, healthcare, and education with additional extensive experience in commercial, hospitality, judicial and multi-family/ mixed use design. Our mission is to create innovative, sustainable and memorable architecture for our clients. Oakland Elementary School

gooDWyn, Mills AnD cAWooD Duke Energy Innovation Center, Clemson University/SCRA, Anderson, SC

101 East Washington Street, Suite 320, Greenville, SC 29601 864.233.2804 | 864.233.6567 (fax) | mike.keeshen@gmcnetwork.com 2660 EastChase Lane, Suite 200, Montgomery, AL 36117 334.271.3200 | 334.272.1566 (fax) | andrea.jean@gmcnetwork.com 1200 Abernathy Road, NE, Suite 1700, Atlanta, GA 30328 843.566.0771 | 843-566-0777 (fax) | Paul.Anderson@gmcnetwork.com www.gmcnetwork.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Michael P. Keeshen, AIA, LEED AP Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood is one of the Southeast’s largest privately held architecture and engineering firms with 11 offices across the Southeast, including Greenville, SC. GMC provides Architecture, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Planning, Civil, Municipal, and Electrical Engineering, Environmental, Geotechnical, Surveying, and Airport Planning. GMC enthusiastically supports sustainable design.

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fIrM prOFIleS gofoRth, BRoWn & AssociAtes, inc. 1413 West Evans Street, Florence, SC 29501 843.665.5868 | 843.669.7596 questions@gbaflo.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Joseph E. Goforth, AIA, CBO | Gary W. Brown, AIA, LEEP AP Complete architectural and planning service for educational, institutional, medical, and industrial clients in South Carolina. GBA has a diversified portfolio.

gRAhAM gRouP ARchitectuRe Office of Graham Group Architecture

124 Professional Lane, Pawleys Island, SC 29585 843.237.3488 www.2GArch.com | info@grahamgrouparchitecture.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: David A. Graham, AIA Our emphasis is placed on client-friendly guidance, building strong project teams at outset, versatility of design, responsiveness, and production of high-quality documents. The design staff’s combined experience totals 97 years and includes two LEED APs.

gRouP 3 Design | ARchitectuRe & inteRioRs 1600 Main Street, Hilton Head Island, SC 29926 843.689.9060 | 843.689.9072 (fax) Group3Designs.net | Mike@group3designs.net AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Michael G. Ruegamer, AIA We specialize in custom homes and high end design projects for retail, hospitality and office. We also provide complete interior design services for a totally integrated project. Our work has been recognized nationally on numerous occasions, most recently the 2008 BALA Platinum Award for “Best Specialty Room.” Residence

JuMPeR cARteR seAse ARchitects 412 Meeting Street, West Columbia, SC 29169 803.791.1020 | 803.791.1022 (fax) www.jcsarchitects.com | todd@jcsarchitects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Joel M. Carter, AIA | L. Todd Sease, AIA LEED AP Jumper Carter Sease Architects endeavors to provide our clients with innovative and functional buildings, while focusing on the importance of aesthetics and environmentally responsible design. Our attention to detail and exceptional customer service is paramount to our continued success and is precisely what our clients have come to expect. Career & Technology Center, Picken’s County

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lAngley & AssociAtes ARchitects, llc 109 South Main Street, Greer, SC 29650 864.968.0224 | 864.968.9550 (fax) www.la-architects.com | dlangley@la-architects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: David E. Langley, AIA Richard D. Pittman, AIA | David K. Greer, AIA, LEED AP BD+C Organized in 1995, Langley & Associates Architects, LLC is a general practice firm offering architectural, interior design, site planning and graphic design services. With 20 years of architectural experience, our portfolio includes commercial, industrial, healthcare, historic preservation/restoration, religious and residential projects.

lee & PARkeR, ARchitects, PA PO Box 5010, Hilton Head Island, SC 29938 843.785.5171 | 843.785.7471 (fax) jhleearch@hargray.com | wtparker@hargray.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Jakie H. Lee, AIA | W. Thomas Parker, Jr., AIA, LEED AP Lee & Parker has delivered superior design, value and experience for our residential, institutional, and commercial clients since 1996. The firm’s two partners have over five and a half decades of hands-on design services which have produced 36 awards for design excellence and countless satisfied clients.

lfk ARchitects, llc 802 Coleman Boulevard, Suite 100, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843.330.8940 www.lfkarchitect.com | losse@lfkarchitect.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Losse F. Knight, III, AIA, NCARB Curt Berg, III, AIA LFK Architects offers an extensive range of design services from Planning and Feasibility Studies, Commercial Design and Residential Design. We are committed to maintaining a smaller studio environment enabling us to focus on innovative design and most importantly developing strong professional relationships with our clientele.

liollio ARchitectuRe, inc. 147 Wappoo Creek Drive, Suite 400, Charleston, SC 29412 843.762.2222 One Page Avenue, Suite 220D, Asheville, NC 28801 828.252.8100 www.liollio.com | jane@liollio.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Cherie A. Liollio, AIA, LEED AP | C. Dinos Liollio, AIA, LEED AP | Tommy L. Schimpf, Assoc. AIA Rick L. Bousquet, AIA, LEED AP Thoughtful, respectful, creative design solutions.

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fIrM prOFIleS ls3P AssociAtes ltD. 205 1/2 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401 843.577.4444 | 843.722.4789 (fax) | georgetemple@ls3p.com 701-A Lady Street, Columbia, SC 29202 803.765.2418 | 803.765.2419 (fax) | marybethbranham@ls3p.com 110 W North Street, Suite 300, Greenville, SC 29601 864.235.0405 | 864.233.4027 (fax) | scottmay@ls3p.com www.ls3p.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Allen R. Taylor, AIA, LEED AP | Brian T. Wurst, AIA, LEED AP Cameron L. Wilson, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP | Charles J. Hultstrand, AIA Marc Marchant, AIA, LEED AP | David C. Burt, AIA, LEED AP | David E. Benham, AIA Eric C. Aichele, AIA, LEED AP | Frank E. Lucas, FAIA | George E. Temple, AIA, LEED AP Mary Beth Branham, AIA | Prescott D. May, III, AIA, LEED AP | Rebecca Smith, AIA, LEED AP Richard J. Gowe, AIA, LEED AP | Thompson E. Penney, FAIA, LEED AP | Willie W. Murphy, AIA, LEED AP LS3P is an architecture, interior architecture and strategic visioning firm providing services nationwide from their offices in Charleston, Columbia, and Greenville, South Carolina and Charlotte, Raleigh and Wilmington, North Carolina. Their vision is to deeply understand and fully enhance client strategies through places designed for exceptional results, not just applause.

ltc AssociAtes, inc. 912 Lady Street, Suite 300, Columbia, SC 29201 803-254-9082 | 803-252-7200 (fax) www.LTCarch.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: J. Wes Taylor, AIA | John Taylor, AIA LTC Associates, founded in 1995 by J. Wes Taylor and John Taylor, provides full scope design services to a wide range of clientele for a variety of building types including commercial, governmental, industrial, medical, restaurant, recreation, religious, aviation and military.

MichAel BAkeR coRPoRAtion 700 Huger Street, Columbia, SC 29201 803.254.2211 | 803.779.8749 (fax) www.mbakercorp.com | gwredfern@mbakercorp.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Wayne Redfern, AIA | Bob Anderson, AIA | Dennis Wiehl, AIA

City of Columbia, Pendleton Street Parking Garage

Michael Baker Corporation is a full service architecture, engineering, and construction management firm. Our Columbia office was founded as the LPA Group over 25 years ago and has a 16 person architectural staff with 7 registered architects with experience in offices, garages, renovation, aviation, K-12 and higher education facilities.

we INVIte YOU tO BeCOMe INVOlVeD! Our chapter recognizes the value of networking, as well as the idea that there is no “one size fits all� sponsorship program. Sponsorship Opportunities Include: Annual AIASC Sponsorship program, South Carolina Architecture magazine and the 2012 SAr Conference. we are here to assist you as you decide where to spend your dollars with AIA South Carolina. we value your participation at all levels and look forward to hearing from you and as always, we appreciate your support.

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McA ARchitectuRe, inc. 28 Agora Place, Greenville, SC 29615 864.232.8204 | 864.370.9359 (fax) www.designmca.com | sberry@designmca.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Keith M. Clarke, AIA | Georgia Coundoussias, AIA P. Phillip Campbell, AIA

SCANA Headquarters, Cayce, SC

MCA is a multi-disciplined firm serving a variety of clients all across the country, assisting them with making decisions that affect the way people use buildings, interior spaces and the land surrounding them. In order to provide the highest quality services and solutions, MCA has complemented the Architecture Design staff with dedicated professionals in the Interior Design and Forensic Architecture disciplines.

Mozingo + WAllAce ARchitects, llc 618 Chestnut Road, Suite 205, Myrtle Beach, SC 29572 843.449.8000 | 843.449.1113 (fax) www.mozingowallace.com | dmozingo@mozingowallace.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: S. Derrick Mozingo, Jr. AIA | Gerald C. Wallace, III, AIA Mozingo + Wallace Architects is a full architectural and interior design firm with 25+ year history of providing clients with creative and affordable design solutions. Project experience includes hospitality, custom single-family, multi-family, educational, religious, municipal, corporate and recreational clients.

McMillAn PAzDAn sMith ARchitectuRe Boeing HUB Project

12-A Vanderhorst Street, Charleston, SC 29405 843.566.0771 | 843.566.0777 (fax) | ebello@mcmillanpazdansmith.com 200 East Broad Street, Suite 300, Greenville, SC 29601 864.242.2033 | 864.242.2034 (fax) | jpazdan@mcmillanpazdansmith.com bsmith@mcmillanpazdansmith.com 127 Dunbar Street, Spartanburg, SC 29306 864.585.5678 | 864.542.9451 (fax) | rsmith@mcmillanpazdansmith.com www.mcmillanpazdansmith.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Ron G. Smith, AIA | Brad B. Smith, AIA | Joseph M. Pazdan, II, AIA | Brian Deichman, AIA Cullen Pitts, AIA | Donza Mattison, AIA | Donald L. Love, AIA | Lisa M. Lanni, AIA Dave Ballard, AIA | Keith “K.J.� Jacobs, AIA McMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture is a studio-based, award-winning design firm supporting a southeastern clientele with full-service architecture, planning and interior design services. The firm has completed 25 LEED projects including Platinum, Gold and Silver and has a strong portfolio in institutional, commercial and retail markets.

Get INVOlVeD

w w w.AIASC.OrG aiasc.org

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fIrM prOFIleS PelhAM ARchitects, llc PO Box 8698, Greenville, SC 29604 864.271.7633 | 864.271.0958 (fax) www.PelhamArchitects.com | Bill.Pelham@PelhamArchitects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: William (Bill) H. Pelham, AIA Founded in 1983 Pelham Architects, LLC specializes in single family residential design. Their work includes new homes, additions, renovations, and historic preservation.

PegRAM AssociAtes, inc. 1131-B 48th Avenue North, Myrtle Beach, SC 29577 843.449.5202 | 843.497.2635 (fax) www.pegramassociates.com | tpegram@pegramassociates.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: J. Thomas Pegram, AIA | Dennis H. Springs, AIA Pegram Associates is a nine person firm with five licensed architects, three intern architects, and one administrative person. On staff are one LEED AP, two LEED GA.

QuAckenBush ARchitects + PlAnneRs 217 Hampton Street, Columbia, SC 29201 803.771.2999 | 803.771.2858 (fax) www.quackenbusharchitects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: P. Douglas Quackenbush, AIA, LEED AP | Barbara Haller, AIA, LEED AP BD+C

Richland School District Two, Muller Road Middle School

Design integrity and quality service are the binding principles of Quackenbush Architects + Planners. Our staff of motivated professionals encourages critical thinking in a collaborative environment. We strive to establish new innovative benchmarks in educational, institutional and master planning projects.

RADiuM ARchitectuRe 420 East Park Avenue, Suite 102, Greenville, SC 29601 864.242.9027 | 864.349.2082 (fax) www.radiumarchitecture.com | brad@radiumarchitecture.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Brad Benjamin, AIA, CSI, LEED AP BD+C Radium works to bring purpose to the built environment by designing more sustainable & socially responsible places for our clients and our community.

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RosenBluM coe ARchitects, inc. 121 Wentworth Street, Charleston, SC 29401 843.577.6073 | 843.722.1659 (fax) www.rosenblumcoe.com | scoe@rosenblumcoe.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Jeffrey Rosenblum, FAIA | Steven H. Coe, AIA, LEED AP With over 40 years of experience designing award-winning, contextual projects our firm remains committed to client service with the highest levels of professionalism. Our work ranges in size and complexity in a wide variety of projects including custom residential, commercial, education and health care.

schMitt WAlkeR ARchitects One Vendue Range/Photography by Creative Sources Photography, Inc.

91-B Broad Street, Charleston, SC 29403 843.727.3140 | 843.727.3143 (fax) jwalker@schmittwalker.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: James S. Walker, AIA | R. Christian Schmitt, FAIA Established in 1986, Schmitt Walker Architects is a Charleston, South Carolina based architectural firm that has been honored with numerous national and regional design awards, and with critical appraisal of its work. Its completed projects have received extensive coverage in various professional and consumer publications.

sgA ARchitectuRe, llc 245 Business Center Lane, Suite 4B, Pawleys Island, SC 29585 843.237.3421 • 843.237.1992 (fax) 1535 Hobby Street, Suite 204, Charleston, SC 29405 843.853.4506 • 843.853.4507 (fax) 1350 Farrow Parkway, Suite 200, Myrtle Beach, SC 29578 www.sgaarchitecture.com • info@sgaarchitecture.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Steven Goggans, AIA, LEED AP | Don Baus, AIA LEED AP | Lyudmila Sobchuk, AIA SGA is an award-winning, multi-discipline firm that closely integrates Architecture, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, and Land Planning. Successfully practicing for over 25 years, SGA is committed to innovative design, attention to detail and engaged service for educational, governmental, healthcare and private clients.

S CArchipaC

SCArchipAC elevates the voice of architects in the advocacy process and engages our members to build and support relationships with statewide elected leaders to better our profession and improve our communities. to make a contribution today, go to www.aiasc.org and help ensure your voice is heard in 2013! aiasc.org

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fIrM prOFIleS shePARD & AssociAtes, llc 3547 Dreher Shoals Road, Suite 6, Irmo, SC 29063 803.407.8284 | 803.407.8206 (fax) shepard-admin@sc.rr.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: William Blount Shepard III, AIA | Anders J. Kaufmann, AIA

Somerset Condominiums, Hilton Head Island, SC

Since 2001, Shepard & Associates, LLC has provided professional services in the Carolinas specializing in designing and managing building envelope assets. Architectural services for construction and conservation projects include: programming, evaluation, investigation, thermal imaging, asbestos surveys, building asset management, design, and quality control inspections for public and private sector clients.

sPivey ARchitects, inc. 147 Wappoo Creek Drive, Suite 304, Charleston, SC 29412 369 West US 19E, Burnsville, NC 28714 843.795.9370 | 843.795.3532 (fax) www.spiveyarchitects.com | mspivey@spiveyarchitects.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Michael W. Spivey

Daniel Island Residence

Spivey Architects, Inc. serves the southeast region and offers Custom Residential and Commercial Design Services for homes of any size, branch banks, commercial offices, medical, dental, and lab facilities. Our main office is in Charleston, SC with a studio office in Burnsville, NC.

stevens & Wilkinson 1501 Main Street, Level G, Columbia, SC 29201 803.765.0320 | 803.254.6209 (fax) | raull@stevens-wilkinson.com 100 Peachtree Street Northwest, Suite 2500, Atlanta, GA 30303 404.522.8888 | 404.521.6204 (fax) | rstang@stevens-wilkinson.com www.stevensandwilkinson.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Robert T. Lyles, AIA | T. Ashby Gressette, AIA | Robby Aull, AIA, ACHA, Leed AP BD+C Full- Service Architecture, Engineering & Interior Design Firm. James E. Clyburn Research Center

stuBBs MulDRoW heRin ARchitects 400 Hibben Street, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843.881.7642 | 843.884.5021 (fax) www.smha.com | j.dixon@smha.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Charles S. Muldrow, AIA, LEED AP | Samuel B. Herin, AIA | Steven D. Graudin, AIA, LEED AP Judith A. Dixon, AIA, LEED AP | Glenn Allison, AIA Stubbs Muldrow Herin architects is a full-service architectural firm located in Mt. Pleasant, centered on a variety of project types for primarily local and regional clients. The firm’s emphasis is on careful planning, detailing, sustainability and appropriate architecture for its place. Ashley Hall Dining Commons

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stuDio 2lR | ARchitectuRe + inteRioRs 801 Gervais Street, Suite 201, Columbia, SC 29201 803.233.6602 | 803.233.6613 (fax) www.studio2LR.com I Find us on Facebook AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Wes Lyles, AIA, LEED AP | Gretchen Lambert, AIA | Tripp Riley, AIA Studio 2LR is a full service architectural and interior design firm located in Columbia’s historic Vista. We provide informed design solutions for our clients in a wide variety of project types. Please visit studio2lr.com to learn more about us. SC National Guard Maintenance Shop

tAyloR ARchitectuRe, P.A. 4011-A Belle Terre Blvd., Myrtle Beach, SC 29579 843.424.8280 ptarch@sccoast.net AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: Pamela Taylor Cecala Taylor Architecture was established in 2004 by Pamela Taylor Cecala and has consistently produced a variety of projects, including commercial, charter and private schools, religious, and residential projects. Currently a sole practitioner design firm Taylor Architecture has maintained excellent client relations and satisfaction by ensuring professionalism, integrity, personal attention and excellent quality results from design through construction.

thoMAs & DenzingeR ARchitects

73 1/2 State Street, Charleston, SC 29401 843.577.5373 | 843.577.9503 (fax) | paulette@thomasanddenzinger.com 51 Elizabeth Street, Charleston, SC 29403 843.723.6651 | 843.723.9866 (fax) | jtstudio@thomasanddenzinger.com 920 Bay Street, Beaufort, SC 29902 843.524.6361 | 843.524.2083 (fax) | jnewman@thomasanddenzinger.com www.thomasanddenzinger.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Jim Thomas, AIA | Hermann Denzinger, AIA | Paulette Myers, AIA, LEED AP Joel Newman, AIA, LEED AP | David Fisher, AIA, LEED AP Thomas & Denzinger is known for the creativity of its architecture, for the highly individualistic response of each of its selective projects both to the specific site as well as to the spiritual considerations and physical needs of its clients. Tadler Residence, Thomas and Denzinger

2013 AIASC CALendAr

JAnuAry 22

legislative Day & reception Columbia, SC

June 20-22

AIA National Convention Denver, CO

MArCh 20-23

AIA Grassroots Conference washington, DC

AuGusT 23

MAy 2-4

AIASC Spring Conference Charleston, SC

SAr Academy of Architecture for Health Conference Greenville, SC aiasc.org

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tungsten coRPoRAtion PO Box 1672, Conway, SC 29528 843.369.2871 | 843.369.7991 (fax) www.tungstencorporation.com | dvic@tungstencorporation.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAl: David J. Victoria Jr., AIA, LEED AP The Tungsten Corporation provides its clients with an integrated delivery process by offering comprehensive design/build services from a single source. Clients also have the option of selecting a particular service to meet a specific need with General Contracting, Construction Management, or Architecture.

usRy Wolfe PeteRson Doyle ARchitectuRe, inc. 4610 Oleander Drive, Suite 201, Myrtle Beach, SC 29577 843.449.8737 | 843.449.8436 (fax) www.UWPDarchitecture.com | pdoyle@UWPDarchitecture.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Stephen A. Usry, AIA | Emily M. Peterson, AIA | Paul G. Doyle, AIA, LEED AP Thoughtful. Creative. Responsible. Since 1989, our practice has been shaped by these four timeless principles. With core specialties in education and healthcare architecture, we combine innovative, thoughtful design with a hands-on, well-defined project management process to create superior value for our clients.

WAtson tAte sAvoRy 1316 Washington Street, Suite 100, Columbia, SC 29201 803.799.5181 | www.watsontatesavory.com AiA MeMBeR PRinciPAls: Michael S. Watson, AIA, LEED AP BD+C | J. Sanders Tate, AIA, LEED AP BD+C Thomas M. Savory, AIA, LEED AP BD+C | Regina R. Floyd, AIA, LEED AP BD+C

Office of Watson Tate Savory 2012 SAR Honor Award Winner

...creating contextually responsive architecture of distinction

ACquIrInG KnoWLedGe. MAKInG ConneCTIons. Keeping up-to-date or getting ahead of the curve.And joining in the celebration as AIASC is honored in recognition of our 100th Anniversary! these are the reasons why you need to attend the 2013 AIA National Convention. 84 AIA South Carolina Architecture

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eduCATIonAL

the Boudreaux Group

Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood

O. Douglas Boyce, Jr.

Graham Group Architecture

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langley & Associates Architects, llC

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lFK Architects, llC

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lS3p ASSOCIAteS ltD.

Childs Architecture, llC

ltC Associates, Inc.

CJMw Architecture

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McMillan pazdan Smith Architecture

Context Design Group, pllC

Michael Baker Corporation

Craig Gaulden Davis

rosenblum Coe Architects, Inc.

Cummings & McCrady Inc.

Shepard & Associates, llC

Curtis Group Architects

Spivey Architects, Inc.

DA Architects, llC

Stubbs Muldrow Herin Architects

earl Architects llC

Studio 2lr | Architecture + Interiors

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Furman Architects, Inc. Fw Architects, Inc.

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1x1 Design

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the Boudreaux Group

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pegram Associates, Inc.

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watson tate Savory

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IndusTrIAL

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heALTh CAre

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Studio 2lr | Architecture + Interiors

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watson tate Savory

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AAG Associates Adeptus Architecture, Inc. Ard wood Holcombe & Slate Architects and planners Batson Associates, Inc. BetschAssociates, Inc.

Goforth, Brown & Associates, Inc.

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fIrMs BY prOJeCt tYpe JudICIAL/CorreCTIonAL

Craig Gaulden Davis

CJMw Architecture

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Adeptus Architecture, Inc.

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evans & Schmidt Architects

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Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood

Group 3 Design • Architecture & Interiors

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langley & Associates Architects, llC

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MILITAry

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lS3p ASSOCIAteS ltD.

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pegram Associates, Inc.

pelham Architects, llC

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radium Architecture

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rosenblum Coe Architects, Inc.

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Studio 2lr | Architecture + Interiors

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tungsten Corporation

Studio 2lr | Architecture + Interiors

watson tate Savory

taylor Architecture, p.A.

Boykin & Munnerlyn Architects & Associates CJMw Architecture Clancy wells Architects Inc. Craig Gaulden Davis Cummings & McCrady Inc. DA Architects, llC Dp3 Architects, ltd. GMK Associates, Inc. Goff D’Antonio Associates Goforth, Brown & Associates, Inc. lS3p ASSOCIAteS ltD. Mozingo + wallace Architects, llC Quackenbush Architects + planners Shepard & Associates, llC Stevens & wilkinson Stubbs Muldrow Herin Architects

Ard wood Holcombe & Slate Architects and planners CDA Architects CeMS engineering/Architecture CJMw Architecture Clancy wells Architects Inc. Context Design Group, pllC Goff D’Antonio Associates Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood lS3p ASSOCIAteS ltD. ltC Associates, Inc. Michael Baker Corporation rosenblum Coe Architects, Inc. Shepard & Associates, llC Stevens & wilkinson Stubbs Muldrow Herin Architects Studio 2lr | Architecture + Interiors thomas & Denzinger Architects

offICe/CorporATe 1x1 Design AAG Associates Adeptus Architecture, Inc. the Anderson Studio of Architecture & Design Ard wood Holcombe & Slate Architects and planners Batson Associates, Inc. BetschAssociates, Inc. the Boudreaux Group O. Douglas Boyce, Jr. Boykin & Munnerlyn Architects & Associates Bynum Architecture, llC Catalyst Architects, llC CDA Architects CeMS engineering/Architecture Childs Architecture, llC CJMw Architecture Clancy wells Architects Inc. Context Design Group, pllC

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AIA South Carolina Architecture

renovATIon

thomas & Denzinger Architects tungsten Corporation Usry wolfe peterson Doyle Architecture, Inc.

1x1 Design AAG Associates Adeptus Architecture, Inc.

watson tate Savory

resIdenTIAL

Anderson Studio of Architecture and Design Ard wood Holcombe & Slate Architects and planners

1x1 Design

Batson Associates, Inc.

Adeptus Architecture, Inc.

BetschAssociates, Inc.

Anderson Studio of Architecture and Design

Glen Boggs Architect

Ard wood Holcombe & Slate Architects and planners

the Boudreaux Group

BetschAssociates, Inc.

O. Douglas Boyce, Jr.

Glen Boggs Architect

Boykin & Munnerlyn Architects & Associates

O. Douglas Boyce, Jr.

Bynum Architecture, llC

Boykin & Munnerlyn Architects & Associates

Catalyst Architects, llC

Bynum Architecture, llC

CDA Architects

Catalyst Architects, llC

CeMS engineering/Architecture

Childs Architecture, llC

Childs Architecture, llC

CJMw Architecture

Christopher rose Architects, p.A.

Clancy wells Architects Inc.

t weNt Y Context Design Group, pllC

Goforth, Brown & Associates, Inc.

Craig Gaulden Davis

Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood

Cummings & McCrady Inc.

Group 3 Design • Architecture & Interiors

DA Architects llC

Jumper Carter Sease Architects, p.A.

evans & Schmidt Architects

langley & Associates Architects, llC

Frederick + Frederick Architects

lFK Architects, llC

Furman Architects, Inc.

liollio Architecture, Inc.

g2 Design, llC

lS3p ASSOCIAteS ltD.

Bo Garland Architects

ltC Associates, Inc.

GJS Architects llC

MCA Architecture, Inc.

Goff D’Antonio Associates

McMillan pazdan Smith Architecture

Graham Group Architecture

Michael Baker Corporation

Group 3 Design • Architecture & Interiors

pelham Architects, llC

langley & Associates Architects, llC

Schmitt walker Architects

lee & parker, Architects, pA

SGA Architecture

lFK Architects, llC

Shepard & Associates, llC

lS3p ASSOCIAteS ltD.

Stubbs Muldrow Herin Architects

ltC Associates, Inc.

taylor Architecture, p.A.

Mozingo + wallace Architects, llC

thomas & Denzinger Architects

pegram Associates, Inc.

watson tate Savory

pelham Architects, llC radium Architecture

reTAIL

Christopher rose Architects, pA rosenblum Coe Architects, Inc.

1x1 Design

Schmitt walker Architects

Adeptus Architecture, Inc.

SGA Architecture

Anderson Studio of Architecture and Design

Shepard & Associates, llC

Ard wood Holcombe & Slate Architects and planners

Spivey Architects, Inc.

BetschAssociates, Inc.

Stubbs Muldrow Herin Architects

Bynum Architecture, llC

Studio 2lr | Architecture + Interiors

CDA Architects

taylor Architecture, p.A.

Childs Architecture, llC

thomas & Denzinger Architects

CJMw Architecture

tungsten Corporation

Clancy wells Architects Inc.

resTorATIon

Context Design Group, pllC Craig Gaulden Davis Dp3 Architects, ltd.

AAG Associates

Furman Architects, Inc.

Adeptus Architecture, Inc.

g2 Design, llC

Ard wood Holcombe & Slate Architects and planners

Bo Garland Architects

Batson Associates, Inc.

Garvin Design Group

BetschAssociates, Inc.

Goff D’Antonio Associates

Glen Boggs Architect

Goforth, Brown & Associates, Inc.

the Boudreaux Group

Graham Group Architecture

O. Douglas Boyce, Jr.

Group 3 Design • Architecture & Interiors

Boykin & Munnerlyn Architects & Associates

Jumper Carter Sease Architects, p.A.

Bynum Architecture, llC

lFK Architects, llC

Catalyst Architects, llC

lS3p ASSOCIAteS ltD.

CDA Architects

MCA Architecture, Inc.

Childs Architecture, llC

McMillan pazdan Smith Architecture

Christopher rose Architects, p.A.

Mozingo + wallace Architects, llC

CJMw Architecture

pegram Associates, Inc.

Clancy wells Architects Inc.

Quackenbush Architects + planners

Craig Gaulden Davis

radium Architecture

Cummings & McCrady Inc.

rosenblum Coe Architects, Inc.

Dp3 Architects, ltd.

SGA Architecture

evans & Schmidt Architects

Shepard & Associates, llC

Frederick + Frederick Architects

Spivey Architects, Inc.

Furman Architects, Inc.

Stubbs Muldrow Herin Architects

Garvin Design Group

Studio 2lr | Architecture + Interiors

GJS Architects, llC

thomas & Denzinger Architects

GMK Associates, Inc.

watson tate Savory

13

susTAInAbILITy 1x1 Design AAG Associates Adeptus Architecture, Inc. Anderson Studio of Architecture and Design Ard wood Holcombe & Slate Architects and planners Batson Associates, Inc. BetschAssociates, Inc. the Boudreaux Group Boykin & Munnerlyn Architects & Associates Catalyst Architects, llC CDA Architects CeMS engineering/Architecture Childs Architecture, llC Christopher rose Architects, p.A. CJMw Architecture Clancy wells Architects Inc. Context Design Group, pllC Craig Gaulden Davis Cummings & McCrady Inc. Dolphin Architects and Builders, Inc. Dp3 Architects, ltd. Frederick + Frederick Architects Furman Architects, Inc. Bo Garland Architects Garvin Design Group GJS Architects, llC GMK Associates, Inc. Goff D’Antonio Associates Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood Graham Group Architecture Group 3 Design • Architecture & Interiors Jumper Carter Sease Architects, p.A. langley & Associates Architects, llC lFK Architects, llC liollio Architecture, Inc. lS3p ASSOCIAteS ltD. ltC Associates, Inc. MCA Architecture, Inc. McMillan pazdan Smith Architecture Mozingo + wallace Architects, llC pegram Associates, Inc. Quackenbush Architects + planners radium Architecture rosenblum Coe Architects, Inc. SGA Architecture Shepard & Associates, llC Stevens & wilkinson Stubbs Muldrow Herin Architects Studio 2lr | Architecture + Interiors thomas & Denzinger Architects Usry wolfe peterson Doyle Architecture, Inc. watson tate Savory

Goff D’Antonio Associates

aiasc.org

87

ADVertISer INDex ArCHIteCtUrAl FIrM Dp3 Architects .....................................

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COSt eStIMAtOrS Aiken Cost Consultants .....................

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DOOr & HArDwAre Ingersoll rand ......................................

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CONStrUCtION Hood Construction .............................

FlOOrING David Allen Company ...........................

47

CONSUltING eNGINeerS 4Se Structural engineers, Inc. ..........

88 ADC engineering, Inc. ........................ 47 Buford Goff & Associates ................... 48 Fuller Consulting engineers ............. 58 GwA, Inc................................................. 47 MeCA ...................................................... 88 rMF engineering, Inc. ........................ 58 Sprague & Sprague Consulting engineers .........................

MASONrY Boral Bricks, Inc. .................................

IBC Brick Industry Southeast region .. IFC

58

SOFtwAre & prINtING SerVICeS the print Machine (tpM) ...................

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FUrNItUre Herman Miller Healthcare.................

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pHOtOGrApHer Olin redmon ........................................

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INSUrANCe SerVICeS BB&t Boyle Vaughan Insurance ......

88

Insurance Management Consultants, Inc. (IMCI) ......................

wINDOwS/DOOrS Marvin ....................................................

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21 pella ........................................................ 48

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BB&T/Boyle Vaughan Insurance Services provides professional liability insurance to design firms through a variety of markets. BB&T/Boyle Vaughan Insurance Services is the only representative in the state of SC for the following two carriers: XLDP and Hudson.

Donny R. Pittman, PE Jefferson T. Howell, PE LEED AP BD+C Columbia, SC | Charleston, SC

Mechanical Engineering Consulting Associates, Inc. 2330 Main Street | Columbia, SC 29201 PO Box 50644 | Columbia, SC 29250 Phone: 803.765.9421 | www.mecainc.com

AIA South Carolina Architecture

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FOODSerVICe DeSIGN whitmire Ballington Associates ......

BB&T/Boyle Vaughan Insurance Services 2000 Center Point Drive, Suite 2400 Columbia, SC 29210 Ph: 803.231.6154 | Fx: 877.467.7210 www.plan.org | arogers@bbandt.com

88

25

INterIOr DeSIGN SerVICeS Dailey & Associates .............................

www.AikenCost.com Brad@AikenCost.com

Aiken cost consultants, inc. 1010 East North Street, Suite C-2 Greenville, SC 29601 Ph: 864.232.9342 Fx: 864.233.2573

Acc provides all levels of estimates, including MCACES MII and Success estimates for military projects. We also offer Detailed and Budget type estimates for commercial, institutional, medical, and industrial clients in our sequential cost estimating program, ACCProgressive. ACC Progressive was developed specifically to comply with the South Carolina State Engineer estimating requirements.

4SE Structural Engineers 7 Radcliffe Street, Suite 301 | Charleston, SC 29403 Ph: 843.722.1992 | Fx: 843.722.1211 | www.4seinc.com Structural engineering for new and existing architecture, historic structures, and broadcast towers. Contact: John Moore | jmoore@4seinc.com

Boral. More than just brick. Boral Building Products is your one-stop shop for brick, Cultured Stone速, Finestone EIFS and stucco, Nichiha fiber cement siding, Boral速 Pavers, Fire Rock fireplaces and all your masonry accessory items. Boral Building Products Lexington, SC 803.356.1730

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ConCrete Masonry. Design suCCess. Project 1: Target | Location, Myrtle Beach SC | Architect: Target Stores | Contractor: Batson Cook, Jacksonville, FL | Mason : Pyramid, Decatur, GA Project 2: Ty Cobb Regional Medical Center, Lavonia, GA | Architect: Earle Architects, Greenville, SC | Contractor: Cox-Shepp, Marietta, GA | Mason: Pyramid Masonry, Atlanta, GA Project 3: Holiday Inn Express, Lexington SC | Architect: Olive Design Build | Contractor: MB Kahn, Columbia, SC | Mason: MB Kahn, Columbia, SC Project 4: Myrtle Beach Aviation, Myrtle Beach SC | Architect: Pegram Assoc., Myrtle Beach, SC | Contractor: MB Kahn, Columbia, SC | Mason: Southeast, Myrtle Beach, SC

ConCrete masonry produCts offer attraCtive , durable and eConomiC design solutions. for many arChiteCts, ConCrete masonry is the material of ChoiCe.

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AIASC Magazine 2013