Issuu on Google+

cover photography:

Chia Chiung Chong, B.F.A. photography, Penang, Malaysia

CONTENTS 126 Fibers

SCAD Core

The University for Creative Careers

134 Film and television

318 Foundation studies

142 Furniture design

320 General education

SCAD:

2 Locations

150 Graphic design

14 Academic experience

158 Historic preservation

Other programs

22 Learning resources

164 Illustration

322 Minors

32 Student life

176 Industrial design

324 SCAD Language Studio

42 Connect with SCAD

186 Interactive design and game development

Policies and general information

Degree programs

196 Interior design

326 Academic programs and policies

45 Programs by school

204 Jewelry

344 Admission

46 Accessory design

210 Luxury and fashion management

354 Scholarships

52 Advertising

214 Motion media design

359 Financial policies and

60 Animation

224 Painting

68 Architectural history

234 Performing arts

365 Academic calendar

72 Architecture

240 Photography

366 Tuition and fees

80 Art history

252 Printmaking

368 Accreditation

84 Branded entertainment

258 Production design

88 Business design and

264 Sculpture

arts leadership

272 Sequential art

92 Cinema studies

280 Service design

96 Design for sustainability

284 Sound design

100 Design management

290 Television producing

104 Dramatic writing

294 Themed entertainment design

108 Equestrian studies

298 Urban design

114 Fashion

302 User experience (UX) design

122 Fashion marketing

306 Visual effects

and management

314 Writing

student accounts

Your creativity knows no bounds. Neither do we. SCAD is one university with multiple locations, opening up a world of opportunity. Students may transition seamlessly among SCAD locations around the globe, experiencing the university’s unique cultural milieu, robust course offerings and rich professional connections in each setting. The SCAD student body is as diverse as its global impact. University locations in Atlanta, Hong Kong, Lacoste, Savannah and online are each perfectly poised to capitalize on the leadership contacts, employer relations and professional contexts of the programs they serve — ensuring that every SCAD student is always in the right place at the right time. 2

SCAD.EDU / LOCATIONS

One university. Multiple locations. Opportunity awaits. SCAD’s curricula encourage students to expand their horizons, experience multiple SCAD locations and explore different disciplines that augment their major degree programs. SCAD students may take their foundation studies, general education, minor and elective courses toward degree completion at any SCAD location, regardless of where a major program is offered, as long as prerequisites and other requirements are met. 3

ATLANTA Atlanta is an international center of commerce ablaze with ingenuity and sophistication. This American metropolis is a dynamic crossroads, a place where people from around the world converge. Serviced by the world’s busiest airport and fortified by elite companies that include the Coca-Cola Company, Newell Rubbermaid, Mercedes-Benz USA, Carter’s, The Home Depot, Delta Air Lines, Turner Broadcasting, Chickfil-A and many, many more, Atlanta is a global economic engine. The capital of the New South is also a capital for culture, art and design. SCAD Atlanta stands in the heart of Midtown, close to everything: verdant parks, bustling shops and historic music venues. SCAD Atlanta’s main facility on Peachtree Street hums with activity, housing the location’s expansive library, digital labs, a dining hall, a fully equipped fitness center, multiple galleries and SCADfash, a museum dedicated to the exhibition of fashion and accessories. Students also benefit from a variety of other resources, including the SCADshow theater, two residence halls, a Renzo Piano-designed sculpture studio, and the SCAD Digital Media Center, a state-of-the-art, film and television production studio. Additionally, SCAD’s distinguished Ivy Hall cultural arts and writing center serves as a literary hub for classes and seminars. SCAD Atlanta is also home to globally recognized initiatives such as SCADpad, as well as signature events including SCAD aTVfest and Out to Launch. Intercollegiate athletics, student associations and award-winning student media groups provide active outlets for students to learn, share and grow. Many students choose to study at SCAD Atlanta for the entirety of their degree program, while others may spend a quarter, a year or more in this vibrant alpha city.

 SCAD Atlanta not only provided me the tools and education to develop my photography skills, but it also connected me to people and projects that helped jump-start my career —  from a public art commission with the Atlanta BeltLine to providing photography for Porsche. SCAD Atlanta is a major benchmark on my creative and professional journey.

Joshua McFadden, M.F.A. photography, Rochester, New York

4

SCAD.EDU / ATLANTA

5

6

SCAD.EDU / HONG-KONG

HONG KONG From glittering skyscrapers to sacred temples, white-sand beaches to mountain views, Hong Kong is an alluring gateway to Asia — and to vast new worlds. This vibrant city thrives as an entertainment capital, a digital media hub, a leading global financial powerhouse, and an economic center for fashion production, manufacturing and retail. Boasting the area’s most comprehensive art and design degree programs, SCAD Hong Kong is leading the city’s creative revival. Students here study in the university’s UNESCO-award-winning facility, a grand midcentury courthouse fully restored and revitalized by SCAD, located in the historic Sham Shui Po district, where the fusion of ancient heritage and Western influence inspires and ignites inventive minds. SCAD students bask in the city’s aura while learning to shine in their own creative light. Students from around the globe can immerse themselves in Hong Kong’s dynamic arts scene and take part in the region’s biggest and brightest cultural events, including the Hong Kong International Film Festival, Art Basel Hong Kong, Art Central Hong Kong and SIGGRAPH Asia. Whether they study here for a single quarter or for the full length of their degree programs, SCAD students are perfectly at home in Asia’s World City.

 SCAD Hong Kong has changed my life, my vision of my life and the way I feel life should be! I feel so inspired with everything I see, everyone I meet, everything I eat — art is everywhere.

Carmela Osorio Lugo, B.F.A. fashion, Caracas, Venezuela

7

LACOSTE Since the 15th century, artists have made the pilgrimage to Lacoste, France, simply to witness the purity of its light and drink inspiration from a landscape of pastoral beauty. Today, artists still flock to this flawlessly preserved medieval village to study at SCAD. Steeped in the culture of Provence, creative renewal and rejuvenation abound at this location, inviting students to shed the distractions of daily life and focus on their work — be it painting, photography, art history, historic preservation, writing, or the many other disciplines the university makes available at this unforgettable location. While in Lacoste, students live and study in carefully and artfully rehabilitated facilities dating from the ninth to the 19th centuries. Though immersed in a remote and tranquil retreat, students remain at the vanguard of modern technology. Here, students utilize high-end resources, including a digitally connected library, printmaking and photography labs, studio and lecture classrooms, a sculpture garden and more. Course offerings at Lacoste vary each quarter, allowing students to earn credit toward their SCAD degrees while experiencing the riches of the region. Celebrated artists and designers visit SCAD Lacoste throughout the year. Recent notable guests include London-based illustrator and printmaker Christopher Brown, Vogue fashion writer Lynn Yaeger, Academy Award-winning screenwriter Geoffrey Fletcher, and CFDA Award-winning fashion designers Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters of Creatures of the Wind. Students also have the opportunity to exhibit their work at a local vernissage, take field trips to unique museums and historic sites, and travel to Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, Avignon and Paris. Students from every SCAD location can choose to incorporate a quarter of study at SCAD Lacoste, adding cultural depth to the university experience and a worldly perspective to their career preparation.

 I was challenged to take a place that thousands of artists rendered before me and to make it my own. I have left my mark on Lacoste, and Lacoste has left its mark on me.

Paige Westberg, B.F.A. photography, Mesa, Arizona

8

SCAD.EDU / LACOSTE

9

10

SCAD.EDU / SAVANNAH

SAVANNAH Sprawling beaches. Charming squares. A thriving artistic community. One of the largest National Historic Landmark Districts in the United States. Savannah offers bountiful opportunity for inspiration while providing the ideal launchpad for students’ creative careers. Home to the university’s flagship location and one of the most admired urban designs in the world, Savannah nurtures students with its inviting climate, distinctly Southern hospitality and culturally rich downtown that lends itself to endless exploration. SCAD Savannah constitutes the largest of the university’s locations, with award-winning facilities interwoven throughout the port city’s tapestry of historic and modern structures. Students live and learn in SCAD buildings celebrated for their excellence by the American Institute of Architects, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and countless other authorities. With nearly 70 distinctive buildings, SCAD Savannah’s campus comprises the entire city. Among the most lauded of these facilities is the SCAD Museum of Art, a masterpiece in its own right. In a premier contemporary art museum that draws visitors from around the globe, students’ lives are transformed by renowned speakers, lively discussions, and transcendent exhibitions and events. SCAD engages and educates students through a robust array of academic disciplines and limitless collaborative opportunities. SCAD Savannah events enliven the city scene as the world’s great personalities and talents attend the Savannah Film Festival, the SCAD Fashion Show, SCAD deFINE ART, SCADstyle and other signature experiences. Many SCAD students choose to study in Savannah for the entirety of their degree programs, while others from across the university spend a quarter, a year or more among the cobblestone streets and Spanish moss that frame this picturesque coastal city.

11

eLEARNING SCAD eLearning students connect to the university’s accredited, award-winning educational programming regardless of their locations. A global online community, SCAD eLearning puts the entire university network at the fingertips of working professionals, artists and designers around the world. Students benefit from the same course structure and credentialed faculty available to students pursuing degrees at the university’s on-ground locations. Many students choose to earn their degrees entirely online, while others spend a quarter or more at one of the university’s physical locations in North America, Europe or Asia. SCAD provides eLearning students with career coaching, research workshops, counseling services, peer tutoring and writing assistance. Access to resources including scad.tv, SCAD Libraries and the Visual Resources Center increase students’ academic and artistic prowess, enabling them to graduate as highly marketable individuals in their professional spheres. Through the Virtual Lecture Hall, a treasure trove of livestreaming and on-demand content encompassing every major SCAD event, eLearning students are vitally connected to the university’s pulse — wherever they may be.

BOOKMARK THIS SCAD eLearning was the only art and design university included in U.S. News & World Report’s 2015 list of “Best Online Bachelor’s Programs,” and the university was the first art and design university to receive the Instructional Technology Council’s award for Outstanding Distance Education Program and the rank of Excellence in Institution-Wide Online Teaching and Learning from the Online Learning Consortium. 12

SCAD.EDU / eLEARNING

13

14

SCAD.EDU / FYE

JUMP RIGHT IN SCAD prepares students to excel in their future careers, but first, SCAD prepares them to excel at the university. Through the required First Year Experience course, designed to aid in the transition to college life and prepare participants for academic success and professional fulfillment, students are nurtured at SCAD from day one. The FYE course supports the SCAD commitment to creating a positively oriented university environment, offering students insight on a variety of success strategies. Discussing university policies and examining major, minor and career options, the FYE course gives students the tools to achieve their goals. To further aid their growth at SCAD, students are guided by the same dedicated student success advisers throughout their time at the university. In the process, lasting friendships flourish among students who are on the same academic trajectory. The FYE course meets once per week and is available to students at no additional charge. While designed specifically for first-year students, those who have transferred to SCAD from other institutions may opt to take advantage of this unique learning opportunity.

15

16

SCAD.EDU / UNDERGRADUATE

WELCOME TO THE CREATIVE CLASS At SCAD, students have the freedom to do it all: explore more than 40 art and design disciplines, study in unique locations around the world and gain useful, professional experience before they even graduate. Students shape an undergraduate experience that suits their vision and career aspirations. The curricula at SCAD are tailored to develop young talent into tomorrow’s creative leaders. Offering the most diverse and comprehensive array of degree programs at any art and design university in the nation, SCAD is uniquely qualified to prepare students for thriving careers. Creative degrees have grown increasingly valuable in today’s professional marketplace, where many of the highest-paying occupations have their roots in the critical thinking, problemsolving and effective communication skills embedded in SCAD curricula. SCAD Core, the nexus of the SCAD undergraduate experience, focuses on knowledge and cultivates highly capable graduates who are prepared to thrive in the professional realm. A thoughtfully curated series of foundation studies and general education courses, SCAD Core propels students through the university’s demanding degree programs and serves as a centerpiece for lifelong personal and professional success. And because no undergraduate courses are ever taught by teaching assistants, every SCAD student receives one-on-one attention from credentialed professors who are masters in their fields.

 There is nowhere else in this world that offers such a diverse community and rich artistic learning environment.

 att Higgins, M.F.A. performing arts, M B.F.A. graphic design, Westford, Massachusetts

17

POSITIONED FOR PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS SCAD graduate programs shape the leaders of tomorrow. From powerful roles at global companies to innovative careers in fine art and design to entrepreneurial endeavors, these elite professions demand an ambitious, progressive approach. That’s why SCAD graduate programs emphasize research and critical analysis alongside studio creation and fieldwork, engendering in all students a holistic, integrated understanding of their chosen discipline or field. Each graduate program culminates in a final project or thesis — a pinnacle of the graduate experience that invites students to pioneer a single, personal project. Graduate thesis work may include traditional scholarly research as well as creative work, exhibitions and more. SCAD graduate students emerge from their studies with a highly evolved analytical and practical understanding of their areas of study, priming them to spearhead design firms, change lives through higher education, pilot imaginative companies and launch their own successful startups.

 I searched graduate schools worldwide, and SCAD was the only one offering a practical, coursework-based program. I’m graduating from SCAD with three years of work experience at one of the best design firms in Atlanta. SCAD truly changed my life.

Samira Rahimi, M.F.A. motion media design, Tehran, Iran

18

SCAD.EDU / GRADUATE

19

20

SCAD.EDU / ISSO

A CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNITY SCAD is an international university with a diverse student body. The university welcomes students from around the globe into an inviting community of artists and designers — a home away from home. Programs and resources developed specifically for international students help these members of the SCAD family navigate what is most important to them. The dedicated international student services office at SCAD works exclusively with the university’s international population. Through a special orientation session coordinated by ISSO, students from outside the U.S. learn about academics, university life, cross-cultural topics, housing, safety, immigration, travel and more before diving into their studies. SCAD’s Cultural and Academic Preparation Program is a fourweek pre-orientation summer program for new international students that provides a bridge to university life. CAPP prepares students to excel and helps them forge bonds with other students at SCAD. The university offers an intensive and engaging art- and designfocused English as a Second Language program through the SCAD Language Studio. With an authentic studio experience, dedicated instruction and extended learning opportunities beyond the classroom, the SCAD Language Studio ensures students succeed during their time at SCAD — and beyond.

 I am quite proud I had a chance to study at such a profound institution, one that is always motivated to create. You have given us keys to doors we never knew we could open.  haldoun Al Charabi, M.Arch., B.F.A. architecture, K Damascus, Syrian Arab Republic

21

LEARN FROM THE MASTERS SCAD is home to an award-winning faculty that champions student success in class and through extended learning opportunities. Wielding real-world experience, university professors bring valuable professional connections into the classroom every day. SCAD faculty members are Emmy and Academy Award winners, Fulbright Scholars, New York Times best-selling authors, Cannes Jury Prize recipients and AIA award-winning architects. They are artists whose work has been collected by and exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the High Museum of Art. Their photography graces the pages of Time magazine, Esquire, Businessweek, USA Today, The New York Times Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar and Vanity Fair. Their credits include films by Pixar and Disney, and they regularly appear on most admired educators lists. This elite faculty is at the helm of the SCAD learning community at every location and online. They have honed their crafts at some of the world’s most recognizable companies and studios, such as DreamWorks, CBS, CNN, Saks Fifth Avenue, Warner Bros., NASA, The New Yorker, DC Comics, Marvel and more. SCAD professors bring these years of professional experience to classroom instruction, inviting industry contacts to the university to network with students and participate in oneon-one portfolio reviews. Yet for all of their vital professional insight, the greatest achievement of SCAD professors is the success of their students.

“

The close-knit community that SCAD cultivates led to relationships with professors who I now consider mentors and colleagues. To have the opportunity to grow in such an inspiring setting is something I continue to benefit from.

Silas Breaux, B.F.A. printmaking, Santa Rosa Beach, Florida

22

SCAD.EDU / FACULTY

23

CONNECTING, COLLABORATING, CREATING At SCAD, students join forces with the world’s best and most respected companies — including Disney, NASA, Hewlett-Packard, the Coca-Cola Company, FOX Sports, Microsoft, Fisher-Price, Fossil, Hershey and Adobe. SCAD established the Collaborative Learning Center to serve as the buzzing hive of external partnerships for all SCAD students at all locations. The CLC specializes in bringing the world’s hottest brands to the university, so students can put their creative energies and diverse skills to work in authentic, real-world environments with realworld partners, well before graduation. This work with professional partners outside the university translates to for-credit courses through which students seek imaginative, practicable solutions and build extraordinary portfolios. During a CLC course, students learn every aspect of concept development — from market research to branding, from managing deadlines to conducting client presentations. They rise to the challenges posed by high-profile companies, investigating and discovering opportunities to innovate, and delivering actionable results to corporate partners. SCAD students have collaborated with Procter & Gamble to assist in the research and development of concepts for advancing Swiffer into alternative streams of commerce, as well as with the BMW Group to develop fine art concepts for the BMW plant in Spartanburg, South Carolina. Each quarter, new opportunities await future SCAD students who want to work with major brands to solve the design challenges of tomorrow. Each year, the CLC generates nearly 40 distinct marketplace projects to support the mission of preparing talented students for professional careers. Companies that have partnered with the CLC include:

24

Adobe

NASA

AT&T

Newell Rubbermaid

BMW

Procter & Gamble

Electronic Arts

Reebok

Fossil

Snap-on

FOX Sports

The Coca-Cola Company

General Electric

The Hershey Company

Gulfstream Aerospace

UBS

Hewlett-Packard

VTech

Mattel

Walt Disney Imagineering

Microsoft

Whole Foods Market

SCAD.EDU / CLC

25

FIND YOUR MUSE The SCAD Museum of Art is a luminous beacon of inspiration and design innovation. SCAD students frequent this center for learning, which is at the heart of the university. They flow in and out of its storied walls as they attend academic classes and career workshops, lecture series, film screenings, gallery talks and annual events. A work of art in and of itself, the museum incorporates the oldest surviving railroad depot in the United States. The SCAD Museum of Art is the recipient of the 2014 American Institute of Architects Honor Award for Architecture, a pinnacle achievement for new buildings given annually by the AIA. The museum has also garnered accolades from the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation, the Congress for the New Urbanism, the International Interior Design Association and the Historic Savannah Foundation. The museum exhibits work by a range of highly acclaimed international artists throughout the year and presents SCAD student and alumni work to a global audience. In the André Leon Talley Gallery, SCAD regularly curates couture exhibitions such as “Oscar de la Renta: His Legendary World of Style” and “Vivienne Westwood: Dress Up Story — 1990 Until Now.” Design and high style reign supreme in Atlanta, where SCAD students and the community enjoy access to SCADfash, the university’s fashion museum. The museum engages in education, research and programming, including exhibitions and film screenings, devoted exclusively to fashion and accessories. An integral part of the SCAD educational experience, SCADfash is a center for the reflective study of fashion, from modern luxury brands to historic costume. With a remarkable collection of works by major artists, with media and subject matter ranging from painting and photography to fashion and textile art, the SCAD Museum of Art and SCADfash serve as testaments to the university’s dedication to culture, art and education. The university’s permanent collection includes: The Walter O. Evans Collection of African American Art The Modern and Contemporary Art Collection The Earle W. Newton Collection of British and American Art The 19th- and 20th-century Photography Collection The SCAD Costume Collection 26

SCAD.EDU / MUSEUM

27

28

SCAD.EDU / LIBRARIES

PERUSE PRIZED COLLECTIONS SCAD libraries are quiet sanctuaries that inspire and enlighten through a vast array of publications, audiovisual resources and archival materials — accessible by all students at all SCAD locations and online. SCAD libraries include collections containing volumes for research and reference, as well as thousands of literary and creative works and periodicals. SCAD is also home to one of the most significant collections of artists’ books in the United States, including work by artists active from the 1960s through the contemporary era. The prized Don Bluth Collection of Animation consists of animation drawings, storyboards and other materials from some of the artist’s most admired work in film, including “The Secret of NIMH,” “An American Tail,” “The Land Before Time,” “Anastasia” and “Titan A.E.” The special collections held within the university’s libraries also include vintage comic books, graphic novels, graphic nonfiction and other rare books on artists, architects and art movements. Students have a broad range of collections and services available to them at every location, including access to digital images, online databases, media, course reserves and personalized research instruction. SCAD operates an international network of galleries and exhibition spaces, each with a distinct atmosphere, floor plan, and play of light and space. Inviting students to learn unique approaches to the art of curating and display, the university’s many galleries also serve as learning spaces with dynamic, vibrant exhibitions featuring the work of students, alumni, faculty and visiting artists. These exhibitions continue to receive praise and press from such diverse, influential venues as CNN, Art in America, Artforum, Forbes, Garden & Gun, W Magazine, Huffington Post and The Guardian.

 The SCAD library is my favorite thing about this school — it’s amazing. I go in there looking for one thing, and I come out of there with something 10 times better.

Kate Absher, B.F.A. fashion, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

29

SIGNATURE EVENTS, CELEBRATED GUESTS Global press. Exclusive guest lists. Big names. Huge crowds. SCAD signature events are designed with the most important VIPs in mind — SCAD students. Throughout the year at each location around the world, the university is host to a spectacular lineup of sparkling events in star-studded venues. Annual SCAD signature events include the acclaimed Savannah Film Festival, SCAD Fashion Show, SCAD deFINE ART, SCADstyle, Sidewalk Arts Festival, SCAD aTVfest, Sand Arts Festival, SCAD New Alumni Concert and the Game Developers eXchange. These events put student work on center stage, where the talented SCAD student artists and designers rub elbows with the world’s most celebrated creative professionals. Here’s just a sampling of guests who have lectured, critiqued and taught master classes at SCAD:

30

Marina Abramović

Marc Jacobs

Joseph Altuzarra

Mindy Kaling

Margaret Atwood

Jamaica Kincaid

Alec Baldwin

John Lasseter

David Benioff

Marianne Lau

Sara Blakely

Stan Lee

Neil Blumenthal

Mike Myers

Joel Cohen

Shirin Neshat

Luigi Colani

Andrea Ponsi

Francisco Costa

Zac Posen

Lee Daniels

Suzanne Ramljak

David Elliott

Norman Reedus

Bret Easton Ellis

Ralph Rucci

George Esquivel

Margaret Russell

Geoffrey Fletcher

Stefan Sagmeister

Diane von Furstenberg

David Shannon

Philippa Gregory

Johannes Torpe

James Gurney

Alexander Wang

Prabal Gurung

Vivienne Westwood

Arianna Huffington

Fred Wilson

Jeremy Irons

Lynn Yaeger

Alfredo Jaar

Vern Yip

Dakota Jackson

Randi Zuckerberg

SCAD.EDU / CALENDAR

31

ACTIVE, ENGAGING STUDENT LIFE SCAD students have as many opportunities to excel beyond the classroom as they do inside it. The university promotes activities that engender leadership, social responsibility and healthy lifestyles, and diverse student clubs and organizations that create opportunities for SCAD students to meet others with common interests — from improv comedy to mixed martial arts. SCAD also sponsors student groups affiliated with professional organizations, community service programs and clubs related to academic departments. The university’s multitude of leadership-oriented student groups includes the Student Activities Council, United Student Forum and award-winning student media and Internet radio stations. These extracurricular opportunities nurture SCAD students’ success and give them an edge as they engage their future careers. The university also offers resources to maximize students’ time and safety, such as the Bee Line bus system and transit visualization software accessible through any wireless device. The system tracks the university’s buses in real time. Additional resources include late-night shuttle service for students requiring transportation from SCAD’s academic buildings, professional counseling staff for addressing student concerns and emergencies, and round-the-clock security officers. Specialists in learning styles and counseling help students adjust to university life and reach personal and academic goals.

 I chose SCAD because I wanted to be a better artist, but after coming here, I found that I was growing up and learning how to be a better person. SCAD opened my life to a world of creative people and great opportunity for growth.

Katrina Teh, B.F.A. illustration, Quezon City, Philippines

32

SCAD.EDU / LIFE

33

34

SCAD.EDU / LIFE

A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO ART EDUCATION SCAD is known equally for the quality of its degree programs and for the quality of its student life. Students enjoy state-of-the-art fitness resources that embody the university’s commitment to physical and mental well-being, such as ClubSCAD in Savannah, the SCAD Atlanta Fitness Center and SCADfit in Lacoste. Students can join group classes or work individually with seasoned personal trainers, or even experience a moment of Zen while practicing yoga and Pilates at the SCAD Studio in Savannah, a newly renovated, sun-drenched Colonial cottage. SCAD students nourish their bodies and minds with locally sourced, sustainable and organic foods available through Bon Appétit, which provides food services to SCAD dining facilities. Through these offerings, students have access to healthy, fresh foods that help them power through active lifestyles, marathon study sessions and late-night bursts of creativity. Student housing options also offer avenues for social engagement, involvement in the university community and a variety of programmed events. Apartment-style and traditional residence halls feature live-in directors and amenities that include swimming pools, sand volleyball courts, cafés, Webenhanced laundry facilities, computer labs and meeting rooms. In common areas, students may relax, watch television, or play pool, video games or table tennis. Graduate-preferred housing provides graduate students with additional living environment options exclusive to those pursuing advanced degrees.

35

CUSTOMIZED CAREER GUIDANCE At SCAD, career preparation is woven into every fiber of the university, from its mission to its degree programs and coursework to the career advisers who are assigned to all students. Through career-focused resources, events and advising, the university equips students to realize their highest aspirations as creative professionals and industry leaders. Dedicated career and alumni success advisers help students set specific career goals, create distinctive résumés and portfolios, rehearse for interviews and presentations, and network with employers and professionals in each student’s chosen field. Advisers stay connected with SCAD students even after graduation and are committed to helping alumni prepare for every advancing level of professional success. Outstanding creative firms and corporations visit every SCAD location, every year. To prepare students for these interactions, SCAD offers workshops on entrepreneurship, branding, salary negotiation, social responsibility and career preparedness. The university also knows that writing and presentation skills matter, which is why SCAD created the annual “Write On/Speak Up” seminars to help students present themselves and their work in polished, articulate form. The series includes sessions on creating artist statements, writing cover letters and improving confidence during interviews, as well as workshops on speaking clearly in professional situations and utilizing mental techniques to ensure success. The SCAD job portal is an exclusive online gateway to hundreds of jobs and internships at top companies, available to all SCAD students and alumni. Students also interact with representatives of top-tier creative organizations at SCAD’s exceptional career-focused events. In 2015, nearly 3,500 SCAD students and alumni attended annual career fairs in Atlanta, Savannah and Hong Kong, where premier global employers conducted interviews with students, viewed portfolios and discussed career opportunities. Companies that regularly recruit at SCAD include:

36

Abercrombie & Fitch

FCB Global

NASA

Amazon

Fossil

Nickelodeon

American Greetings

Gensler

Nike

Apple

Google

Ogilvy & Mather

BCBGMAXAZRIA

Gulfstream

Penguin Random House

Bloomingdale’s

Hallmark

Pixar

Blue Sky Studios

Hasbro

Procter & Gamble

Camuto Group

The Home Depot

Ralph Lauren

Carter’s

IBM

Razorfish

Coach

J.Crew

Reebok

Crispin Porter + Bogusky Kohl’s

Target

DDB Worldwide

Leo Burnett Worldwide

Tiffany & Co.

Diane von Furstenberg

Lilly Pulitzer

Turner Broadcasting

Discovery

Lucasfilm

Urban Outfitters

Disney

Mattel

Wunderman

DreamWorks

Microsoft

Zynga

SCAD.EDU / CAREERS

SCAD GRADS WANTED Ninety-seven percent of SCAD Spring 2014 alumni responding to a survey were employed, pursuing further education or both within 10 months of graduation.

37

38

SCAD.EDU / LEARNING-RESOURCES

ELITE TECHNOLOGY, EXTRAORDINARY TOOLS SCAD places professional tools and advanced technology at students’ fingertips, such as green screens, Ultra HD (4K) cameras, Cintiq drawing screens, Wacom tablets, 3-D printers, a Foley soundstage, a fully equipped HD television studio, a Jacquard loom, laser cutters, a state-of-the-art sculpture foundry and Vicon motion capture studios. At SCAD, specialized educational resources help students traverse their areas of study and push the limits of their disciplines. Students work with the same advanced technologies and instruments they will soon use in the workplace as professionals. With a wealth of resources and facilities across three continents, the university provides students with the spaces and equipment needed to master their talents. Assets include state-of-the-art Mac and high-end PC workstation labs with cinematic displays and industry-standard software applications, including complimentary access to Adobe Creative Cloud Complete. Students in every department have the tools they need to fuel their creative spirits, from the rare opportunity to become Media Composer and Pro Tools certified before graduating as a sound design or film and television student to producing ABS and polycarbonate 3-D models as a student of industrial design. In photography, students expose and process RA-4 photographic materials using powerful high-resolution printers, including a Durst Theta printer and an Epsilon printer, while many SCAD film and digital media degree programs benefit from equipment including the Steadicam EFP, Panther Evo Plus and Fisher dollies, Techno-Jib, two chroma key green screen studios, a 7.1 Dolby surround mix suite and an Icon D-Command professional recording studio. 39

40

SCAD.EDU / ATHLETICS

SPIRIT THRIVES AT SCAD SCAD athletics celebrate the art of competition. As the first art and design university in the United States to offer a comprehensive intercollegiate athletics program, SCAD is fully dedicated to creating a well-rounded, active environment. The university’s sports teams hold recent national titles in swimming, golf, tennis, lacrosse and soccer. The SCAD equestrian team has earned a stellar 22 team and individual national titles in the American National Riding Commission’s national team championship competition, along with five individual reserve and one reserve team national top honors. In addition, SCAD equestrian won its second Overall Tournament of Champions National Championship and its first Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association Collegiate Cup National Championship in the 2014-15 competition year. At SCAD Atlanta and SCAD Savannah, the university’s studentartist-athletes compete in men’s and women’s sports as part of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. The SCAD community consistently rallies together to support its talented athletes and cheer the university on to conference, regional and national wins. SCAD athletic teams include: Cross country

Lacrosse

Tennis

Equestrian

Soccer

Track and field

Golf

Swimming

SCAD students across the globe work hard and play hard while enjoying a wide variety of intramural sports and recreational activities. Activities include: Basketball

Dodgeball

Kayaking

Canoeing

Flag football

Volleyball

Cycling

Indoor soccer

41

CONNECT WITH SCAD VISIT AND TOUR The best way to get to know a university is to visit in person. Students are encouraged to tour SCAD to learn more about all the university has to offer. Come to Atlanta, Hong Kong, Lacoste or Savannah to sit in on a class, meet with faculty, tour residence halls, have lunch at SCAD dining facilities and fall in love with the university for creative careers. scad.edu/visit INFORMATION SESSIONS AND CREATIVE CAREERS WORKSHOPS Attend an overview presentation near you to learn about SCAD locations, programs of study, admission guidelines, and art and design career options. scad.edu/yourarea SCAD DAYS Take advantage of special SCAD open house events to see the university for yourself. Students can explore facilities, get to know other applicants, talk with professors, apply for admission and meet with advisers. scad.edu/scadday EVENTS FOR ACCEPTED STUDENTS Exclusive events designed just for the elite group of students accepted to SCAD are offered throughout the year. Contact your admission adviser for details. ONLINE INTERACTION Chat live with admission representatives and learn about SCAD locations, academic programs, student life, application processes, transfer credit, scholarships and fellowships. scad.edu/admission ATLANTA

Join SCAD on Facebook

877.722.3285 or 404.253.2700

facebook.com/scad.edu

scadatl@scad.edu HONG KONG 800.869.7223 or 852.2253.8044 (HK) admission@scad.edu.hk LACOSTE 800.869.7223 or +33.(0)4.90.75.80.34 admission@scad.edu SAVANNAH 800.869.7223 or 912.525.5100 admission@scad.edu eLEARNING 800.869.7223 or 912.525.5100 admission@scad.edu

42

SCAD.EDU / ADMISSION

Follow SCAD on Twitter twitter.com/scaddotedu Watch SCAD videos youtube.com/aboutscad and scad.tv View SCAD photos instagram.com/scaddotedu

TAKE A CLOSER LOOK Aspiring artists and designers (and parents, too) can now explore SCAD from wherever they may be thanks to the university’s virtual reality goggles. The customizable headset requires only a smartphone to use and offers a fully immersive, 360-degree virtual reality experience of all SCAD locations. 43

Welcome to SCAD, an accredited, nonprofit art and design university, one of the 2014 Red Dot Design Rankings’ top 10 universities in the Americas and Europe. As you explore the university’s clear pathways to creative careers, imagine studying with SCAD professors — Academy Award winners; AIA award-winning architects; Cannes Film Festival Jury Prize screenwriters; Emmy Award winners; Fulbright Scholars; fashion leaders from Bergdorf Goodman, The Limited, Nike Europe, and Saks Fifth Avenue; photographers with images in Time magazine and Vanity Fair; and artists with work at MoMA and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Professional mentors, drawn from the upper echelon of business, entertainment, art and design, lead master classes and individual critiques. And be sure to factor in the prestigious companies that collaborate with ingenious SCAD students to design real-world solutions. Now picture a global classroom, fully equipped with leading-edge technologies and facilities at university locations in Atlanta and Savannah, Georgia; Hong Kong; Lacoste, France; and online via eLearning. Populate this image with talented peers drawn from 100 countries. These individuals are your collaborators and supporters, a network of SCAD students and alumni 40,000 strong. We’re here for you,

Paula Wallace SCAD President and Founder

44

PROGRAMS OF STUDY SCHOOL OF BUILDING ARTS 68 Architectural history 72 Architecture 322 Electronic design (MINOR) 322 Exhibition design (MINOR) 142 Furniture design 158 Historic preservation 163 Historic preservation (CERTIFICATE) 196 Interior design 298 Urban design SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION ARTS 52 Advertising 322 Advertising copywriting (MINOR) 84 Branded entertainment 322 Design for 3-D action figures (MINOR) 156 Digital publishing (CERTIFICATE) 150 Graphic design 164 Illustration 322 Marketing for mobile and interactive environments (MINOR) 322 Mobile and interactive design (MINOR) 322 Package design (MINOR) 322 Scientific illustration (MINOR) 272 Sequential art 322 Storyboarding (MINOR) 302 User experience (UX) design SCHOOL OF DESIGN 322 Arts and entertainment management (MINOR) 88 Business design and arts leadership 96 Design for sustainability 100 Design management 126 Fibers 176 Industrial design 322 Interaction design (MINOR) 204 Jewelry 322 Marine design (MINOR) 280 Service design 302 User experience (UX) design

SCHOOL OF DIGITAL MEDIA 60 Animation 322 Character technical direction (MINOR) 322 Concept art for games (MINOR) 193 Interactive design (CERTIFICATE) 186 Interactive design and game development 214 Motion media design 322 Previsualization (MINOR) 322 Technical direction (MINOR) 290 Television producing 302 User experience (UX) design 306 Visual effects SCHOOL OF ENTERTAINMENT ARTS 322 Acting for the camera (MINOR) 322 Costume design (MINOR) 322 Dance (MINOR) 134 Film and television 322 Music composition (MINOR) 234 Performing arts 322 Producing for film and television (MINOR) 258 Production design 284 Sound design 294 Themed entertainment design 322 Vocal performance (MINOR)

SCHOOL OF FOUNDATION STUDIES 322 Drawing (MINOR) 318 Foundation studies SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 80 Art history 322 British-American studies (MINOR) 322 Business management and entrepreneurship (MINOR) 92 Cinema studies 322 Creative writing (MINOR) 104 Dramatic writing 108 Equestrian studies 320 General education 322 Language and cultural studies (MINOR) 322 Museum studies (MINOR) 322 New media art (MINOR) 314 Writing

SCHOOL OF FASHION 46 Accessory design 114 Fashion 122 Fashion marketing and management 210 Luxury and fashion management 322 Menswear (MINOR) SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 322 Book arts (MINOR) 322 Ceramic arts (MINOR) 224 Painting 240 Photography 252 Printmaking 264 Sculpture 45

ACCESSORY DESIGN

Kelsey Harris, B.F.A. accessory design, Greenwood, Indiana

47

ACCE

ACCESSORY DESIGN

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MASTER OF ARTS

SCHOOL OF FASHION ACCESSORY DESIGNERS CONCEPTUALIZE AND CREATE AN ECLECTIC RANGE OF WEARABLE ITEMS — FROM SHOES AND HANDBAGS TO SMALL LEATHER GOODS — THAT SHAPE PERSONAL STYLE AND NARRATE THE WEARER’S STORY.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS ACCESSORIES BUYER ACCESSORIES DESIGNER

At SCAD, undergraduate and graduate students engage in every facet

ACCESSORIES PATTERNMAKER

of accessory design, learning the complex manual and digital processes

CAD ACCESSORY DESIGNER

that result in distinctive products for this competitive sector of fashion.

DESIGNER AND CONSULTANT

From sewing technology to computer-aided design, students discover

HANDBAG DESIGNER

everything encompassing this innovative and growing field. Studio

LEATHER GOODS DESIGNER

courses culminate in the creation and execution of concepts and finished

LUXURY FOOTWEAR DESIGNER

products that enable students to build impressive portfolios quarter by

SMALL LEATHER GOODS DESIGNER

quarter — portfolios that secure internships and jobs.

TECHNICAL DESIGNER

While sharpening their design and patternmaking techniques, students also master the use of state-of-the-art equipment: industrial sewing machines, men’s and women’s shoe lasts, skiving machines and CAD software, among other resources. Undergraduate students learn to fabricate designs from unified concepts, experiment in 2-D and 3-D formats, and present a well-defined body of work that demonstrates their design expertise and personal aesthetic. Graduate students engage in comprehensive research and analysis of visual culture that informs a fully developed body of work and makes a meaningful contribution to the field. Students also may choose to pursue CFDA+ certification or Rhino certification to enhance their knowledge and career preparation. An international faculty with a wide range of expertise in accessory design — including the art of shoemaking — leads the department. Major

MAKING A STATEMENT

annual events, including SCADstyle and the SCAD Fashion Show, afford

SCAD is the only university

opportunities for students to showcase their work and interact with

in the world to offer an

leaders in the field. Recent guests include Neil Blumenthal, cofounder

M.F.A. degree in accessory

and co-CEO of Warby Parker, and social entrepreneur Lauren Bush

design and the first in the

Lauren; Style Lab mentors Anna Corinna Sellinger, Rafé Totengco,

United States to offer an

Richard Lambertson and John Truex; and accessory designers David

M.A. in the discipline.

Yurman, Carlos Falchi, Sam and Libby Edelman, Mary Norton and Pour La Victoire’s David Giordano.

48

SCAD.EDU / ACCESSORY-DESIGN

49

ACCE 50

SCAD.EDU / ACCESSORY-DESIGN

B.F.A. DEGREE  ACCESSORY DESIGN

35

HOURS

55

HOURS

80

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 200 Life Drawing I DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 115 Creative Thinking Strategies

Neil Blumenthal, cofounder and co-CEO of Warby Parker, SCADstyle guest

ACCESSORY DESIGN

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

Morgan Richards (B.F.A. accessory design, South Charleston, West Virginia) carried home the top prize in the Best Student Made category of the 2014 Independent Handbag Designer Awards, one of the most prestigious awards for indie

M.A. DEGREE 

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

A bespoke, Buffalo-hide briefcase crafted by

thinking and design intelligence world would be a better place.

Major curriculum 45* ACCE 110 Sewing Technology for Accessory Design HOURS ACCE 120 Materials and Processes for Accessory Design ACCE 203 Sketching and Rendering for Accessory Design ACCE 205 Introduction to Fashion Accessory Design ACCE 300 Computer-aided Design for Accessory Design ACCE 362 Handbag Design I: Introduction to Design and Construction ACCE 364 Footwear Design I: Introduction to Design and Construction ACCE 372 Handbag Design II: Advanced Patternmaking and Design Technique ACCE 374 Footwear Design II: Advanced Patternmaking and Design Technique ACCE 415 Senior Collection I: Research and Design Development ACCE 420 Senior Collection II: 3-D Prototype and Development ACCE 430 Senior Collection III: Final Collection CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ FASH 247 History of Fashion FASH 422 Fashion Portfolio Presentation — ACCE elective ‡ — ACCE, FASH or FIBR studio elective

WORK THAT WINS

to approach the world with design in the way SCAD students do, the

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

* Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

 If we can encourage all students

90*

HOURS

ACCE FASH FASH ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ARTH

501 Accessory Design and Development * 502 Fashion and Accessory Sketching and Illustration * 503 Forecasting and Business Trends * 711 Methodologies in Accessory Design 715 Presentation Methods I: Portfolio Development 720 Presentation Methods II: Marketing a Personal Aesthetic 725 Computer-aided Design for Accessories 730 Accessory Studio I: Collection Conceptualization 740 Accessory Studio II: Production Planning and Execution 749 Accessory Design M.A. Final Project 701 Contemporary Art — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE  ACCESSORY DESIGN ACCE FASH FASH ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ACCE ARTH FASH FASH

501 Accessory Design and Development * 502 Fashion and Accessory Sketching and Illustration * 503 Forecasting and Business Trends * 711 Methodologies in Accessory Design 715 Presentation Methods I: Portfolio Development 720 Presentation Methods II: Marketing a Personal Aesthetic 725 Computer-aided Design for Accessories 730 Accessory Studio I: Collection Conceptualization 740 Accessory Studio II: Production Planning and Execution 750 Directed Studies I: Thesis Collection Research and Development 765 Directed Studies II: Thesis Collection Realization F 779 Graduate Field Internship † 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † 790 Accessory Design M.F.A. Thesis 701 Contemporary Art 763 Fashion Promotion 782 Fashion Theory — Directed elective ‡ — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of the following: FIBR 704 Surfaces and Structures, FIBR 716 Fiber and Fabric Exploration, IDUS 723 Digital 3-D Modeling and Rendering, or MTJW 705 Contextual Study I: Technical Research. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

accessory designers. 51

ADVERTISING

Faten Almukhtar, B.F.A. advertising, Jid Ali, Bahrain; Ryan Lewis, B.F.A. advertising, Maastricht, Netherlands

53

ADVE

ADVERTISING

BACHELOR OF ARTS

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION ARTS

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

ADVERTISING PROFESSIONALS COMBINE SKILLS IN DESIGN, WRITING, STRATEGIC PLANNING AND BRANDING TO DEVELOP INTEGRATED MULTIMEDIA MARKETING CAMPAIGNS THROUGH NUMEROUS AVENUES OF COMMUNICATION.

MASTER OF ARTS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

There is no second chance to make a good first impression. In today’s advertising world, the chance to make a good first impression comes

CREATIVE CAREERS

not just in conventional magazine spreads, radio spots and TV ads but

ADVERTISING DESIGNER

also by way of Instagram feeds, Snapchat sessions and Web banners.

ADVERTISING STRATEGIC PLANNER

Advertising in the 21st century is a dynamic and fluid arena. Art directors,

ADVERTISING WEB DESIGNER

designers and copywriters must know how to identify a story, how to tell it

ART DIRECTOR

and — perhaps more important — how to sell it.

BRAND MANAGER

At SCAD, students master a contemporary approach, and they do it with unfettered imagination under the guidance of accomplished faculty mentors. The progressive curriculum encompasses design, art direction, business, history, strategy, Web media, typography and collaboration. The undergraduate program introduces students to the entire scope of advertising as a way to discover and refine their own unique talents

COPYWRITER CREATIVE DIRECTOR INTERACTIVE ART DIRECTOR INTERACTIVE COPYWRITER INTERACTIVE PROJECT COORDINATOR

and professional aspirations. Graduate students hone their conceptual and digital production skills, and the M.F.A. program culminates in a thesis and holistic branding campaign. In the productive, high-energy environment of SCAD, advertising students learn to think strategically about branding and marketing, quickly generate smart, successful ideas, and interact professionally with peers and clients.

MOVE OVER, DON DRAPER SCAD advertising students have landed internships and jobs with companies including Disney’s Yellow Shoes Creative Group, Teen Vogue, Digital Kitchen, DDB Worldwide, Grey Worldwide, Mullen, DigitasLBi, TracyLocke, Leo Burnett Worldwide, Goodby Silverstein & Partners, Hallmark, Razorfish, Huge, Crispin Porter + Bogusky, Marriott International and Cox Media Group.

54

SCAD.EDU / ADVERTISING

55

ADVE

Through collaboration with peers in branded entertainment, film and television, writing, illustration, photography, graphic design, interactive design and game development and more, advertising students experience a model of teamwork common in the industry. Real-world competitive challenges complement the classroom and studio experience, as SCAD students are regularly featured in professional events such as The One Club’s annual One Show. They also take top honors in national competitions, including the prestigious Addy and Telly awards. SCAD advertising students and alumni have contributed to the brand campaigns of household names like Kit Kat, Sears, Wonka, FedEx and many more. SCAD offers ready access to the latest software programs and applications. The university provides all students with an Adobe Creative Cloud Complete account — including the full suite of Adobe creative applications and services — that may be downloaded to their personal computers at no additional charge. Advertising students may also add Adobe software certifications to expand their knowledge and enhance their résumés.

IT’S AN AD, AD, AD, AD WORLD The SCAD advertising program covers everything from design and copywriting to integrated brand marketing, strategic planning and more. Through class projects with blue-chip brands, students gain real experience in the field. By mastering all facets of advertising — and while working with faculty and industry professionals — students graduate fully prepared to enter the fastpaced, creative world of advertising.

t Coca-Cola Marketing Communications Director Miguel Moreno Toscano, SCAD Atlanta

56

SCAD.EDU / ADVERTISING

Eileen Hogan, B.F.A. advertising, Alpharetta, Georgia u

57

ADVE

B.A. DEGREE 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION Concentration in ADVERTISING

25

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application — Studio elective

90

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition PHIL 301 Aesthetics — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — General education elective † — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

45

Concentration ADVE 130 Introduction to Advertising ADVE 201 Digital Production for Advertising ADVE 204 Advertising Copywriting ADVE 207 Fundamentals of Typography for Advertising ADVE 253 Web Advertising ADVE 304 Art Direction I: Traditional and Digital ADVE 321 Copywriting for Print and Digital Media ‡ ADVE 323 Advertising Design and Typography ‡ CLC 580 Collaboration § GRDS 285 Graphic Design Media Management # MOME 130 Motion Media Design Techniques I # — ADVE, GRDS, ILLU or SEQA elective §

20

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective

180

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

* Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § Choose one course. # Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

58

SCAD.EDU / ADVERTISING

At every interview I’ve been on, people love the fact that I went to art school and that I have a concept of design and photography and art history. SCAD absolutely helped

B.F.A. DEGREE  ADVERTISING

35

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 200 Life Drawing I DRAW 206 Drawing for Storyboarding DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space

55

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

HOURS

HOURS

75

HOURS

15

HOURS

180

HOURS

Major curriculum ADVE 130 Introduction to Advertising ADVE 150 Creative Concepting ADVE 201 Digital Production for Advertising ADVE 204 Advertising Copywriting ADVE 207 Fundamentals of Typography for Advertising ADVE 253 Web Advertising ‡ ADVE 304 Art Direction I: Traditional and Digital ADVE 321 Copywriting for Print and Digital Media § ADVE 323 Advertising Design and Typography § ADVE 334 Art Direction II: Integrated Campaigns ADVE 341 Branding ADVE 353 Interactive and Digital Media in Advertising ADVE 430 Advertising Self-promotion CLC 580 Collaboration # ITGM 267 Core Principles: Interactive Design ITGM 357 Applied Principles: Interactive Web Design ‡ MOME 130 Motion Media Design Techniques I — ADVE, GRDS, ITGM or MOME elective # Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Studio elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § Choose one of these two courses. # Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

me land the job I have today. FeiFei Sun, B.F.A. advertising, Atlanta, Georgia

M.A. DEGREE  ADVERTISING

45*

HOURS

ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ITGM

501 Advertising and Copywriting Essentials * 502 Art Direction and Typography Essentials * 503 Software and Production Essentials * 705 Typography for Advertising Designers 709 Advertising Studio I: Creative Strategies 715 Digital Production Strategies for Advertising 719 Advertising Studio II: Branding Solutions 729 Art Direction 731 Creative Copywriting for Advertising 749 Advertising M.A. Final Project 715 Interactive Web Design — 700-level ARTH elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE 

ADVERTISING

90*

HOURS

ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ADVE ITGM

501 Advertising and Copywriting Essentials * 502 Art Direction and Typography Essentials * 503 Software and Production Essentials * 705 Typography for Advertising Designers 709 Advertising Studio I: Creative Strategies 715 Digital Production Strategies for Advertising 719 Advertising Studio II: Branding Solutions 725 Digital Media for Advertising 729 Art Direction 731 Creative Copywriting for Advertising 751 Advertising for Alternative Media 779F Graduate Field Internship † 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † 791 Advertising M.F.A. Thesis 792 Advertising M.F.A. Visual Thesis 715 Interactive Web Design — 700-level ARTH elective — 700-level ARTH elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

59

ANIMATION

Jessica Marfisi, B.F.A. animation, Gibsonia, Pennsylvania

61

ANIM

ANIMATION

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF DIGITAL MEDIA

MASTER OF ARTS

ANIMATORS EMPLOY THEIR CRAFT IN FILM, TELEVISION, INTERACTIVE MEDIA AND VIDEO GAMES, EXPLORING NEW WAYS TO CREATE BELIEVABLE WORLDS AND TELL TALES THAT RESONATE ACROSS GENERATIONS, CULTURES AND CONTINENTS. Animation has ascended to preeminence in the film and entertainment industry, and SCAD animation students learn and work on the advancing front of this growing field, discovering innovative methods for creating believable worlds and characters.

CREATIVE CAREERS 2-D DIGITAL CEL ANIMATOR 3-D ANIMATOR ANIMATION PRODUCER CHARACTER TECHNICAL DIRECTOR/RIGGER CREATURE TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

Undergraduate animation coursework addresses both traditional

DIGITAL MODELER

and digital media, emphasizing classical drawing and observational

PREVIS ARTIST

skills. At the graduate level, M.A. students focus on advanced

STOP-MOTION ANIMATOR

technique within a context of animation storytelling, while the

STORY AND CONCEPT ARTIST

M.F.A. program delves into animation principles and specializes in

TEXTURE/LIGHTING

alternative forms of animation. Students at every level explore animation styles from stop motion to 3-D, including digital modeling, rigging, lighting and look development. They gain mastery of technology that helps launch their careers: Autodesk Maya, Adobe Creative Cloud Complete (Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects, Flash and Premiere), Toon Boom Storyboard, Harmony and a Vicon motion-capture system. SCAD is recognized as a Toon Boom Centre of Excellence, and students have the opportunity to become certified in the use of this elite professional software. SCAD animation students also work with peers and professors in other programs, including visual effects, interactive design and game development, sound design, and film and television.

‘MY BIG BROTHER’ NETS BIG WIN In 2015, the Association Internationale du Film d’Animation named Jason Rayner’s (B.F.A. animation, Middletown, Pennsylvania) film “My Big Brother” the Best Student Film at the 42nd annual Annie Awards, one of animation’s highest honors.

62

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

SCAD.EDU / ANIMATION

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

63

IN A LEAGUE OF ITS OWN SCAD has been heralded as one of the world’s

ANIM

top universities for the study of animation and has been dubbed the “Ivy League of Animation” by 3D World magazine.

B.F.A. DEGREE 

SCAD animation students learn from professors who have worked in the world’s

ANIMATION

greatest animation studios on some of

35

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Studio elective — Studio elective

60

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition LIBA 288 Media Literacy Theory — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective * — Mathematics/natural sciences elective * — Social/behavioral sciences elective *

75

Major curriculum ANIM 180 Action Analysis I ANIM 202 Principles of 2-D Animation ANIM 223 History of Animation ANIM 250 Digital Form, Space and Lighting ANIM 252 Principles of 3-D Animation ANIM 270 Principles of Screen Design ANIM 280 3-D Character Setup and Animation ANIM 312 2-D Animation Production † ANIM 313 3-D Animation Production † ANIM 385 Concept Development for Animation ANIM 390 Animation Professional Development ANIM 408 Senior Animation Project I ANIM 448 Senior Animation Project II ANIM 488 Animation Postproduction CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective ‡ — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective

10

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

the most memorable features, including “Hotel Transylvania,” “Harry Potter and the

HOURS

Sorcerer’s Stone,” “How to Train Your Dragon,” “Pocahontas,” “Matrix Reloaded” and “Titanic.” Each academic quarter, SCAD hosts recruiters from studios and companies such as Lucasfilm Animation, Walt Disney Animation Studios, DreamWorks, Pixar, Electronic Arts, Activision, Blue Sky Studios, Turner Studios, Framestore,

HOURS

Charlex, Industrial Light & Magic, Laika and Tippett Studio. SCAD animation graduates leave prepared to rise to the pinnacle of their profession. Alumni have gone on to work on numerous major feature-length productions and are employed full time at Disney, Pixar, Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon.

HOURS

WORK THAT WINS When audiences screened a sneak peek of Disney’s “Big Hero 6” at the 2014 Savannah Film Festival, they also had the opportunity to hear from two of the real-life heroes responsible for the animated megahit: SCAD alumni Zach Parrish (B.F.A. animation, Fort Wayne, Indiana) and Nathan Engelhardt (B.F.A. animation, Barrington, Illinois).

HOURS

180

HOURS

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

A critical and commercial success, the blockbuster raked in one of the biggest opening weekend box offices ever for

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

a Disney film — an astounding $56.2 million — and won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature Film.

64

SCAD.EDU / ANIMATION

u  SCAD President and Founder Paula Wallace interviews Zach Parrish and Nathan Engelhardt, SCAD alumni and lead animators for Disney’s “Big Hero 6.”

65

ANIM

M.A. DEGREE  ANIMATION

45*

HOURS

ANIM 501 Animation Context and History * ANIM 504 Character Animation Basics * ANIM 505 Animation Character Set-up * VSFX 501 Digital 3-D Effects * ANIM 705 Animation Aesthetics and Practice ANIM 709 Computer-generated Modeling and Design ANIM 713 Drawing in Motion ANIM 714 3-D Cartoon Character Animation † ANIM 715 Character Look Development † ANIM 724 3-D Naturalistic Character Animation ‡ ANIM 725 Environment Look Development ‡ ANIM 737 Collaborative Project ANIM 748 Animation M.A. Final Project ARTH 702 Art Criticism CLC 580 Collaboration § — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective § * Up to three intensive courses may be assigned upon admission. Intensive courses are only available at the Savannah location. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE  ANIMATION

90*

HOURS

ANIM ANIM ANIM VSFX ANIM ANIM ANIM ANIM ANIM ANIM ANIM ANIM ANIM ANIM ARTH CLC SFDM

501 Animation Context and History * 504 Character Animation Basics * 505 Animation Character Set-up * 501 Digital 3-D Effects * 705 Animation Aesthetics and Practice 709 Computer-generated Modeling and Design 713 Drawing in Motion 721 Storyboarding and Previsualization 737 Collaborative Project 753 Animation M.F.A. Thesis Exploration and Research 775 Animation M.F.A. Thesis Visual Component Production 779F Graduate Field Internship † 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † 790 Animation M.F.A. Thesis Completion 702 Art Criticism 580 Collaboration ‡ 719 Media Theory and Application — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective ‡ — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Up to three intensive courses may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

66

SCAD.EDU / ANIMATION

 I’ve visited so many universities over the years and I have never seen a program that is so dedicated to putting their students first and giving them the best opportunity to succeed. SCAD is raising the bar and seems intent on raising it higher.

Dave Walvoord, visual effects supervisor, DreamWorks Animation

p Sylvia Chambers, B.F.A. animation, Boca Raton, Florida

67

ARLH

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

68

SCAD.EDU / ARCHITECTURAL-HISTORY

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF BUILDING ARTS ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIANS RESEARCH, EVALUATE, PRESERVE AND MANAGE HISTORIC RESOURCES, AND PROVIDE CAREFUL PRESERVATION PLANNING AND OVERSIGHT TO HELP RESTORE AND MAINTAIN THE INTEGRITY OF ARCHITECTURAL TREASURES.

CREATIVE CAREERS ADMINISTRATOR OR CONSULTANT FOR A HERITAGE ORGANIZATION ARCHITECTURAL CRITIC ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY EDUCATOR ARCHITECTURAL RESEARCHER AND EVALUATOR

Architectural historians go beyond the façade of history to probe the

CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGER

innermost habitations of human experience — the spaces in which

HISTORIC FOUNDATION MANAGER

people work, play and dwell. Together with preservationists, designers

HISTORIC SITE MANAGER OR CURATOR

and civic leaders, these professionals educate the public about the past,

LOCAL OR REGIONAL HERITAGE

present and future of the built environment.

ORGANIZER

At SCAD, the study of architectural history includes architecture,

MAIN STREET PROGRAM MANAGER

urbanism and landscape, addressing issues of globalism and

PRESERVATION PLANNER/OFFICER

environmentalism as well as social processes and the role of politics. Innovative courses investigate virtual environments, the building cultures of the Americas and the economics of urban conditions. Savannah — one of the best-preserved urban landscapes in the United States — offers a rich variety of high-style and vernacular architecture. In the medieval village of Lacoste, France, SCAD students explore firsthand Europe's rich architectural legacy, including the university’s own unique and historical structures, a number of which were built more than a millennium ago. Students have the opportunity to visit and study more recent architectural history in the vibrant cities of Atlanta and Hong Kong.

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ART

Through undergraduate coursework, students learn the characteristics

SCAD is one of only

of built environments and the principles and practices of architectural

two universities in the

history. They study methods employed in the creation and utilization

United States to offer

of constructed environments — work driven and informed by technical

an undergraduate

expertise such as field drawing, 3-D computer modeling, photographic

degree in architectural

documentation and applied preservation practices.

history, covering

Graduate students investigate the intricacies of architectural history, conduct advanced research, and gain valuable professional experience through internships and special projects. Graduates are prepared

all major historical periods in Western and global traditions.

for careers with government agencies, design firms and cultural foundations, or for a Ph.D. program and a career in higher education. 69

ARLH 70

SCAD.EDU / ARCHITECTURAL-HISTORY

A FORTIFIED EDUCATION All architectural history students have the opportunity to pursue National Charrette

B.F.A. DEGREE 

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

Institute certification, professional internships and diverse, complementary elective options

30

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 115 Graphics for the Building Arts DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space

65

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas COMM 305 Techniques for Professional Presentations ENGL 123 Composition — ENGL elective — Foreign language I † — Foreign language II † — Foreign language III † — General education elective ‡ — Mathematics/natural sciences elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡

HOURS

HOURS

70

HOURS

Additional electives — Diversified elective ‡‡ — Free elective — Free elective

180

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

HOURS

M.F.A. DEGREE 

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

90

HOURS

Major curriculum ARLH 479 Undergraduate Internship ARLH 499 Architectural History B.F.A. Thesis CLC 580 Collaboration § — Discovering the Non-Western World # — Discovering the Non-Western World # — Examining Modernity ¶ — Examining Modernity ¶ — Exploring Pre-Modern Traditions ** — Exploring Pre-Modern Traditions ** — Investigating the American Hemisphere †† — Investigating the American Hemisphere †† — 300-level ARLH elective — 400-level ARLH elective — ARLH elective § — ARLH or ARTH elective

15

HOURS

that expand their academic experience.

* Choose one of these two courses. † A foreign language is required for the B.F.A. degree in architectural history. To satisfy the foreign language requirement, all courses must be in the same language. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. § Choose one course. # Choose one of the following: ARLH 211 Survey of World Architecture and Urbanism, ARLH 212 Global Modernity in Architecture and Urbanism, ARLH 325 Islamic Art and Architecture, ARLH 344 African Art and Architecture, or ARLH 363 World Vernacular Architecture. ¶ Choose one of the following: ARLH 206 Modern Architecture I: 1750-1900, ARLH 208 Modern Architecture II: 1900-Present, ARLH 212 Global Modernity in Architecture and Urbanism, or ARLH 311 The Modern City. ** Choose one of the following: ARLH 236 Renaissance and Baroque Architecture, ARLH 321 Ancient Architecture in Context, ARLH 323 Medieval Architecture in Context, ARLH 353 The Architecture of Provence, or ARLH 355 Gothic Art and Architecture. †† Choose one of the following: ARLH 301 Built Environment of the Americas, PreColonial–1865; ARLH 302 Built Environment of the Americas, 1865–1945; ARLH 303 Built Environment of the Americas, 1945–Present; or ARLH 375 Architecture and Urban History of Savannah. ‡‡ Diversified electives expand the knowledge of the student beyond the building arts and art historical disciplines. Courses with subject codes other than ARCH, ARLH, ARTH, ELDS, FURN, HIPR, INDS and URBA meet these requirements. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

ARLH ARLH ARLH ARLH ARLH ARLH ARLH ARLH ARLH CLC

700 Research Methods in Architectural History 705 Architectural History Methodology and Historiography 770 Documenting and Interpreting the Built Environment 779F Graduate Field Internship * 779T Graduate Teaching Internship * 779F Graduate Field Internship † 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † 787 Directed Research in Architectural History 790 Architectural History M.F.A. Thesis 580 Collaboration ‡ — 700-level ARLH elective: Analysis of the American Hemisphere § — 700-level ARLH elective: Analyzing Modernity # — 700-level ARLH elective: Evaluating Pre-Modern Traditions ¶ — 700-level ARLH elective: Investigation of the Non-Western World ** — 700-level ARLH seminar — 700-level ARLH elective ‡ — 700-level ARLH or ARTH elective — 700-level School of Building Arts elective †† — 500- to 700-level diversified elective ‡‡ — 500- to 700-level studio elective — 500- to 700-level studio elective

* Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one course. § Choose one of the following: ARLH 761 Analyzing American Cultural Landscapes; ARLH 771 Building Cultures of the Americas, Pre-Colonial–1865; ARLH 772 Building Cultures of the Americas, 1865–1945; ARLH 773 Building Cultures of the Americas, 1945–Present; or ARLH 775 Savannah: Architecture and Urban History. # Choose one of the following: ARLH 730 Questions of Housing and Building Culture, ARLH 731 Economies and Building Culture, ARLH 741 Analyzing the Modern City, or ARLH 759 Power and the Built Environment. ¶ Choose one of the following: ARLH 723 Contextualizing Medieval Architecture, ARLH 724 Contextualizing Ancient Architecture, ARLH 726 Art and Architecture of the Gothic Period, ARLH 742 Monastic Architecture of the Western World, or ARLH 753 Architecture and the History of Provence. ** Choose one of the following: ARLH 743 Analyzing Art and Architecture of the Islamic World, ARLH 744 Traditional Arts and Architeture of the African Continent, ARLH 747 Interconnections in Pre-modern Global Architecture, ARLH 757 The Islamic City, or ARLH 763 Traditions in Global Vernacular Architecture. †† Choose one of the following: ARCH 760 Sustainable Design, ARCH 769 Hybrid Media Presentation in Architecture, ELDS 704 Electronic Design, FURN 732 Evolution of Furniture Design, HIPR 703 Preservation Law and Advocacy, HIPR 709 Preservation Science: Laboratory Methods and Analysis, HIPR 712 Digital Innovation and Application for Historic Preservation, INDS 726 Environmental Psychology for Interior Design, or URBA 725 Urban Ecology. ‡‡ Choose one of the following: BUSI 730 Global Macroeconomics of Business, COMM 740 Advanced Techniques for Professional Presentations, DMGT 706 Idea Visualization, DRAW 602 Drawing the Environment, GRDS 718 Contemporary Media Production Techniques, ITGM 705 Interactive Design and Media Application, MOME 709 Motion Media Cinematography and Editing, MUSM 754 Museum Curation and Collections, PHOT 502 Photographic Technique and Signification, SEQA 715 Environment as Character, THED 720 Themed Entertainment Industry, or WRIT 753 Freelance Writing for Publication. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Students also must pass a comprehensive exam as part of the degree requirement. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER. 71

ARCHITECTURE

Zoe Lee, M.Arch., B.F.A. architecture, Portland, Maine

73

ARCH

ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL OF BUILDING ARTS ARCHITECTS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR HOW THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT TAKES SHAPE — CONCEIVING STRUCTURES THAT NOT ONLY IMBUE PLACES WITH MEANING AND CHARACTER, BUT ALSO SERVE THE INTERESTS OF DISTINCT AND DIVERSE COMMUNITIES AND POPULATIONS. Architects must consider a range of issues — from the social to the sustainable — as they create and renew the buildings and spaces in which

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS PROFESSIONAL MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

CREATIVE CAREERS ARCHITECT ARCHITECTURAL ILLUSTRATOR/VIRTUAL MODELING SPECIALIST BUILDING CONSTRUCTION MANAGER/ PERFORMANCE EVALUATOR

people work, gather, play and live. At SCAD, architecture students learn

CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGER

to apply historical, cultural, theoretical and aesthetic concepts and use

HEALTH CARE AND HOSPITALITY DESIGNER

technical expertise to design buildings that add value to the world and to

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER

human experience within those structures.

LIGHTING AND ACOUSTICAL DESIGNER

SCAD offers a preprofessional Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in architecture and a professional Master of Architecture degree accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board. In 2013, NAAB awarded

REAL ESTATE DEVELOPER SUSTAINABILITY SPECIALIST ZONING OFFICIAL

the M.Arch. program a new and unprecedented maximum eight-year term of accreditation. For students who already hold undergraduate degrees in other disciplines, SCAD also offers preparatory courses to enter the professional M.Arch. degree program. With the opportunity to study at SCAD locations on three continents, architecture students gain an acute awareness of how citizens move through historic, ever-evolving built environments and develop a sense of how rural and urban cultural contexts drive design. In Savannah, students thrive amid one of the most celebrated urban plans in the world, inspired by a diverse cityscape of historic and contemporary architecture. Eichberg Hall, a Savannah building constructed in 1887 for the Central of Georgia Railway and rehabilitated nearly 100 years later by SCAD, serves as one of several award-winning university facilities for the study of building arts.

DESIGNING A CAREER, BUILDING A FUTURE According to the U.S. Department of Labor, employment for architects is projected to grow 17 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations.

74

SCAD.EDU / ARCHITECTURE

75

ARCH 76

SCAD.EDU / ARCHITECTURE

At SCAD, interdisciplinary collaboration is an integral component of career preparation, and architecture students join fellow undergraduate and graduate students from across the university to address topical design challenges and create real-world solutions that matter. In response to the micro-housing movement, SCAD students examined the intersection of underutilized existing structures in the urban landscape of Atlanta and the growing need for sustainable urban housing. In 2014, the university unveiled the resulting, ambitious initiative — SCADpad, a vibrant community of three 135-square-foot residential units located within the parking structure of SCAD Atlanta. SCADpad has been prominently featured by Time magazine, Dwell, Fast Company, CNN, Architectural Record, Elle Decor, USA Today and NBC’s “Today” show, and was featured in Singapore at the 2014 World Architecture Festival as the only housing project from the United States. SCAD’s legacy of innovation is recognized with student, alumni and faculty awards from the American Institute of Architects and the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, among others. The university’s architecture program was awarded the largest grant in NCARB history for creating a groundbreaking interactive game that simulates professional architecture practice environments. In Spring 2015, the national AIA Convention was held in Atlanta, and SCAD collaborated with AIA to develop unique programming and provide valuable access to the professional arena for students. SCAD architecture students have worked on city planning efforts including the Cuyler-Brownsville Neighborhood Redevelopment project in Savannah, supported by a grant from the National Trust for Historic Preservation and involving the U.S. Green Building Council as an institutional partner. An institutional member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, the university also recently hosted the AIAS Forum, the nation’s premier annual gathering of architecture students. In Lacoste, architecture students collaborated with Jakob + MacFarlane, one of Paris’ most celebrated design firms, to develop a new protocol for international internships. SCAD architecture faculty members include honorees of the Congress for the New Urbanism and the American Institute of Architects, as well as professional practitioners and LEED-accredited specialists. Among its many nationally recognized and esteemed organizations, the university has active student chapters of the American Institute of Architecture Students, the National Organization of Minority Architecture Students, and the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. SCAD architecture students also have the opportunity to earn National Charrette Institute certification to enhance their professional credentials. t Jamison Sweat, B.F.A. architecture, Palm Harbor, Florida

77

ARCH

B.F.A./PROFESSIONAL M.ARCH. DEGREE*  ARCHITECTURE

35

HOURS

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 115 Graphics for the Building Arts DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 223 Architectural Fundamentals Studio I: Form, Space and Order DSGN 224 Architectural Fundamentals Studio II: Site as Design Generator DSGN 225 Architectural Fundamentals Studio III: Spatial Relationships and Human Response

55

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition MATH 201 Applied Mathematics PHYS 201 Applied Physics — ENGL elective — General education elective † ‡ — General education elective ‡ — General education elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡

80

Major curriculum ARCH 101 Introduction to Architecture ARCH 241 Construction Technology I: Building Materials and Assemblies ARCH 301 Architecture Design Studio I: Human-centered Design § ARCH 302 Architecture Design Studio II: Site and Environmental Context § ARCH 303 Architecture Design Studio III: Structural Applications § ARCH 319 Structures: General Structure ARCH 341  Construction Technology II: Building Systems and Technologies ARCH 361 Environmental Control I: Energy, Climate and Human Comfort ARCH 404 Architecture Design Studio IV: Urban Context § ARCH 405 Architecture Design Studio V: Capstone I - Research and Schematic Design § ARCH 406 Architecture Design Studio VI: Capstone II - Comprehensive Design Development § ARCH 461 Environmental Control II: Mechanical, Lighting, Acoustics and Life Safety Systems ARLH 206 Modern Architecture I: 1750–1900 ARLH 208 Modern Architecture II: 1900–Present ARLH 211 Survey of World Architecture and Urbanism ELDS 225 Electronic Design I: Digital Communication for the Building Arts

10

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

180

Undergraduate course of study

90

Graduate curriculum ARCH 706 Architectural Practices ARCH 717  Graduate Architecture Studio I: Urban Design and Development ARCH 719 Structures: Lateral Forces ARCH 727 Graduate Architecture Studio II: Comprehensive Design and Programming ARCH 737 Graduate Architecture Studio III: Comprehensive Detailing and Systems ARCH 745 Graduate Seminar in Architecture ARCH 747 Graduate Architecture Studio IV: Interdisciplinary Focus ARCH 779F Graduate Field Internship ¶ ARCH 779T Graduate Teaching Internship ¶ ARCH 798 Graduate Architecture Studio: Thesis I — Developing Concept, Context and Program ARCH 799 Graduate Architecture Studio: Thesis II — Design Detailing and Final Exposition ELDS 727 Advanced Digital Applications for Practice and Project Management — 500- to 700-level ARCH, ARLH or ARTH elective — 500- to 700-level HIPR or URBA elective # — 500- to 700-level diversified elective ** — 500- to 700-level diversified elective ** — 500- to 700-level diversified elective ** — Directed elective †† — Focused elective ‡‡

HOURS

HOURS

270 HOURS

* The course of study for the B.F.A. in architecture degree consists of 180 undergraduate quarter credit hours and includes all required and elective courses, with the exception of the 700-level graduate courses and 35 credit hours of graduate-level electives in the graduate program. The course of study for the graduate program consists of 90 graduate quarter credit hours for a total of 270 quarter credit hours when taken together (equivalent to 180 semester credit hours). Students with a preprofessional or preparatory degree in architecture from other institutions may apply for admission to the professional M.Arch. program. Acceptance of students with a preprofessional or preparatory degree in architecture from other institutions to the SCAD graduate program is based on review of academic transcripts, coursework and portfolio to ensure that their undergraduate study satisfies NAAB student performance criteria required at the preprofessional level. Required credit hours will be determined on an individual basis. Students may be assigned preparatory (preliminary) courses from the SCAD B.F.A. program in addition, prior to admission to the graduate program. † Students who have SAT math scores lower than 560, have ACT math scores lower than 24, or are otherwise unable to demonstrate an aptitude for the study of mathematics and science must complete MATH 101 Intermediate Mathematics in order to pursue the professional M.Arch. degree. The credit hours earned in MATH 101 Intermediate Mathematics may be applied as an undergraduate general education elective toward the 180 credit hours required for the preprofessional B.F.A. degree. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. Courses with the subject code “ARLH” will not satisfy these requirements. § Undergraduate students must pass all architecture design studio courses with a grade of “C” or better. ¶ Choose one of these two courses. # The following courses will also satisfy this elective: ARCH 721 Landscape Design for Urban Design or ARCH 765 Emerging Urban Issues. ** Diversified electives expand the knowledge of the student beyond architecture, building arts and art historical disciplines. Courses with subject codes other than ARCH, ARLH, ARTH, DECA, ELDS, HIPR, INDS, SUST or URBA meet these requirements. †† Choose one of the following: ARCH 714 Advanced Parametric Design and Generative Modeling Strategies for the Building Arts, ARCH 715 Construction Management, ARCH 728 Advanced Tectonics in Architecture, ARCH 736 Complex Structural Applications, ARCH 760 Sustainable Design, or ELDS 745 Digital Prototyping and Fabrication Methods for Building Design. ‡‡ The focused elective is assigned to coincide with the content of ARCH 747 Graduate Architecture Studio IV: Interdisciplinary Focus. Students may not progress into the architecture design studio sequence until they have successfully completed DSGN 225 Architectural Fundamentals Studio III: Spatial Relationships and Human Response, and then only upon faculty recommendation and approval by the chair of the department and the dean of the School of Building Arts. After successfully completing 150 undergraduate credit hours and a fourth-year portfolio review, students may apply to the architecture department faculty committee for entry into the graduate program, which consists of 90 graduate quarter credit hours in residence. 180 undergraduate quarter credit hours and all academic requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in architecture, including any secondary, double major or minor coursework, must be successfully completed prior to admission to the graduate curriculum of the professional M.Arch. program. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change. The professional M.Arch. degree is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board. In the United States, most registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board, which is the sole agency authorized to accredit professional degree programs in architecture offered by institutions with U.S. regional accreditation, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted an eightyear, three-year or two-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards. Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may require a preprofessional undergraduate degree in architecture for admission. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.  The Savannah College of Art and Design School of Building Arts offers the following NAAB-accredited degree program: M.Arch. (preprofessional degree + 90 graduate credits). Next accreditation visit: 2021.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

t Adriana Acosta, M.Arch., B.F.A. architecture, Duluth, Georgia

79

ARTH

ART HISTORY

80

SCAD.EDU / ART-HISTORY

ART HISTORY

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS

MASTER OF ARTS

ART HISTORIANS VIEW THE WORLD THROUGH ART AND ARTIFACTS AND SEEK TO PRESERVE THESE PRECIOUS ITEMS AS SOURCES FOR UNDERSTANDING THE WORLD AND ITS CULTURES. SCAD art history students learn from consummate scholars and

CREATIVE CAREERS ART ADMINISTRATOR FOR ART GALLERIES, AUCTION HOUSES, MUSEUMS AND HISTORIC SITES

practitioners who have outstanding credentials and extraordinary

ART APPRAISER

research experience. From ancient art to new media, faculty

ART HISTORIAN

backgrounds and specializations bring robust and varied perspectives

ART JOURNALIST

to the classroom, sharing current research and methodologies to mentor

COLLECTIONS MANAGER

each project and nurture students’ professional development.

CURATOR FOR INSTITUTIONAL AND

Undergraduate art history students address visual arts of diverse periods and media, and develop a thesis as a directed inquiry into

CORPORATE COLLECTIONS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER FOR

the history, theory and criticism of art and design. The B.F.A. course

NONPROFIT AND PUBLIC ART

of study invites students to engage in advanced study of work that

PROGRAMMING

inspires — from representations of identity to transformative experiences of place. The M.A. emphasizes the critical analysis and interpretation of works of art and culminates in original research. Numerous and varied elective options are integral to the course of study.

MANAGER FOR PRIVATE, CORPORATE OR PUBLIC ART PROGRAMMING PROFESSOR OR INSTRUCTOR VISUAL ARTS AND DIGITAL MEDIA

Through the university’s network of galleries and its series of exhibition

ARCHIVIST

events, SCAD offers art history students rare opportunities to intern, work, study and hold docent positions around the world. Most especially, the expansive, award-winning SCAD Museum of Art in Savannah provides access to permanent collections and traveling exhibitions that cover the entire scope of art and design history and influence. Students’ artistic exposure is broadened by access to the work of renowned artists including Alfredo Jaar, Kara Walker, Fred Wilson, Simon Njami, Jane

MIND YOUR MANNERISM

Alexander, Xu Bing and others.

The SCAD Museum of Art

In addition to exceptionally curated collections and exhibitions, students engage in enriching art history lecture series, symposia and SCAD deFINE ART. Recent visitors to these events include some of the most influential art critics and writers working today, such as Jerry Saltz, columnist for New York magazine, and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Louis Menand, as well as curators and directors from The Studio Museum in Harlem, The Metropolitan Museum of Art and other renowned institutions.

and the university’s extensive permanent collection provide art history students exclusive year-round access to their objects of study — from painting to photography to historic costume.

81

ARTH 82

SCAD.EDU / ART-HISTORY

B.F.A. DEGREE  ART HISTORY

30

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Studio elective

65

General education CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ENGL elective — ENGL elective — ENGL elective — Foreign language I † — Foreign language II † — Foreign language III † — General education elective ‡ — General education elective ‡ — Mathematics/natural sciences elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡

HOURS

HOURS

65

HOURS

20

180

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

HOURS

a writer or a performer, what elevates good artists from the greats are those who know the roots of their art, for knowing these roots are necessary to achieve ingenuity. Madeline Harbick, B.F.A. art history, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania

Major curriculum ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 400 Methods of Art History ARTH 499 Art History B.F.A. Thesis — 200-level ARTH elective § — 200- to 400-level ARTH elective § — 300-level ARTH elective § — 300- to 400-level ARTH elective § — 300- to 400-level ARTH elective § — 300- to 400-level ARTH elective § — 400-level ARTH elective § — 400-level ARTH elective § — 400-level ARTH elective § Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective

HOURS

Whether you’re a designer,

* Choose one of these two courses. † A foreign language is required for the B.F.A. degree in art history. To satisfy the foreign language requirement, all courses must be in the same language. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. § Electives must be distributed in four out of five concentrations: ancient/medieval, early modern, modern, contemporary and non-Western. One elective must be in non-Western. Two electives may be architectural history courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.A. DEGREE  ART HISTORY

45

HOURS

ARTH ARTH ARTH

700 Historiography of Art History 703 Modern and Contemporary Critical Theory 788 Art History M.A. Thesis — 700-level ARLH or ARTH elective * — 700-level ARLH or ARTH elective * — 700-level ARTH elective * — 700-level ARTH elective * — 700-level ARTH elective * — Directed elective †

* Electives must be from three out of four concentrations: ancient/medieval, early modern, modern and contemporary. Additionally, students are strongly encouraged to take non-Western courses. Architectural history courses at the appropriate level may serve as art history electives with faculty adviser approval. † Choose one of the following: ARTH 779F Graduate Field Internship, ARTH 779T Graduate Teaching Internship or any 700-level ARTH course. Foreign language proficiency is required in reading and translation. Students can meet this requirement by passing the language exam administered by the department. Students also must pass a comprehensive exam as part of the degree requirement. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

83

BREN

BRANDED ENTERTAINMENT

84

SCAD.EDU / BRANDED-ENTERTAINMENT

Student credit u

BRANDED ENTERTAINMENT SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION ARTS BRANDED ENTERTAINMENT PROFESSIONALS SHED THE PERCEPTION OF PRODUCTS AND SERVICES AS PASSIVE ARTIFACTS AND STAGNANT MODALITIES, TRANSFORMING BRANDS INTO CHARACTERS THAT ENGAGE CONSUMERS’ THOUGHTS AND EMOTIONS.

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS BRANDED ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCER CONTENT SOLUTIONS DIRECTOR CONTENT STRATEGIST INTERACTIVE DEVELOPER MANAGER OF INTEGRATED MARKETING PRODUCTION/DIGITAL EDITOR SENIOR CONTENT MANAGER SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT PRODUCER

In this emerging field, professionals creatively integrate brand

TRANSMEDIA DESIGNER

awareness into the modern anywhere, anytime approach to

VICE PRESIDENT OF BRANDED

today’s entertainment content. Through artful storytelling, creative

ENTERTAINMENT

professionals develop and produce branded content for traditional and emerging media — from films to TV to 3-D building projections, to viral videos, console games and mobile apps. Now a rewarding destination unto themselves, brands and their stories are cultivating lasting relationships in which passive consumers become enthusiastic brand ambassadors. From “The Lego Movie” to Thinkmodo’s “Devil Baby” stunt and Samsung’s elaborate tie-in to “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 1,” today’s brands are engaging a global audience by defining memorable moments through meaningful brand experiences. The branded entertainment program at SCAD aligns with today’s business expectations to prepare students for professional careers coursework enables students to acquire skills and develop exciting

LEND ME YOUR EARWORM

résumés toward a variety of career options focused on stronger

Working across device

engagement between consumers and brands. Graduates of the

platforms, time and place,

branded entertainment program are prepared to contribute to a

branded entertainment

dynamic professional field, lead innovative companies on the cutting

professionals produce brand

edge, and innovate in a thriving and growing global marketplace.

stories in integrated and

at the intersection of advertising and entertainment. Advanced

SCAD developed the branded entertainment program in response to the exponential growth and demand for experiential entertainment that advances a brand. As traditional advertising campaigns converge in a fusion of television, gaming, themed entertainment and

meaningful ways to attract loyal consumers and promote the products, services and experiences of tomorrow.

digital interaction, branded entertainment professionals strategically affect smart brand integration at the right time and place. SCAD.EDU / BRANDED-ENTERTAINMENT

85

B.F.A. DEGREE 

BREN

BRANDED ENTERTAINMENT

35

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 200 Life Drawing I DRAW 206 Drawing for Storyboarding DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application — Studio elective

60

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II BUSI 101 The Design of Business BUSI 210 Management in the Creative Environment BUSI 265 Principles of Marketing CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — Mathematics/natural sciences elective * — Social/behavioral sciences elective *

HOURS

HOURS

Major curriculum ADVE 201 Digital Production for Advertising ADVE 304 Art Direction I: Traditional and Digital BREN 200 Introduction to Branded Entertainment BREN 470 Branded Entertainment Strategic Development BREN 490 Branded Entertainment Execution and Amplification ITGM 370 Digital Media Entrepreneurship WRIT 320 The Art of Story Writing — ADVE, ANIM, BREN, CLC, FILM, GRDS, ITGM, MOME, SNDS, TELE or THED elective — ADVE, ANIM, BREN, CLC, FILM, GRDS, ITGM, MOME, SNDS, TELE or THED elective Choose one concentration:

75

HOURS

Game development ITGM 120 Introduction to Interactive Design and Game Development ITGM 220 Core Principles: Programming ITGM 226 Gamification and Game-based Learning ITGM 256 Core Principles: Game Design ITGM 356 Applied Principles: Game Design — Directed elective † Interactive design ITGM 120 Introduction to Interactive Design and Game Development ITGM 130 Digital Design Aesthetics ITGM 220 Core Principles: Programming ITGM 267 Core Principles: Interactive Design ITGM 377 Applied Principles: Social Media Applications — Directed elective ‡ Television producing FILM 101 Introduction to Video Production SNDS 201 Introduction to Sound Design TELE 205 Television Field Production TELE 210 Television Studio Production TELE 350 Television Postproduction — Directed elective §

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. † Choose one of the following: ITGM 236 Core Principles: Game Art, ITGM 326 Applied Principles: Programming, ITGM 351 Cognitive Art of Game Design, ITGM 360 Interactive Game Project or ITGM 364 Scripting for Games. ‡ Choose one of the following: ITGM 237 Core Principles: Visual Design for Interactive Media, ITGM 277 Core Principles: User-centered Design, ITGM 347 Applied Principles: Physical Computing, ITGM 357 Applied Principles: Interactive Web Design, ITGM 360 Interactive Game Project or MOME 130 Motion Media Design Techniques I. § Choose one of the following: ANIM 459 The Short Short, FILM 106 Introduction to Screenwriting, MOME 130 Motion Media Design Techniques I, MOME 401 3-D Motion Media Design, TELE 202 Survey of Television, TELE 300 Line Producing, TELE 303 Segment Producing or TELE 401 Producing New Media for Advanced Television. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

86

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

87

BUSINESS DESIGN AND ARTS LEADERSHIP

88

BUSINESS DESIGN AND ARTS LEADERSHIP SCHOOL OF DESIGN LEADERS IN THE CREATIVE SECTOR ARE VISIONARIES OF THE HIGHEST ORDER —THEY UNITE ARTS, CULTURE, DESIGN, BUSINESS PRINCIPLES AND AGILE STRATEGY WITHIN ORGANIZATIONS TO INSPIRE INNOVATION AT EVERY LEVEL.

MASTER OF ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS ARTS ADMINISTRATOR BUSINESS DESIGNER CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER CREATIVE ENTREPRENEUR CULTURAL AFFAIRS DIRECTOR CREATIVE STARTUP INCUBATOR FOUNDER PUBLIC RELATIONS EXECUTIVE FESTIVAL/THEATER DIRECTOR DEVELOPMENT AND

A new convergence is occurring between the creative sphere and

FUNDRAISING OFFICER

the business world. The SCAD business design and arts leadership

MUSEUM DIRECTOR/GALLERIST

program anticipates the growing need for a new generation of leaders capable of uniting original insights with strategic vision in the development of thriving companies, pioneering nonprofits, and innovative arts and culture organizations. Serving as a living laboratory through which students learn to create, manage and lead enterprises as experiential epicenters of human interest and advancement, the university’s business design and arts leadership program is articulated through courses that fuse business principles and design ethos with entrepreneurship and arts management. The program’s common core of courses establishes the creative economy as context, emphasizing strategic thinking, leadership and management skills. Through upper-level marketing and funding coursework, students focus on one of two concentrated areas of study: art and design ventures or arts and cultural initiatives.

CULTURED COMMERCE

As part of their studies, students may opt to analyze market

conducted by the National

opportunities and design a business strategy for a new enterprise or

Endowment for the Arts

complete an arts leadership internship with an organization of their

and the U.S. Department

choosing, before executing a final, original project toward degree

of Commerce’s Bureau of

completion. This carefully calibrated curriculum prepares students

Economic Analysis, arts

to operate in multiple professional contexts, building the business

and cultural production

acumen and adaptive abilities required to lead across a dynamic and

contributed more than $698

growing creative sector.

billion to the U.S. economy.

According to a 2014 study

89

BDAL

Up-close engagement with notable professionals enhances the educational experience for business

I didn’t just study theories in

design and arts leadership students. Guest lecturers share their journeys with students — CEOs

my classes; I was able to apply

from some of the most impactful brands today,

the knowledge I was learning

including Neil Blumenthal of Warby Parker and

and develop my skills through

Lauren Bush Lauren of FEED; internationally

professional practice and

known art critics Paul Laster and Simon Njami;

projects that were meaningful

and renowned artists and MacArthur Fellows Uta

to my career.

Barth and Xu Bing — illuminating how creative ideas become real-life ventures. Business design

Michelle Balshem, M.A. arts administration, Edison, New Jersey

and arts leadership studies embrace both business and artistic success. Extraordinary professionals visit SCAD as part of the university’s world-class signature events — the Savannah Film Festival, SCAD deFINE ART, SCAD aTVfest and

M.A. DEGREE 

SCADstyle — which grant students unparalleled

BUSINESS DESIGN AND ARTS LEADERSHIP

learning and access to the types of experiences they will foster as professionals. University collaborations with major organizations such as the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the National Biennial Foundations in Art: Theory and Education Conference, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum present students with an inside view of what it takes to lead and manage on a grand scale. Exposure to a wide range of creative enterprises, both nonprofit and for-profit, teaches students how a design perspective can elevate business and organizational performance. Through the office of career and alumni success, employer presenters from global corporations such as Abercrombie & Fitch, Warby Parker and L’Oréal discuss their companies’ creative cultures with students, routinely extending opportunities for internships and employment. These and other experiences uniquely position SCAD students to be the next generation of standout creative leaders.

90

SCAD.EDU / BUSINESS-DESIGN

45

HOURS

BDAL BDAL BDAL BDAL BDAL BDAL BUSI BUSI BUSI BUSI WRIT

701 Principles of Business Design and Arts Leadership 709 Business Complexities in Creative Industries 739 Funding Arts and Cultural Initiatives * 745 Marketing Arts and Cultural Initiatives † 746 Arts Leadership Internship ‡§ 749 Business Design and Arts Leadership M.A. Final Project § 715 Strategic Decision-making for Enterprise Success 739 Funding Art and Design Ventures * 745 Marketing Art and Design Ventures † 746 Entrepreneurship Practicum ‡ 743 Professional Writing for Business Applications — 500- to 700-level elective

* Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § This course is available only via eLearning. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

91

CINEMA STUDIES

CINEMA STUDIES

MASTER OF ARTS

SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS THROUGH CINEMA STUDIES, STUDENTS ACQUIRE AN INFORMED UNDERSTANDING OF THE RICH TRADITIONS AND HISTORY OF FILM AS WELL AS THE THEORIES OF STORYTELLING AND IMAGE-MAKING. Movies do more than tell stories: They describe the human condition, articulate the philosophy of a generation, and serve as important sociological and historical artifacts. For professionals (critics, reviewers, journalists and more) who wish to be conversant in 21st-century culture, it is essential to speak the language of film. SCAD invites students to learn every aspect of cinema — from its early technological

CREATIVE CAREERS AGENT ARTS ADMINISTRATOR CULTURAL CRITIC ENTERTAINMENT MARKETER FILM ARCHIVIST FILM CRITIC AND REVIEWER FILM FESTIVAL ORGANIZER/ DIRECTOR PRESERVATIONIST SCRIPT SUPERVISOR SOCIAL MEDIA REPRESENTATIVE

breakthroughs to the social transformations it has wrought throughout the last 125 years — preparing students to thrive in a wide range of arts and entertainment careers. The M.A. degree in cinema studies at SCAD highlights important developments and movements in filmmaking. Students scrutinize early developments, genres, and the principles and philosophies behind the art of the cinematic narrative. The curriculum emphasizes critical and analytical attention to social, cultural and political influences on cinema, with seminars addressing everything from literary films to cinema of the Middle East. Elective coursework includes acting, animation, anthropology, art history, business design and arts leadership, film production, visual effects, writing and other areas to inform a broad understanding of the discipline.

CALLING ALL CINEPHILES Each year, more than 50,000 people participate in the Savannah Film Festival, the university’s weeklong celebration of cinematic creativity. The festival is now the largest university film festival in the United States. The movie magic continues after the festival credits roll: The SCAD Cinema Circle engages students and the community throughout the year with a robust schedule of special film screenings, from sweeping epics and period dramas to cult classics and award-winning faves.

t Film historian James Naremore, Clarence Thomas Center for Historic Preservation, SCAD Savannah

93

SCAD offers graduate students the opportunity to

CINE

pursue an M.F.A. in film and television in addition to an M.A. in cinema studies. This powerful degree pairing thoroughly prepares candidates for careers in filmmaking by marrying the deep analysis of cinema with the hands-on experience of a terminal film degree. At the annual SCAD aTVfest and Savannah Film Festival events, SCAD brings legends and working professionals together for panel discussions and other activities where students get plugged in to the energy of the film world. Throughout the academic year, the cinema studies department’s Cinema Circle series provides students with an enriched viewing experience of beloved, iconic and award-winning films.

My cinema studies professors worked one-on-one with me throughout my time at SCAD. The collaborative nature of the program was comprehensive and rich in film theory, and allowed me to explore my own interests in cinema. Jillian Schlake, M.A. cinema studies, B.F.A. dramatic writing, Red Cloud, Nebraska

M.A. DEGREE  CINEMA STUDIES

45

HOURS

CINE 703 Research Methodology in Cinema Studies CINE 705 Cinema in Context: From the Fairground to the French New Wave CINE 715 History of American Cinema I: Industry, Aesthetics and Culture CINE 725 World Cinema: Transnational Perspectives CINE 737 Graduate Seminar in Cinema Studies CINE 740 History of American Cinema II: Art, Indies and Auteurs in the Age of Media Conglomerates CINE 747 Issues in Cinema Theory CINE 788 Cinema Studies M.A. Thesis — 500- to 700-level elective Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

94

SCAD.EDU / CINEMA-STUDIES

95

DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABILITY

96

DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABILITY

MASTER OF ARTS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF DESIGN GRADUATES OF THE SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM BRING MULTIDISCIPLINARY DESIGN PRACTICES TO A WIDE RANGE OF INDUSTRIES, CREATING INNOVATIONS THAT TRANSFORM HUMAN, ECOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC NEEDS INTO TANGIBLE OPPORTUNITIES.

CREATIVE CAREERS CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY MANAGER DESIGN RESEARCHER DESIGN STRATEGIST/RESEARCHER PRODUCT DEVELOPER SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN CONSULTANT

Careers in sustainability are on the rise as organizations of every kind

SUSTAINABILITY MANAGER/DIRECTOR

are taking an interdisciplinary lens to improving conditions in the

SUSTAINABILITY SERVICES DESIGNER

modern world. When it comes to design, the complexities of the 21st

SUSTAINABLE GRAPHIC DESIGNER

century demand more than isolated solutions — they require holistic

SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECT/

thinking and systems-based approaches. The SCAD design for sustainability program differentiates itself

INTERIOR DESIGNER SUSTAINABLE PACKAGING DESIGNER

through its integrated approach to sustainable design and emphasis on design leadership, encompassing the technological, economic, social, behavioral and attitudinal realms of sustainable solutions. Designed to draw individuals with diverse and cross-disciplinary orientations , including engineers, political scientists, journalists, environmental scientists, sociologists and more,  the program invites diverse worldviews and skillsets. Coursework for the M.A. program is formulated to provide students with the analytical tools to design according to the “triple bottom line” of sustainable practice and problem-solving toward minimized comprehensive framework of courses designed to offer a thorough

GREEN IS THE NEW BLACK

understanding of the theories, methodologies and practical

Sustainable design isn’t

knowledge of the field of sustainability as it applies to design

just a trend — it’s a way of

professions. Students apply this expertise to one of four focus

life that’s here to stay. With

areas — built environment, packaging and print media, management

innovative, groundbreaking

and products — that enable them to customize their professional

initiatives like SCADpad, the

preparation to key market sectors for sustainable practice.

university is at the forefront

negative environmental impact. The M.F.A. degree is based on a

of this ever-growing and specialized area of design.

97

SUST

Across both graduate programs, students extend the reach of design and design thinking to investigate consumer

Having all the SCAD disciplines

lifestyle choices and business practices. Leading-edge

together results in some

technologies such as life cycle analysis software as

extraordinary projects. It’s

well as unparalleled out-of-classroom experiences — in

mind-boggling what we’re

partnership with stakeholders presenting dynamic design challenges — provide all students with experience relevant

able to do together.

to a broad spectrum of professional fields. SCAD graduates

Erin Fenley, M.A. design for sustainability, Jonesborough, Tennessee

find themselves at the forefront of technological innovation and organizational change, prepared for careers within and beyond the corporate environment.

M.A. DEGREE 

M.F.A. DEGREE 

SDES 501 Visual Communication and Presentation * SDES 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * SDES 503 Fundamentals of Graduate Research * DMGT 740 Sustainable Practices in Design IDUS 711 Methods of Contextual Research SUST 704 Applied Theories in Sustainability SUST 708 Principles of Sustainable Materials SUST 713 Interdisciplinary Studio I: Design Leadership SUST 748 Design for Sustainability M.A. Final Project — Directed elective † — Directed elective † — 500- to 700-level elective

SDES 501 Visual Communication and Presentation * SDES 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * SDES 503 Fundamentals of Graduate Research * ANTH 701 Global Cultural Theory BIOL 700 Environmental Science and Sustainability DMGT 740 Sustainable Practices in Design IDUS 711 Methods of Contextual Research SDES 739 Biomimicry Methodology SUST 704 Applied Theories in Sustainability SUST 708 Principles of Sustainable Materials SUST 713 Interdisciplinary Studio I: Design Leadership SUST 743 Interdisciplinary Studio II: Sustainable Living Laboratory SUST 779F Graduate Field Internship † SUST 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † SUST 791 Design for Sustainability M.F.A. Thesis I: Planning and Research SUST 792 Design for Sustainability M.F.A. Thesis II: Design Execution — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABILITY

45*

HOURS

DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABILITY

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of the following: ANTH 701 Global Cultural Theory, ARCH 721 Landscape Design for Urban Design, ARCH 760 Sustainable Design, ARCH 765 Emerging Urban Issues, ARLH 763 Traditions in Global Vernacular Architecture, DMGT 702 History and Interpretation of Innovation, DMGT 720 Design Innovation Development and Marketing Strategies, DMGT 747 Collaboration at a Distance, FIBR 728 Structural Materials and Processes, FIBR 738 Contemporary Theory in Fibers, FURN 710 Issues in Furniture Design, GRDS 726 The Role of Graphic Design in Social Awareness, HIPR 701 Preservation History and Theory, HIPR * 704 Preservation Economics and Development, HIPR 709 Preservation HOURS Science: Laboratory Methods and Analysis, HIPR 716 Building Assessment I: Research, Analysis and Interpretation, HIPR 721 Preservation Planning in the Built Environment, HIPR 726 Revitalizing Downtowns, HIPR 734 Preservation Rehabilitation, HIPR 751 Building Assessment II: Comprehensive Evaluation and Reporting, IDUS 733 Entrepreneurship for Designers, INDS 721 Emerging Interior Materials, MTJW 705 Contextual Study I: Technical Research, MTJW 724 Contemporary Issues in Jewelry, URBA 705 Political Economy of Urbanization, or URBA 739 Economics of Urban and Regional Development. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

90

SCADpad allowed me to experience micro-housing firsthand and challenged me to rethink my housing needs and wants. The week I spent in SCADpad was spectacular. Jerome Elder, M.A. design for sustainability, M.Arch., B.F.A. architecture, Vistabella, Trinidad and Tobago

98

SCAD.EDU / DESIGN-SUSTAINABILITY

Choose one concentration: Built environment ARCH 760 Sustainable Design HIPR 701 Preservation History and Theory INDS 721 Emerging Interior Materials URBA 725 Urban Ecology Management DMGT 710 Design, Chaos and Complexity DMGT 783 Design Futures: Trends, Foresight and Intuition SERV 753 Service, Innovation and Enterprise SUST 725 Design Leadership and Environmental Transformation Packaging and print media GRDS 702 Graphic Design Studio: Methodological Practice GRDS 717 Sustainable Graphic Design Practices GRDS 730 3-D Graphics Studio GRDS 754 Graphic Design Studio: Visual Information Practice Products DMGT 720 Design Innovation Development and Marketing Strategies DMGT 783 Design Futures: Trends, Foresight and Intuition IDUS 713 Industrial Design Studio I: Discovery to Design Solutions IDUS 733 Entrepreneurship for Designers * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

(PARKING) DECKED OUT Each of the university’s SCADpad micro-houses is outfitted with stylish works — from original fine art and lighting fixtures to handmade rugs and furnishings — created by SCAD students and alumni. 99

DESIGN MANAGEMENT

100

SCAD.EDU / DESIGN-MANAGEMENT

DESIGN MANAGEMENT

MASTER OF ARTS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF DESIGN DESIGN MANAGERS ARE MASTERS OF COORDINATION WHO INTEGRATE DESIGN THINKING AT ALL LEVELS OF STRATEGY, PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT. Design innovation — a key component in creating new enterprises, developing new market offerings and connecting with the investor community — is at the core of the SCAD design management program. With a foundation in the social sciences and an emphasis on strategic planning, collaborative learning, brand development and business practices, the design management program primes students to leverage creativity with design as a sustainable strategic advantage for organizations.

CREATIVE CAREERS BRAND MANAGER CHIEF DESIGN OFFICER DESIGN MANAGER/DIRECTOR DESIGN RESEARCHER DESIGN STRATEGIST EXPERIENCE DESIGNER INNOVATION CONSULTANT INNOVATION OFFICER PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT MANAGER USER EXPERIENCE MANAGER

At SCAD, design management students develop innovative and often unconventional business, marketing and branding strategies for future products and services in both the commercial and nonprofit sectors. Recent student projects have included everything from the development of data visualization systems for gender disparity in college enrollment to the creation of a new planter design for the university’s award-winning micro-housing installation, SCADpad.

LIVING LARGE SCADpad, the university’s experimental micro-housing initiative, brings big style to small spaces, both indoors and out. The eco-chic village features a compact and sustainable community garden outfitted with space-saving recycling and compost units designed by Eric Green (M.F.A. design management, San Luis Obispo, California).

101

DMGT

M.A. DEGREE 

The M.A. degree culminates in a final project that requires students to apply relevant theory

DESIGN MANAGEMENT

to real-life situations where the perceptions and

SDES 501 Visual Communication and Presentation * SDES 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * SDES 503 Fundamentals of Graduate Research * BUSI 710 Financial Reporting and Analysis DMGT 702 History and Interpretation of Innovation DMGT 706 Idea Visualization DMGT 720 Design Innovation Development and Marketing Strategies DMGT 732 Facilitating Creative Thinking DMGT 748 Design Management M.A. Final Project IDUS 711 Methods of Contextual Research SDES 704 Applied Theory in Design — 500- to 700-level elective

limitations of traditional design and product development are challenged. M.F.A. students conduct scholarly investigations into visual, synergistic and organizational issues, and

45*

HOURS

develop theoretical constructs that contribute to progressive leadership, inventive management and design thinking. While at SCAD, students have

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

the opportunity to earn certifications or take a course in biomimicry; through this coursework, they engage in nature-inspired frameworks, experiences and design processes.

M.F.A. DEGREE 

Design management students have joined forces

DESIGN MANAGEMENT

with industry leaders including Citrix Systems, Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S., Fisher-Price, Johnson Controls and other Fortune 500 companies to design solutions for real-world problems. In one case, students helped Kicker understand how to engage the European car market and, in another, they worked with Cellular Sales to generate creative solutions and concepts for a brand redesign based on the in-store customer experience. Students also engage in global virtual teams with international organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund and the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. These project experiences become a part of student portfolios and often lead directly to internships and employment opportunities.

90*

HOURS

SDES 501 Visual Communication and Presentation * SDES 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * SDES 503 Fundamentals of Graduate Research * BUSI 710 Financial Reporting and Analysis DMGT 702 History and Interpretation of Innovation DMGT 706 Idea Visualization DMGT 720 Design Innovation Development and Marketing Strategies DMGT 732 Facilitating Creative Thinking DMGT 740 Sustainable Practices in Design DMGT 747 Collaboration at a Distance DMGT 750 Collaborative Culture in Design Organizations DMGT 757 M.F.A. Thesis Research, Discovery, Insight DMGT 779F Graduate Field Internship † DMGT 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † DMGT 783 Design Futures: Trends, Foresight and Intuition DMGT 790 Design Management M.F.A. Thesis IDUS 711 Methods of Contextual Research SDES 704 Applied Theory in Design — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

Graduates of the design management program stand poised to infuse design thinking into the business strategies of organizations ranging from magazines to television networks, from engineering to manufacturing and more. SCAD students and alumni have secured coveted internships and full-time positions with American Greetings, Energy BBDO, Google, Procter & Gamble, JWT, Gensler, frog design, Ralph Lauren, Reebok, Gulfstream Aerospace and many others.

102

SCAD.EDU / DESIGN-MANAGEMENT

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

103

DRAMATIC WRITING

DRAMATIC WRITING

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS BEFORE THE RISE OF THE FIRST CURTAIN, BEFORE THE FIRST FADE-IN, A DRAMATIC WRITER DEVELOPS THE CHARACTERS, SCENES AND DIALOGUE THAT MAKE STORIES WORTH WATCHING. Dramatic writing is storytelling at its most elemental — a form that spans recorded history, from the Greek dramatists and Shakespeare to the showrunners of AMC’s “The Walking Dead” and Netflix’s “House of Cards.” At SCAD, dramatic writing students draw inspiration from directors, actors, designers and technicians who help bring life to words. The range of preparation students gain — marrying classic storytelling techniques with an understanding of 21st-century narrative

CREATIVE CAREERS DRAMATURGE FILM OR THEATER CRITIC INTERACTIVE CONTENT WRITER MAGAZINE WRITER/EDITOR NEW MEDIA BLOGGER PLAYWRIGHT SCREENWRITER SCRIPT SUPERVISOR STORY EDITOR STORY CONSULTANT TELEVISION WRITER

platforms — has helped SCAD dramatic writing alumni launch their careers with top-flight companies around the world. At the undergraduate level, dramatic writing students deepen the wells of inspiration through literature, history and foundation studies courses. They learn to understand and engage the world around them in order to capture history, human nature and sociological truths in their own writing. Graduate students delve into every genre of playwriting and scriptwriting with thorough and wide-ranging studies that culminate in the student’s chosen form of thesis. The graduate thesis serves to launch a professional career in entertainment, and student scripts regularly become the basis for SCAD student productions in a variety of mediums. During star-studded annual events such as the Savannah Film Festival

SCRIPTS AND SHORTS AND STORIES! OH, MY!

and SCAD aTVfest, students interact with some of dramatic writing’s

SCAD’s dramatic writing

most notable talents, including Joel H. Cohen, Emmy Award-winning

program fosters learning

writer for “The Simpsons” and “Saturday Night Live”; Alfred Uhry, “triple

opportunities across

crown” award-winning writer of “Driving Miss Daisy” and “Mystic Pizza”;

all dramatic platforms,

David Benioff, screenwriter of “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” and co-creator

including film, television,

of HBO’s “Game of Thrones”; and Geoffrey Fletcher, Oscar-winning

theater, animation and

screenwriter of “Precious” and honorary chair of the university’s dramatic

stories produced expressly

writing department. These and many other special guests share their

for digital media.

knowledge in master classes and lectures on the reality of working as a writer in the biggest entertainment markets around the world.

105

DWRI 106

SCAD.EDU / DRAMATIC-WRITING

B.F.A. DEGREE  DRAMATIC WRITING

30

HOURS

60

HOURS

80

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

Foundation studies DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 204 Design III: Time — Studio elective — Studio elective

The diversity of classes taught by professors who brought real-world experiences and professional expertise to

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition ENGL 137 Shakespeare † ENGL 171 World Mythology † — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective ‡ — Mathematics/natural sciences elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡ Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration § DWRI 101 Introduction to Dramatic Writing DWRI 495 Dramatic Writing Senior Project FILM 100 Introduction to Film and Video Production FILM 105 Preproduction FILM 215 Screenwriting: Short Form FILM 224 Survey of Film FILM 315 Screenwriting: Long Form FILM 401 Directing Actors # PERF 103 Introduction to Performance PERF 201 Survey of Theater and Drama I PERF 204 Survey of Theater and Drama II PERF 215 Playwriting PERF 314 Acting for the Camera I PERF 315 Advanced Playwriting PERF 375 Directing # — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective § — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, MUST, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective

the classroom has given me what I need as I start my career as a dramatic writer. Allison Hirsch, M.F.A. dramatic writing, B.F.A. dramatic writing, Smithtown, New York

M.F.A. DEGREE  DRAMATIC WRITING

90

HOURS

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

* Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. § Choose one course. # Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

THE WRITE STUFF SCAD dramatic writing alumni are employed with companies such as Discovery Channel, Millennium Films, Disney, Pow! Entertainment, National Geographic, Pixar, Playbill and more.

ARTH 701 Contemporary Art ARTH 702 Art Criticism DWRI 708 Forms in Playwriting * DWRI 728 Script Analysis * DWRI 738 Playwriting: Elements and Execution DWRI 740 Playwrights, Actors and Directors Lab DWRI 775 Dramaturgy DWRI 779F Graduate Field Internship † DWRI 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † DWRI 790 Dramatic Writing M.F.A. Thesis FILM 704 Producing for Film and Television FILM 706 Crafting the Short Film Screenplay FILM 707 Screenwriting FILM 708 Designing Shots FILM 762 Writing for Television FILM 763 Scripting Episodic Comedy ‡ FILM 769 The Television Pilot ‡ — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

 The SCAD students I’m privileged to know are among the brightest and warmest people I’ve ever encountered.

Geoffrey Fletcher, Academy Award-winning screenwriter, SCAD Commencement speaker and honorary chair of dramatic writing

107

EQUESTRIAN STUDIES

109

EQST

EQUESTRIAN STUDIES SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS FROM THE ORGANIZATION OF COMPETITIONS AND MASTERY OF REGULATIONS TO THE MANAGEMENT OF BARNS AND EQUINE BUSINESSES, EQUESTRIAN PROFESSIONALS WORK WITHIN A GROWING, MULTIBILLIONDOLLAR INDUSTRY.

BACHELOR OF ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS EQUESTRIAN EVENTS MANAGER EQUESTRIAN TRAINER EQUINE ACCESSORIES DESIGNER EQUINE BUSINESS/ FACILITIES MANAGER EQUINE FACILITIES DESIGNER EQUINE JOURNALIST EQUINE MARKETING SPECIALIST

In order to succeed, professionals in the equestrian field must

EQUINE PHOTOGRAPHER

be capable communicators, savvy entrepreneurs and attuned

HORSE SHOW DIRECTOR

businesspeople with a passion for all things equine. SCAD is home to

SPORT HORSE SALES/

extraordinary equestrian facilities and a powerhouse equestrian team.

INSURANCE BROKER

The context of a comprehensive art and design university presents numerous crossover opportunities; equestrian students are invited to explore creative avenues such as equine photography, barn and facility design, equestrian accessories design and more through the university’s diverse curricular offerings in the fine arts, building arts, fashion and other industries. Within the equestrian program curriculum, students are prepared to be top-tier trainers, coaches, managers and entrepreneurs. The curriculum includes the study of equine anatomy, conditioning, health and nutrition, equine law, regulations of equestrian governing bodies, and social and professional responsibility. These rigorous studies are supplemented with lectures from visiting industry professionals, including internationally acclaimed riders, judges, trainers, veterinarians and horse show managers.

SCAD fields a championship equestrian team that has won more American

At the heart of the SCAD equestrian program is the renowned Ronald

National Riding Commission

C. Waranch Equestrian Center, a 180-acre facility with paddocks,

championships than

pastures, competition arenas and a beautiful stable for student-owned

any other university

and SCAD-owned horses. The James and Laurette Shaw Pavilion,

equestrian program.

a covered riding arena, allows university riders to practice and conduct academic fieldwork and assignments under all weather conditions and is engineered with considerations for equine vision and optimum ventilation.

110

RING LEADERS

SCAD.EDU / EQUESTRIAN-STUDIES

111

EQST 112

SCAD.EDU / EQUESTRIAN-STUDIES

B.A. DEGREE 

EQUESTRIAN STUDIES

25

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application — Studio elective — Studio elective

60

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art BUSI 101 The Design of Business CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

75

Major curriculum EQST 110 Fundamentals of Horse Care EQST 115 Advanced Horse Care and Management EQST 205 Principles and Theories of Riding and Training Horses EQST 215 Principles and Applications of Training Horses EQST 220 Barn Construction, Design and Facility Layout EQST 305 Principles of Equine Anatomy EQST 315 Equine Business Management EQST 330 Equine Systems, Disorders and Lameness EQST 340 Rules and Regulations for Competition Horses EQST 350 Equine Business Law and Ethics EQST 400 Judging and Selection of the Performance Horse EQST 410 Course Design EQST 425 Capstone Seminar in Equestrian Studies — Directed electives‡

20

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective

180

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

* Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose 10 of these 16 courses (one credit per course for a total of 10 credits): RIDE 119 Introduction to Horsemanship; RIDE 120 Basic Horsemanship; RIDE 121 Position and Control I; RIDE 122 Position and Control II; RIDE 150 Fundamentals of Flat Work; RIDE 200 Developing the Horse’s Balance; RIDE 225 Advanced Flat Work; RIDE 230 Applied Dressage I; RIDE 235 Cavalletti, Gymnastics and Jumping Exercises I; RIDE 240 Jumping Exercises II; RIDE 300 Applied Dressage II; RIDE 301 Riding the Show Hunter; RIDE 302 Concepts in Equitation; RIDE 303 Riding the Show Jumper; RIDE 405 Advanced Concepts in Show Jumping; or RIDE 415 Starting the Green Horse. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

113

FASHION

Nichole Rodriguez, B.F.A. fashion, San Juan, Puerto Rico; SCAD Fashion Show, SCAD Museum of Art

115

FASH

FASHION

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF FASHION

MASTER OF ARTS

FROM COUTURE TO CASUAL, MASS MARKET TO MENSWEAR, FASHION DESIGNERS CREATE EXHILARATING, WEARABLE WORKS OF ART THAT LAUNCH INTERNATIONAL TRENDS, SHAPE CULTURAL MOMENTS AND HELP INDIVIDUALS EXPRESS THEIR BEST, TRUEST SELVES. SCAD fashion students prepare to lead in the ever-evolving and globally competitive fashion industry through a rigorous curriculum anchored by innovative design, creative thinking and state-of-the-art technology. Through recurring interactions between leading fashion authorities and students, the program is strongly connected to the professional realm.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS CAD FASHION DESIGNER FASHION BUYER FASHION DESIGNER FASHION FORECASTER FASHION ILLUSTRATOR MENSWEAR DESIGNER MERCHANDISE MANAGER PATTERN MAKER

Under the guidance of experienced faculty and with inspiration from

PRODUCT DEVELOPER

visiting mentors, students explore fashion from the conceptual to

VISUAL MERCHANDISER

the commercial, applying technical dexterity with creative vision to develop original fashion collections. During their course of study, students experiment in 2-D and 3-D formats, conduct research and analysis and develop a personal aesthetic. Studio courses culminate in the creation of physical samples that become important career-making evidence in the graduates’ portfolios. The university’s advanced technology prepares students for the dynamic world of digital fashion design, and students benefit from the opportunity to pursue CFDA+ and Adobe certifications. For seven consecutive years, SCAD students have been honored as Young Menswear Association Fashion Scholarship Fund scholars. Over the past two years, SCAD has celebrated more YMA scholars than any other university. In addition to winning valuable scholarships, these outstanding students have gone on to intern or work for companies such as Oscar de la Renta, Polo Ralph Lauren, Alexander Wang and Saks Fifth Avenue.

WORKING THE WORLDWIDE RUNWAY With access to global learning opportunities, rewarding collaborative experiences, and professional career preparation spanning three continents and online, SCAD fashion students are positioned for in-style, in-demand jobs.

116

SCAD.EDU / FASHION

117

FASH

Each year, the university hosts the Style Lab mentorship program, through which outstanding senior students are selected to work with superstar designers in a yearlong process that includes oneon-one critiques and personal meetings. Recent Style Lab mentors include Christian Siriano, Juan Carlos Obando, Behnaz Sarafpour, Bibhu Mohapatra, Zac Posen, Catherine Malandrino, Yigal Azrouël, Stephen Burrows and Rachel Roy. The annual SCAD Fashion Show is a highly anticipated signature event that presents juried collections of undergraduate and graduate work on stage and is streamed live to a global audience. Each year, in preparation for the show, “America’s Next Top Model” star J Alexander directs student models, and former Vogue editor André Leon Talley presents his namesake Lifetime Achievement Award to a fashion icon. Past honorees include Vivienne Westwood, Stephen Burrows, Francisco Costa, Oscar de la Renta, Karl Lagerfeld, Miuccia Prada, Tom Ford, Vera Wang, Marc Jacobs, Isabel and Ruben Toledo, Diane von Furstenberg, Manolo Blahnik and Ralph Rucci. Other recent visitors include designers Joseph Altuzarra, Alexander Wang, Prabal Gurung, Derek Lam, Betsey Johnson, Mark Badgley, James Mischka and Eddie Borgo; Oscar de la Renta creative director Peter Copping; Tom Ford International chairman Domenico De Sole; Maxim editor-in-chief Kate Lanphear; Elle magazine fashion news director Anne Slowey; fashion PR maven Kelly Cutrone; Teen Vogue editor-in-chief Amy Astley; and The New York Times fashion director and chief fashion critic Vanessa Friedman. Through these visits, students gain valuable insight to further their career paths in fashion. Students interact with and are inspired by history-making fashion on a daily basis at the SCAD Museum of Art, where, in the André Leon Talley Gallery, the university premieres couture exhibitions such as “Little Black Dress,” “Oscar de la Renta: His Legendary World of Style” and “Dress Up Story — 1990 Until Now.” The SCAD permanent collection includes signature garments and historic costume treasures donated to SCAD that are available for study by critics, scholars and students. Beyond the classroom, SCAD fashion students have partnered with Elle magazine on Fashion Next, where the magazine showcased the work of SCAD students in a Fall Fashion Week runway show at Lincoln Center for Performing Arts in New York. SCAD fashion students have also worked on projects through the SCAD Collaborative Learning Center, partnering with Procter & Gamble, Dressage, Kohl’s, Microsoft, Dylan’s Candy Bar and others.

118

SCAD.EDU / FASHION

p Fashion design and Style Lab mentor Christian Siriano, Eckburg Hall, SCAD Savannaht

119

FASH 120

SCAD.EDU / FASHION

When I was at SCAD, I took advantage of every opportunity in and out of the classroom, and they’ve opened so many doors for me within the industry.

B.F.A. DEGREE 

FASHION

30

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 200 Life Drawing I DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space

55

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective† — Mathematics/natural sciences elective† — Social/behavioral sciences elective†

HOURS

HOURS

85

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

Audra Noyes, B.F.A. fashion, Hockessin, Delaware

M.A. DEGREE  FASHION

45*

HOURS

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ FASH 100 Fashion Technology FASH 105 Introduction to Textiles FASH 110 Introduction to Fashion Design FASH 215 Apparel Development I: Introduction to Draping FASH 219 Introduction to Fashion Sketching FASH 220 Advanced Fashion Sketching FASH 247 History of Fashion FASH 300 Computer-aided Fashion Design FASH 303 The Business of Fashion FASH 315 Apparel Development II: Intermediate Pattern Development FASH 399 Fashion Design: Concept Development FASH 415 Apparel Development III: Advanced Apparel Development FASH 420 Senior Collection I: Research and Design Development FASH 422 Fashion Portfolio Presentation FASH 430 Senior Collection II: 3-D Prototype and Development FASH 440 Senior Collection III: Final Collection — ACCE, FASH, FASM or FIBR elective ‡ Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FASH FASH FASH ARTH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH

501 Fashion Design and Development * 502 Fashion and Accessory Sketching and Illustration * 503 Forecasting and Business Trends * 701 Contemporary Art 710 Fashion Materials and Structures 713 Drawing and Illustration for the Fashion Designer 715 Multimedia Communication for Fashion 716 Fashion Studio I: Directed Design Innovation 721 Computer-enhanced Fashion Design 725 Fashion Studio II: Exploring Multifaceted Design Aesthetics 749 Fashion M.A. Final Project — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE 

FASHION

90*

HOURS

FASH FASH FASH ARTH ARTH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH FASH

501 Fashion Design and Development * 502 Fashion and Accessory Sketching and Illustration * 503 Forecasting and Business Trends * 701 Contemporary Art 702 Art Criticism 710 Fashion Materials and Structures 713 Drawing and Illustration for the Fashion Designer 715 Multimedia Communication for Fashion 716 Fashion Studio I: Directed Design Innovation 721 Computer-enhanced Fashion Design 725 Fashion Studio II: Exploring Multifaceted Design Aesthetics 763 Fashion Promotion 779F Graduate Field Internship † 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † 781 Fashion M.F.A. Thesis I: Directed Studies 782 Fashion Theory 791 Fashion M.F.A. Thesis II: Collection Development 792 Fashion M.F.A. Thesis III: Exhibition and Documentation — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

t Emily Seifert, B.F.A. fashion, Charleston, South Carolina; SCAD Fashion Show, SCAD Museum of Art

121

FASHION MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT

122

FASHION MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT SCHOOL OF FASHION

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS FASHION MARKETER

FROM THE FAST-PACED, MULTIFACETED INTERSECTION OF DESIGN AND COMMERCE, FASHION MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT PROFESSIONALS ESTABLISH, PROMOTE AND DIRECT GLOBAL MARKETPLACE TRENDS.

FASHION PROMOTER

Fashion is business, and a big business it is. With the global fashion

RETAIL BUYER

industry valued at more than $1.2 trillion and employing approximately

STORE PLANNER

75 million people, savvy marketing and management professionals

VISUAL MERCHANDISER

GLOBAL MARKETER IMPORT MANAGER MARKETING/MEDIA MANAGER MERCHANDISE COORDINATOR PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR

are needed to guide every segment of the fashion pipeline — from the runway to the consumer. These adept experts oversee an impressive range of responsibilities: sourcing materials, establishing manufacturing procedures, organizing supply chains, developing economic strategy, understanding trends and communicating with all stakeholders in the creation of the fashion product. SCAD fashion marketing and management students are prepared to excel in the cross-functional careers of this international industry. Through a comprehensive curriculum focused on trend forecasting, product development, material sourcing, visual merchandising, retailing, advertising and more, SCAD fashion marketing and management students emerge ready to develop new world-class business models that define the future of fashion for some of the industry’s biggest names and brands.

EARNING THEIR STRIPES (AND PLAIDS)

Students at every SCAD location learn to be strategic,

SCAD fashion marketing

imaginative professionals who will play an integral role in

and management students

the creative story of fashion. SCAD Atlanta’s positioning in

have landed prestigious

Midtown affords students close proximity and convenient

internships with companies

access to numerous high-end retailers and commercial

such as Fashionista,

venues, including Etro, Hermès, Ralph Lauren and

Anthropologie, French

AmericasMart, one of the world’s largest wholesale trade

Connection, BCBGMAXAZRIA

centers. Hong Kong is a fashion manufacturing capital,

Group, Urban Outfitters,

and students there have the opportunity to see production

Juicy Couture, Seventeen

processes firsthand, immersed in an international luxury

magazine and Hugo Boss.

fashion scene.

123

FASM

 If you’re a fashion designer, you better have someone who understands the business of fashion — production,

In Savannah, fashion marketing and management

marketing and sales. These are all things

students benefit from studying in the university’s

that make for a great designer.

wholly reimagined Morris Hall, 14,000 square feet

Kelly Cutrone, founder of People’s Revolution, SCADstyle guest

of inspired learning spaces. The facility includes a Steelcase media:scape table that grants students access to new technologies to synergize with

B.F.A. DEGREE 

classmates, professors and professionals, and a

FASHION MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT

resource room with carpet designed by SCAD

30

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 115 Creative Thinking Strategies * — Studio elective *

60

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II BUSI 101 The Design of Business BUSI 265 Principles of Marketing CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications † CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications † COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective ‡ — Mathematics/natural sciences elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡

students as a part of Shaw’s Dye Lab line. SCAD provides opportunities for students at all

HOURS

locations to benefit from the SCAD Collaborative Learning Center, which provides a platform for fashion marketing and management students to partner with peers and outside companies to solve real-world design problems. In addition to partnerships with Microsoft and Kohl’s, the department has collaborated with the Silver

HOURS

Promotion Service, Diana Vreeland Parfums and Michael Grey Footwear. Fashion marketing and management students also benefit from annual events such as SCADstyle and the SCAD Fashion Show, where the powerhouses of fashion marketing interact face to face with students. Throughout the year, students gain insight and professional guidance from today’s true fashion luminaries. Special guests include

80

HOURS

designers Joseph Altuzarra and Christian Siriano; Neil Blumenthal, cofounder and co-CEO of Warby Parker; Scott Schuman, founder and photographer of the Sartorialist; writer Dana Thomas; and Elle magazine fashion news director Anne Slowey.

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration § FASH 105 Introduction to Textiles FASH 110 Introduction to Fashion Design FASH 247 History of Fashion FASH 419 Current Trends and Forecasting FASM 210 Digital Presentation Techniques FASM 215 Fashion Aesthetics and Style FASM 220 Fashion Merchandising, Planning and Control FASM 245 Retail Buying Simulation FASM 310 Private Label Product Development FASM 400 Contemporary Issues in Fashion Merchandising FASM 410 Retail Management FASM 415 Non-traditional Retailing FASM 420 Global Sourcing and Import Buying for Fashion FASM 430 Professional Portfolio Practices FASM 440 Visual Communication in Fashion — ACCE, FASH, FASM or MTJW elective § Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. § Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER. 124

SCAD.EDU / FASHION-MARKETING

125

FIBERS

Kyoko Matsuyama, M.F.A. fibers, Ise, Japan

127

FIBR

FIBERS

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF DESIGN

MASTER OF ARTS

FIBERS PROFESSIONALS COMBINE HISTORIC TEXTILE PROCESSES AND TRADITIONS WITH EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES TO SHAPE THE VERY MATERIAL OF EVERYDAY LIFE, FROM HOME FURNISHINGS TO FASHION TO FINE ART. At SCAD, fibers students engage in a comprehensive curriculum and explore specializations across fine art, studio production, textile design, printing, knitting and weaving. From developing zero-waste fashion collections to fabricating environments for music videos to quilting thermal blankets for outer space equipment, students use their creative talents to push the boundaries of traditional textile practices.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS COLOR/MATERIAL/FINISH SPECIALIST OR FORECASTER FINE ART/INSTALLATION ARTIST KNITWEAR DESIGNER PRINT AND PATTERN DESIGNER SOFT GOODS DESIGNER SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT DEVELOPER

Undergraduate students build a foundation of research and technical

TEXTILE DESIGNER

processes in color, surface design, material exploration, structure,

WOVEN DESIGNER

weaving and the history of textiles. Students shape their course of

VISUAL MERCHANDISER

study choosing from a wide range of electives — from embellishment and embroidery to 3-D printing — and build a comprehensive portfolio during their senior year that lends itself to a directed career path. Across the undergraduate experience, fibers students have opportunities to complete internships, participate in residencies, collaborate on sponsored projects, exhibit at national craft shows and travel to SCAD Lacoste for life-changing experiences. Graduate students hone their professional fibers expertise through advanced study and the completion of a focused research undertaking at the M.A. level and through fieldwork, teaching internships, a fully articulated body of work and a thesis engaging a specialty fibers topic at the M.F.A. level.

UNBE-WEAVE-ABLE SCAD is home to the most comprehensive fibers department in the United States as well as the nation’s largest facility dedicated exclusively to a fibers program. The large, inspiring facility is stocked with top-ofthe-line tools and resources.

128

SCAD.EDU / FIBERS

p Maria Sanez, need more info

129

FIBR 130

SCAD.EDU / FIBERS

SCAD fibers students work in the country’s largest facility dedicated to a fibers program — an inspiring 21,000-square-foot building with dedicated space for screen printing, dyeing, weaving, sewing, felting and papermaking. Resources include Compu-Dobby looms, a Mimaki textile printer, a VersaJet flatbed printer, a mid-arm quilting machine, a Brother digital embroidery machine, flatbed and rotary felting machines, Juki and Bernina sewing machines, a 35-gallon kettle dye drum, and circular and flatbed standard, bulky and electronic knitting machines, as well as a computer lab equipped with Cintiq touch displays, dedicated graduate studios, a comprehensive resource room and one of the largest digital Jacquard looms in higher education. Classroom and studio experiences are uniquely enhanced through engagement with artists, designers, business leaders and the local community. Department guests include Rebecca Burgess, founder of Fibershed; alumna Maura Ambrose, founder of Folk Fibers; Judy Ross, founder of Judy Ross Textiles; Matilda McQuaid, deputy curatorial director at Cooper-Hewitt; Rowland Ricketts of Ricketts Indigo; alumnus Chuck Chewning, director of design at Studio Rubelli and creative director at Donghia; and studio artist Jane Lackey. SCAD fibers students consistently earn major awards in professional competitions sponsored by Cotton Incorporated, Surface Design Association, the International Contemporary Furniture Fair, Shaw Industries, International Textile Market Association, Mayer Fabrics and others. In fact, the department boasts more winning students in the Surtex Student Design Competition (now known as designext) than any other single university in the world. In recognition of the wealth of creative talent that resides within SCAD, Cotton Incorporated sponsors an annual scholarship competition specifically with the SCAD fashion and fibers departments. SCAD fibers alumni open their own studios and businesses or work for universities, galleries, community arts programs and leading companies, including Anthropologie, Urban Outfitters, Martha Stewart Living, Paper Source, Diane von Furstenberg, Duralee Fabrics, Lilly Pulitzer, Macy’s, Target, JCPenney, Kohl’s, Mohawk Fabric Company and Brintons. 131

FIBR

B.F.A. DEGREE  FIBERS

35

HOURS

60

HOURS

75

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 115 Creative Thinking Strategies * — Directed foundation elective † — Studio elective * General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications ‡ CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications ‡ COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective § — Mathematics/natural sciences elective § — Social/behavioral sciences elective §

M.A. DEGREE  FIBERS

45*

HOURS

FIBR FIBR FIBR FIBR

Major curriculum FIBR 160 Fibers Studio: Drawing and Design Development FIBR 170 Fibers Studio: Textile Structures, Materials and Techniques FIBR 190 Fibers Studio: Color Research and Processes FIBR 201 Weaving I: Introduction to Woven Structures FIBR 221 History of Textiles FIBR 276 Digital Applications in Fibers FIBR 315 Digital Dobby Weaving ¶ FIBR 318 Digital Surface Design ¶ FIBR 401 Fibers Senior Studio I: Research and Concept Development FIBR 403 Fibers Senior Studio II: Innovation and Production FIBR 406 Fibers Senior Studio III: Professionalization and Portfolio — CLC, FIBR or SDES elective — CLC, FIBR or SDES elective — Directed elective # — Directed elective ** — Directed elective ††

M.F.A. DEGREE  FIBERS

90*

* Choose one of these two courses. HOURS † Choose one of the following: DRAW 200 Life Drawing I, DRAW 207 Drawing III: Content and Interpretations, DRAW 230 Drawing for Design, DRAW 242 Sketchbook or DRAW 341 Travel Portfolio. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ¶ Choose one of these two courses. # Choose one of the following: FIBR 308 Exploration of Complex Structures for Fibers, FIBR 310 Exploration of Complex Colors, Surfaces and Applications for Fibers, FIBR 312 Screen Printing I: Technical and Experimental Approaches to Textile Printing, FIBR 321 Weaving II: Exploration of Color and Process in Woven Structures or FIBR 345 Studio Production. ** Choose one of the following: FIBR 410 Structures, Materials and Techniques: Applied Processes and Contextual Investigations, FIBR 415 Computer-aided Jacquard Design, FIBR 416 Digital Textile Printing, FIBR 418 Digital Print and Pattern Design for Industry or FIBR 457 Screen Printing II: Advanced Techniques and Industry-level Applications. †† Choose one of the following: FIBR 308 Exploration of Complex Structures for Fibers, FIBR 310 Exploration of Complex Colors, Surfaces and Applications for Fibers, FIBR 312 Screen Printing I: Technical and Experimental Approaches to Textile Printing, FIBR 321 Weaving II: Exploration of Color and Process in Woven Structures, FIBR 345 Studio Production, FIBR 410 Structures, Materials and Techniques: Applied Processes and Contextual Investigations, FIBR 415 Computeraided Jacquard Design, FIBR 416 Digital Textile Printing, FIBR 418 Digital Print and Pattern Design for Industry or FIBR 457 Screen Printing II: Advanced Techniques and Industry-level Applications. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

t Daniela Guarin, B.F.A. fibers, B.F.A. painting, Barranquilla, Colombia

502 Materiality and Meaning in Fibers * 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * 503 Fundamentals of Graduate Research * 701 Contemporary Art 704 Surfaces and Structures 707 Fabric History as Source 716 Fiber and Fabric Exploration 724 Digital Surface Design Studio I: From Concept to Client Presentation † 728 Structural Materials and Processes † 745 Studio Issues in Fibers I: Research and Development 748 Professional Practices in Fibers 749 Fibers M.A. Final Project — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

FIBR SDES SDES ARTH FIBR FIBR FIBR FIBR

FIBR 502 Materiality and Meaning in Fibers * SDES 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * SDES 503 Fundamentals of Graduate Research * ARTH 701 Contemporary Art ARTH 702 Art Criticism FIBR 704 Surfaces and Structures FIBR 707 Fabric History as Source FIBR 716 Fiber and Fabric Exploration FIBR 738 Contemporary Theory in Fibers FIBR 745 Studio Issues in Fibers I: Research and Development FIBR 748 Professional Practices in Fibers FIBR 765 Seminar in Fibers FIBR 772 Studio Issues in Fibers II: Analytic Practice FIBR 775 Studio Issues in Fibers III: Synthesis FIBR 779F Graduate Field Internship † FIBR 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † FIBR 790 Fibers M.F.A. Thesis — Directed elective ‡ — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of the following: FIBR 724 Digital Surface Design Studio I: From Concept to Client Presentation, FIBR 726 Digital Dobby Design Studio or FIBR 728 Structural Materials and Processes. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

133

SCAD.EDU / ILLUSTRATION

FILM AND TELEVISION

135

FILM

FILM AND TELEVISION

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MASTER OF ARTS

SCHOOL OF ENTERTAINMENT ARTS FILMMAKING IS THE ART OF STORYTELLING WITH PICTURES, SOUND, MUSIC AND MOVEMENT — STORIES THAT CAPTURE HEARTS, CHANGE MINDS AND AWAKEN IMAGINATIONS.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS CAMERA OPERATOR

From blockbusters and documentaries to sitcoms and commercials,

CINEMATOGRAPHER

professionals in this sector require an exhaustive and multifaceted

DIRECTOR

knowledge of the filmmaking process and the ability to communicate

DOLLY GRIP

with others across the spectrum of production. At SCAD, students

EDITOR

become conversant in all areas of film and television, discovering the

PREPRODUCTION SUPERVISOR

roles that best suit their talents and interests.

POSTPRODUCTION SUPERVISOR

SCAD student films have been showcased at the Sundance Film Festival, the Cannes International Film Festival, the Los Angeles Film Festival, the New York International Independent Film and Video Festival, the Hong

PRODUCER SCREENWRITER UNIT PRODUCTION MANAGER

Kong International Film Festival, Tribeca Film Festival, SXSW, the Palm Springs International Film Festival, and countless other venues and events. SCAD students and alumni have also won Student Emmys, Student Academy Awards and the ICG Emerging Cinematographer Award. SCAD students and graduates win these awards, in part, because they have the opportunity to explore every area of filmmaking, pinpointing their interests and capitalizing on their individual strengths to build a tailored, focused degree. Graduate students perfect their craft through a final project or original thesis work — up to and including directing their own film. Students showcase their talents through short and full-length films, while investigating creative visual stories in animation, fashion,

WELCOME TO HOLLYWOOD SOUTH Thanks in part to lucrative

music, documentary and performing arts. Their cinematic collections

tax incentives for film and

feature excellence and the crucial tool of versatility.

television productions, the entertainment biz is booming in Georgia. SCAD students are uniquely positioned to gain experience working on real productions — even before they graduate.

136

SCAD.EDU / FILM-TELEVISION

137

FILM

FROM SCRIPT TO SCREEN The newest addition to the university’s digital media and entertainment facilities, Savannah Film Studios, is designed for professional-level film production and education. The expansive 22,000-square-foot facility is outfitted with three sounds stages, green rooms, lighting grids, postproduction suites, screening rooms and production offices.

138

SCAD.EDU / FILM-TELEVISION

Students learn to structure and execute visual narratives while gaining artistic and technical mastery of complex equipment, software and other industry-standard tools. In Atlanta, the SCAD Digital Media Center provides film and television students access to motion capture and green screen production capabilities, sound recording and mixing suites, editing rooms, screening spaces, and set and prop fabrication studios. The high-tech center, encompassing 60,000 square feet of space, enables students to complete a wide spectrum of work in a fully equipped studio environment. Professional screen and stage facilities are also available to students at SCADshow, a 13,000-square-foot, three-stage performance and event venue. At the university’s 22,000-square-foot Savannah Film Studios, students have access to three sound stages, green rooms, lighting grids, postproduction suites, a multipurpose recording booth for ADR and Foley recordings, screening rooms and production offices. Here, students work in the creative atmosphere of a cutting-edge film and television studio using leading digital technologies and equipment, including high-end Avid and Final Cut workstations and editing suites; cameras such as Red One digital, DSLRs, Sony NEX-FS100, Super 16 and 35 mm, and a Hurricane 3-D camera rig with five Sony F3K cameras; Steadicam Ultra, Flyer and Zephyr; and Super Panther and Fisher dollies. The Savannah Film Festival, presented each year by SCAD, brings cinema’s luminaries together with students, including honorees and guests Alexander Payne, Matt Bomer, Gena Rowlands, Natalie Dormer, John Goodman, Jeremy Irons, Abigail Breslin, Oliver Stone, Alec Baldwin and others. During this weeklong annual event, acclaimed guests spend time talking with students and sharing insights on the art and business of film. In Atlanta, the annual SCAD aTVfest is a similarly starstudded event for film and television students, where actors, directors, producers and other entertainment professionals — whose work can be seen on ABC, HBO, AMC, FOX, TBS and elsewhere — discuss filmmaking in this golden age of television. Distinguished guests and honorees include Timothy Hutton, Terrence Howard, Mindy Kaling and the casts of ABC’s “How to Get Away with Murder” and The CW’s “Vampire Diaries.” 139

FILM 140

SCAD.EDU / FILM-TELEVISION

Filmmaking is the ultimate team sport, and B.F.A. DEGREE 

SCAD’s collaborative environment prepared

FILM AND TELEVISION

me for what I do today:  build teams that make commercials, music videos and feature films.

35

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Studio elective — Studio elective

60

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II CINE 275 History of Cinema * CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications † CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications † COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective * — ENGL elective — General education elective ‡ — General education elective ‡ — Mathematics/natural sciences elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡

HOURS

HOURS

75

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

Jett Steiger, B.F.A. film and television, Charlotte, North Carolina, producer and Sundance Creative Producing Fellow

M.A. DEGREE 

FILM AND TELEVISION FILM FILM FILM CINE

45*

HOURS

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration § FILM 100 Introduction to Film and Video Production FILM 105 Preproduction FILM 106 Introduction to Screenwriting FILM 132 Lighting and Field Production Techniques FILM 210 Postproduction Techniques FILM 224 Survey of Film FILM 320 Directing the Narrative FILM 337 Directing the Documentary FILM 431 Film and Television Senior Project I: Preproduction FILM 432 Film and Television Senior Project II: Production FILM 433 Film and Television Senior Project III: Postproduction PERF 314 Acting for the Camera I SNDS 201 Introduction to Sound Design — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective § — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of the following: FILM 704 Producing for Film and Television, FILM 707 Screenwriting, FILM 729 Directing for Film and Television, or FILM 732 Field Production. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE 

FILM AND TELEVISION FILM FILM FILM ARTH CINE

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. § Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

‘REEL’ BIG DEAL Thanks to a partnership between RealD

501 Technical Elements of Film Production * 502 Conceptual Elements of Film Production * 503 Practical Elements of Film Production * 705 Cinema in Context: From the Fairground to the French New Wave FILM 710 Film and Digital Media Production Technology FILM 717 Postproduction FILM 747 Graduate Seminar in Film and Television FILM 748 Film and Television M.A. Final Project SNDS 701 Sound Design for Film and Video — Directed elective † — Directed elective † — 500- to 700-level elective

90*

HOURS

501 Technical Elements of Film Production * 502 Conceptual Elements of Film Production * 503 Practical Elements of Film Production * 701 Contemporary Art 705 Cinema in Context: From the Fairground to the French New Wave CINE 737 Graduate Seminar in Cinema Studies † FILM 704 Producing for Film and Television FILM 707 Screenwriting FILM 710 Film and Digital Media Production Technology FILM 717 Postproduction FILM 729 Directing for Film and Television FILM 732 Field Production FILM 747 Graduate Seminar in Film and Television † FILM 770 Film and Television Professional Development FILM 779F Graduate Field Internship ‡ FILM 779T Graduate Teaching Internship ‡ FILM 787 Film and Television M.F.A. Thesis Preproduction FILM 790 Film and Television M.F.A. Thesis SNDS 701 Sound Design for Film and Video — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

and the Savannah Film Festival, SCAD students have access to dedicated, on-

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS,

site technology for 3-D film screening.

VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

t Actor/director Mike Myers, legendary talent agent Shep Gordon and Hollywood Reporter contributor Scott Feinberg; Savannah Film Festival, Lucas Theatre for the Arts, SCAD Savannah

141

FURNITURE DESIGN

Eny Lee Parker, M.F.A. furniture design, B.F.A. interior design, Norwalk, California

143

FURN

FURNITURE DESIGN

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MASTER OF ARTS

SCHOOL OF BUILDING ARTS BALANCING AESTHETIC AND CONCEPTUAL IDEALS WITH PRACTICAL AND FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS, FURNITURE DESIGNERS CREATE THE FURNISHINGS THAT ORGANIZE, DEFINE AND ENHANCE OUR ENVIRONMENTS.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS CONTRACT OR RESIDENTIAL FURNITURE DESIGNER

SCAD furniture design students learn to speak the languages of design,

CREATIVE DESIGN MANAGER

art, technology, culture and history. They identify design opportunities,

CUSTOM PRODUCTION FURNITURE

conduct research, synthesize findings and develop solutions that advance

DESIGNER

product strategies. Their designs develop into full-scale, functional works

DESIGN CONSULTANT

of art through the use of industry-standard resources and software that

DESIGNER FOR GALLERY SALES OR

guide the creative process from sketch to final product. The 42,000-square-foot SCAD Gulfstream Center for Design is the hub of creativity for furniture design students, housing extensive woodworking and metal fabrication studios, a plastics and composites laboratory, a welding facility, a paint booth and state-of-the-art fabrication labs — everything the designers of today require. Other resources include a five-axis computer numeric control router, a three-

PRIVATE COMMISSIONS ENVIRONMENTAL, EXHIBITION OR PRODUCT DESIGNER FIXTURE AND DISPLAY DESIGNER HOSPITALITY FURNITURE DESIGNER LIGHTING/ACCESSORIES DESIGNER STUDIO ARTIST

axis CNC milling machine, rapid prototypers and laser cutters. The most current digital applications are available, including AutoCAD, Autodesk 3ds Max, Adobe Creative Cloud Complete, SolidWorks, SketchUp, KeyShot and Rhino 3D. All furniture design students are members of the American Society of Furniture Designers, and they may choose to pursue National Charrette Institute certification to enhance their professional credentials.

BUILT TO LAST SCAD is an academic member of the Sustainable Furnishings Council, a nonprofit coalition promoting sustainable practices among manufacturers, retailers and consumers.

144

SCAD.EDU / FURNITURE-DESIGN

FURN

SCAD furniture design students were exposed to wideranging aspects of design and intellectual exploration through the department’s exclusive partnership with renowned furniture designer Dakota Jackson, who regularly hires SCAD students to work in his studio and has helped students secure internships with David Rockwell, west elm and others. Outside the classroom and studio, furniture design students take part in a creative synergy that connects the university across locations and academic programs. For example, furniture design students, in partnership with Brown Jordan, developed an entire line of exterior furnishings for the university’s groundbreaking SCADpad micro-housing community. Furniture design students exhibit their work at the industry’s top national and international trade shows: the Architectural Digest Home Design Show, High Point Market, WantedDesign, the International Contemporary Furniture Fair and the NeoCon World Trade Fair. In 2015, SCAD furniture design students garnered numerous accolades, including the first-place award in the prestigious Bienenstock Furniture Library Design Competition. The department’s experiential environmental furnishings installation, “Authenticity,” earned a Top Shelf Award from the New York International Interior Design Association.

PRIME SEATING The SCAD furniture design program is well seated in a region renowned for superior design and craftsmanship in textiles and furniture. SCAD students enjoy close proximity to several major international trade and manufacturing hubs, including High Point, North Carolina, home to the largest home furnishings trade show in the world.

146

SCAD.EDU / FURNITURE-DESIGN

B.F.A. DEGREE  FURNITURE DESIGN

35

HOURS

55

HOURS

80

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 115 Graphics for the Building Arts DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Studio elective

M.A. DEGREE 

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective * — Mathematics/natural sciences elective * † — Social/behavioral sciences elective *

FURNITURE DESIGN

45*

HOURS

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ FURN 200 Furniture Materials and Techniques I: Tools, Fabrication and Joinery FURN 201 Design Studio: Introduction to Furniture FURN 232 Visual Communication for Furniture Design FURN 236 Furniture Materials and Techniques II: Integrating Design and Fabrication FURN 238 Design Studio: Furniture and Spatial Composition FURN 302 Materials and Processes FURN 303 Design Studio: Market Context and Furniture Design FURN 305 Design Studio: Furniture Design for the Market FURN 307 History of Furniture Design FURN 309 Electronic Design and Visualization FURN 360 Professional Practice in Furniture Design FURN 405 Design Studio: Directed Project FURN 410 Design Studio: Advanced Furniture Design FURN 425 Design Studio: Senior Focus — 300- or 400-level ARCH, EXHI, FURN, HIPR or INDS elective ‡ — 300- or 400-level EXHI, FIBR, FURN or IDUS elective

M.F.A. DEGREE  FURNITURE DESIGN

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

 What draws me to SCAD and intrigues me about SCAD is the way there is a very cerebral aspect of what it means to make things. Dakota Jackson, legendary furniture designer, SCADstyle honoree and guest

501 Visual Communication and Presentation * 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * 503 Fundamentals of Graduate Research * 708 3-D Computer-aided Design for Furniture 715 Methods in Furniture Fabrication 732 Evolution of Furniture Design 738 Furniture Studio: Design and Implementation 748 Furniture Studio: Process and Prototype 749 Furniture Design M.A. Final Project — 700-level ARLH or ARTH elective — Directed elective † — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of the following: DMGT 702 History and Interpretation of Innovation, DMGT 706 Idea Visualization, DMGT 720 Design Innovation Development and Marketing Strategies, IDUS 711 Methods of Contextual Research, INDS 706 Interior Design Theory and Criticism, INDS 726 Environmental Psychology for Interior Design, INDS 740 Contemporary Issues in Interior Design, SDES 704 Applied Theory in Design, SUST 704 Applied Theories in Sustainability or SUST 708 Principles of Sustainable Materials. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

* Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. † MATH 101 Intermediate Mathematics is recommended. ‡ Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

SDES SDES SDES FURN FURN FURN FURN FURN FURN

90*

HOURS

SDES SDES SDES FURN FURN FURN FURN FURN FURN FURN FURN FURN FURN FURN FURN FURN

501 Visual Communication and Presentation * 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * 503 Fundamentals of Graduate Research * 708 3-D Computer-aided Design for Furniture 710 Issues in Furniture Design 715 Methods in Furniture Fabrication 732 Evolution of Furniture Design 738 Furniture Studio: Design and Implementation 742 Directed Research in Furniture Design 748 Furniture Studio: Process and Prototype 754 Directed Studies I: Thesis Research, Application and Design 764 Directed Studies II: Thesis Development, Execution and Exhibition 770 Professional Portfolio: Entrepreneurial and Business Strategies 779F Graduate Field Internship † 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † 790 Furniture Design M.F.A. Thesis — 700-level ARLH or ARTH elective — Directed elective ‡ — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of the following: DMGT 702 History and Interpretation of Innovation, DMGT 706 Idea Visualization, DMGT 720 Design Innovation Development and Marketing Strategies, IDUS 711 Methods of Contextual Research, INDS 706 Interior Design Theory and Criticism, INDS 726 Environmental Psychology for Interior Design, INDS 740 Contemporary Issues in Interior Design, SDES 704 Applied Theory in Design, SUST 704 Applied Theories in Sustainability or SUST 708 Principles of Sustainable Materials. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER. 147

KATY SKELTON M.F.A. FURNITURE DESIGN AUSTIN, TEXAS

SCAD ALUMNA KATY SKELTON USES CREATIVITY AND BUSINESS SAVVY TO DESIGN FURNITURE THAT’S TIMELESS AND SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE. ALUMNI TALK

Q: What made you decide on furniture design as a career? A: Furniture is a really personal expression of how you live your life. Everything I design, I try to make it really functional, beautiful, and timeless so that not only will the design transcend time, but also the piece is something you could pass down because the quality is there.

Q: What’s special about your brand? A: The most important thing to me is social responsibility — using manufacturers   

that have safety equipment and training for their employees, pay their employees a fair wage and understand that all the woods I use come from Iowa or Pennsylvania — they’re not contributing to deforestation.

Q: How did SCAD help you become successful? A: I went to SCAD with the idea that I would start a business after, but never knew how — it was always more a dream that I didn’t know how I could make a reality. At SCAD, there were so many talented people and supportive professors. Through them, I discovered having the creative and collaborative community is the best way to grow yourself as a designer.

LEARN MORE AT SCAD.EDU/KATY-SKELTON.

148

SCAD.EDU / ALUMNI

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Jenna Hutzler, M.F.A. graphic design, Grand Island, New York

151

GRDS

GRAPHIC DESIGN

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION ARTS ACROSS PRINT, INTERACTIVE AND MULTIMEDIA PLATFORMS, GRAPHIC DESIGNERS USE SYMBOLIC AND VISUAL METHODS OF COMMUNICATION TO CREATE COLLATERAL THAT INFORMS, COMPELS AND PROVOKES.

BACHELOR OF ARTS BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MASTER OF ARTS

Graphic designers are visual translators who bring life, color and form to intangible ideas, emotions and brands. They seek to understand

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

cultural and technological trends, recognize changing values, tell visual stories, share their visions with clients, and create new artifacts and experiences. At SCAD, graphic design students gain the worldview and practical sensibilities needed to make their visual mark in a shifting global landscape.

CREATIVE CAREERS BRAND DESIGNER EXHIBIT AND ENVIRONMENTAL

The university’s graphic design curriculum is strongly rooted in

DESIGNER

creative processes that consider multiple perspectives and the ways

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

that perception influences meaning. Students learn about motion and

INTERACTIVE DESIGNER

interaction design, brand and typeface design, augmented reality,

MOBILE APP DESIGNER

branded space, environmental and wayfinding systems and more.

PACKAGE DESIGNER

They explore package design by energizing product appearance and

PUBLICATION DESIGNER

connected media, while also innovating Web and digital design for

TYPEFACE DESIGNER

mobile applications and social media.

USER EXPERIENCE DESIGNER

Facilities include state-of-the-art Mac labs and presentation equipment

WEB-BASED APPLICATION

with industry-standard software applications, including the full Adobe

COMPOSER

Creative Cloud Complete, which students may download to their personal computers at no charge, and the Adobe font library. Graphic design students may choose to pursue certification as an Adobe Certified Associate, adding a valuable credential that expands their career opportunities even further.

DYNO-TYPE! SCAD graphic design students and alumni consistently win awards and recognition in top-tier competitions and from leading publications, including the Adobe Design Achievement Awards, the Applied Arts Magazine Awards and the American Graphic Design Awards.

152

SCAD.EDU / GRAPHIC-DESIGN

153

GRDS 154

SCAD.EDU / GRAPHIC-DESIGN

The SCAD graphic design department has been ranked in the top 10 programs nationally by Graphic Design USA magazine, and student work has been featured in CMYK Magazine and the Adobe Design and Film School Connection. Key recognition leads to elite internships with prestigious companies, including Pixar, Google, IBM, Ralph Lauren, Gulfstream Aerospace, Nickelodeon, Verizon, Time Inc. and Cartoon Network. Through the SCAD Collaborative Learning Center, students engage with corporate partners such as Hewlett-Packard, the Coca-Cola Company, Fossil, Snap-on, JCPenney, American Greetings, the American Red Cross and others. In the last four years, SCAD graphic design students have collaborated with more than 30 global companies and organizations. The graphic design department also facilitates visits to top agencies and organizations such as Donovan/Green, Razorfish, Carbone Smolan Agency, frog design, mcgarrybowen, Vignelli Associates, Wallace Church, Type Directors Club, Sterling Brands and ESPN Creative Services. Here, students meet and share their portfolios with the giants of the profession. Coursework parallels the latest evolutions of professional practice, and emphasis is placed on sustainability processes, cultural cachet and economic feasibility. For master’s candidates, the M.A. and M.F.A. programs focus on leadership and the designer’s role in fulfilling client needs. Students enjoy the opportunity to interact with numerous visiting professionals, including internationally acclaimed designer Stefan Sagmeister; SCAD alumnus and Grammy Award-nominated graphic designer Todd Gallopo; AIGA medalist Joe Duffy; renowned designer Steff Geisbuhler; snowboarding’s most well-known designer, Aaron Draplin; Pentagram partner DJ Stout; Mucca Design founder and president Matteo Bologna; Charles Wilkin of Automatic Art and Design; and graphic designer and writer Ken Carbone.

THE PROOF IS IN THE PROJECTS Collaborating with Hewlett-Packard’s Link Creation Studio, SCAD students created a mobile Savannah tourism experience. By scanning images with a digital watermark, users enhance interaction with their spaces.

t Stefan Sagmeister, graphic designer, typographer and co-founder of Sagmeister & Walsh

155

GRDS

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE  DIGITAL PUBLISHING

30

HOURS

GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS

201 Introduction to Graphic Design 205 Typography I: Anatomy, Form and Space 285 Graphic Design Media Management 348 Graphic Design Studio I: Idea Visualization 358 Production for Print and Digital Environments — Directed elective*

* Choose one of the following: GRDS 384 Web Design, ITGM 267 Core Principles: Interactive Design, or ITGM 357 Applied Principles: Interactive Web Design.

B.A. DEGREE 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION Concentration in GRAPHIC DESIGN

25

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application — Studio elective

90

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition PHIL 301 Aesthetics — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — General education elective † — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

45

Concentration GRDS 201 Introduction to Graphic Design GRDS 205 Typography I: Anatomy, Form and Space GRDS 229 History of Graphic Design GRDS 285 Graphic Design Media Management GRDS 348 Graphic Design Studio I: Idea Visualization GRDS 353 Typography II: Information and Media GRDS 358 Production for Print and Digital Environments — ADVE, ANIM, CLC, FILM, GRDS, ILLU, ITGM, MOME, PHOT, SCOM, SERV, SNDS or VSFX elective — Directed elective‡

20

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective

180

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

* Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one of the following: GRDS 384 Web Design, ITGM 267 Core Principles: Interactive Design, or ITGM 357 Applied Principles: Interactive Web Design. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

156

SCAD.EDU / GRAPHIC-DESIGN

t Binbin Lv, M.A. graphic design, Beijing, China

B.F.A. DEGREE 

M.A. DEGREE 

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 105 Visual Design Systems — Studio elective

GRDS GRDS GRDS CLC GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS

GRAPHIC DESIGN

35

HOURS

55

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

75

Major curriculum GRDS 201 Introduction to Graphic Design GRDS 205 Typography I: Anatomy, Form and Space GRDS 229 History of Graphic Design GRDS 285 Graphic Design Media Management GRDS 348 Graphic Design Studio I: Idea Visualization GRDS 353 Typography II: Information and Media GRDS 358 Production for Print and Digital Environments GRDS 387 Interface Design GRDS 395 Graphic Design Entrepreneurship GRDS 400 Graphic Design Studio II: Systems Visualization GRDS 408 Graphic Design Portfolio — ADVE, ANIM, CLC, FILM, GRDS, ILLU, ITGM, MOME, PHOT, SCOM, SERV, SNDS or VSFX elective — ADVE, ANIM, CLC, FILM, GRDS, ILLU, ITGM, MOME, PHOT, SCOM, SERV, SNDS or VSFX elective — ADVE, ANIM, CLC, FILM, GRDS, ILLU, ITGM, MOME, PHOT, SCOM, SERV, SNDS or VSFX elective — Directed elective‡

HOURS

HOURS

15

HOURS

180

HOURS

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Studio elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one of the following: GRDS 384 Web Design, ITGM 267 Core Principles: Interactive Design, or ITGM 357 Applied Principles: Interactive Web Design. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

GRAPHIC DESIGN

45*

HOURS

502 Visual Communication History, Research and Discourse * 503 Typographic Communication * 504 Integrated Design Media * 580 Collaboration † 701 Graphic Design Seminar: Methodologies 702 Graphic Design Studio: Methodological Practice 726 The Role of Graphic Design in Social Awareness 748 Graphic Design M.A. Final Portfolio — 700-level ARLH or ARTH elective — 700-level GRDS elective — 700-level GRDS studio elective † — 700-level GRDS studio elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE 

GRAPHIC DESIGN

90*

HOURS

GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS GRDS

502 Visual Communication History, Research and Discourse * 503 Typographic Communication * 504 Integrated Design Media * 701 Graphic Design Seminar: Methodologies 702 Graphic Design Studio: Methodological Practice 723 Graphic Design Seminar: Media Strategy 724 Graphic Design Studio: Media Practice 733 Graphic Design Seminar: Typographic Strategy 734 Graphic Design Studio: Typographic Practice 753 Graphic Design Seminar: Visual Information Strategy 754 Graphic Design Studio: Visual Information Practice 761 Thesis Preparation 783 Graphic Design Seminar: User Experience Strategy 784 Graphic Design Studio: User Experience Practice 791 Graphic Design M.F.A. Thesis 792 Graphic Design M.F.A. Visual Thesis — 700-level ARTH elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

The reason we decided to partner with SCAD — to find employees and interns —  is because the students are taught by the best, and they are passionate. Devin O’Bryan, M.F.A. graphic design, Shreveport, Louisiana, design internship program lead, IBM Design

157

SCAD.EDU / ILLUSTRATION

HISTORIC PRESERVATION

159

HIPR

HISTORIC PRESERVATION

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS GRADUATE CERTIFICATE

SCHOOL OF BUILDING ARTS HISTORIC PRESERVATIONISTS SHAPE THE FUTURE AND IMPROVE THE PRESENT BY RESEARCHING, UNDERSTANDING AND CONSERVING THE PAST. Historic preservationists leverage the complex relationship between the built environment’s past and future for a society acting in the present. Never static, their work traverses a dynamic spectrum. Sometimes, they protect the irreplaceable continuity and shared cultural heritage of places and structures through education and restoration; other times, they adapt architectural legacies for today’s new uses, rescuing by reinventing. The SCAD historic preservation program prepares students to

MASTER OF ARTS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS CITY OR REGIONAL PRESERVATION PLANNER DIGITAL CULTURAL HERITAGE SPECIALIST DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

be leaders in the 21st century in preservation practice, heritage

GRANT DEVELOPER OR MANAGER

conservation and cultural resource management. Even before they

HERITAGE TOURISM SPECIALIST

graduate, SCAD students distinguish themselves in the academic

HISTORIC MATERIALS CONSERVATOR

and professional communities: In 2014–15, SCAD students received

MUSEUM ADMINISTRATOR/CURATOR

scholarships and honors from the Association for Preservation

HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICER

Technology International, the National Council for Preservation

PRESERVATION DESIGN SPECIALIST

Education and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

RESTORATION ARTISAN

Within the framework of creative preservation, students collaborate at the intersection of preservation advocacy and action, adroitly navigating business and economic issues. Recent project partners include the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the 1772 Foundation and Preservation Green Lab.

HANDS-ON HISTORY The SCAD historic preservation program is the only one in the United States to include opportunities for immersive studies in North America, Europe and Asia.

160

SCAD.EDU / HISTORIC-PRESERVATION

161

HIPR

In Savannah, historic preservation students put their learning into practice, capitalizing on the city’s vast array of historic architecture. Students also have the opportunity to study at university locations in Atlanta, Lacoste and Hong Kong. Through international study, students gain fluency in global issues in urban and rural preservation. By preserving the history, values and ideas of the built environment, students become agents of change. At the Clarence Thomas Center for Historic Preservation in Savannah, students learn in a space that is itself an exemplar of historic preservation. Resources include a restoration workshop, conservation laboratory and outdoor shop pavilion, as well as lecture and drafting classrooms, an exhibition space and an intimate chapel repurposed as a lecture hall. Across the curriculum, students conduct comprehensive research and become versed in innovative software and digital tools, combining traditional methods with the latest technologies to evaluate, interpret and advocate for the sustainable preservation of cultural resources. Beyond the classroom, students have direct access to faculty experts and co-curricular events so they may specialize in areas of personal interest. In 2013, SCAD hosted the 16th annual United States Committee of the International Council on Monuments and Sites symposium, and in 2014, SCAD partnered with the National Trust for Historic Preservation to create PastForward, the National Preservation Conference, one of the largest and most influential preservation events in the world.

HIGH HONORS SCAD is known not only for its excellence as a university but also as a paragon of best practices in historic preservation. The university has won many awards for its renowned historic preservation efforts, including top honors from UNESCO and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

162

SCAD.EDU / HISTORIC-PRESERVATION

B.F.A. DEGREE 

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE 

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 115 Graphics for the Building Arts DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Studio elective

HIPR HIPR HIPR HIPR HIPR

HISTORIC PRESERVATION

35

HOURS

55

HOURS

80

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH elective — ARLH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective * — Mathematics/natural sciences elective * † — Social/behavioral sciences elective *

HISTORIC PRESERVATION

20

HOURS

* Choose one of these two courses.

M.A. DEGREE 

HISTORIC PRESERVATION

45*

HOURS

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ ELDS 225 Electronic Design I: Digital Communication for the Building Arts HIPR 101 Introduction to Historic Preservation HIPR 202 Recording and Interpretation for Historical Buildings HIPR 203 Preservation Research HIPR 307 Preservation Technology I: Historic Building Systems HIPR 312 Digital Communication for Historic Preservation HIPR 313 Preservation Law HIPR 322 Preservation Economics HIPR 407 Adaptive Rehabilitation HIPR 479 Undergraduate Internship HIPR 480 Historic Preservation Senior Project WRIT 255 Business and Professional Writing — ARCH, ARLH, CULT, DECA, ELDS, FURN, HIPR or INDS elective ‡ — ARCH, ARLH, CULT, DECA, ELDS, FURN, HIPR or INDS elective — HIPR elective — HIPR elective

from the past, so we don’t repeat the mistakes in the future. Preservation is not just for buildings; it’s about preserving our cultural

501 History of Modern Architecture * 501 Communication for the Preservationist * 502 The Technology of Historic Structures * 701 Preservation History and Theory 703 Preservation Law and Advocacy 704 Preservation Economics and Development 706 Preservation Research and Survey 709 Preservation Science: Laboratory Methods and Analysis 716 Building Assessment I: Research, Analysis and Interpretation 734 Preservation Rehabilitation 749 Historic Preservation M.A. Final Project — 500- to 700-level elective

M.F.A. DEGREE 

HISTORIC PRESERVATION

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

It’s important to learn

ARLH HIPR HIPR HIPR HIPR HIPR HIPR HIPR HIPR HIPR HIPR

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

* Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. † MATH 101 Intermediate Mathematics is recommended. ‡ Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

701 Preservation History and Theory 703 Preservation Law and Advocacy * 704 Preservation Economics and Development * 706 Preservation Research and Survey 709 Preservation Science: Laboratory Methods and Analysis

90*

HOURS

ARLH 501 History of Modern Architecture * HIPR 501 Communication for the Preservationist * HIPR 502 The Technology of Historic Structures * HIPR 701 Preservation History and Theory HIPR 703 Preservation Law and Advocacy HIPR 704 Preservation Economics and Development HIPR 706 Preservation Research and Survey HIPR 709 Preservation Science: Laboratory Methods and Analysis HIPR 712 Digital Innovation and Application for Historic Preservation HIPR 716 Building Assessment I: Research, Analysis and Interpretation HIPR 734 Preservation Rehabilitation HIPR 755 Preservation Philosophy and Criticism HIPR 757 Preservation Restoration HIPR 765 Preservation Seminar HIPR 779F Graduate Field Internship † HIPR 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † HIPR 791 Historic Preservation M.F.A. Thesis I: Research and Analysis HIPR 792 Historic Preservation M.F.A. Thesis II: Development and Presentation — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

practices and our history. Maggie O’Neill, B.F.A. historic preservation, Montvale, New Jersey

163

ILLUSTRATION

Ai Zhang, M.F.A. illustration, Chengdu, China

165

ILLU

ILLUSTRATION

BACHELOR OF ARTS

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION ARTS

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

ILLUSTRATORS TRANSLATE A RANGE OF IDEAS AND EMOTIONS INTO TANGIBLE IMAGES FOR A VARIETY OF OUTLETS —  FROM STORYBOARDS FOR FILM SEQUENCES TO DESIGNS FOR BOOK COVERS, DIGITAL ALBUM ART AND PUBLIC WORKS.

MASTER OF ARTS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

SCAD illustration students learn to do it all using traditional and

CREATIVE CAREERS

digital mediums to illustrate concepts, solve visual problems and add

ADVERTISING ILLUSTRATOR

expressive imagery to everyday life. Undergraduate students explore

ANIMATION CHARACTER DESIGNER

drawing, materials and techniques, while also studying the illustration

ART DIRECTOR

business, including digital portfolio presentation and marketing.

BOOK ILLUSTRATOR

Graduate students pursue advanced research, hone their individual

EDITORIAL ILLUSTRATOR

aesthetic and create a complete body of work that culminates in a

GRAPHIC NOVEL ARTIST

research or thesis project. All illustration students are encouraged to let

ILLUSTRATOR FOR GAME DESIGN

their unique styles shine. They learn to differentiate and promote their

ILLUSTRATOR FOR ENTERTAINMENT

personal brands in today’s markets. At all locations, SCAD illustration classrooms and labs are equipped with Wacom Cintiq displays, Mac minis, and the latest hardware and software.

DESIGN STORYBOARD ARTIST SURFACE DESIGN ILLUSTRATOR

SCAD provides the full Adobe Creative Cloud Complete for download to students’ personal computers and a full subscription to Lynda. com tutorials at no charge. Students may also earn Adobe software certifications to enhance their résumés.

THE SHARPEST PENCILS IN THE DRAWER In 2014, SCAD illustration and graphic design students were honored with a total of 40 Applied Arts Magazine Awards. This prestigious accolade is one of the highest honors in the communication arts field, and SCAD students have earned more than students at any other university in the past two years.

166

SCAD.EDU / ILLUSTRATION

167

ILLU

SCAD illustration students and alumni garner distinguished accolades in the illustration field. For two years in a row, SCAD has had more than 20 winning illustration projects in the Applied Arts Student Awards. In 2014, Print magazine’s prestigious “20 under 30” list for new visual artists featured four illustration alumni. Also in 2014, the SCAD illustration department represented 17 winning projects with the Society of Illustrators and earned six top honors in the student category of the American Illustration 33rd Annual Awards competition. SCAD illustration student work also has been featured in esteemed magazines and newspapers, including Time, The Saturday Evening Post, The Atlantic, The New Yorker, National Geographic and The New York Times. At SCAD, students have access to a range of professional illustration career paths across media, through the connections and successes of SCAD faculty. SCAD illustration students work one-on-one with visiting experts — such as illustrators Craig Frazier, Minh Uong, Victo Ngai and Jon Klassen — and they engage with illustration professionals through SCAD-sponsored field trips to publishing houses and design studios. These experiences often result in freelance opportunities and job offers.

DRAWING ON EXPERIENCE Not only are SCAD illustration professors admired educators and mentors, but they’re also acclaimed artists in their own right. They illustrate and author award-winning books, produce medical illustrations for top-rated scientific journals, and are published in The New York Times, the San Francisco Chronicle and The Washington Post, among others.

168

SCAD.EDU / ILLUSTRATION

169

ILLU 170

SCAD.EDU / ILLUSTRATION

B.A. DEGREE 

B.F.A. DEGREE 

25

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application — Studio elective

90

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition PHIL 301 Aesthetics — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — General education elective † — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 200 Life Drawing I DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Studio elective

VISUAL COMMUNICATION Concentration in ILLUSTRATION

HOURS

HOURS

45

Concentration CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ ILLU 200 Drawing and Design for Illustrators ILLU 205 Illustration Materials and Techniques ILLU 213 Introduction to Illustration ILLU 215 Exploration of Mediums ILLU 217 Editorial Illustration ILLU 225 Digital Illustration and Techniques ILLU 229 Survey of Illustration ILLU 305 Children’s Book Illustration § ILLU 306 Book Illustration § — ILLU elective ‡

20

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective

180

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

* Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one course. § Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

ILLUSTRATION

35

HOURS

60

HOURS

70

HOURS

15

HOURS

180

HOURS

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective † Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ ILLU 200 Drawing and Design for Illustrators ILLU 205 Illustration Materials and Techniques ILLU 213 Introduction to Illustration ILLU 215 Exploration of Mediums ILLU 217 Editorial Illustration ILLU 225 Digital Illustration and Techniques ILLU 229 Survey of Illustration ILLU 304 Advertising Illustration ILLU 305 Children’s Book Illustration § ILLU 306 Book Illustration § ILLU 400 Illustration Portfolio ILLU 409 Illustration Self-promotion — ILLU elective ‡ — ILLU elective — ILLU elective Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Studio elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one course. § Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

t Diego Peñuela, M.F.A. illustration, Bogotá, Colombia

171

ILLU

My professors guided me and opened so many creative doors and opportunities for me. They really helped solidify my creative foundation. Yohei Horishita, M.F.A. illustration, B.F.A. illustration, Kagoshima, Japan

M.A. DEGREE  ILLUSTRATION

45*

HOURS

ILLU ILLU ILLU ARTH ILLU ILLU ILLU ILLU ILLU ILLU ILLU

503 Illustration Strategies * 504 Drawing Strategies for Illustration * 505 Influences in Illustration * 701 Contemporary Art 701 Media and Techniques 714 Drawing for Illustrators 727 Illustration Concepts and Composition 730 Digital Solutions for Illustration 735 Illustration Markets 742 Directed Projects in Illustration 749 Illustration M.A. Final Project — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE 

ILLUSTRATION

90*

HOURS

ILLU 503 Illustration Strategies * ILLU 504 Drawing Strategies for Illustration * ILLU 505 Influences in Illustration * ARTH 701 Contemporary Art ARTH 702 Art Criticism ILLU 701 Media and Techniques ILLU 714 Drawing for Illustrators ILLU 721 Advanced Studio Techniques ILLU 727 Illustration Concepts and Composition ILLU 730 Digital Solutions for Illustration ILLU 735 Illustration Markets ILLU 742 Directed Projects in Illustration ILLU 764 Illustration for Publications ILLU 774 Professional Practices in Illustration ILLU 779F Graduate Field Internship † ILLU 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † ILLU 779F Graduate Field Internship ‡ ILLU 779T Graduate Teaching Internship ‡ ILLU 790 Illustration M.F.A. Thesis — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER. 172

SCAD.EDU / ILLUSTRATION

p Malina Omut, M.F.A. illustration, Constanta, Romania

173

MARK WETZEL B.F.A. ILLUSTRATION STATE COLLEGE, PENNSYLVANIA

SCAD ALUMNUS MARK WETZEL MIXES HUMOR AND STYLE TO CREATE CELEBRATED AD CAMPAIGNS FOR ALUMNI TALK

NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED BRANDS. Q: What’s the best part of your job? A: I really like incorporating humor and playfulness into my work. I tend to work on a lot of kids’ brands, or at least brands that relate to kids. I’m basically a big kid. It’s just more fun to always play and keep that sense of wonderment.

Q: What advice do you have for students? A: Do more and know less. I’ve worked with apprentices, and the people I like working with more are the people that don’t think they know everything. There’s a little bit of a chip on a lot of people’s shoulders when they come in. They think they have something to prove — and you do have something to prove — but there’s much more to learn.

Q: What’s the most important lesson SCAD taught you? A: In my illustration classes, my professors were really all about the idea and the conception. The idea comes first and then execute on that. I’d rather see something with a little bit of soul behind it than the most beautifully rendered portrait. If it has some sort of a narrative or you can take something away, that’s a big win.

LEARN MORE AT SCAD.EDU/MARK-WETZEL.

174

SCAD.EDU / ALUMNI

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

John Gray Parker, M.F.A. service design, M.A. industrial design, New Orleans, Louisiana

177

IDUS

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF DESIGN

MASTER OF ARTS

INDUSTRIAL DESIGNERS DETERMINE THE FORM AND FUNCTION OF EVERYDAY PRODUCTS AND SOLVE CHALLENGES OF USABILITY, EMOTIONAL CONNECTION AND PRODUCTION AS THEY CONSIDER STRATEGIC BUSINESS OBJECTIVES. SCAD industrial design students directly influence the aesthetic language, functional performance and financial value of products. They master a process of identifying design challenges and transforming them into opportunities, resulting in viable design solutions that become tangible parts of a system, service or brand that generate memorable and valuable experiences.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS CONSUMER ELECTRONIC DESIGNER DESIGN STRATEGIST INTERACTION DESIGNER MARINE DESIGNER MEDICAL DEVICES DESIGNER PRODUCT DESIGNER SPORTS EQUIPMENT DESIGNER

The undergraduate curriculum fosters technical literacy and explores

TOY DESIGNER

cognitive methodologies, as students become creative problem solvers

TRANSPORTATION DESIGNER

capable of inspired approaches that positively affect people’s lives

USER EXPERIENCE DESIGNER

and effectively address market and business needs. M.A. students deepen their work with a focused research project, and M.F.A. students engage in significant research that culminates in a thesis. Given the rigorous classroom instruction at SCAD, complemented by real-world experience with some of the world’s biggest brands, it’s easy to see why DesignIntelligence deemed SCAD one of America’s Best Industrial Design Schools for both undergraduate and graduate degrees. Active participation in the broad scope of professional practice is a hallmark of the SCAD student experience. In the last few years, students have conducted projects with dozens of companies and brands, including the Coca-Cola Company, Hewlett-Packard, AT&T, Dell, Fossil, Mattel, Kids II, Microsoft, Reebok, Fisher-Price, Johnson Controls Inc., JCB and Snap-on. Students produce real-world solutions to design challenges, and their portfolio projects help launch them into specialized career tracks.

TOP-TIER DESIGN THINKERS SCAD’s graduate and undergraduate industrial design programs were ranked No. 1 in the South in DesignIntelligence’s 2014 edition of “America’s Best Architecture & Interior Design Schools.”

178

SCAD.EDU / INDUSTRIAL-DESIGN

Jeffrey Dull, B.F.A. industrial design, Strasburg, Pennsylvania u

IDUS

Classroom and studio work take place in the renowned SCAD Gulfstream Center for Design, a 42,000-square-foot facility equipped with studios, labs, workshops and tools to help students turn their concepts into realities. Available to all industrial design students are high-end computers with Cintiq monitors running Adobe Creative Cloud Complete, Rhino 3D, Orca, Grasshopper, SolidWorks, KeyShot and other current software. Students can use one of seven 3-D printers to print ABS and polycarbonate models of their computer-generated designs, or one of the university’s laser cutters to transfer their digital designs to a wide range of materials. The facility’s model shop offers 10,000 square feet of space where students work with wood, metal, plastics and composites to actualize design solutions. Other resources include a three-axis computer, numerically controlled vertical milling machine, and a large envelope five-axis CNC router. By choosing the option to pursue certification in Rhino software and/or biomimicry, students can further enhance their professional credentials and career preparation.

WORK THAT WINS Learning just got a lot more fun, thanks to Santiago Acevedo (B.F.A. industrial design, Bogotá, Colombia). He took on the challenge of facilitating the physical and emotional development of children and became a finalist in the 2015 Royal Society of Arts U.S. Student Design Competition. Acevedo’s “Little Peaks” toys — three over-sized roll-on paint brushes — help children 5 to 8 years of age refine their motor skills and express their creativity with water-based paint.

180

SCAD.EDU / INDUSTRIAL-DESIGN

181

IDUS

WORK THAT WINS Retriever, an app-controlled urban parking system, allows the user to find, reserve and pay for parking space from anywhere in the city. A network of sensory-enhanced parking meters linked to a user-friendly mapping and reservation app, Retriever aims to maximize limited urban parking resources by indicating every parking spot available to both app users and non-app users. The concept — developed by Qing Xu, M.A. industrial design, Shanghai, China; Jian Shi, M.F.A. industrial design, Hangzhou, China; Weijing Zhao, M.F.A. industrial design, Beijing, China; Yunman Gu, M.F.A. industrial design, Jiangyou, China; and Holly Chisholm, B.F.A. industrial design, Cedar Park, Texas — garnered the Red Dot Awards’ prestigious Best of the Best Award, a top recognition given to innovative concepts in the field of production design. 182

SCAD.EDU / INDUSTRIAL-DESIGN

At SCAD, the resources are there, the outlets are there. If you really dive in and get as much as you can in those four years, your dreams can definitely come true. B.F.A. DEGREE  INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

35

HOURS

Michael Mack, B.F.A. industrial design, Goose Creek, South Carolina

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 230 Drawing for Design DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 115 Creative Thinking Strategies * — Studio elective *

55

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications † CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications † COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective ‡ — Mathematics/natural sciences elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡

80

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration § ELDS 205 Computer-aided Product Design IDUS 100 Introduction to Industrial Design IDUS 212 Model and Prototype Development IDUS 213 Industrial Design Idea Visualization IDUS 215 Contextual Research Methods IDUS 221 Human Factors in Industrial Design IDUS 250 The Development of Product Form IDUS 313 Computer Modeling IDUS 314 Manufacturing and Assembly of Innovative Materials IDUS 316 Portfolio and Résumé Development IDUS 321 Industrial Design in the Marketplace IDUS 421 Commercial Practices for Industrial Design IDUS 471 Industrial Design Senior Studio I: Research and Ideation IDUS 491 Industrial Design Senior Studio II: Development and Communication — 300- or 400-level ACCE, FURN, IACT, IDUS, MARI, SERV or SUST elective § — 300- or 400-level ACCE, FURN, IACT, IDUS, MARI, SERV or SUST elective

10

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

180

HOURS

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. § Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.A. DEGREE 

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

45*

HOURS

IDUS SDES SDES ARTH BUSI IDUS IDUS IDUS IDUS IDUS SDES

501 Design in Context * 501 Visual Communication and Presentation * 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * 701 Contemporary Art 710 Financial Reporting and Analysis 711 Methods of Contextual Research 713 Industrial Design Studio I: Discovery to Design Solutions 718 Industrial Design Studio II: Delivering the Design Solution 733 Entrepreneurship for Designers 748 Industrial Design M.A. Final Project 704 Applied Theory in Design — 500- to 700-level elective †

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Electronic design courses are highly recommended. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE  INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

90*

HOURS

IDUS 501 Design in Context * SDES 501 Visual Communication and Presentation * SDES 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * ARTH 701 Contemporary Art BUSI 710 Financial Reporting and Analysis DMGT 732 Facilitating Creative Thinking IDUS 711 Methods of Contextual Research IDUS 713 Industrial Design Studio I: Discovery to Design Solutions IDUS 718 Industrial Design Studio II: Delivering the Design Solution IDUS 733 Entrepreneurship for Designers IDUS 755 Directed Studies in Industrial Design I: Research IDUS 763 Graduate Seminar in Methodology IDUS 765 Directed Studies in Industrial Design II: Advanced Innovative Methodologies IDUS 770 Professional Practices in Industrial Design IDUS 779F Graduate Field Internship † IDUS 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † IDUS 790 Industrial Design M.F.A. Thesis SDES 704 Applied Theory in Design — 500- to 700-level elective ‡ — 500- to 700-level elective ‡ — 500- to 700-level elective ‡ — 500- to 700-level elective ‡ * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Electronic design courses are highly recommended. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER. 183

JONATHAN ASSARAF B.F.A. INDUSTRIAL DESIGN LAUREL, MARYLAND

SCAD ALUMNUS JONATHAN ASSARAF COLLABORATES WITH OTHER DESIGNERS TO CREATE NEW ANGLES AND SOLUTIONS. ALUMNI TALK

Q: Why did you choose industrial design? A: My dad is an engineer and he was always trying to push science and math. I was more into the art of things. I think industrial design is a good harmony between the two.

Q: What was the best thing about the community at SCAD? A: Going to SCAD was like a new beginning for me. That’s where I found my most like-minded friends and I’ve felt most whole. That’s something I always try to recreate going into new jobs — importance of culture fit — because collaboration is so important. It can’t be done with just one person.

Q: What do you love most about your job? A: The traveling aspect is vital to my happiness. I feel a clean slate in my brain and I can be as creative as I want. It’s like a different way of seeing things you take for granted at home. Having that in my arsenal as a designer is good because then I can always look at problems from different angles.

LEARN MORE AT SCAD.EDU/JONATHAN-ASSARAF.

184

SCAD.EDU / ALUMNI

SCAD.EDU / ILLUSTRATION

INTERACTIVE DESIGN AND GAME DEVELOPMENT

Qwenn Parker, B.F.A. interactive design and game development, Canton, Georgia

187

ITGM

INTERACTIVE DESIGN AND GAME DEVELOPMENT SCHOOL OF DIGITAL MEDIA INTERACTIVE DESIGNERS AND GAME DEVELOPERS CONCEIVE AND CREATE THE WORLD’S MOST POPULAR VIDEO GAMES, AWARD-WINNING WEBSITES, AND THE ENDLESS ARRAY OF NEW SMARTPHONE APPS AND DIGITAL PLATFORMS.

BACHELOR OF ARTS BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS GRADUATE CERTIFICATE MASTER OF ARTS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS

Professionals in interactive design and game development work in the

ENVIRONMENT ARTIST

vanguard of virtual and physical computing environments, advancing

GAME DESIGNER

frontiers of human-and-machine interaction. By working in the digital

INTERACTIVE DESIGNER

world, developers help users understand the material world. SCAD

LEVEL DESIGNER

offers one of the first and most celebrated interactive design and game

MOBILE GAME/APP DESIGNER

development programs in the United States, where designers blend

MODELER/TEXTURE ARTIST

technical mastery with artistic sensibility.

TECHNICAL ARTIST

From immersive game worlds to physical computing spaces, SCAD interactive design and game development delivers cutting-edge technology paired with the rising talents of next-generation artists

USER INTERFACE DESIGNER USER EXPERIENCE DESIGNER WEB/SOCIAL MEDIA DEVELOPER

and designers to explore dynamic interactive environments. Whether for entertainment industries or information visualization, students push interactive boundaries in the creation of advanced interfaces and compelling new worlds, engaging the possibilities of virtual and augmented digital delivery. Every year, SCAD students win prestigious prizes like the E3 Award, and they do so with the support and guidance of a department lauded by The Princeton Review and Animation Career Review for helping students think critically, design conceptually and create with industry-standard tools.

GAME ON! During the annual Game Developers eXchange, students interact with their future colleagues in the industry: prominent game designers, artists, writers, game audio and level designers.

188

SCAD.EDU / INTERACTIVE-DESIGN

189

ITGM

SCAD students have exclusive access to resources that include a full motion-capture lab, green screen and Wacom Cintiq displays, and they receive professionallevel training in Autodesk Maya, Autodesk Mudbox, Unity, Unreal Engine, ZBrush, Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, After Effects, Flash, Python, C#, C++ and Processing. The department participates annually in various professional conferences, such as SIGGRAPH, GDC and others, including SXSW, where SCAD students have swept the game design category more than once. Students also learn to translate their vision across disciplines and operate in the professional pipeline by conducting sponsored projects for professional partners, including Microsoft and Legacy. Additionally, professionals visit with students every quarter, interviewing for positions and reviewing portfolios. Recent visitors include representatives from Google, Leo Burnett, IBM, frog design, Zynga, Blizzard Entertainment, Electronic Arts and Activision.

WORK THAT WINS SCAD interactive design and game development and animation students took top prize at the Electronic Entertainment Expo College Game Competition — the world’s largest trade show for video and computer games — two years in a row. In 2014, the team won for its game “Prisma,” a side-scrolling platformer that follows a girl named Ray as she journeys through different color-coded dimensions.

190

SCAD.EDU / INTERACTIVE-DESIGN

191

ITGM

POWER PLAYER

B.A. DEGREE 

DIGITAL MEDIA Concentration in INTERACTIVE DESIGN

Princeton Review named SCAD one of its “Top Undergraduate Schools for Game Design” and “Top Graduate Schools for Game Design” in 2015.

25

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application — Studio elective

90

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition PHIL 301 Aesthetics — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — ENGL elective — General education elective * — General education elective * — General education elective * — Mathematics/natural sciences elective * — Mathematics/natural sciences elective * — Social/behavioral sciences elective * — Social/behavioral sciences elective *

45

Concentration CLC 580 Collaboration † GRDS 205 Typography I: Anatomy, Form and Space ITGM 120 Introduction to Interactive Design and Game Development ‡ ITGM 122 Introduction to Interactive Design ‡ ITGM 130 Digital Design Aesthetics ITGM 220 Core Principles: Programming ITGM 267 Core Principles: Interactive Design ITGM 337 Applied Principles: Information Architecture § ITGM 357 Applied Principles: Interactive Web Design § ITGM 377 Applied Principles: Social Media Applications — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective † — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective

HOURS

B.A. DEGREE 

DIGITAL MEDIA Concentration in GAME DEVELOPMENT

25

HOURS

90

HOURS

45

HOURS

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application — Studio elective General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition PHIL 301 Aesthetics — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — ENGL elective — General education elective * — General education elective * — General education elective * — Mathematics/natural sciences elective * — Mathematics/natural sciences elective * — Social/behavioral sciences elective * — Social/behavioral sciences elective *

20

180

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

HOURS

HOURS

Concentration CLC 580 Collaboration † ITGM 120 Introduction to Interactive Design and Game Development ‡ ITGM 121 Introduction to Game Development ‡ ITGM 130 Digital Design Aesthetics ITGM 220 Core Principles: Programming ITGM 236 Core Principles: Game Art ITGM 256 Core Principles: Game Design 20 ITGM 267 Core Principles: Interactive Design HOURS ITGM 336 Applied Principles: Game Art § ITGM 356 Applied Principles: Game Design § — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, 180 MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, HOURS TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective † — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective

HOURS

HOURS

* Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. † Choose one course. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. † Choose one course. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE  INTERACTIVE DESIGN

25

HOURS

ITGM ITGM ITGM ITGM ITGM

705 Interactive Design and Media Application 709 Visual Interface and Information Design 715 Interactive Web Design 719 Scripting for Interactivity 727 Databases and Dynamic Website Programming

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

t Everett Gunther, B.F.A. interactive design and game development, Memphis, Tennessee

193

ITGM 194

SCAD.EDU / INTERACTIVE-DESIGN

B.F.A. DEGREE 

M.A. DEGREE 

35

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Studio elective — Studio elective

55

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — Mathematics/natural sciences elective * — Social/behavioral sciences elective *

ITGM ITGM ITGM ARTH CLC ITGM ITGM ITGM ITGM ITGM ITGM ITGM ITGM ITGM

INTERACTIVE DESIGN AND GAME DEVELOPMENT

HOURS

HOURS

INTERACTIVE DESIGN AND GAME DEVELOPMENT

45*

HOURS

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one course. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § Choose one of these two courses. # Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration † ITGM 130 Digital Design Aesthetics ITGM 220 Core Principles: Programming ITGM 380 Interactive Design and Game Development Portfolio ITGM 405 Interactive Design and Game Development Studio I ITGM 465 Interactive Design and Game Development Studio II ITGM 475 Interactive Design and Game Development Postproduction — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective † — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective

M.F.A. DEGREE 

INTERACTIVE DESIGN AND GAME DEVELOPMENT

Choose one concentration:

75

HOURS

Game development ITGM 121 Introduction to Game Development ITGM 236 Core Principles: Game Art ITGM 256 Core Principles: Game Design ITGM 266 Core Principles: Game Tech ITGM 336 Applied Principles: Game Art — Directed elective‡ — Directed elective‡ Interactive design and physical computing ITGM 122 Introduction to Interactive Design ITGM 237 Core Principles: Visual Design for Interactive Media ITGM 267 Core Principles: Interactive Design ITGM 277 Core Principles: User-centered Design ITGM 337 Applied Principles: Information Architecture § ITGM 347 Applied Principles: Physical Computing § ITGM 357 Applied Principles: Interactive Web Design ITGM 377 Applied Principles: Social Media Applications

15

HOURS

180

HOURS

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. † Choose one course. ‡ Choose one of the following: ITGM 326 Applied Principles: Programming, ITGM 356 Applied Principles: Game Design, or ITGM 366 Applied Principles: Game Tech. § Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

502 Game Design Perspectives * 503 Design Methods for Interactivity * 505 Game Art Methods * 701 Contemporary Art 580 Collaboration † 705 Interactive Design and Media Application 706 Game Design Documentation ‡ 709 Visual Interface and Information Design ‡ 710 Character Development § 715 Interactive Web Design § 719 Scripting for Interactivity # 721 Environments for Games # 723 Human-centered Interactive Design 748 Interactive Design and Game Development M.A. Final Project — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective † — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective

90*

HOURS

ITGM 502 Game Design Perspectives * ITGM 503 Design Methods for Interactivity * ITGM 505 Game Art Methods * ARTH 701 Contemporary Art CLC 580 Collaboration † ITGM 705 Interactive Design and Media Application ITGM 706 Game Design Documentation ‡ ITGM 709 Visual Interface and Information Design ‡ ITGM 710 Character Development § ITGM 715 Interactive Web Design § ITGM 719 Scripting for Interactivity # ITGM 721 Environments for Games # ITGM 723 Human-centered Interactive Design ITGM 749 ITGM Portfolio and Business Practices ITGM 755 Thesis Studio I: Exploration and Prototype Research ITGM 765 Thesis Studio II: Application and Production ITGM 779F Graduate Field Internship ¶ ITGM 779T Graduate Teaching Internship ¶ ITGM 790 Interactive Design and Game Development M.F.A. Thesis — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective † — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one course. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § Choose one of these two courses. # Choose one of these two courses. ¶ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

195

SCAD.EDU / ILLUSTRATION

INTERIOR DESIGN

Ignacio Ivan Alvarez, B.F.A. interior design, Thomaston, Georgia

197

INDS

INTERIOR DESIGN

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF BUILDING ARTS

MASTER OF ARTS

INTERIOR DESIGNERS SHAPE THE SPACES THAT MATTER MOST, CONCEIVING AND DESIGNING HOSPITALITY, RETAIL, MUSEUM, CORPORATE AND RESIDENTIAL INTERIORS THAT INSPIRE. Concerned with far more than just beauty and style, interior designers

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS

examine the fundamental relationship humans have with the

CORPORATE DESIGNER

environments and objects around them. They carefully and holistically

FACILITIES PLANNER

consider purpose and use, health, wellness and sustainable practices. At

HEALTH CARE FACILITY DESIGNER

SCAD, interior design students learn to engage aesthetic theory, culture,

HOSPITALITY DESIGNER

materiality and function in the design of interior spaces — and they do it

INTERIOR DESIGNER

under the guidance of credentialed and connected professors.

LIGHTING DESIGNER PROJECT MANAGER

In every interior design course at SCAD, students are challenged to

RETAIL DESIGNER

become thoughtful designers capable of critical thinking, effective

SPACE PLANNER

communication and productive teamwork. Undergraduate students

SPECIFICATIONS WRITER

study history, construction methods, materials, furnishing, lighting, building codes, barrier-free design and other specializations. The B.F.A. degree programs at both SCAD Atlanta and SCAD Savannah are accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation, affirming that graduates are qualified to enter professional practice. At the graduate level, the curriculum emphasizes emerging materials, human response and research methods. M.F.A. students investigate the design discipline in depth to become professional practitioners and educators. Work includes commercial, residential and institutional design, and addresses a wide range of behavioral, environmental, decorative and technical issues. Students at every level work with electronic design software, including Autodesk Revit, AutoCAD, SketchUp, Adobe Creative Cloud Complete and Autodesk 3ds Max.

FEELS LIKE THE FOURTH TIME For the fourth consecutive year, SCAD’s undergraduate interior design program was ranked No. 1 in the United States in DesignIntelligence’s annual “America’s Best Architecture & Design Schools.” The honor goes to the university program that interior design professionals deem to be “best preparing students for success in the profession.”

198

SCAD.EDU / INTERIOR-DESIGN

199

INDS

To gain valuable connections and experience, design students often participate in sponsored projects. Most recently, they joined forces with SCAD urban design, architecture and furniture design on the groundbreaking SCADpad initiative, a prototype community that expands new possibilities for micro-housing — within a midcentury parking structure. Interior design students gave each micro-dwelling a unique visual identity, creating custom exterior and interior elements, from fixtures and finishes to artworks and textiles. SCADpad residences have been prominently featured by CNN, Time magazine, Dwell, Fast Company, Architectural Record, Elle Decor, USA Today and NBC’s “Today” show. The micro-housing community was highlighted at the 2014 World Architecture Festival, and was honored with AIA Georgia’s 2014 Honor Award and the 2015 Best of the Best Forum Design Award from the Georgia chapter of the International Interior Design Association. In awarding SCAD its top ranking, DesignIntelligence cited the university’s outstanding buildings and facilities equipped with leading-edge technology. Students also benefit from a global view of the discipline — from the soaring skyline of Hong Kong and the picturesque countryside of Lacoste, France, to the metropolitan bustle of Atlanta, Georgia, and the historic charm of Savannah, Georgia, SCAD students are immersed in environments conducive to creative exploration and professional networking.

SUCCESS BY DESIGN For three consecutive years, SCAD’s graduate interior design programs were ranked No. 1 in the United States by DesignIntelligence.

200

SCAD.EDU / INTERIOR-DESIGN

B.F.A. DEGREE  INTERIOR DESIGN

35

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 115 Graphics for the Building Arts DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Studio elective

55

General education ARLH 206 Modern Architecture I: 1750–1900 ARLH 208 Modern Architecture II: 1900–Present ARLH 211 Survey of World Architecture and Urbanism * ARLH 363 World Vernacular Architecture * ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ENGL elective — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

HOURS

HOURS

M.A. DEGREE  INTERIOR DESIGN

45

HOURS

80

Major curriculum ELDS 225 Electronic Design I: Digital Communication for the Building Arts INDS 101 Introduction to Interior Design INDS 102 Form, Space and Order INDS 110 Interior Design Studio I: Exploring People and Space INDS 204 Rendering for the Interior INDS 209 Interior Materials INDS 210 Interior Design Studio II: Specialized Interior Environments INDS 211 History of Interior Design INDS 220 Building Construction and Systems for the Interior INDS 302 Lighting for the Interior INDS 320 Interior Design Studio III: Documentation and Communication INDS 350 Interior Design Studio IV: Collaborative Practice in Design INDS 413 Professional Practice in Interior Design 90* INDS 470 Interior Design Studio V: HOURS Capstone I — Design Thinking for Innovation INDS 480 Interior Design Studio VI: Capstone II — Design Development and Communication — ELDS elective

10

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

HOURS

HOURS

180

HOURS

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ MATH 101 Intermediate Mathematics is recommended. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER

INDS INDS INDS INDS INDS INDS INDS

702 Interior Design Seminar 706 Interior Design Theory and Criticism 709 Research Methods for Interior Design 721 Emerging Interior Materials 726 Environmental Psychology for Interior Design 740 Contemporary Issues in Interior Design 749 Interior Design M.A. Final Project — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE 

INTERIOR DESIGN INDS INDS INDS INDS INDS INDS INDS

502 Technical Foundation for Interior Design * 503 Design Visualization, Communication and Documentation * 504 Interior Design Studio Applications * 702 Interior Design Seminar 706 Interior Design Theory and Criticism 709 Research Methods for Interior Design 712 Graduate Interior Design Studio I: Analysis and Design of Live-work Settings INDS 714 Graduate Interior Design Studio II: Environments for Special Populations INDS 726 Environmental Psychology for Interior Design INDS 740 Contemporary Issues in Interior Design INDS 751 Graduate Interior Design Studio III: Inclusive Design for Special Populations INDS 752 Graduate Interior Design Studio IV: Environments for Public Interaction INDS 779F Graduate Field Internship † T INDS 779 Graduate Teaching Internship † INDS 779F Graduate Field Internship ‡ INDS 779T Graduate Teaching Internship ‡ INDS 791 Graduate Interior Design Studio V: Thesis I — Developing Research to Inform Design INDS 792 Graduate Interior Design Studio VI: Thesis II — Informed Design Application — 700-level ELDS elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

SCAD enabled me to become the designer I want to be. Capable professors, talented peers, numerous guest lecturers and signature events — they all allow you to reflect on your strengths, work on your weaknesses and aim for perfection. Bernardo Coronado-Guerra, M.F.A. interior design, Mexico City, Mexico

201

RODRIGO BUELVAS M.A. INTERIOR DESIGN CARTAGENA, COLOMBIA

SCAD ALUMNUS RODRIGO BUELVAS CREATES SPACES THAT CROSS CULTURES AS A DESIGNER. ALUMNI TALK

Q: What made you decide to study at SCAD? A: I loved the programs and creative environment at SCAD. You’re exposed to people from all different continents. This diversity helps you develop an understanding of how people from other cultures think, work and act differently.

Q: How did the interior design program help you grow as an artist? A: SCAD gave me a solid foundation in interior design. Professors encouraged me to study other subjects and get involved in the different creative communities the university offers. It helped me solidify my knowledge in interior design.

Q: What is the most important lesson you learned at SCAD? A:

O  ne of the most essential things I learned at SCAD was how to value what my profession does, to value what I do and to help others understand that value, as well as the impact it has on the world.

LEARN MORE AT SCAD.EDU/RODRIGO-BUELVAS.

202

SCAD.EDU / ALUMNI

SCAD.EDU / ILLUSTRATION

JEWELRY

Stephanie O’Brien, B.F.A. jewelry and objects, Bergenfield, New Jersey

205

JEWL

JEWELRY

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF DESIGN

MASTER OF ARTS

JEWELRY DESIGNERS CREATE AESTHETICALLY STRONG, WEARABLE OBJECTS THAT DELIGHT AND SURPRISE — FROM TACTILE SYMBOLS OF PERSONAL EXPRESSION TO FUTURE HEIRLOOMS AND FINE ART INSTALLATIONS.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS ACCESSORY DESIGNER CORPORATE JEWELRY DESIGNER CUSTOM JEWELRY DESIGNER

Characterized by conceptual thinking and refined craftsmanship,

DESIGN CONSULTANT

the SCAD jewelry program teaches students to identify and

FINE ARTIST

execute truly original designs in an evolving industry.

FINE JEWELER

Coursework addresses a fast-paced, dynamic design world

JEWELRY DESIGN ENTREPRENEUR

and leads students through myriad techniques and processes.

JEWELRY TECHNICAL SPECIALIST

Emphasis is also placed on the articulation of ideas and the

STUDIO GOLDSMITH/SILVERSMITH

professional presentation of work. The M.A. offers in-depth

STUDIO JEWELRY ARTIST

study and a focused approach to jewelry creation, meeting industry-specific objectives. The M.F.A. culminates in a thesis project to showcase students’ sophisticated contributions to their field. All students benefit from a comprehensive program that promotes participation in national and international competitions, exhibition opportunities, and internships with top names in the jewelry profession.

BIGGEST AND BRIGHTEST The SCAD jewelry department is housed in a 13,562-square-foot facility flush with resources that enable students to fabricate, cast, finish, enamel, laser weld, anodize, electroplate, electroform, smith silver and set stones — all on-site. It also houses SCADlab, which offers 3-D printers and large-format photo printers that are available to all students.

206

SCAD.EDU / JEWELRY

207

JEWL

In Savannah, SCAD jewelry students create within a dedicated 13,562-square-foot facility that puts cuttingedge technology at their fingertips. They engage in invention and innovation through the physical process of shaping objects, utilizing resources that include two laser welders, an induction casting machine, a microscope system, a dual handpiece Micro-Motor System, Solidscape 3Z Pro wax printers, Roland JWX-10 milling machines and Cintiq tablets. Software resources include Adobe Creative Cloud Complete, Matrix Digital Goldsmith, KeyShot and an authorized RhinoFabStudio, enabling students to receive industry-led instruction and earn Rhino certification before graduation. Sponsored projects with professional partners place students within authentic environments to learn industry practices. As students collaborate to solve design challenges, they navigate real factors such as client expectations, budgets and deadlines. Students have partnered with The Limited, Michael Kors Watches, Fossil Watches, Fossil Jewelry and McGee Group. SCAD is also the only university invited to participate in four of the nation’s most prestigious fine art craft shows: the Smithsonian Craft Show, Philadelphia Museum of Art Contemporary Craft Show, American Craft Council Show in Atlanta and Palm Beach Fine Craft Show. Students travel to these events, while visitors also regularly come to SCAD to offer critiques and mentor students. Department guests include Gijs Bakker, Ted Noten, Omar Torres, Eddie Borgo, Danielle and Jodie Snyder, Iris Eichenberg, Kacper Dolatowski, Biba Schutz, Anthony Camargo, Irene Neuwirth, Nak Armstrong, Robert Lee Morris, Waris Ahluwalia, Robert Ebendorf, Andres Gonzalez, Chi Galatea Huynh, Barbara Heinrich, Gail Brown, Tim McCreight, Charon Kransen, Donald Friedlich and Leonard Urso.

t Lauren Heydinger, B.F.A. jewelry, Bellefontaine, Ohio

The atmosphere at SCAD is very collaborative. I think that’s important for any artist. Corinne Grealish, B.F.A. metals and jewelry, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

M.A. DEGREE  JEWELRY

B.F.A. DEGREE  JEWELRY

35

HOURS

45*

HOURS

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 230 Drawing for Design DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 115 Creative Thinking Strategies * — Studio elective*

55

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications † CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications † COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective ‡ — Mathematics/natural sciences elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡

80

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration § MTJW 102 Introduction to Jewelry MTJW 225 Studio Practice I: Design and Fabrication 90* HOURS MTJW 235 Idea Visualization for Jewelry Design MTJW 245 CAD and RP for Jewelry Design MTJW 255 Studio Practice II: Content and Context MTJW 304 Rendering for Jewelry Design MTJW 306 Adornment, Identity and the Power of Jewelry MTJW 325 Studio Practice III: Materials, Processes and Creative Solutions MTJW 355 Portfolio Development MTJW 360 Innovations in Studio Practice MTJW 400 Senior Project I: Concept Development MTJW 460 Senior Project II: Studio Application MTJW 490 Senior Capstone Experience: Professionalization and Practice — MTJW or SDES elective § — MTJW or SDES elective — MTJW or SDES elective

HOURS

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

MTJW 502 Contemporary Processes in Studio Practice * SDES 501 Visual Communication and Presentation * SDES 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * ARTH 701 Contemporary Art MTJW 702 History of Jewelry as Source MTJW 705 Contextual Study I: Technical Research MTJW 708 Contextual Study II: Concept Development MTJW 724 Contemporary Issues in Jewelry MTJW 731 Multiples: Objects for Adornment MTJW 739 Theory and Criticism for Jewelry MTJW 749 Jewelry M.A. Final Project — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE  JEWELRY

MTJW 502 Contemporary Processes in Studio Practice * SDES 501 Visual Communication and Presentation * SDES 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * ARTH 701 Contemporary Art ARTH 702 Art Criticism MTJW 702 History of Jewelry as Source MTJW 705 Contextual Study I: Technical Research MTJW 708 Contextual Study II: Concept Development MTJW 724 Contemporary Issues in Jewelry MTJW 731 Multiples: Objects for Adornment MTJW 739 Theory and Criticism for Jewelry MTJW 755 Integrated Solutions for Jewelry and Objects MTJW 765 Applied Theory and Practice in Jewelry MTJW 770 Professional Development in Jewelry MTJW 779F Graduate Field Internship † MTJW 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † MTJW 779F Graduate Field Internship ‡ MTJW 779T Graduate Teaching Internship ‡ MTJW 790 Jewelry M.F.A. Thesis — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS,

* Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. § Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

209

LUXURY AND FASHION MANAGEMENT

LUXURY AND FASHION MANAGEMENT SCHOOL OF FASHION

MASTER OF ARTS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS

THE LUXURY MARKET IS A GROWING GLOBAL ENTERPRISE AND ITS LEADERS MUST SPEAK THE LANGUAGE OF INTERNATIONAL FINANCE, RECOGNIZE THE TIDES OF MACROECONOMICS AND UNDERSTAND THE MOST IMPORTANT PLAYER IN THE MARKETPLACE: THE CONSUMER. The professionals who manage top luxury brands — from resort hotels and designer labels to worldwide retail chains and leading style magazines — understand the complexities of organizational

BRAND MANAGER FASHION FORECASTER GLOBAL SOURCER LUXURY BRAND ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LUXURY MARKETER PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR RETAIL BUYER RETAIL MANAGER SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGER VISUAL MERCHANDISING MANAGER

management and the narrative that drives a resonant marketing campaign. SCAD’s luxury and fashion management curriculum prepares students to find their fortes in the profession. SCAD offers the world’s very first M.A. and M.F.A. degree programs in the specialized field of luxury and fashion management, and for professionals who are already active in the market, the M.A. is available completely online through SCAD eLearning. The dynamic courses of study in these premier graduate programs reflect the vigor of an ever-evolving luxury trade.

BIG BUSINESS Fashion is a $1.2 trillion global industry, with more than $250 billion spent annually on fashion in the United States alone, according to industry analysts. Fashion and apparel industries employ 1.9 million people in the United States and have a positive impact on regional economies across the country.

211

LXFM

I always wanted a master’s degree and assumed it would be in business, but someone pointed me toward SCAD and the luxury and fashion management program. It [was] perfect for what I wanted to do — such a great mix of business and design. Kirk Stafford, M.A. luxury and fashion management, Cornelia, Georgia

M.A. DEGREE 

LUXURY AND FASHION MANAGEMENT At SCAD, luxury and fashion management students examine global finance, explore decision-making strategies and study the life cycle of products. The curriculum emphasizes

45*

HOURS

operations and leadership through strategic studies in consumer behavior, marketing, brand and supply chain management, communications

FASH LXFM LXFM ARTH BUSI FASH FASH FASH LXFM LXFM LXFM

503 Forecasting and Business Trends * 501 Professional Concepts and Theories for the Fashion Industry * 502 Fashion Marketing and Advertising Principles * 701 Contemporary Art 710 Financial Reporting and Analysis 721 Computer-enhanced Fashion Design 763 Fashion Promotion 782 Fashion Theory 720 Supply Chain Management Strategies 730 Marketing of Luxury Goods 749 Luxury and Fashion Management M.A. Final Project — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

and promotion. Luxury and fashion management coursework involves research and the exploration of existing models to identify unmet needs and areas for

M.F.A. DEGREE 

improvement. Students use these learning

LUXURY AND FASHION MANAGEMENT

experiences to create their own compelling proposals and business solutions of relevance to the international luxury market. Each year, star-studded signature university events, including the SCAD Fashion Show and SCADstyle, offer students opportunities to interact with and learn from influential leaders of luxury and fashion. Guests include Elle magazine fashion news director Anne Slowey, Women’s Wear Daily executive editor Bridget Foley, Maxim editor-in-chief Kate Lanphear, Bergdorf Goodman president Joshua Schulman, Vogue digital creative director Sally Singer, Marc Jacobs president Robert Duffy and Tom Ford International chairman Domenico De Sole.

90*

HOURS

FASH 503 Forecasting and Business Trends * LXFM 501 Professional Concepts and Theories for the Fashion Industry * LXFM 502 Fashion Marketing and Advertising Principles * ARTH 701 Contemporary Art ARTH 702 Art Criticism BUSI 710 Financial Reporting and Analysis BUSI 745 Marketing Art and Design Ventures BUSI 760 Strategic Financial Management BUSI 781 Global Marketing Management DMGT 783 Design Futures: Trends, Foresight and Intuition FASH 721 Computer-enhanced Fashion Design FASH 763 Fashion Promotion FASH 782 Fashion Theory LXFM 720 Supply Chain Management Strategies LXFM 730 Marketing of Luxury Goods LXFM 779F Graduate Field Internship † LXFM 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † LXFM 790 Luxury and Fashion Management M.F.A. Thesis — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER. 212

SCAD.EDU / LUXURY-FASHION

Fashion designer, SCAD Style Lab mentor and André Leon Talley New Look Award winner Zac Posen; SCAD Atlanta u

213

MOTION MEDIA DESIGN

Yeojin Shin, B.F.A. motion media design, Seoul, South Korea

215

MOME

MOTION MEDIA DESIGN

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MASTER OF ARTS

SCHOOL OF DIGITAL MEDIA MOTION MEDIA DESIGNERS DELIVER SOME OF THE MOST MEMORABLE AND CAPTIVATING MOMENTS IN POPULAR CULTURE: THE TITLE SEQUENCE OF A BOX-OFFICE BLOCKBUSTER, THE OPENING VISUAL OF A NETWORK SPORTS BROADCAST OR A FEATURE THAT TURNS A SMARTPHONE INTO AN INTERACTIVE CANVAS. At SCAD, motion media design students embrace every facet of their future careers, learning to work in both fine art and commercial roles at the intersection of video, abstract film, computer animation, kinetic layout and typography design. The undergraduate curriculum leads to the creation of a professional portfolio, while M.A. and M.F.A. students pursue advanced creative, analytical and methodological studies in preparation for leadership roles in studios or academic settings.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS ART DIRECTOR BROADCAST DESIGNER CREATIVE DIRECTOR CREATIVE TECHNOLOGY DESIGNER DESIGNER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL GRAPHICS MOTION GRAPHICS ANIMATOR MOVIE TITLE DESIGNER PRODUCTION DESIGNER FOR NEW MEDIA COMPANIES STYLE FRAME ILLUSTRATOR USER EXPERIENCE DESIGNER

SCAD STUDENTS SCORE Working with the SCAD Collaborative Learning Center, a team of SCAD motion media design and animation students partnered with FOX Sports to design and produce the title graphics for Super Bowl XLVIII. After conducting in-depth research, they developed three design concepts that brought the story of Cleatus, the network’s robotic football mascot, to life. The final animation was a halfminute slot seen by more than 111.5 million viewers.

216

SCAD.EDU / MOTION-MEDIA-DESIGN

217

In the world’s first specialized degree program

MOME

in motion media design, SCAD students create studio work for gallery and fine art exhibitions, as well as programming for commercial use in broadcasting, learning on the same 2-D, 3-D and compositing tools used in the profession. Academic symposia, such as the annual SCAD CoMotion event, bring industry experts to the university to present lectures, exhibit their work, and participate in creative exchange on broadcast design, motion graphics and media art. Guests include multiple Oscar-winning visual effects professionals, Emmynominated designers, and creative talents behind such networks as VH1 and MTV. Today’s powerhouse companies actively recruit SCAD students, including Apple, CNN, FOX Sports, Sony Pictures Imageworks, ESPN, Industrial Light & Magic, MTV, NBC Sports, Showtime Networks, Digital Kitchen, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Turner Broadcasting and The Weather Channel. Department faculty members are acclaimed masters of the profession, earning Emmy Awards, PromaxBDA awards, the Australian Writers and Art Directors School award, the Game Developers Choice Award, ADDY awards and Fulbright scholarships.

WORK THAT WINS For their collaborative animation, “Memory Stream,” motion media designers Yeojin Shin, B.F.A. motion media design, Seoul, South Korea; Daniel Uribe, B.F.A. motion media design, Mexico City, Mexico; and Peter Clark, B.F.A. graphic design and motion media design, Greenville, North Carolina, were awarded a prestigious Silver Cube award at the 94th Annual Art Directors Club Awards, the oldest continuous international advertising and design award show in the world. The animation also garnered a first-place win at the 2014 Adobe Design Achievement Awards. Since it was introduced in 2001, the ADAA competition has attracted more than 27,000 student participants from 75 countries.

218

SCAD.EDU / MOTION-MEDIA-DESIGN

219

MOME

B.F.A. DEGREE 

MOTION MEDIA DESIGN

35

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Studio elective — Studio elective

65

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition LIBA 288 Media Literacy Theory — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective* — Mathematics/natural sciences elective* — Social/behavioral sciences elective*

70

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration † GRDS 205 Typography I: Anatomy, Form and Space MOME 115 Survey of Motion Media Design MOME 120 Concepts and Storyboards MOME 130 Motion Media Design Techniques I MOME 206 Motion Media Design Techniques II MOME 309 Concepts in Motion Media Design MOME 369 Time-based Typography I MOME 390 Motion Media Design Professional Development MOME 400 Senior Motion Media Design Project I MOME 408 Multiplatform Media Brand Packaging MOME 448 Senior Motion Media Design Project II — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective † — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. † Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

220

SCAD.EDU / MOTION-MEDIA-DESIGN

221

MOME

M.A. DEGREE 

MOTION MEDIA DESIGN

45*

HOURS

MOME 501 Screen Design and Typography * MOME 502 Motion Analysis and Application * MOME 503 Motion Media Context and Application * ARTH 701 Contemporary Art CLC 580 Collaboration † MOME 705 Visualization and Concept Storyboarding MOME 709 Motion Media Cinematography and Editing MOME 729 Dynamic Typography MOME 748 Motion Media Design M.A. Final Project SFDM 719 Media Theory and Application SFDM 721 Studio Business Practice — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective † — 700-level MOME elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE 

MOTION MEDIA DESIGN

90*

HOURS

MOME 501 Screen Design and Typography * MOME 502 Motion Analysis and Application * MOME 503 Motion Media Context and Application * ARTH 701 Contemporary Art CLC 580 Collaboration † MOME 705 Visualization and Concept Storyboarding MOME 709 Motion Media Cinematography and Editing MOME 729 Dynamic Typography MOME 735 Motion Media Design Studio I: Thesis Preproduction MOME 749 Motion Media Design Portfolio MOME 775 Motion Media Design Studio II: Thesis Development MOME 779F Graduate Field Internship ‡ MOME 779T Graduate Teaching Internship ‡ MOME 790 Motion Media Design M.F.A. Thesis SFDM 719 Media Theory and Application SFDM 721 Studio Business Practice — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective † — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective — 700-level MOME elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one course. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

222

SCAD.EDU / MOTION-MEDIA-DESIGN

223

PAINTING

Hasani Sahlehe Lockhart, B.F.A. painting, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

225

PNTG

PAINTING

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS

MASTER OF ARTS

PAINTING IS AN EXPANSIVE AND EVEREVOLVING MEDIUM IN WHICH STUDENTS DEVELOP CREATIVE PROBLEM-SOLVING SKILLS AND COLLABORATIVE ABILITIES THAT INCLUDE AND TRANSCEND FINE ARTS APPLICATIONS. SCAD encourages all painting students to push the boundaries of expression while also mastering classical methods of fine art instruction and professional practice. Through the fusion of traditional skills in a progressive approach, students create works unbound by conventional limitations for a wide range of venues and opportunities that include galleries, museums, the Web, film and publishing. Their finely developed abilities incorporate a number of practices, including performance, installation and digital media. Painting alumni serve as art directors and even branch out into other fields, including design directors for apparel companies or experts in setting and object manipulation for Hollywood.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS ART CONSULTANT FOR PRIVATE OR CORPORATE COLLECTORS ART CRITIC/WRITER CURATOR EXHIBITION DESIGNER FILM AND TELEVISION SCENIC DESIGNER GALLERY OWNER/DIRECTOR/ ADMINISTRATOR INDEPENDENT STUDIO ARTIST MUSEUM PREPARATOR

Undergraduate students gain expertise in traditional and contemporary

PAINTER

approaches and learn to articulate a personal vision while developing a

PROFESSOR/INSTRUCTOR/TEACHER

body of work. Emphasis is placed on the entire palette of professional practice — from editing a portfolio and engaging a gallery to creating a self-promotional website. Graduate students work in private studios with mentoring and critical feedback from faculty, guest artists and their peers through a series of rigorous traditional and studio courses. Topics in contemporary art, art criticism and critical theory are explored throughout the coursework, offering advanced perspective and providing a historical and critical context. Students discuss their work and interact with collectors through myriad open studios, gallery strolls, installations and performances organized

GLOBAL EXPOSURE IN POSITIVE PLACES

by SCAD. A critique-based system of learning further expands students’

The works of SCAD painting

opportunities to see and realize ambitious works of fine art in all media.

alumni can be found near

Even while still taking classes, students find numerous opportunities

and far on the international

within metropolitan settings in which to exhibit their work to the public in

art fair scene — from Art

both traditional and cutting-edge venues.

Basel Miami Beach to Art Central Hong Kong.

226

SCAD.EDU / PAINTING

227

PNTG

Graduates of the university’s multifaceted painting program have exhibited at world-renowned museums, including the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, as well as at the world’s most prestigious art fairs, including the Hong Kong International Art Fair, Prix de Rome in the Netherlands, Art Basel Miami Beach and Art Central Hong Kong. New American Paintings has featured or published the work of SCAD painting students and alumni more than 50 times since 2000, and painting alumni are propelled to rewarding careers as studio artists, educators and digital matte artists. Throughout the academic year, SCAD painting students have the opportunity to view more than 250 exhibitions by luminaries from the arts world, hosted by the university at its Atlanta, Savannah, Hong Kong and Lacoste locations. In addition, the SCAD Museum of Art hosts dozens of major exhibitions, among them the works of media artist and choreographer Jonah Bokaer, visual artist and performer Tony Orrico and installation artist Nicola López. Annual events such as SCAD deFINE ART invite students to place a finger on the pulse of the art world by attending exhibitions, panel discussions, lectures and more. Recent SCAD deFINE ART guests include MacArthur Fellow Xu Bing, sculptural installation artist Nari Ward, and New York Magazine senior critic Jerry Saltz. Guest artists and alumni mentors also conduct critiques, review portfolios, visit student studios, offer lectures and hold workshops. Guest artists have included Jack Whitten, Adam Cvijanovic, Marina Abramović, and Tim Rollins and K.O.S.; SCAD alumnae Summer Wheat and Monica Cook; distinguished curator Philippe de Montebello and critic Gary Tinterow.

deFINING ART AND DESIGN EDUCATION The annual SCAD deFINE ART celebration offers students unprecedented opportunities to engage with celebrated artists, curators and scholars through exhibitions, master classes, panels and critiques. 228

SCAD.EDU / PAINTING

229

PNTG 230

SCAD.EDU / PAINTING

p Isaac McCaslin, B.F.A. painting, Madisonville, Louisiana

It’s the artist’s role to explain the past, B.F.A. DEGREE 

PAINTING

35

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 200 Life Drawing I DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Directed elective *

65

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications † CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications † COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition PHIL 301 Aesthetics ‡ — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective‡ — ENGL elective — General education elective § — Mathematics/natural sciences elective § — Social/behavioral sciences elective §

HOURS

HOURS

60

HOURS

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Studio elective — Studio elective

180

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

HOURS

of language. We’re taught at SCAD that media and concept are inseparable. Jason Kofke, M.F.A. painting, B.F.A. painting, Vero Beach, Florida

M.A. DEGREE  PAINTING

45*

HOURS

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration # PNTG 203 Oil-based Media Exploration PNTG 206 Water-based Media Exploration PNTG 302 Intermediate Painting PNTG 310 Life Painting PNTG 312 Mixed Media ¶ PNTG 319 Painting Materials and Techniques ¶ PNTG 401 Alternative Media Exploration PNTG 409 Advanced Painting PNTG 415 Painting Senior Seminar SFIN 413 Professional Practices in Fine Arts — PNTG elective # — PNTG elective — PNTG elective

20

HOURS

present and future, beyond the realm

* Choose one of the following: CERA 125 Ceramics I: Understanding Materials and Techniques, PHOT 113 Photographic Foundations I, PRMK 200 Introduction to Printmaking, PRMK 202 Etching I: Experimenting with Plate Materials, PRMK 203 Lithography I: Plate and Stone or SCPT 110 Sculptural Practices I: Fabrication and Materials. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. # Choose one course. ¶ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

DRAW 502 Drawing Methods Studio * PNTG 502 Painting Methods and Form * PNTG 503 Painting Aesthetics and Concept * ARTH 701 Contemporary Art DRAW 708 Graduate Drawing PNTG 704 Formal Aspects of Painting PNTG 728 Studio I: Ideation PNTG 738 Studio II: Theory in Practice PNTG 749 Painting M.A. Final Project SFIN 716 Theory and Processes I: Critical Analysis SFIN 745 Fine Art M.A. Self-promotion — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE 

PAINTING

90*

HOURS

DRAW 502 Drawing Methods Studio * PNTG 502 Painting Methods and Form * PNTG 503 Painting Aesthetics and Concept * ARTH 701 Contemporary Art ARTH 702 Art Criticism † ARTH 703 Modern and Contemporary Critical Theory † DRAW 708 Graduate Drawing PNTG 704 Formal Aspects of Painting PNTG 728 Studio I: Ideation PNTG 738 Studio II: Theory in Practice PNTG 758 Studio III: Vision and Aesthetics PNTG 768 Studio IV: Individual Exploration ‡ PNTG 775 Advanced Painting Studio Analysis PNTG 779F Graduate Field Internship § PNTG 779T Graduate Teaching Internship § PNTG 779F Graduate Field Internship ¶ PNTG 779T Graduate Teaching Internship ¶ PNTG 790 Painting M.F.A. Thesis SFIN 716 Theory and Processes I: Critical Analysis SFIN 756 Theory and Processes II: Philosophical Interpretations ‡ SFIN 770 Fine Art M.F.A. Self-promotion — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § Choose one of these two courses. ¶ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER. 231

SCOTT CARTER B.F.A. PAINTING HOPKINSVILLE, KENTUCKY

SCAD ALUMNUS SCOTT CARTER PUSHES THE BOUNDARIES OF FINE ART AND PERFORMANCE ALUMNI TALK

AS A SCULPTOR AND INSTALLATION ARTIST. Q: What led you to design environments? A: I took an installation class at SCAD, and it became obvious to me that I wanted to work with spaces and architecture. I became serious about this after working with physical spaces and seeing how I can alter them to shape the viewer’s experience.

Q: What is your driving force as an artist? A: I think we all have a creative drive, and I feel a drive to make things. Art is a way for me to get these creative ideas out and feel fulfilled. That’s what I enjoy. It’s what I want to do, and if I’m not doing it, I’m not happy.

Q: What is your biggest source of inspiration? A: I’ve always been fascinated with construction, the materials, the type of work. The tangibility of being able to manipulate something that’s three-dimensional and making something else with meaning — it’s just really interesting to me.

LEARN MORE AT SCAD.EDU/SCOTT-CARTER.

232

SCAD.EDU / ALUMNI

PERFORMING ARTS

235

PERF

PERFORMING ARTS

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF ENTERTAINMENT ARTS

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

PERFORMANCE IS THE MOST VISCERAL OF THE ARTS, WHERE ACTORS GIVE LIFE TO CHARACTERS AND ENRAPTURE AUDIENCES.

CREATIVE CAREERS

Today’s performing artists work on stage and in film, creating memorable characters in sitcoms and advertisements, providing the voices for animated heroes, and reaching a global audience via TV shows and viral YouTube videos. At SCAD, performing arts students receive focused instruction paired with opportunities to apply their skills in real projects, working with filmmakers, designers, animators and directors to bring their ideas to life.

ACTOR ARTISTIC DIRECTOR CASTING DIRECTOR PERFORMANCE ARTIST PLAYWRIGHT/SCRIPTWRITER PRODUCER STAGE MANAGER STUNTMAN/STUNTWOMAN

The undergraduate curriculum is structured to support individual

VOCAL ARTIST

artistic growth. Students build professional discipline, historical

VOICE-OVER TALENT

perspective and an individual aesthetic. Graduate students pursue advanced studies in acting, movement, vocal production, and selfpromotion for screen, stage and emerging mediums. SCAD performing arts students develop skills in an environment where character creation, visual creativity, hands-on production and cultural dialogue are emphasized. Students have the opportunity to perform in SCAD films each year, plus a touring production of a classic, a performance by first-year and transfer students, dance concerts, original works, new interpretations of classical and modern plays, musicals, improv performances, senior projects and M.F.A. thesis shows.

READY FOR THEIR CLOSE-UPS The SCAD Casting Office — the only on-site casting office in higher education — connects SCAD actors to film and television productions of all sizes and across a variety of locations. SCAD actors have been cast in major motion pictures, including “CBGB,” “The Conspirator” and “Footloose” (2011), and in a variety of television series, such as CBS’ “Reckless,” Cinemax’s “Banshee,” BET’s “The Game,” Lifetime’s “Army Wives” and USA Network’s “Royal Pains.”

236

SCAD.EDU / PERFORMING-ARTS

Actor Asa Butterfield, Savannah Film Festival, Crites Hall, SCAD Savannah u

237

PERF

Performing arts professors — award-winning actors, screenwriters and directors with impressive film, television and professional theater credentials — bring years of success to the classroom. The curriculum is complemented by courses in dramatic writing, dance and vocal performance. Society of American Fight Directors Actor Combatant certification is offered for students who wish to expand their career options in this specialized area of stage combat. Performing arts students investigate a wide range of roles for the application of their talents — director, producer, stage manager, casting agent and more. Engagement with other university departments — including film and television, fashion, animation, and interactive design and game development — gives students new perspectives on performing arts. The university offers career-launching interaction with the industry through on-site auditions with the best agents, managers and casting directors in the business. Students also have the opportunity to perform in showcases in Atlanta, Los Angeles and New York. During the annual Savannah Film Festival and SCAD aTVfest, performing arts students interact with internationally lauded actors and directors who conduct master classes and spend time sharing their knowledge and experiences. While attending featured screenings, panel discussions and presentations, students have the opportunity to learn from these celebrated performers. The department offers a stellar array of production facilities: Savannah Film Studios, the historic Lucas Theatre for the Arts (1,200 seats), Trustees Theater (1,100 seats), Arnold Hall theater (400 seats), the SCAD Museum of Art theater (250 seats), and the Mondanaro Theater (a 150-seat black box venue) in Savannah, as well as the three-stage SCADshow theater (635 seats) in Atlanta.

238

t “Ragtime,” May 2015, Lucas Theatre for the Arts

My professors and mentors  offered me a safe, expansive environment in which to find my performance voice. SCAD gave me a healthy respect

B.F.A. DEGREE  PERFORMING ARTS

30

HOURS

55

HOURS

85

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

for interdisciplinary work

Foundation studies DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 204 Design III: Time — Studio elective — Studio elective

that I have carried with me into my professional life. Ryan McCurdy, B.F.A. performing arts, Charlotte, North Carolina

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective † Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ PERF 106 Movement for Performance I PER 160 Fundamentals of Character and Stagecraft PERF 201 Survey of Theater and Drama I PERF 204 Survey of Theater and Drama II PERF 210 Voice for Performance I PERF 211 Voice for Performance II PERF 261 Improvisation PERF 300 Theory and Acting for the Classics PERF 310 Stage Combat I PERF 314 Acting for the Camera I PERF 340 Scene Study PERF 366 Advanced Character Development PERF 375 Directing PERF 400 Audition Techniques and Materials § PERF 414 Acting for the Camera II # PERF 416 Auditioning for Film and Television § PERF 421 Advanced Acting for the Classics # PERF 460 Actor/Writer Laboratory ¶ PERF 495 Performing Arts Senior Project ¶ — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective ‡

M.F.A. DEGREE  PERFORMING ARTS

90

HOURS

PERF 701 Graduate Improvisation Technique for Screen and Stage PERF 705 Art of Combat for Screen and Stage PERF 708 Vocal Technique for Screen, Stage and Voice-over PERF 711 Contemporary Drama in Context PERF 718 Advanced Voice and Speech for Live and Recorded Media PERF 721 Performance Styles: Classical and Period Texts PERF 731 Performance Styles: Realism PERF 735 On-camera Performance Technique PERF 741 Performance Styles: Contemporary Acting PERF 745 On-camera Acting Styles PERF 755 On-camera Audition Techniques PERF 770 Branding, Self-marketing for the Performer PERF 775 On-camera Comedy Styles PERF 777 Applications in Performance PERF 790 Performing Arts M.F.A. Thesis — 700-level ARTH elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

 SCAD students were incredible today! Without exception, they

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

were composed, prepared and

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

of the camera. We were amazed.

* Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one course. § Choose one of these two courses. # Choose one of these two courses. ¶ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

completely professional in front

Amy Herzig, executive vice president of casting, CBS TV

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

239

SCAD.EDU / ILLUSTRATION

PHOTOGRAPHY

Justin Tarlton, B.F.A. photography, Marshville, North Carolina

241

PHOT

PHOTOGRAPHY

BACHELOR OF ARTS

SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

PHOTOGRAPHERS FRAME, CAPTURE AND ILLUMINATE THE MODERN WORLD. THEY PROVIDE VIEWERS WITH REINTERPRETATIONS OF FAMILIAR VANTAGES AND GRANT ACCESS TO VIEWS RARELY SEEN, FROM NEW PERSPECTIVES ON WORKS OF ART AND ARCHITECTURE TO THE DOCUMENTATION OF HISTORY, NATURE, CULTURE AND POLITICS. Through a comprehensive program at SCAD, students learn the full spectrum of photography — from historic and analog processes to the newest digital technologies professionals use today. Students gain fluency with a variety of camera systems, digital workflows, color and black-and-white techniques, and studio and location lighting, developing expertise through tailored study and faculty mentorship. Coursework is designed to help students realize a unique creative vision,

MASTER OF ARTS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS ADVERTISING/STUDIO/COMMERCIAL/ ILLUSTRATIVE PHOTOGRAPHER ART DIRECTOR/ART BUYER CORPORATE PHOTOGRAPHER DIGITAL TECHNICIAN/ PHOTOFINISHER DIGITAL VIDEOGRAPHER EXHIBITION CURATOR/GALLERY DIRECTOR

master visual literacy and launch their careers. M.A. students engage in

FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER/STYLIST

advanced study and complete a unified body of work in the form of a final

FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHER

portfolio. M.F.A. students practice advanced research toward their thesis

HISTORICAL/ARCHITECTURAL

projects and careers in both professional photography and academia. Equipment in well-furnished facilities at each location includes leadingedge Mac computers, the most recent versions of the Adobe Creative

PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOJOURNALIST/DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHER

Cloud Complete, Imacon scanners, an ICG drum scanner, a Chromira ProLab printer and wide-format inkjet printers. Students may augment their career preparation by becoming Adobe Certified Experts in Photoshop.

PICTURE PERFECT The SCAD M.F.A. photography program has been ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top photography programs in the United States.

242

SCAD.EDU / PHOTOGRAPHY

243

PHOT

A strong emphasis on internships encourages students to gain real experience outside the classroom. Photography students have served as interns for Annie Leibovitz, Ford Models, Turner Broadcasting, Hearst Magazines and others. Photography alumni work for companies such as Harper’s Bazaar, Google, Popular Mechanics, Field & Stream, WebMD, Ralph Lauren, Amazon, Saks Fifth Avenue, Nissan and Facebook. The SCAD photography department is well represented in the professional world, with alumni taking top honors in prestigious international competitions — including first place in the Panasonic Lumix Changing Photography contest and a Photo District News Curator Award. In the last three years, five SCAD alumni have been highlighted among PDN’s prestigious “30 New and Emerging Photographers to Watch.” SCAD hosts hundreds of exhibitions every year, across all locations, bringing the best in contemporary photography to SCAD students for contemplation and study. Through events like SCADstyle and SCAD deFINE ART, talks and lectures by leading critics, photographers and other fine artists further inform and inspire. The award-winning SCAD Museum of Art houses the Shirrel Rhoades Photography Collection, including iconic works by Mathew Brady, Ansel Adams, Robert Mapplethorpe and Man Ray. Each year, the department hosts the popular “Silver & Ink” exhibition and portfolio review event, providing students with the opportunity to have their portfolios reviewed by industry professionals and submit work for a juried exhibition and publication.

FULL EXPOSURE SCAD student and alumni work is featured in prominent venues across various media: CNN, MTV, NBC’s “Today” show, National Geographic, Fast Company, Forbes and Garden & Gun.

244

SCAD.EDU / PHOTOGRAPHY

245

PHOT

B.F.A. DEGREE  PHOTOGRAPHY

The photography department at SCAD was everything I needed it to be. SCAD

35

HOURS

prepared me for life in the real world as a photographer. Mark Mahaney, B.F.A. photography, Saint Charles, Illinois

55

HOURS

B.A. DEGREE 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION Concentration in PHOTOGRAPHY

25

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application — Studio elective

90

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition PHIL 301 Aesthetics — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — General education elective † — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

HOURS

HOURS

45

HOURS

Concentration CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ PHOT 113 Photographic Foundations I PHOT 114 Photographic Foundations II PHOT 214 Controlled Lighting I PHOT 219 Photography Project Seminar I PHOT 238 History of Photography I § PHOT 240 History of Photography II § PHOT 340 Inkjet Printing for Photography PHOT 345 Advanced Digital Imaging PHOT 400 Business Practices for Photography — PHOT elective ‡

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Directed elective * — Studio elective General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications † CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications † COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective ‡ — Mathematics/natural sciences elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡

75

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration § PHOT 113 Photographic Foundations I PHOT 114 Photographic Foundations II PHOT 150 Color Technique PHOT 214 Controlled Lighting I PHOT 218 Black-and-white Technique PHOT 219 Photography Project Seminar I PHOT 220 Large-format Technique PHOT 238 History of Photography I PHOT 240 History of Photography II PHOT 319 Photography Project Seminar II PHOT 400 Business Practices for Photography PHOT 475 Photography Senior Project — PHOT elective § — PHOT elective — PHOT elective

15

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Studio elective

HOURS

HOURS

180

HOURS

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of the following: CERA 125 Ceramics I: Understanding Materials and Techniques, PNTG 101 Painting Basics for the Non-major, PRMK 200 Introduction to Printmaking or SCPT 110 Sculptural Practices I: Fabrication and Materials. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. § Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

It’s good to get out of our comfort zone, to actually

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective

work with real-world

20

180

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

students get a chance to do.­­­

HOURS

HOURS

* Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one course. § Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

246

SCAD.EDU / PHOTOGRAPHY

professionals, because that’s not something that a lot of Jessica Imhoff, B.F.A. photography, Boulder, Colorado

Carly Starnes, B.F.A. photography, Waxhaw, North Carolina u

247

PHOT 248

SCAD.EDU / PHOTOGRAPHY

M.A. DEGREE  PHOTOGRAPHY

45*

HOURS

PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT

501 Survey: Photography * 502 Photographic Technique and Signification * 503 Photography Portfolio Process * 709 Graduate Critique Seminar 714 Digital Craft I: Technique and Concept 719 Photographic Arts I: Ideation and Experimentation 730 Digital Printing Methodology 749 Photography M.A. Final Portfolio — 700-level ARTH elective — Directed elective † — Directed elective ‡ — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of the following: PHOT 706 Documentary Photography I, PHOT 715 Studio Craft, PHOT 724 Web Design for Photography or PHOT 754 Business of Marketing Photography. ‡ Choose one of the following: PHOT 716 Commercial I: Standards and Innovations in Lighting Design, PHOT 726 Documentary Photography II or PHOT 734 Digital Craft II: Beyond Visual Limits. Only PHOT 734 Digital Craft II: Beyond Visual Limits is available via eLearning. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE 

PHOTOGRAPHY

90*

HOURS

PHOT PHOT PHOT ARTH ARTH PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT PHOT

501 Survey: Photography * 502 Photographic Technique and Signification * 503 Photography Portfolio Process * 701 Contemporary Art 702 Art Criticism 709 Graduate Critique Seminar 714 Digital Craft I: Technique and Concept 719 Photographic Arts I: Ideation and Experimentation 722 Photographic Arts II: Project Definition and Development 753 Photographic Arts III: Aesthetics and Direction 762 Issues in Contemporary Photography 764 Photographic Arts IV: Sequence and Nuance 779F Graduate Field Internship † 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † 790 Photography M.F.A. Thesis — Directed elective ‡ — Directed elective ‡ — Directed elective § — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of the following: PHOT 704 Black-and-white Craft, PHOT 707 Color Craft, PHOT 715 Studio Craft or PHOT 730 Digital Printing Methodology. § Choose one of the following: PHOT 775 Photographic Arts V: Portfolio Refinement, PHOT 779F Graduate Field Internship or PHOT 779T Graduate Teaching Internship. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

249

COLIN DOUGLAS GRAY B.F.A. PHOTOGRAPHY SPRINGFIELD, VIRGINIA

SCAD ALUMNUS COLIN GRAY CONNECTS WITH OTHERS FROM BEHIND THE LENS. ALUMNI TALK

Q: How did you decide on your major at SCAD? A: One of my prerequisite classes was Intro to Photography. For an assignment I decided to photograph a man who sold fruits and vegetables outside the dorms. I remember developing the picture and thinking, “Man, this is a really cool shot.” I just immediately loved taking photos.

Q: What do you love about portraits? A: I love the interaction with people. A portrait can tell a story, but it could also be just one version of this person or how you present them or how they want to present themselves. With most of my portraits, I try to capture the honest version of the person.

Q: What’s the best part of post-grad life? A: So many alumni move to New York City after graduating from SCAD, which has led to more work or collaborations with friends. It’s so cool to be able to have that community. New York can be a lonely place. Having a community of former SCAD students has been so helpful.

LEARN MORE AT SCAD.EDU/COLIN-DOUGLAS-GRAY.

250

SCAD.EDU / ALUMNI

PRINTMAKING

Christopher Brown, B.F.A. illustration, Birmingham, Alabama

253

PRMK

PRINTMAKING

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

PRINTMAKING IS A 21ST-CENTURY DISCIPLINE IN WHICH ARTISTS MARRY THE BEST OF FINE ART PRACTICE WITH DESIGN TECHNOLOGIES, BOTH HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY. IT EMBRACES MULTIPLE TRADITIONS, BLENDING ELEGANCE AND PRECISION, HISTORY AND INNOVATION.

CREATIVE CAREERS ART EDUCATOR COMMUNITY ARTS ADMINISTRATOR CONSERVATOR CURATOR EXHIBITING ARTIST

From relief, etching and lithography to monotype and digital

MASTER PRINTER

applications, the SCAD printmaking program invites students to

MUSEUM STAFF

consider every aspect of the profession and practice one of human

PRE-PRESS DESIGNER

history’s most enduring arts. Students learn to conceptualize,

PRINT PROTOTYPE TECHNICIAN

experiment and produce work for exhibition and the marketplace. At

SCREEN PRINTER

the undergraduate level, students explore etching, mixed processes, letterpress, the book arts, silkscreen and more. At the graduate level, they delve deeply into studio work, research and the investigation of new processes, producing a body of work that culminates in a thesis. At SCAD, students have access to all the tools and technologies for every form of printmaking, from traditional applications to the finest photographic and digital applications such as photogravure, photolithography and photopolymer techniques. With exposure to such a variety of tools and techniques, students can create fine art for exhibition as practicing artists, and they can also seek careers where printmaking finds expression in stationery and printing, or in fabrics or leather goods used for interior, fashion and accessory design. SCAD printmaking students have worked with BMW on an installation piece, and they have designed prints to be used for scarves by Paradise Garden.

FINE PRINT Printmakers, as artists in the 21st century, have extensive possibilities to contribute to a wide range of professions related to the discipline. Graphic design, fibers, painting, photography, film and more are closely linked to this centuries-old art form.

254

SCAD.EDU / PRINTMAKING

255

PRMK

SCAD printmaking facilities specialize in low-toxicity and nontoxic processes. The advanced printmaking studios at SCAD were designed expressly for this discipline, offering state-of-the-art ventilation, modern presses and the largest Takach etching press in the Southeast, as well as letterpress, papermaking and lithographic studios. SCAD Atlanta is also home to the ACA Library of SCAD, which is equipped with the university’s premier collection of artists’ books — among the most significant collections in the United States. Regular interaction with guest artists and faculty members promotes the art of collaborative printmaking. Students have had the opportunity to work with and assist artists including Kiki Smith, Valerie Hammond, Chakaia Booker, Ingrid Calame, Kael Alford, Marshall Arisman and Jeffrey Sippel. They also enjoy lectures from well-known and respected artists such as Fahamu Pecou. These experiences complement rigorous coursework to give students an advantage in seeking coveted internships, as well as international exposure for their work. All students may study at SCAD Lacoste, where studios and printmaking labs in an extraordinary setting offer a truly inspiring study abroad experience. While spending a quarter or more at this location, students make excursions to Paris and other cities in Europe to study the world’s great printmaking collections and exhibitions. SCAD also has an exclusive standing reservation at the Bibliothèque nationale de France, which holds the largest collection of prints in the world.

SHELF RIGHTEOUS The ACA Library of SCAD in Atlanta holds a premier collection of more than 2,100 artists’ books — original works of art in book form. The genre includes immense diversity in shape, medium and content. The SCAD collection reflects this variety with unique creations from more than 1,000 artists active from the 1960s through the contemporary era.

256

SCAD.EDU / PRINTMAKING

B.F.A. DEGREE  PRINTMAKING

35

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 200 Life Drawing I DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Directed elective *

65

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications † CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications † COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — ENGL elective — General education elective ‡ — Mathematics/natural sciences elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡

HOURS

HOURS

65

HOURS

15

HOURS

180

HOURS

SCAD provided me with a strong technical base that launched me into a career in the field of printmaking and book arts. The faculty worked to prepare me to compete as an artist, and gave me the tools to pursue my goals. Jay Fox, B.F.A. printmaking, Morganton, North Carolina

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration § PRMK 202 Etching I: Experimenting with Plate Materials PRMK 203 Lithography I: Plate and Stone PRMK 205 Monotype/Mixed Processes PRMK 238 Survey of Printmaking PRMK 301 Etching II: Color and Digital Techniques # PRMK 306 Lithography II: Color and Digital Processes # PRMK 308 Book Arts I: Letterpress and Binding Techniques PRMK 311 Serigraphy I: Tools and Techniques PRMK 401 Photographic and Digital Applications for Printmaking PRMK 404 Printmaking Studio I: Proposal and Concept PRMK 408 Printmaking Studio II: Theme and Critique SFIN 413 Professional Practices in Fine Arts — PRMK elective § — PRMK elective Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Studio elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of the following: CERA 125 Ceramics I: Understanding Materials and Techniques, PHOT 113 Photographic Foundations I, PNTG 101 Painting Basics for the Non-major or SCPT 110 Sculptural Practices I: Fabrication and Materials. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. § Choose one course. # Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE  PRINTMAKING

90

HOURS

ARTH 701 Contemporary Art ARTH 702 Art Criticism PRMK 704 Technical Approaches in Printmaking PRMK 713 Studio I: Imagery and Concept PRMK 716 Studio II: Personal Vision PRMK 722 Digital and Photographic Applications in Printmaking PRMK 740 Single Edition Portfolio PRMK 745 Alternative Processes in Printmaking PRMK 764 Graduate Seminar in Printmaking PRMK 779F Graduate Field Internship * PRMK 779T Graduate Teaching Internship * PRMK 779F Graduate Field Internship † PRMK 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † PRMK 790 Printmaking M.F.A. Thesis SFIN 716 Theory and Processes I: Critical Analysis SFIN 770 Fine Art M.F.A. Self-promotion — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

257

PRODUCTION DESIGN

259

PROD

PRODUCTION DESIGN

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF ENTERTAINMENT ARTS

MASTER OF ARTS

PRODUCTION DESIGNERS BRING STORIES TO LIFE, CONSTRUCTING FANTASTICAL SCENERY FOR A BROADWAY PRODUCTION, DESIGNING SETS FOR AWARD-WINNING TELEVISION AND CINEMATIC FEATURES AND CREATING VISUAL SOLUTIONS FOR THE WORLD’S GREAT LIVE EVENTS. At SCAD, production design students engage in many avenues of the industry, learning to design for both traditional productions that offer timeless engagement and digital productions that push the frontier of entertainment. The production design program at SCAD is the only one in the United States to offer a comprehensive approach to entertainment design, including film and television, live performance, public events and exhibitions and themed entertainment.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS ART DIRECTOR OR ASSISTANT FOR FILM AND TELEVISION DESIGNER FOR EXHIBITS, MUSEUM DISPLAYS OR THEME PARKS MODEL MAKER MUSEUM DESIGNER PRODUCTION DESIGNER OR ASSISTANT FOR FILM RETAIL DESIGNER

Production design coursework covers scenic, costume and lighting

SCENIC ARTIST

design, and incorporates film, dance and theater in both contemporary

SCENIC, COSTUME OR

and historic contexts. Classes emphasize techniques such as drawing, drafting, rendering and digital and sound design, as well as work in live performance, film, event design and commercial displays.

LIGHTING DESIGNER FOR LIVE PERFORMANCES STYLIST/WARDROBE DESIGNER FOR ADVERTISING THEMED ENTERTAINMENT/ EVENT DESIGNER

QUITE A PRODUCTION What do the Super Bowl halftime show, the 2013 Oscar-winning film “Twelve Years a Slave,” the 2012 Broadway revival of “Annie,” the AMC TV hit “The Walking Dead,” and the Bonaroo Music and Arts Festival have in common? All of these events, performances, television shows and films are created through the imagination and skill of production designers, and all of them feature the work of SCAD alumni.

260

SCAD.EDU / PRODUCTION-DESIGN

261

PROD

Undergraduate students choose a concentration in either costume or lighting and scenery. Graduate students focus their studies through advanced coursework and the completion of a final project in the M.A. program or a thesis in the M.F.A. program. Design opportunities range from recent productions such as “Ragtime,” “Into the Woods,” “Machinal” and “Drunken City” to experiential design projects such as museum exhibitions and theme park attractions, as well as environments for weddings, parties and other major events. SCAD production facilities offer diverse spaces for production design students to hone and practice their craft. Facilities include an intimate black box theater for experimental productions; an Arcadian outdoor amphitheater; three historic proscenium stages for large casts, Broadway-style musicals and dance productions; green screen studios; and film and television studios. SCAD production design alumni find such impressive employment because they are the best-prepared candidates for professional positions in art direction, exhibition design, production and retail design, and the scenic arts, and as stylists for film, themed entertainment, events and advertising. Graduates are employed around the world at 20th Century Fox, Discovery Communications, Food Network, HBO, HGTV, MTV Networks, NBC Universal, New American Shakespeare Tavern, Nickelodeon and the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts.

FROM STAGE TO SCREEN AND BEYOND Production designers provide visual and physical context and support to the storytelling function of all performance and presentation media, including film and television, video, live event, live performance and digital media.

262

SCAD.EDU / PRODUCTION-DESIGN

B.F.A. DEGREE 

PRODUCTION DESIGN

35

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Studio elective — Studio elective

55

General education ARLH 206 Modern Architecture I: 1750–1900 * ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art * CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications † CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications † COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective ‡ — Mathematics/natural sciences elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡

HOURS

HOURS

M.A. DEGREE 

PRODUCTION DESIGN

45

HOURS

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration § DWRI 101 Introduction to Dramatic Writing PROD 101 Introduction to Production Design PROD 110 Drafting for Production Design PROD 210 Script Interpretation PROD 212 Period Style for Production Design PROD 220 Lighting Design I PROD 221 Scenic Design I PROD 230 Costume Design I PROD 430 The Public Event: Concept and Collaboration PROD 490 Production Design Portfolio — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective §

80

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

M.F.A. DEGREE 

PRODUCTION DESIGN

Costume FASH 100 Fashion Technology PROD 150 Introduction to Makeup Design PROD 330 History of Costume in Film PROD 380 Costume Rendering for Construction PROD 420 Costume Design II

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. § Choose one course. # Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

701 Contemporary Art 580 Collaboration * 720 Production Design Theory and Practice 726 Production Design Studio I: Conceptualization 730 Script Analysis and Conceptualization 745 Decorative Arts: Context in Storytelling 749 Production Design M.A. Final Project 756 Evolution of Production Design — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective * — 500- to 700-level elective * Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

Choose one concentration:

Lighting and scenery PROD 130 Stagecraft PROD 270 CAD for Production Design PROD 300 Rendering for Entertainment Design PROD 320 Lighting Design II # PROD 321 Scenic Design II # — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective

ARTH CLC PROD PROD PROD PROD PROD PROD

90

HOURS

ARTH ARTH CLC FILM PROD PROD PROD PROD PROD PROD PROD PROD PROD PROD PROD PROD

701 Contemporary Art 702 Art Criticism 580 Collaboration * 708 Designing Shots 720 Production Design Theory and Practice 726 Production Design Studio I: Conceptualization 730 Script Analysis and Conceptualization 741 Digital Design for Entertainment † 745 Decorative Arts: Context in Storytelling 746 Draping as Design for Costume † 750 Digital Visualization for Production Design 756 Evolution of Production Design 762 Production Design Studio II: Design Development 770 Professional Practices in Production Design 772 Production Design Studio III: Implementation 790 Production Design M.F.A. Thesis — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective * — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Choose one course. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER. 263

SCULPTURE

Susan Becar Guzman, B.F.A. interior design, Norcross, Georgia

265

SCPT

SCULPTURE

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS

MASTER OF ARTS

SCULPTURE BRINGS FINE ART INTO EVERY DIMENSION, USING SPACE AND TIME  TO CREATE THE MONUMENTS AND EXHIBITIONS THAT TEACH US TO EXPERIENCE OUR ENVIRONMENTS IN NEW AND SURPRISING WAYS. Today’s sculptors work indoors and out, shaping marble, concrete, bronze, light, textiles, sustainable and organic matter, digital projections and so many other materials. At SCAD, students learn the practice of sculpture in one of the finest sculpture studios in higher education, located in Midtown Atlanta. Designed by world-renowned architect Renzo Piano, the expansive 16,700-square-foot facility contains a comprehensive wood and metal shop, 3-D printing technology, a foundry for bronze and stainless steel, support equipment, as well as studio and exhibition space. Here, sculpture students learn to produce work in a professional context. They engage in a comprehensive sculpture curriculum, exploring traditional and nontraditional

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS 3-D COMPUTER MODELER ART DIRECTOR CURATOR EXHIBITION DESIGNER FOUNDRY/MOLD-MAKING SPECIALIST INDEPENDENT STUDIO ARTIST MODEL MAKER FOR FILM PROSTHETIC ARTIST PUBLIC ARTIST/CONSULTANT TOY DESIGNER

media. Emphasis is placed on a broad spectrum of approaches and contemporary materials, processes, applications and technologies. SCAD sculpture students become fluent in every aspect of the profession, including large public art projects, fine art casting, installation and props production. M.A. students deepen and enrich their studio work with research and advanced study, and M.F.A. students engage in thesis projects that demonstrate conceptual and technical mastery, as well as their ability to articulate the historical and artistic traditions that inform their work. Sculpture students learn the value of synergy, too, working closely with external partners, including Noble Investment Group, a leader in the U.S. lodging and hospitality real estate sector. For this collaborative partnership, SCAD sculpture students created large-scale public works commemorating the rich history and urban renewal of Midtown Atlanta.

CARVING OUT COVERAGE

Through the completion of such high-profile, real-world design projects,

work has been featured

SCAD sculpture students attain the professional practice and portfolio

in prestigious media

power necessary to land fulfilling jobs in today’s art and design sector.

outlets including CNN

Guest artists and alumni mentors conduct studio sessions, review and

and Wired magazine.

critique work, offer lectures and hold workshops. Past guests include notable fine artists Fred Wilson, Dennis Oppenheim and Patrick Dougherty.

266

SCAD.EDU / SCULPTURE

SCAD sculpture alumni

267

SCPT

If you are serious about developing your practice and pushing the boundaries in which you currently operate, the SCAD sculpture department is a place where you can achieve both. My practice has reached levels I never imagined. I am very excited to see where the future takes me. Sam Lasseter, B.F.A. sculpture, Glen Ellen, California

B.F.A. DEGREE 

M.A. DEGREE 

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 200 Life Drawing I DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 204 Design III: Time

ARTH SCPT SCPT SCPT SCPT SCPT SCPT SFIN

SCULPTURE

35

HOURS

65

HOURS

65

15

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Studio elective

HOURS

180

HOURS

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one course. § Choose one of the following: CERA 125 Ceramics I: Understanding Materials and Techniques, PHOT 113 Photographic Foundations I, PNTG 101 Painting Basics for the Non-major or PRMK 200 Introduction to Printmaking. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

268

45

HOURS

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art ARTH 340 Art Since 1945 CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective † Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ SCPT 110 Sculptural Practices I: Fabrication and Materials SCPT 115 Sculptural Practices II: Malleable Media SCPT 250 Digital Applications in Sculpture SCPT 320 Sculptural Practices III: Tradition and Contemporary Works SCPT 360 Installation Art SCPT 420 Sculptural Practices IV: Research and Portfolio SCPT 490 Senior Seminar in Sculpture SFIN 413 Professional Practices in Fine Arts — 200-level SCPT elective — 200- or 300-level SCPT elective — 400-level SCPT elective ‡ — 400-level SCPT elective — Directed elective §

HOURS

SCULPTURE

SCAD.EDU / SCULPTURE

701 Contemporary Art 704 Sculptural Studio Processes 713 Sculpture Studio I: Influences and Sources 717 Sculpture Studio: Concept and Content 723 Sculpture Studio II: Research and Discourse 743 Sculpture Studio III: Production and Critique 749 Sculpture M.A. Final Project 716 Theory and Processes I: Critical Analysis — 500- to 700-level elective

Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE  SCULPTURE

90

HOURS

ARTH 701 Contemporary Art ARTH 702 Art Criticism CLC 580 Collaboration * SCPT 704 Sculptural Studio Processes SCPT 713 Sculpture Studio I: Influences and Sources SCPT 717 Sculpture Studio: Concept and Content SCPT 723 Sculpture Studio II: Research and Discourse SCPT 743 Sculpture Studio III: Production and Critique SCPT 773 Sculpture Studio IV: Defining a Personal Style SCPT 775 Sculpture Studio V: Developing Thesis and Exhibition SCPT 779F Graduate Field Internship † SCPT 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † SCPT 779F Graduate Field Internship ‡ SCPT 779T Graduate Teaching Internship ‡ SCPT 790 Sculpture M.F.A. Thesis SFIN 716 Theory and Processes I: Critical Analysis SFIN 770 Fine Art M.F.A. Self-promotion — 700-level PHOT, PNTG, PRMK or SCPT elective * — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Choose one course. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

James Thompson, B.F.A. sculpture, Austin, Texas u

269

JOHANA MOSCOSO M.F.A. SCULPTURE BOGOTÁ, COLOMBIA

SCAD ALUMNA JOHANA MOSCOSO WORKS ACROSS MEDIUMS TO EXPLORE IDEAS OF IDENTITY, PLACE AND HOME. ALUMNI TALK

Q: What opportunities were available at SCAD? A: In the SCAD sculpture department, every type of machinery is available. You can work with metal, wood, ceramics —  any material you can imagine to work with, you can.

Q: Why did you choose to pursue a degree in Atlanta, Georgia? A: I knew SCAD would be a great opportunity, and Atlanta was very interesting to me. The city is very connected in so many ways. The facilities and resources at SCAD Atlanta are amazing, too.

Q: How do you feel your work represents who you are? A: When I moved to Chicago, I began to realize that I was going to stay here and live in the United States. There was a Spanish counterculture and an American counterculture in my life and my work began leaning more in this direction — representing Hispanic culture and also immigrant Hispanic culture in the U.S.

LEARN MORE AT SCAD.EDU/JOHANA-MOSCOSO.

270

SCAD.EDU / ALUMNI

SEQUENTIAL ART

Lucas Filappi, B.F.A. sequential art, Sorocaba, Brazil

273

SEQA

SEQUENTIAL ART

BACHELOR OF ARTS

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION ARTS

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SEQUENTIAL ARTISTS ARE STORYTELLERS WHO UNITE NARRATIVE AND VISUAL PRINCIPLES TO BUILD MEANING-FILLED MOMENTS THAT PROGRESS A PLOT AND BECOME THE ARC OF OUR FAVORITE CHARACTERS’ ADVENTURES.

MASTER OF ARTS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

In the 21st century, sequential art has become a cornerstone of visual

CREATIVE CAREERS

and literary culture — encompassing comic books, graphic novels,

CARTOONIST

cartoons, comic strips, Manga, concept art for games, children’s books,

CHARACTER DESIGNER

and storyboards for film, television and animation. Through the largest

CHILDREN’S BOOK ARTIST

sequential art faculty in the United States, SCAD offers expertise in

COMIC BOOK ARTIST

every style and genre imaginable in this burgeoning creative discipline.

CONCEPT ARTIST

SCAD was the first, and remains one of the few, institutions to offer both undergraduate and graduate degrees in sequential art. The progressive curriculum incorporates traditional techniques with advanced technology, conventional materials and specialized digital applications. SCAD provides the full Adobe Creative Cloud Complete

GRAPHIC NOVELIST ILLUSTRATOR PRODUCTION ARTIST STORYBOARD ARTIST TOY/FIGURE SCULPTOR

for download to students’ personal computers at no extra charge, and sequential art students may earn Adobe software certifications to further enhance their résumés. Elective course topics include Manga and superhero comics, cartooning, character design, advanced storyboarding, publishing, painting for comics, cover illustration, creating sequential art for emerging media, maquette design, advanced studies in human and animal anatomy and sequential picture books for children. Production methods, criticism, theory and practice are taught at the graduate level, and those pursuing M.F.A. degrees at SCAD are required to complete a field or teaching internship. Graduate students are prepared for careers in the field or as educators ready to cultivate the creativity of the next generation of visual storytellers.

BAM! KAPOW! BOOM! SCAD was the first university to offer degrees in sequential art at both the undergraduate and graduate level. SCAD is the only institution to offer an M.F.A. in sequential art in the United States.

274

SCAD.EDU / SEQUENTIAL-ART

275

SEQA 276

SCAD.EDU / SEQUENTIAL-ART

This high level of academic and professional preparation has led to a number of accolades for the program in recent years. The Daily Beast named SCAD one of three institutions from which Marvel Comics recruits the most editors, and USA Today has highlighted SCAD’s sequential art program. Philadelphia Weekly has called SCAD “the Harvard of comics.” SCAD sequential art alumni are working successfully in mainstream and alternative comic production, education, illustration, model sculpting for action figures, concept design for animation, and drawing storyboards for major animated films, television, commercials, feature films and video games. They have landed internships and full-time positions with prominent companies such as DC Comics, Disney, Top Cow Productions, National Public Radio, Gaijin Studios, Image Comics, Visible Light Entertainment and Vertigo Comics. SCAD sequential art students are taught by nationally recognized faculty and have the opportunity to engage with master storytellers who visit SCAD each year. The sequential art department has hosted guests such as comic mogul Stan Lee; Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Axel Alonso; AfterShock Comics editor-in-chief Mike Marts; comiXology marketing and business development guru Chip Mosher; legendary illustrator James Gurney; graphic novelist Art Spiegelman; cartoonist Jules Feiffer; Mad Magazine greats Jack Davis and Al Jaffee; comics theorist Scott McCloud; DC Comics art director Mark Chiarello; comic creator Mark Schultz; “Sandman” illustrator Jill Thompson; and webcomic artist Scott Kurtz.

MAKING A SPLASH SCAD sequential art students and alumni secure top internships and jobs with illustrious companies like Marvel Comics, Archaia Entertainment, Cartoon Network, Tyler Perry Studios and Dark Horse Comics, just to name a few.

t Kailee Roark, B.F.A. sequential art, Stillwater, Oklahoma

277

SEQA

 I’m very impressed with SCAD. You have incredible facilities here with a lot of resources for students. It makes me envious, and I work for Marvel Comics.

Axel Alonso, editor-in-chief, Marvel Comics

B.A. DEGREE 

VISUAL COMMUICATION Concentration in SEQUENTIAL ART

25

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application — Studio elective

90

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition PHIL 301 Aesthetics — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — General education elective † — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

45

Concentration SEQA 100 Introduction to Sequential Art SEQA 202 Drawing for Sequential Art SEQA 205 Survey of Sequential Art SEQA 215 Materials and Techniques for Sequential Art SEQA 224 Character Design and Storyboarding for Animation SEQA 244 Comic Book Scripting SEQA 277 Digital Coloring and Lettering Applications for Comics SEQA 325 Environments, Props and Structures SEQA 382 Visual Storytelling I

20

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective — Free elective

180

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

* Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

278

t Gerardo Alba Rojas, M.A. sequential art, Naucalpan de Juárez, Mexico

WORK THAT WINS In July 2014, SCAD alumni Sean Murphy (B.F.A. sequential art, Derry, New Hampshire) and Andrew Robinson (B.F.A. illustration, Macon, Georgia) won a total of three Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards — known as the comic industry’s equivalent to the Oscars. Murphy won two Eisners for his work on the series “The Wake,” one for Best Limited Series and one for Best Penciller/Inker. Robinson won top prize for Best Reality-Based Work for his art in the graphic novel “The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story.”

M.A. DEGREE  SEQUENTIAL ART

B.F.A. DEGREE  SEQUENTIAL ART

35

HOURS

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 200 Life Drawing I DRAW 206 Drawing for Storyboarding DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space

60

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

70

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ SEQA 100 Introduction to Sequential Art SEQA 202 Drawing for Sequential Art SEQA 205 Survey of Sequential Art SEQA 215 Materials and Techniques for Sequential Art SEQA 224 Character Design and Storyboarding for Animation SEQA 244 Comic Book Scripting SEQA 277 Digital Coloring and Lettering Applications for Comics SEQA 325 Environments, Props and Structures SEQA 382 Visual Storytelling I SEQA 405 Visual Storytelling II SEQA 410 Sequential Art Senior Project — SEQA elective ‡ — SEQA elective — SEQA elective

15

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective — Studio elective

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

180

HOURS

45*

HOURS

SEQA SEQA SEQA ARTH SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA

501 Drawing Strategies for Sequential Art * 502 Visual Story Development * 503 Sequential Art Production Methods * 701 Contemporary Art 701 Theories and Practices for Sequential Art 707 Anatomy and Perspective for Sequential Art 716 Studio I: Sequential Art Methods 717 Exploring the Narrative 731 Digital Design Issues in Sequential Art 741 Inking Techniques † 745 Writing for Sequential Art † 749 Sequential Art M.A. Final Project — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE  SEQUENTIAL ART

90*

HOURS

SEQA SEQA SEQA ARTH ARTH SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA SEQA

501 Drawing Strategies for Sequential Art * 502 Visual Story Development * 503 Sequential Art Production Methods * 701 Contemporary Art 702 Art Criticism 701 Theories and Practices for Sequential Art 707 Anatomy and Perspective for Sequential Art 712 Concept Design in Sequential Art 716 Studio I: Sequential Art Methods 717 Exploring the Narrative 726 Studio II: Sequential Art Applications 731 Digital Design Issues in Sequential Art 741 Inking Techniques † 745 Writing for Sequential Art † 756 Studio III: Sequential Art Professional Practices 770 Sequential Art Self-promotion 779F Graduate Field Internship ‡ 779T Graduate Teaching Internship ‡ 790 Sequential Art M.F.A. Thesis — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

279

SERVICE DESIGN 280

SERVICE DESIGN

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF DESIGN

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

SERVICE DESIGNERS CREATE, EVALUATE AND IMPROVE USER EXPERIENCES FOR THE BENEFIT OF ORGANIZATIONS AND INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS OF SERVICES. THEY IMAGINE, STUDY AND IMPROVE USABILITY AS WELL AS END RESULTS IN HOSPITALITY, RETAIL, HEALTH CARE AND OTHER SECTORS OF THE BUSINESS AND SERVICE ECONOMY. At the heart of service design is a holistic and human-centered approach to innovation. In today’s service- and experience-focused economies, organizations routinely collaborate with service designers to stage experiences across multiple channels and create interactions that are appealing, meaningful and memorable for users. A well-rounded service designer is part researcher, part strategist

CREATIVE CAREERS CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MANAGER/DIRECTOR DESIGN MANAGER/DIRECTOR DESIGN OR USER EXPERIENCE RESEARCHER DESIGN STRATEGIST EXPERIENCE MANAGER/DIRECTOR INNOVATION MANAGER/DIRECTOR INTERACTION DESIGNER RETAIL DESIGNER SERVICE OR EXPERIENCE DESIGNER SERVICE OR EXPERIENCE STRATEGIST

and part designer. At SCAD, service design students learn to deftly move among each of these roles. As researchers, they use contextual research methods to uncover deep insights about the needs, motivations and behaviors of people and communities. As strategists, they identify business opportunities and build business models across touch points and stakeholders. As designers, they use creative problem-solving methods to frame problems, generate ideas and validate solutions. The service design program at SCAD offers a holistic and innovative curriculum, faculty with extensive professional experience, and a wealth of real-life projects with leading organizations that give students the edge to become designers who understand how services work. Beyond the undergraduate level, M.F.A. students are prepared to take leadership roles in large service organizations in the private and public sectors — spearheading change processes, envisioning the future,

LEADING THE WAY

managing multidisciplinary teams and overcoming innovation roadblocks.

SCAD is the first university

User experience and client loyalty are critical to mission success in all types of global endeavors. As the field of service design rapidly grows in importance and stature across the world, graduates of the SCAD service

in the United States to offer both B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees in service design.

design program are helping companies and organizations plan for and realize the future. 281

SERV

B.F.A. DEGREE  SERVICE DESIGN

35

HOURS

65

HOURS

70

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

SCAD prepares students not only

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 230 Drawing for Design DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 115 Creative Thinking Strategies * — Studio elective*

to be designers or artists but, more important, to be creative problem solvers. SCAD students and alumni are prepared to excel in the creative

General education ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art BUSI 101 The Design of Business BUSI 265 Principles of Marketing COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

environment because they learn

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ ELDS 205 Computer-aided Product Design IACT 315 Human/Computer Interaction IDUS 212 Model and Prototype Development IDUS 213 Industrial Design Idea Visualization IDUS 215 Contextual Research Methods IDUS 316 Portfolio and Résumé Development SERV 216 Blueprinting Services SERV 311 Service Architectures, Ecologies and Touch Points SERV 312 Prototyping Experiences SERV 325 Technology and Services SERV 421 Services and Enterprise SERV 431 Service Design Senior Studio — ARCH, FIBR, FURN, IDUS, SERV or SUST elective ‡ — ARCH, FIBR, FURN, IDUS, SERV or SUST elective

Jeannie Fung, B.F.A. service design, Chicago, Illinois

in an environment where even the most everyday interactions can be explored with curiosity and conversation. The SCAD experience is far more than an educational one. It’s a life experience.

M.F.A. DEGREE  SERVICE DESIGN

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

90*

HOURS

SDES 501 Visual Communication and Presentation * SDES 502 The Human Factor, Design Thinking * SDES 503 Fundamentals of Graduate Research * ANTH 701 Global Cultural Theory DMGT 720 Design Innovation Development and Marketing Strategies DMGT 783 Design Futures: Trends, Foresight and Intuition IACT 701 Theory of Interaction Design IACT 731 Information Architecture for Designers IDUS 711 Methods of Contextual Research SERV 711 Service Design: Principles and Practice SERV 722 Critical Methods of Prototyping Services and Experiences SERV 724 User-centered Design for Services SERV 728 Service Design Studio I: Creation of Services, Products, Interfaces and Experiences SERV 753 Service, Innovation and Enterprise SERV 769 Service Design Studio II: Pleasure-based Approaches to Service Design SERV 779F Graduate Field Internship † SERV 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † SERV 790 Service Design M. F. A. Thesis — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

282

SCAD.EDU / SERVICE-DESIGN

283

SNDS

SOUND DESIGN 284

SCAD.EDU / SOUND-DESIGN

SOUND DESIGN

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF ENTERTAINMENT ARTS

MASTER OF ARTS

SOUND DESIGNERS CREATE THE SOUNDSCAPES THAT TRANSPORT AUDIENCES. THEY BLEND DIALOGUE, SOUND EFFECTS OR MUSIC TO ORCHESTRATE A COMPELLING SOUNDTRACK THAT SUPPORTS THE NARRATIVE EXPERIENCE. At SCAD, sound design students become virtuosos who can do it all, learning the techniques and execution behind masterful sensory storytelling. SCAD is the first and only university to confer B.F.A., M.A. and M.F.A. degrees in sound design. Students are immersed in a curriculum that models the tools, workflow and aesthetics of commercial media production. The university provides sound design students the opportunity to enhance their education by earning professional certifications before graduation. SCAD offers Avid Pro Tools certification in postproduction, music production and Icon mixing techniques, as well as certification in Sibelius.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS ADR AND FOLEY MIXER FOLEY ARTIST MIDI MOCKUP ORCHESTRATOR MUSIC EDITOR/SUPERVISOR PRODUCTION MIXER/ BOOM OPERATOR RECORDING ENGINEER SOUND EDITOR SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR THEATER MIXER THEATER SOUND DESIGNER

State-of-the-art technologies support all aspects of the curriculum and include four HDX rigs; 16 Pro Tools HD Native rigs; 60 Pro Tools workstations; two dedicated surround sound mix/mastering rooms; a MIDI mockup room complete with a full range of synthesis and sampling technologies; four dedicated HD Native editing suites; four classrooms housing Pro Tools LE workstations; a recording studio for music, Foley and film scoring; and three rooms for dialogue recording and editing. Production equipment includes five completely outfitted production

DID YOU HEAR? SCAD sound design students

sound carts for film and television production. SCAD is also home to an

have unique opportunities to

extensive effects and music library, which students use in developing

contribute to original films,

highly sophisticated, legal soundtracks.

animations and video games

Preeminent faculty members — authors of books on the subject matter

as they collaborate with peers

and collaborators on films including “Die Hard,” “Edward Scissorhands,” “Predator,” “Batman Returns,” “Speed” and “The Green Mile,” and TV shows such as “Futurama” — mentor students as they grow into dynamic and in-demand sound design professionals.

in other film and digital media programs at the university, as well as develop live sound reinforcement expertise for use in venues such as performance theaters, music halls and community centers.

285

SNDS 286

SCAD.EDU / SOUND-DESIGN

SCAD provided an incredible learning experience for me as a young artist. I learned many important life lessons that I will never forget. As I move forward in the professional world, I will always remember what the university and the incredibly talented people I was surrounded by have taught me. Ross Fish, B.F.A. sound design, Springfield, New Jersey

B.F.A. DEGREE 

M.A. DEGREE 

Foundation studies DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 204 Design III: Time — Studio elective — Studio elective

CINE SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS

SOUND DESIGN

30

HOURS

55

HOURS

85

10

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

HOURS

180

HOURS

45

HOURS

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective † Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration ‡ FILM 100 Introduction to Film and Video Production FILM 224 Survey of Film MUSC 140 Music Theory SNDS 100 Sound Synthesis SNDS 105 Desktop Audio SNDS 201 Introduction to Sound Design SNDS 212 Music for Motion Pictures SNDS 223 Intermediate Sound Design SNDS 225 Sound in Media SNDS 314 MIDI Technologies for Sound Design SNDS 316 Advanced Sound Design SNDS 320 Sound Effects and Foley SNDS 331 Location Sound SNDS 345 Voice in Cinema SNDS 400 Surround Sound SNDS 440 Postproduction Sound — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective ‡

HOURS

SOUND DESIGN

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

703 Research Methodology in Cinema Studies 705 Production Mixing 729 Theory and Practice in Sound Design 730 Scoring to Picture 734 ADR and Foley Mixing 737 Game Audio Design * 743 Postproduction Methodologies * 749 Sound Design M.A. Final Project — 700-level ARTH elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE  SOUND DESIGN

90

HOURS

CINE SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS SNDS

703 Research Methodology in Cinema Studies 705 Production Mixing 729 Theory and Practice in Sound Design 730 Scoring to Picture 734 ADR and Foley Mixing 737 Game Audio Design * 741 Sound Effects and Dialogue Editing 743 Postproduction Methodologies * 755 Sound Design M.F.A. Studio 756 Sound Art and Installation 761 Audio Signal Processing 776 Surround Sound for Media 779F Graduate Field Internship † 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † 790 Sound Design M.F.A. Thesis — 700-level ARTH elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

287

TODD BEYER B.F.A. SOUND DESIGN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA

SCAD ALUMNUS TODD BEYER FEEDS OFF CREATIVE COMMUNITY AND CHANNELS THAT INTO HIS MUSIC. ALUMNI TALK

Q: How has studying sound design affected the way you listen? A: M  uch in the same way that a painter sees a painting and appreciates the brush strokes, movies, television and film have changed listening for me. Troubleshooting or problem-solving is as much of an enjoyment as listening to someone’s work on the screen or on set and saying, “I see what you did there. I really like that.”

Q: What advice do you have for future sound designers? A: G et involved — pull Internet videos, sound design on your own, keep doing music — and maintain the creative forces that brought you to this point in your life.

Q: What did you like most about SCAD? A: D efinitely the collaboration and the doors it can open. At SCAD, there’s such a large community of creatively passionate people, all pursuing their dream careers, be it in graphic design, painting, film or fashion. Working within such a creative collective broadened my opportunities and really opened creative channels I didn’t necessarily know I even wanted to explore.

LEARN MORE AT SCAD.EDU/TODD-BEYER.

288

SCAD.EDU / ALUMNI

TELEVISION PRODUCING

290

TELEVISION PRODUCING SCHOOL OF DIGITAL MEDIA TELEVISION PRODUCERS CONTROL ALL ASPECTS OF PRODUCTION FOR LIVE, REMOTE, STUDIO, PROMOTIONAL AND PRERECORDED PROGRAMMING. THEY CONCEIVE AND WRITE NEW SHOWS, CAST AND BUILD CREATIVE TEAMS, SUPERVISE SHOOTING, BUDGET, SCHEDULE AND DETERMINE DISTRIBUTION MODELS. SCAD students learn the television business from the inside out, and from one of the fastest-growing and most connected film and television production hot spots — Atlanta. Based at SCAD Atlanta, the university’s television producing program thrives amid the ninth-largest media market in the United States and the third largest

BACHELOR OF ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE PRODUCER EDUCATIONAL AND TRAINING MEDIA PRODUCER EXECUTIVE POSTPRODUCTION SUPERVISOR GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRIAL MEDIA PRODUCER LINE PRODUCER MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCER POSTPRODUCTION SUPERVISOR PRODUCER PRODUCTION ASSISTANT/ COORDINATOR SPECIAL EVENT/FIELD PRODUCER

on the East Coast. As home to CNN, Cartoon Network, FOX Sports, Cox Communications, Turner Broadcasting, The Weather Channel and more than 150 annual film productions, Atlanta is considered a digital media super hub. Here, SCAD students enjoy numerous opportunities for top-tier internships and a wealth of professional opportunities and career-building connections. The university’s television producing degree program capitalizes on this centricity by requiring four field internships in television, video,

WELCOME TO PRIMETIME

digital media or film production. Through in-class work and real-world

Dozens of hit television

experiences, students learn narrative story structure, fundamental

shows — from “The Walking

television production skills, the business of creating television

Dead” and “The Vampire

programming and the creative production process.

Diaries” to “The Real Housewives of Atlanta” and its spin-offs — are filmed and produced in Atlanta. SCAD students are in the mix of major productions, both on the set and behind the scenes.

291

TELE

B.A. DEGREE 

Students take classes in the SCAD Digital Media Center, a fully equipped television studio that

TELEVISION PRODUCING

also supports related digital media fields such

25

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application — Studio elective — Studio elective

70

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CINE 275 History of Cinema CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications * CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications * COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition LIBA 288 Media Literacy Theory WRIT 255 Business and Professional Writing — ENGL elective — General education elective † — General education elective † — Mathematics/natural sciences elective † — Social/behavioral sciences elective †

75

Major curriculum FILM 100 Introduction to Film and Video Production ‡ FILM 101 Introduction to Video Production ‡ FILM 106 Introduction to Screenwriting FILM 215 Screenwriting: Short Form SNDS 201 Introduction to Sound Design TELE 202 Survey of Television TELE 205 Television Field Production TELE 210 Television Studio Production TELE 250 Live Event Production TELE 300 Line Producing TELE 303 Segment Producing TELE 350 Television Postproduction TELE 450 Field Internship I: Exploring Careers in Television Production TELE 451 Field Internship II: Creating a Reputation TELE 452 Field Internship III: Establishing a Strategic Network TELE 453 Field Internship IV: Professional Practices

10

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

as animation and motion media. Students work on high-end television production sets and

HOURS

editing suites, multicamera soundstages, sound recording and mixing suites, editing rooms, screening spaces, and set and prop fabrication studios. The SCAD Digital Media Center is production-ready, allowing students to conceive, shoot and produce entire programs under one roof. Professors with extensive technical and

HOURS

market experience mentor SCAD students. Television producing faculty members have garnered national broadcasting recognition and awards, with diverse backgrounds ranging from reality television productions and network newscasts to talk shows and scientific films. Students experience all spheres of media production — including broadcast, cable, Web, music videos and advertising — and discuss trends in the entertainment sector. Through

HOURS

comprehensive coursework, ample internship offerings and limitless opportunities in Atlanta’s booming entertainment business, SCAD television producing students gain real-world experience and actual television producing credits before ever entering the job market. Each year, the university presents SCAD aTVfest, an international festival where the mavens of television gather at the SCADshow theater for panels on writing, performing, directing and producing for television. At the most recent SCAD aTVfest, Timothy Hutton was honored for his life’s work and new AMC drama “American Crime,” and Terrence Howard for his breakout television hit “Empire.” Television producing students also attended 17 screenings, 22 panel discussions and master classes, and interacted with more than 80 television professionals from ABC, FOX, FX, HBO, TBS, BET, WGN, HTGV, Pivot and others.

292

SCAD.EDU / TELEVISION-PRODUCING

HOURS

* Choose one of these two courses. † Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

293

THEMED ENTERTAINMENT DESIGN

THEMED ENTERTAINMENT DESIGN SCHOOL OF ENTERTAINMENT ARTS THEMED ENTERTAINMENT DESIGNERS CONCEPTUALIZE AND CONSTRUCT UNIQUE ENVIRONMENTS THAT EMPOWER, INFORM, ENTERTAIN AND ENTHRALL. THEY CREATE MEANINGFUL EXPERIENCES FOR ENTERTAINMENT PARKS, VISITOR ATTRACTIONS, RESORTS, HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND MUSEUMS.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS ATTRACTION DESIGNER BRAND DESIGNER EXHIBIT DESIGNER EXPERIENCE DESIGNER GLOBAL EVENT DESIGNER RETAIL AND RESTAURANT DESIGNER SCIENCE AND HISTORY MUSEUM DESIGNER SHOW PRODUCER SPECIAL VENUE THEATER DESIGNER THEME PARK DESIGNER

The themed entertainment design curriculum at SCAD combines architecture, interiors and media content with the narrative pulse of theatrical and cinematic arts. At SCAD, students learn to fill a role in a growing experience-based sector that has come to define entertainment and recreation around the world, at theme parks and resorts in the United States, Asia, South America and Europe. The university’s themed entertainment design program leverages the SCAD creative culture, where graduate students gain broad experience across disciplines that are vital to success in this multifaceted industry. Students work with peers in interior design, interactive design and game development, visual effects, production design, animation, sound design, sequential art and other disciplines to create story-driven environments that electrify and delight. Students also work with professional partners on innovative “blue sky” concepts as well as real-world design and production projects, where

FIRST IN LINE SCAD offers the first and only M.F.A. degree program in themed entertainment design, a rapidly growing, multibilliondollar global industry.

they synthesize expertise from multiple disciplines to create rich, immersive and memorable places.

295

THED

Themed entertainment design faculty members have designed experiences for Walt Disney Parks and Resorts in Florida, California, Hong Kong, Paris and Tokyo, as well as Universal Parks and Resorts. Included among the department’s faculty members are long-term veterans of Walt Disney Imagineering — one has won a lifetime achievement honor from the United States Institute for Theatre Technology, awards from the Themed Entertainment Association and a Tony Award. SCAD is the first university to host the Themed Entertainment Association’s SATE Conference (Storytelling, Architecture, Technology, Experience), an annual event for the world’s leading creators, developers, designers and producers of compelling places and experiences. SATE presenters in Savannah included representatives of Pixar Animation Studios, Walt Disney Imagineering Research and Development, The Warhol Museum, National Public Radio’s StoryCorps and others.

M.F.A. DEGREE 

THEMED ENTERTAINMENT DESIGN

90

HOURS

ARCH 714 Advanced Parametric Design and Generative Modeling Strategies for the Building Arts * ARTH 757 Media Art CLC 580 Collaboration † ELDS 704 Electronic Design * INDS 503 Design Visualization, Communication and Documentation PROD 750 Digital Visualization for Production Design PROD 770 Professional Practices in Production Design THED 720 Themed Entertainment Industry THED 730 Concept Design Studio THED 735 Component Design Studio THED 765 Design for Themed Entertainment THED 775 Themed Environments and Attractions: Design Development THED 777 Collaborative Design Studio THED 790 Themed Entertainment Design M.F.A. Thesis — 700-level ANIM, ARCH, DWRI, FILM, IDUS, INDS, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SERV, SFDM, SNDS or VSFX elective † — 700-level ANIM, ARCH, DWRI, FILM, IDUS, INDS, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SERV, SFDM, SNDS or VSFX elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

296

SCAD.EDU / THEMED-ENTERTAINMENT

297

URBAN DESIGN

298

URBAN DESIGN

MASTER OF URBAN DESIGN

SCHOOL OF BUILDING ARTS URBAN DESIGNERS CONSIDER A RANGE OF ISSUES — FROM ECOLOGY AND ECONOMICS TO HABITATION AND USABILITY — TO TRANSFORM CITYSCAPES INTO MORE BEAUTIFUL, MORE FUNCTIONAL AND MORE HUMANE PLACES. Urban designers understand that the strength of a community is in the union of its built environment and the human-centered events that fill its spaces. At SCAD, urban design students learn to balance historical continuity with formal experiments and technological innovation to design cities that inspire. In Savannah, the urban design program is set amid one of the most celebrated city plans in the world — a plan urban designer Edmund Bacon hailed as “one of the finest diagrams for city organization and growth in existence.” Beyond Savannah, SCAD students may choose to spend a quarter or more at the university’s other global locations, observing how cities grow and function in

CREATIVE CAREERS CITY DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR, CITY MANAGER OR PLANNER ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNER FORM-BASED CODE CONSULTANT GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS SPECIALIST LANDSCAPE DESIGNER REAL ESTATE DEVELOPER SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIST AND PLANNER TRANSPORTATION AND MOBILITY PLANNER URBAN DESIGNER ZONING ADMINISTRATOR/

different contexts and on different continents. Each year in Hong Kong,

PLANNING MANAGER

SCAD students have the opportunity to engage in a 20-day immersion of urban design and architecture. SCAD urban design students develop case studies of cities and explore culturally enriching amenities and civic processes for urban resilience. They work on current city planning initiatives with municipalities and institutions concerned with urban growth, such as a recent collaboration with the Preservation Green Lab, merging big data with an analysis of sustainability in historic neighborhoods. In addition, students may pursue National Charrette Institute and Form-Based Codes Institute certifications to enhance their professional credentials.

PAVING THE WAY FOR CITY SCHOLARS SCAD is the only art and design university in the United States to offer a master of urban design degree. Savannah — the university’s flagship location and home to its urban design program — is a living laboratory for urban design students. The historic coastal town, with its bricked streets and shady squares, is admired by scholars the world over.

299

URBA

The university itself is a superb example of an institution that reimagines and amplifies the potential of the urban landscape. At all SCAD locations, the university has repurposed buildings, created green spaces, generated foot traffic with cultural and educational events, and improved the livability, amenities and prosperity of entire neighborhoods. For the groundbreaking SCADpad initiative, SCAD addressed the challenge of growing urban populations by prototyping an innovative strategy for micro-housing in existing city centers. SCADpad models an immediate solution for sustainable urban redevelopment and has been featured in Time magazine, USA Today, Fast Company and Architectural Record, and on NBC’s “Today” show, CNN and NBC News. SCADpad reached international acclaim in 2014, winning the World Architecture News Urban Design Award in the Completed Projects sub-category and serving as the only U.S. housing project to be featured at the World Architecture Festival in Singapore.

M.U.D. DEGREE  URBAN DESIGN

90

HOURS

ARCH 765 Emerging Urban Issues ARLH 739 Urban Form and Civic Ideals through History ELDS 720 Geospatial Analysis and Digital Design for Urban Environments HIPR 726 Revitalizing Downtowns URBA 709 Graduate Urban Design Studio I: Placemaking at the Neighborhood Scale URBA 719 Real Estate Regulation and Finance URBA 725 Urban Ecology URBA 729 Graduate Urban Design Studio II: The Scale of Town and City URBA 739 Economics of Urban and Regional Development URBA 759 Graduate Urban Design Studio III: The Region and Metropolis URBA 769 Urban Design Research Seminar URBA 779F Graduate Field Internship * URBA 779T Graduate Teaching Internship * URBA 791 Graduate Urban Design Studio IV: Thesis I — Research and Conceptual Design URBA 792 Graduate Urban Design Studio V: Thesis II — Design Development and Final Exposition — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective * Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

Raquel Guzman Geara, B.F.A. architecture, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic u

300

SCAD.EDU / URBAN-DESIGN

301

USER EXPERIENCE (UX) DESIGN

USER EXPERIENCE (UX) DESIGN SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION ARTS SCHOOL OF DESIGN SCHOOL OF DIGITAL MEDIA

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS CREATIVE PROJECT MANAGER DIRECTOR OF INNOVATION AND DESIGN

USER EXPERIENCE (UX) DESIGNERS ARE TRUE CONTEMPORARY PROBLEM SOLVERS, PROVIDING INNOVATIVE, DESIRABLE AND VIABLE SOLUTIONS TO TODAY’S GREATEST DIGITAL CHALLENGES.

INFORMATION ARCHITECT

From mobile devices to intelligent clothing, from automobile interiors

UX RESEARCHER

to health care informatics, UX designers are helping companies and

UX STRATEGIST

INTERACTIVE ART DIRECTOR MOBILE APPLICATION DESIGNER PRODUCT DESIGNER UX DESIGNER UX LEAD CONSULTANT

organizations reimagine user interfaces and experiences. A wellrounded UX designer is a skilled researcher, effective programmer and visionary designer. At SCAD, UX design students learn how to take on — and deftly move among — all three roles, synthesizing aesthetic, creative and emotional aspects of the discipline with technical expertise. As researchers of human behavior, SCAD students use contextual methods to uncover deep insights about the needs, motivations, and behaviors of people and communities. As programmers, students translate concepts, mathematical formulas and graphic user interfaces into working models of innovative solutions. As designers, they seek to understand cultural and technological trends, recognize changing values, tell visual stories, and create beautiful artifacts and memorable experiences.

HAND, HEAD AND HEART Collaborating with Hewlett-Packard, SCAD students used HP’s LinkReader platform to provide easy-to-use and dynamic virtual city tours and augmented reality to offer visitors to Savannah’s Oatland Island Wildlife Center an

This degree program was developed in collaboration with

upclose, interactive experience with animals throughout the park.

303

UXDG

B.F.A. DEGREE 

Through collaboration and innovation, the UX design program at SCAD responds in real time

USER EXPERIENCE (UX) DESIGN

to the technical demands of dynamic digital

25

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DRAW 230 Drawing for Design DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application

55

General education ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ELDS 205 Computer-aided Product Design ENGL 123 Composition MATH 104 Mathematics for Computer Science MATH 204 Algorithm Design and Analysis MATH 240 Logic — ARLH or ARTH elective — General education elective *

90

Major curriculum GRDS 205 Typography I: Anatomy, Form and Space GRDS 285 Graphic Design Media Management GRDS 348 Graphic Design Studio I: Idea Visualization GRDS 353 Typography II: Information and Media GRDS 370 Information Design † IACT 315 Human/Computer Interaction IACT 330 Prototyping Electronics for Designers IACT 370 Information Architecture † IACT 375 Perceptual and Cognitive Human Factors IDUS 212 Model and Prototype Development IDUS 215 Contextual Research Methods ITGM 220 Core Principles: Programming ITGM 326 Applied Principles: Programming ITGM 415 Advanced Principles: Programming UXDG 330 UX Design Studio I: Innovation UXDG 350 Professional Practices for UX Designers ‡ UXDG 415 UX Design Studio II: The Complexity of Simplicity § UXDG 450 UX Design Senior Studio I: Researching and Ideation # UXDG 490 UX Design Senior Studio II: Prototyping and Communication # UXDG 580 Sponsored Collaboration for UX § — CLC, GRDS, IACT, IDUS, ITGM, MOME or SERV elective ‡

10

Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective

environments while creatively integrating technology, aesthetics and human behavior.

HOURS

SCAD faculty and academic leadership collaborated with Google to develop an innovative curriculum that will prepare a new generation of designers. The university’s newest offering is unique in that it synthesizes the human-centric

HOURS

technical expertise needed in dynamic digital environments with aesthetic, creative and emotional aspects of the discipline.

 The SCAD UX program will produce designers who have a remarkable and competitive set of skills essential, though currently in short supply, in

HOURS

today’s workplace. The future of innovation is rooted in the collaborative methods of a wide range of disciplines, and the ability to translate between various disciplines is critical to the UX designer’s role in creating solutions.

Mike Buzzard, design manager, Google

HOURS

180

HOURS

TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Choose one of these courses. § Choose one of these two courses. # Sponsored individual student senior project. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

Pending approval by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

304

SCAD.EDU / UX-DESIGN

Yi Hao, M.A. interactive design and game development, Beijing, China u

305

VISUAL EFFECTS

Tyler Britton, B.F.A. visual effects, Annandale, Virginia

307

VSFX

VISUAL EFFECTS

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF DIGITAL MEDIA

MASTER OF ARTS

VISUAL EFFECTS ARTISTS WORK AT THE FOREFRONT OF ENTERTAINMENT, COMBINING TECHNOLOGY AND ARTISTRY IN FILM TO CREATE UNFORGETTABLE VISUAL REALMS, LEAVING A LASTING IMPRINT ON THE MINDS OF AUDIENCES. At SCAD, students learn the art and craft of visual effects through a foundation in fine arts courses, learning to draw and design in the classical tradition, and then integrating those creative skills with computer programming and technical prowess to achieve professional mastery.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS COMPOSITOR DIGITAL MATTE PAINTER LIGHTING TECHNICAL DIRECTOR MODELER PREVISUALIZATION ARTIST

SCAD visual effects students become leaders in this imaginative

SPECIAL EFFECTS ARTIST

discipline, transforming static visions into vivid visual sequences.

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

Students work individually and jointly within a framework that reflects

TEXTURE ARTIST

the highest standards of digital entertainment production. Graduate

VISUAL EFFECTS PRODUCER

students apply an advanced focus to the discipline, creating portfolios

VISUAL EFFECTS SUPERVISOR

in the M.A. program and participating in internships and completing a comprehensive thesis in the M.F.A. program. Undergraduate students complement their skills by taking electives or completing a minor program in related areas such as film and television, technical direction, architecture, photography or storyboarding. SCAD facilities offer undergraduate and graduate students access to high-end, professional digital tools, including Adobe Creative Cloud Complete, Autodesk Maya, Nuke, mental ray, RenderMan and Houdini. In addition to a high-speed network of Mac and PC workstations, students use a large file server and powerful render farm, taking full advantage of exclusive access to computer labs. Green screen stages in Atlanta, Savannah and Hong Kong, and HD cameras and Vicon motion capture studios in Atlanta and Savannah, round out the resources.

SHINING ALONGSIDE SUPERHEROES More than a dozen SCAD alumni contributed to the visual effects for the 2014 blockbuster “Guardians of the Galaxy.” Produced by Marvel Studios, the film grossed $94 million its opening weekend.

308

SCAD.EDU / VISUAL-EFFECTS

309

VSFX 310

SCAD.EDU / VISUAL-EFFECTS

The visual effects faculty consists of impressive professionals who bring invaluable insight and background to the classroom. Professors have worked for such companies as Pixar, Sony Pictures, Industrial Light & Magic, Walt Disney Animation Studios and DreamWorks Animation. They are the visual effects masterminds behind acclaimed films “Toy Story,” “Rise of the Guardians,” “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,” “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” “Terminator 2: Judgment Day,” “Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl,” “Matrix Reloaded” and “Turbo,” and are Academy Award winners for best visual effects in films such as “The Golden Compass,” “Independence Day” and “What Dreams May Come.” In turn, visual effects alumni go far. They implement their illustrious education at major studios, including Industrial Light & Magic, Disney, DreamWorks, The Mill, Pixomondo, Psyop, Raven Software, Blue Sky Studios, LoGa Studio, Shade VFX, Microsoft and Side Effects Software.

OUT-OF-THIS-WORLD TALENT In recent years, several SCAD visual effects alumni have won Academy Awards for their work on such awe-inspiring films as “Gravity,” “Life of Pi” and “Interstellar.”

Being a part of the team to help bring “Frozen” to life has truly been the experience of a lifetime. My times at SCAD were some of the finest moments in my life and being able to represent the university in the entertainment industry has been the icing on the cake. Derek Nelson, M.F.A. visual effects, Charlotte, North Carolina

311

VSFX 312

SCAD.EDU / VISUAL-EFFECTS

B.F.A. DEGREE 

M.A. DEGREE 

Foundation studies DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space — Studio elective — Studio elective

VSFX VSFX VSFX CLC VSFX VSFX VSFX VSFX

VISUAL EFFECTS

35

HOURS

60

HOURS

75

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

VISUAL EFFECTS

45*

HOURS

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 207 20th-century Art CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition — ARLH or ARTH elective — ARLH or ARTH elective — ENGL elective — General education elective * — Mathematics/natural sciences elective * — Social/behavioral sciences elective * Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration † TECH 316 Digital Lighting and Rendering ‡ VSFX 101 Survey of Visual Effects VSFX 130 Visual Effects-based Cinematography VSFX 160 Introduction to Visual Effects Programming VSFX 210 Digital Visual Effects VSFX 270 Compositing VSFX 310 Matte Painting ‡ VSFX 319 Programming Models and Shaders I VSFX 350 Procedural Modeling and Animation Techniques VSFX 406 Concept Development for Visual Effects VSFX 408 Visual Effects Studio I VSFX 409 Professional Development for Visual Effects VSFX 448 Visual Effects Studio II — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective † — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective — ANIM, CHAR, DANC, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, MUST, PERF, PREV, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, TECH, TELE, THED or VSFX elective Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. † Choose one course. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

501 Digital 3-D Effects * 502 Programming 3-D Models and Shaders * 503 Cinematography for Visual Effects * 580 Collaboration † 705 Programming Concepts for Visual Effects 709 Visual Effects Theory and Application 748 Visual Effects M.A. Studio 749 Visual Effects Portfolio — Directed elective ‡ — Directed elective ‡ — Directed art history elective § — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective † — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective * Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one course. ‡ Choose one of the following: VSFX 708 Modeling for Visual Effects; VSFX 715 Digital Compositing I: The Art and Science of Digital Integration; VSFX 721 Procedural Modeling and Animation for Production; or VSFX 752 3-D Color, Lighting and Rendering. § Choose one of the following: ARTH 701 Contemporary Art, ARTH 703 Modern and Contemporary Critical Theory, ARTH 723 Media and Modernity: Issues in Modern Art, or ARTH 757 Media Art. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

M.F.A. DEGREE  VISUAL EFFECTS

90*

HOURS

VSFX VSFX VSFX CLC VSFX VSFX VSFX VSFX VSFX VSFX VSFX VSFX VSFX VSFX VSFX

501 Digital 3-D Effects * 502 Programming 3-D Models and Shaders * 503 Cinematography for Visual Effects * 580 Collaboration † 705 Programming Concepts for Visual Effects 708 Modeling for Visual Effects 709 Visual Effects Theory and Application 715 Digital Compositing I: The Art and Science of Digital Integration 721 Procedural Modeling and Animation for Production 735 Visual Effects Studio I: Preproduction 755 Procedural 3-D and Shader Programming 775 Visual Effects Studio II: Production 779F Graduate Field Internship ‡ 779T Graduate Teaching Internship ‡ 790 Visual Effects M.F.A. Thesis — Directed elective § — Directed art history elective # — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective † — 700-level ANIM, DWRI, FILM, ITGM, MOME, PERF, PROD, SFDM, SNDS, THED or VSFX elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Intensive coursework may be assigned upon admission. † Choose one course. ‡ Choose one of these two courses. § Choose one of the following: VSFX 728 Particles and Procedural Effects: Stochastic and Calculated Methodologies; VSFX 752 3-D Color, Lighting and Rendering; or VSFX 758 Digital Compositing II: Advanced Studies of Multi-layered Integration. # Choose one of the following: ARTH 701 Contemporary Art, ARTH 703 Modern and Contemporary Critical Theory, ARTH 723 Media and Modernity: Issues in Modern Art, or ARTH 757 Media Art. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

313

WRITING

314

WRITING SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS ACROSS NEW MEDIA AND TRADITIONAL FORMS, TODAY’S WRITERS TURN BLOGS INTO BOOKS, CREATE COPY FOR ADVERTISEMENTS, DEVELOP CONTENT FOR THE WEB AND PIONEER NEW FRONTIERS IN SOCIAL MEDIA. Today, professional opportunities for writers are endless. Writers work with commercial entrepreneurs to write white papers, with political leaders to draft speeches and with social icons to give narrative to their storied lives. At SCAD, writing students learn to communicate effectively as they explore every avenue of the writing profession through a comprehensive and contemporary curriculum. This wide-ranging course of study, where students learn to tell stories

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

CREATIVE CAREERS BLOGGER COPYWRITER EDITOR ESSAYIST JOURNALIST MAGAZINE STAFF WRITER NOVELIST SOCIAL MEDIA SPECIALIST TECHNICAL WRITER WEB/INTERACTIVE WRITER

and marshal language for every human need, has led to SCAD writing graduates being hired to write for Vanity Fair, Time magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, Reader’s Digest, Southern Living, The New York Times and Paste magazine, and being awarded internships and positions with Disney Consumer Products, Marvel Comics, BET, Home Shopping Network, Scripps Networks Interactive, Georgia Public Broadcasting and the Atlanta Hawks. While studying at SCAD, many writing students have published in magazines and newspapers, including The New York Times, USA Today, Oxford American, Swink magazine and others. Even before graduating, SCAD writing students have secured literary agents and successfully sold books and book proposals.

WELCOMING WRITERS TO THE BLOCK Historic Ivy Hall, the university’s cultural arts and writing center in Atlanta, is a hub for distinguished visiting scholars in residence, lectures, literary salons and the acclaimed Ivy Hall Writers Series.

t Syndicated columnist, author and media maven Arianna Huffington; Ivy Hall, SCAD Atlanta

315

WRIT

Writing students study magazine journalism, online reporting for a variety of platforms, short fiction, creative nonfiction and promotional writing for companies and organizations. Students learn to observe and engage the world around them through a foundation in visual and liberal arts — courses that enrich observational and historical sensibilities and enlarge the writer’s ability to describe and narrate. Students benefit from courses in design and computer applications for multimedia content and have the opportunity to earn a digital marketing certification. At both the undergraduate and graduate levels, students learn to write in corporate and nonprofit settings, to market themselves and promote their work, to pitch their story ideas to publications and to publish. M.F.A. students engage in field or teaching internships and complete a full-length work or collection of short works. All students learn to critique, revise and thoughtfully discuss their work and have opportunities to publish in literary journals and participate in award-winning SCAD student media, including print magazines, online newspapers and radio programming. SCAD’s writing faculty includes best-selling novelists, authors of creative nonfiction, memoirists, journalists, columnists, bloggers and writers who have had their work featured in noteworthy publications around the world. Popular authors, agents and publishing experts regularly visit SCAD to share their work and offer feedback to student writers. Recent guests include author and “Adventure Time” writer Jack Pendarvis, novelist Margaret Atwood, fashion journalists Dana Thomas and Lynn Yaeger, “The Simpsons” writer and producer Joel H. Cohen, Pulitzer Prize-winner Alfred Uhry, The New Yorker’s Louis Menand, Bret Easton Ellis, Stanley Fish, David Shields, Pearl Cleage and Alice Hoffman.

316

SCAD.EDU / WRITING

B.F.A. DEGREE  WRITING

30

Foundation studies DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 115 Creative Thinking Strategies — Directed foundation elective * — Studio elective

60

General education ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II ARTH 265 Survey of New Media Art CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications † CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications † COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition ENGL 145 World Masterpieces — ARLH or ARTH elective — General education elective ‡ — General education elective ‡ — Mathematics/natural sciences elective ‡ — Social/behavioral sciences elective ‡

HOURS

HOURS

80

HOURS

10

HOURS

180

HOURS

Major curriculum CLC 580 Collaboration § CREA 162 Fiction Writing I: Elements of Fiction CREA 262 Fiction Writing II: Conflict and Character in the Novel WRIT 101 Reading as Writers WRIT 177 Nonfiction Writing I: Exploration of the Genre WRIT 205 Writing for the Arts WRIT 210 Promotional Writing WRIT 255 Business and Professional Writing WRIT 277 Nonfiction Writing II: Elements of Creative Nonfiction WRIT 345 News Writing and Editing WRIT 355 Writing for New Media I: Digital Communication WRIT 385 Magazine Journalism WRIT 455 Writing for New Media II: Ethical and Cultural Significance WRIT 479 Writing Internship WRIT 480 Writing Portfolio — 300-level CREA, ENGL or WRIT elective — 300- or 400-level WRIT elective § Additional electives — Free elective — Free elective TOTAL COURSE OF STUDY * Choose one of the following: DSGN 105 Visual Design Systems, DSGN 204 Design III: Time, or DSGN 210 Advanced Practices in Color and Design. † Choose one of these two courses. ‡ Consult the general education and mathematics competency requirements. § Choose one course. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

SCAD encourages writing as a multidimensional art, in which every voice is unique. The breadth of the program teaches me how to fine-tune my creative voice, to think critically and work strategically. We are valuable in the industry even before we graduate. Priceless. Shelley Danzy, M.F.A. writing, Fayetteville, Georgia

M.F.A. DEGREE  WRITING

90

HOURS

ARTH ARTH ENGL WRIT WRIT WRIT WRIT WRIT WRIT WRIT WRIT WRIT WRIT WRIT WRIT WRIT

701 Contemporary Art 702 Art Criticism 733 History of Rhetoric 703 Writing for Digital Communication 713 Nonfiction I: Analysis of Creative Nonfiction 723 Nonfiction II: Mastery of Style, Voice and Subject 725 Persuasive Writing 743 Professional Writing for Business Applications 753 Freelance Writing for Publication 763 The Publishing Process 773 Public/Media Relations Writing and Strategy 779F Graduate Field Internship * 779T Graduate Teaching Internship * 779F Graduate Field Internship † 779T Graduate Teaching Internship † 790 Writing M.F.A. Thesis — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective — 500- to 700-level elective

* Choose one of these two courses. † Choose one of these two courses. Consult your faculty adviser in selecting elective courses. Course numbers and titles are subject to change.

FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, VISIT SCAD.EDU/COURSEFINDER.

317

SCAD CORE FOUNDATION STUDIES SCHOOL OF FOUNDATION STUDIES Anchoring every undergraduate student’s educational

about structural planes of objects and the human form.

experience is SCAD Core, which includes a rigorous

Open model sessions offer weekly opportunities for

sequence of courses in drawing and design, providing

drawing from the figure, including gesture, and quick

students with studio experience that builds visual,

and long poses, while open drawing sessions explore

conceptual and creative abilities. In these courses, students

interdisciplinary qualities of gestural sketch approaches

gain a foundation in utilizing visual language, developing

with professors from a variety of majors hosting each

creative solutions, and responding to art and design.

event.

Students advance to foundation courses that move

The Fahm Digital Lab is utilized in many of the DSGN 100

in the direction of their professional aspirations. For

Design I: Elements and Organization classes for both

example, in DSGN 115 Creative Thinking Strategies,

large-scale digital printing and laser cutting. The lecture

students entering programs such as accessory design

series “Ideas in Sight” brings in professionals from many

and industrial design learn to develop concepts

disciplines to discuss how they generate their ideas,

independently and collaboratively. In DRAW 115 Graphics

helping first-year students see the connection between

for the Building Arts, students entering programs such

research, drawing, design process, and environmental

as interior design, historic preservation and architecture

and cultural influences. Students then recognize how

learn to use drawing as a tool for expressing the built

the combination of these elements builds to a final work.

environment. In DRAW 206 Drawing for Storyboarding,

First-year students also have the opportunity to hear

students entering sequential art learn to use a sequence

from students across SCAD majors in the lecture series

of images to tell a story. Students entering the dramatic

“Major Connections,” where upper-level students talk

writing, performing arts and sound design programs

about their current work and its connection to their

explore the design and organization of time-based work

foundation studies experience.

such as video, interactive multimedia and performance in DSGN 204 Design III: Time. The organization of foundation studies courses into a two-year sequence allows students to complete necessary courses in preparation for upper-level coursework. Students should consult their programs of study for specific curriculum requirements.

SCAD foundation studies faculty members hold terminal degrees and high acclaim in their professions. They include a U.S. Artists Fellow, Hudgens Prize recipient, MacDowell Fellow, Clio Award winner, Kennedy Center Faculty Fellow, a Ford Foundation Grant recipient and Fulbright Scholars. Their work has been commissioned and sponsored by governments and institutions around

Through foundation studies, SCAD offers students a

the globe — from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to

remarkable array of support and tutoring services. The

the American Embassy in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and

SCAD Drawing and Design Center offers peer tutoring

beyond — and has been exhibited at the Corcoran

and workshops such as “Color and Light,” where

Gallery of Art, Dublin Biennial, Prague Quadrennial, and

students learn to recognize colors under various lighting

countless other galleries, museums and art fairs.

conditions, and “Planar Analysis,” where students learn

318

SCAD.EDU / FOUNDATION-STUDIES

Charlotte Zale, B.F.A. industrial design, University Heights, Ohio u

SCAD CORE GENERAL EDUCATION SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS Rounding out SCAD Core, the SCAD School of Liberal Arts offers one of the most academically diverse general education programs at any arts university in the U.S. Before SCAD graduates go on to professions at Pixar, Chanel, Marvel, Electronic Arts and The New York Times, they learn to express, defend and investigate new ideas in the humanities and the sciences through courses in anatomy, astronomy, biology, communication, creative writing, English, foreign languages (Chinese, French, Spanish), mathematics, philosophy, physics, political science and psychology. In the liberal arts courses of SCAD Core, all undergraduate students complete a minimum of 55 quarter hours (or approximately 11 courses) where students read great books, engage in critical thinking, and learn to write and speak with power and imagination. These general education courses are a significant part of the SCAD experience, equipping every student with intellectual tools to explore and deepen their creative processes. Students should consult their programs of study for specific curriculum requirements. Popular courses include: • ANTH 107 Introduction to Visual Anthropology • BIOL 100 Environmental Science • COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas • ENGL 142 Foundations of Story • MATH 140 The Geometry of Physical Space • PHIL 320 Dancing with the Dao: Religions of the East • POLS 110 Ideology and Controversy in American Life: Left, Right and Wrong • PSYC 126 A Psychology of Self In liberal arts courses like these, as well as select courses in art history, the SCAD general education program focuses on developing six competencies for all undergraduate students: 1. Aesthetic interpretation. Students will be equipped to respond critically to artistic works and traditions from various societies. 2 . Computer literacy. Students will be literate in current, professional-standard technologies and technological applications. 320

SCAD.EDU / GENERAL-EDUCATION

3. Critical analysis. Students will employ a disciplined process to conceptualize, apply, analyze, synthesize and/or evaluate information as a guide to decisionmaking and action. 4. Multicultural/historical perspectives. Students will examine beliefs and ideologies from cultures and eras that may be different from their own. 5. Quantitative reasoning. Students will acquire an understanding of the concepts and logic underlying mathematical thinking. 6. Written and oral communication. Students will use written and spoken English effectively and with critical discernment. Most powerfully, SCAD general education courses invite students to explore the human condition and human expression while also preparing them to think and communicate as professionals. That’s why SCAD Core is such a significant part of the classroom experience, feeding the artistic and moral imaginations of every undergraduate student at every SCAD location. As a resource for the whole SCAD community, the liberal arts department offers the SCAD Speaker Lab, where communications faculty members provide speech and presentation coaching for students, faculty and staff, to help prepare speakers for classroom presentations and more. The annual “Write On/Speak Up” workshop series invites students to take one-day workshops in areas including “Improv for Shy Speakers,” “How a Poem Happens,” “The Art of Interviewing” and “Writing for Stage and Screen.” Every liberal arts course at SCAD is taught by credentialed professors; no graduate students teach undergraduates at the university. At SCAD, pairing Ph.D. faculty with firstyear students is vital to a student’s ability to thrive in the university environment. The liberal arts faculty includes more than 40 full-time faculty members — accomplished and knowledgeable professionals who regularly present their work at conferences throughout North America, Europe and Asia, and who publish their work and research in international academic journals and publications.

MINORS At SCAD, minor programs are avenues for discovery. They invite students to think about their own creative process in new ways while illuminating future possibilities. Students graduating today find themselves entering an immensely connected and cross-disciplinary world, and the ability to adapt skills and practices has never been more important. Minor programs contribute directly to the career preparation that happens every day at SCAD, enriching students’ education through exposure to uniquely curated coursework across a range of disciplines. Students have the opportunity to complement their major program of study by pursuing such minors as advertising copywriting, business management and entrepreneurship, fashion marketing and management, interaction design, motion media design, storyboarding and more than 50 others. Accessory design

Creative writing

Industrial design

Performing arts

Acting for the camera

Dance

Interaction design

Photography

Advertising

Design for 3-D

Interactive design and

Previsualization

Advertising copywriting

action figures

game development

Printmaking

Animation

Design for sustainability

Interior design

Producing for film and

Architectural history

Dramatic writing

Jewelry

media

Architecture

Drawing

Language and cultural

Production design

Art history

Electronic design

studies

Scientific illustration

Arts and entertainment

Equestrian studies

Marine design

Sculpture

management

Exhibition design

Marketing for mobile and

Sequential art

Book arts

Fashion

British-American studies

Fashion marketing and

Business management and

management

entrepreneurship

Fashion photography

Ceramic arts

Fibers

Character technical

Film and television

direction

Furniture design

Cinema studies Concept art for games Costume design

Graphic design Historic preservation Illustration

interactive environments Menswear Mobile and interactive design Motion media design Museum studies Music composition New media art Package design Painting

FOR PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS, COURSES OF STUDY AND AVAILABILITY BY SCAD LOCATION, VISIT SCAD.EDU/MINORS.

322

SCAD.EDU / MINORS

Service design Sound design Storyboarding Technical direction Television producing Themed entertainment design Visual effects Vocal performance Writing

SCAD LANGUAGE STUDIO AN INTENSIVE ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROGRAM An international university with a presence on three

degree-granting coursework and do not carry credit

continents and students from more than 100 countries,

toward a degree program. Students who receive a waiver

SCAD offers an intensive, immersive English as a Second

for SLS may still enroll in ESL coursework or participate

Language program with an art and design focus.

in English language tutoring if they desire assistance with

The SCAD Language Studio improves the language

language or cultural transitions.

proficiency of non-native English speakers by engaging them in the SCAD community from day one of enrollment. In keeping with its name, SLS offers students an authentic studio experience including active participation in class meetings and the life of the university. Students enrolled in SLS participate in a blended

For information on the cost of SLS courses, visit scad.edu/fees. ESL courses may be waived upon successful performance on the ESL proficiency test. For more information on ESL assessment and criteria for successful completion of the ESL proficiency test, visit scad.edu/eslassessment.

learning approach to language acquisition. In addition to engaging and cooperative in-class experiences, students are exposed to extended learning opportunities that take them beyond the classroom walls and into both an innovative digital learning environment and a wide variety of other SCAD events and activities. These activities may include observing for-credit classes or attending lectures or exhibitions. Individual tutoring is available to all SLS students at no additional cost and is based on instructor feedback and test scores, with each tutoring plan focused not only on speaking skills, but also on reading, writing and listening. Throughout their English language study, students work closely with instructors who have experience teaching students from all over the world. SLS instructors hold advanced degrees in ESL education and instruction, applied linguistics, foreign language education and related fields. ESL classes are preparatory for

324

SCAD.EDU / ESL

ESL CURRICULUM  Level I ESL 160 Foundational Reading, Writing and Grammar ESL 170 Foundational Listening, Speaking and Pronunciation Level II ESL 260 Intensive Reading, Writing and Grammar ESL 270 Intensive Listening, Speaking and Pronunciation Level III ESL 360 Academic Reading, Writing and Grammar ESL 370 Academic Listening, Speaking and Pronunciation Level IV ESL 460 Reading, Writing and Grammar in Art and Design ESL 470 Listening, Speaking and Pronunciation in Art and Design Level V ESL 560 Integrated Reading, Writing and Grammar in Art and Design * ESL 570 Integrated Listening, Speaking and Pronunciation in Art and Design ESL 580 Graduate Reading, Writing and Grammar in Art and Design † Level VI ESL 670 Presentation and Pronunciation in Art and Design ESL 680 Research, Reading and Writing in Art and Design † * This course is for undergraduate students only. † This course is for graduate students only.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND POLICIES Mission statement

The Savannah College of Art and Design exists to prepare talented students for professional careers, emphasizing learning through individual attention in a positively oriented university environment.

Accreditation Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges The Savannah College of Art and Design is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of the Savannah College of Art and Design. SCAD’s office of institutional effectiveness is responsible for reporting substantive changes to SACSCOC according to the Commission’s published policies, as well as keeping the Commission apprised of program changes and other academic updates. National Architectural Accrediting Board  In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted an eight-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards. Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may require a pre-professional undergraduate degree in architecture for admission. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree. The Savannah College of Art and Design School of Building Arts offers the following NAAB-accredited degree program: M.Arch. (180 undergraduate quarter credits plus 90 graduate quarter credits). Next accreditation visit: 2021. 326

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

Hong Kong Council for Accreditation of Academic and Vocational Qualifications The following SCAD Hong Kong degree programs are accredited by the Hong Kong Council for Accreditation of Academic and Vocational Qualifications (10 Siu Sai Wan Road, Chai Wan, Hong Kong, 852.3658.0000) and are recognized on the Hong Kong Qualifications Framework, with a validity period of May 1, 2011, to April 30, 2016: QF Level 5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in advertising, 
 QR Registration Number: 11/001053/5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in animation, 
 QR Registration Number: 11/001052/5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in graphic design, 
 QR Registration Number: 11/001054/5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in illustration, 
 QR Registration Number: 11/001055/5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in interactive design and game development, 
 QR Registration Number: 11/001056/5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in motion media design, QR Registration Number: 11/001057/5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in photography, QR Registration Number: 11/001058/5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in visual effects, QR Registration Number: 11/001059/5

QF Level 6 Master of Arts in graphic design, QR Registration Number: 11/001060/6 Master of Arts in interactive design and game development, QR Registration Number: 11/001061/6 Master of Arts in photography, QR Registration Number: 11/001062/6 Master of Fine Arts in graphic design, QR Registration Number: 11/001063/6 Master of Fine Arts in interactive design and game development, QR Registration Number: 11/001064/6 Master of Fine Arts in photography, QR Registration Number: 11/001065/6

The following SCAD Hong Kong degree programs are accredited by HKCAAVQ and are recognized on the QF with a validity period of January 1, 2013, to December 31, 2017: QF Level 5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in fashion, 
 QR Registration Number: 13/000159/L5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in fashion marketing and management, QR Registration Number: 13/000160/L5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in interior design, 
 QR Registration Number: 13/000161/L5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting, 
 QR Registration Number: 13/000162/L5 Bachelor of Fine Arts in sequential art, 
 QR Registration Number: 13/000163/L5

QF Level 6 Master of Arts in luxury and fashion management, QR Registration Number: 13/000164/L6 Master of Fine Arts in luxury and fashion management, QR Registration Number: 13/000165/L6

Council for Interior Design Accreditation The interior design program leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Atlanta and Savannah is accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation, accredit-id.org, 206 Grandville Ave., Suite 350, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503-4014.

Memberships American Academy in Rome The Savannah College of Art and Design is an associate institutional member of the American Academy in Rome. Founded in 1894, the Academy exists to foster the pursuit of advanced research and independent study in the fine arts and humanities. The Academy awards the prestigious Rome Prize to select artists and scholars invited to Rome to pursue their creative goals in an atmosphere conducive to artistic innovation and progressive scholarship. American Council on Education The American Council on Education (ACE) is the major coordinating body for higher education in the United States. Founded in 1918, ACE seeks to provide leadership and a unifying voice on key higher education issues and to influence public policy through representation, research and program initiatives. ACE aims to foster greater collaboration and new partnerships within and outside the higher education community to help colleges and universities anticipate and address the challenges of the 21st century and contribute to a stronger nation and better world. ACE values inclusiveness and diversity, recognizes higher education’s responsibility to society, and embraces the belief that widespread access to excellent postsecondary educational opportunities is the cornerstone of a democratic society. Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture The Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) is a nonprofit

membership organization established in 1912 to advance the quality of architectural education. Membership in ACSA has grown from 10 charter members to more than 250 institutions representing more than 5,000 architecture faculty, as well as more than 500 architecture firms, product associations and individuals working in support of ACSA’s goals. ACSA provides a forum for the exchange of ideas through facilitating scholarly meetings, workshops, publications, awards programs, support for architectural research, policy development and partnerships with like-minded organizations. Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education The Savannah College of Art and Design is a member of the Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education (ARCHE). ARCHE is a council of 20 public and private institutions of higher learning in the greater Atlanta region. ARCHE brings these institutions together to build awareness of their collective scope, impact and value, and to help them share strengths through cooperative programs. The ARCHE crossregistration process facilitates enrollment in courses offered at all member colleges and universities. Students at ARCHE member institutions have the opportunity to broaden their range of study through access to courses not offered at their home institution. More information about ARCHE is available at atlantahighered.org. Cumulus, International Association of Universities and Colleges of Art, Design and Media The Savannah College of Art and Design is a member of Cumulus, the International Association of Universities and Colleges of Art, Design and Media. Cumulus is the only global association specifically focused on art and design education and research. Cumulus aims to build and maintain a dynamic and flexible academic forum to bring together top-level educational institutions from around the world. EDUCAUSE EDUCAUSE is a nonprofit association with a mission of advancing higher education by promoting the intelligent use of information technology. EDUCAUSE helps those who lead, manage and use information resources to shape strategic decisions at every level. EDUCAUSE programs include professional development

activities, applied research, strategic policy advocacy, teaching and learning initiatives, online information services, print and electronic publications, special interest collaborative communities, and awards for leadership and innovation. eLearning Guild The eLearning Guild is a community of practice for eLearning design, development and management professionals. The Guild offers members high-quality learning opportunities, networking services, resources and publications. Members represent a diverse group of managers, directors and executives focused on training and learning services, as well as eLearning instructional designers, content developers, Web developers, project managers, contractors and consultants. Guild members work in a variety of settings including corporate, government and academic organizations. All members share a common interest in eLearning design, development and management. European League of Institutes of the Arts The Savannah College of Art and Design is a member of the European League of Institutes of the Arts (ELIA), an independent membership organization representing approximately 300 higher arts educational institutions from more than 45 countries. Founded in 1990, ELIA represents all arts disciplines, including architecture, dance, design, fine art, media arts, music and theater. Through its members, ELIA represents unique bodies of knowledge and facilitates dialogues, mobility and activities between artists, teachers, administrators, senior managers, key decision-makers and more than 300,000 students. Georgia Independent College Association The Georgia Independent College Association (GICA) is an association of Georgia’s private, not-for-profit colleges and universities. Through partnerships with institutions, businesses and community leaders, GICA supports private higher education in Georgia in the areas of public policy, research, fundraising for student financial aid and collaborative programs. Online Learning Consortium The purpose of the Online Learning Consortium (OLC) is to help learning organizations continually improve quality, scale and breadth of their online programs according to their own distinctive missions so that education will become

a part of everyday life, accessible and affordable for anyone, anywhere, at any time, in a wide variety of disciplines. Created with funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, OLC encourages the collaborative sharing of knowledge and effective practices to improve online education in learning effectiveness, access, affordability for learners and providers, and student and faculty satisfaction. OLC generates ideas to improve products, services and standards for the online learning industry, and assists members in collaborative initiatives. Members include 1) private and public universities and colleges, community colleges and other accredited course and degree providers; and 2) organizations and suppliers of services, equipment and tools that practice the OLC quality principles. Southeastern College Art Conference The Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) is a nonprofit organization devoted to the promotion of art in higher education through facilitating cooperation among teachers and administrators in universities and colleges, professional institutions, and the community served by their institutions. U.S. Distance Learning Association In 1987, the U.S. Distance Learning Association (USDLA) was founded on the premise of creating a powerful alliance to meet the burgeoning education and training needs of learning communities globally. USDLA supports the development and application of distance learning education and training by uniting learners around the world and serves the needs of the distance learning community by providing advocacy, information and opportunity for networking. USDLA is committed to being the leading distance learning association in the United States.

State authorization

SCAD eLearning degree programs are available to students throughout the United States and across the world. SCAD has taken steps to ensure that eLearning degree programs and university policies are in compliance with the regulations of states that have established consumer-oriented authorization processes. While not all states require the publication of specific disclosures, the university provides the following state agency contact information for the benefit of current and prospective students: SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

327

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND POLICIES 328

Alabama Commission on Higher Education (100 N. Union St., Montgomery, AL 36104; telephone number 334.242.1998) Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education (135 South Union St., Montgomery, AL 36104; telephone number 334.293.4500) SCAD eLearning degree programs are exempt from authorization under A.S. 14.48 and 20 AAC 17.015. SCAD eLearning programs are delivered via correspondence education with no physical presence in Alaska. Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education (P.O. Box 110505, Juneau, AK 99811; telephone number 907.465.2962) Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education (1400 W. Washington St., Room 260, Phoenix, AZ 85007; telephone number 602.542.5709) Arkansas Department of Higher Education (423 Main St., Suite 400, Little Rock, AR 72201; telephone number 501.371.2000). Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board certification does not constitute an endorsement of any institution or program. Such certification merely indicates that certain criteria have been met as required under the rules and regulations implementing institutional and program certification as defined in Arkansas Code §6-61-301. California Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education (2535 Capitol Oaks Drive, Suite 400, Sacramento, CA 95833; telephone number 916.431.6959) Colorado Department of Higher Education (1560 Broadway, Suite 1600, Denver, CO 80202; telephone number 303.866.2723) Connecticut Office of Higher Education (61 Woodland St., Hartford, CT 06105; telephone number 860.947.1800) Delaware Department of Education (The Townsend Building, 401 Federal St., Suite 2, Dover, DE 19901; telephone number 302.735.4000) District of Columbia Education Licensure Commission (810 First St. NE, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20002; telephone number 202.727.6436) Florida Commission for Independent Education (325 W. Gaines St., Suite 1414, Tallahassee, FL 32399; telephone number 850.245.3200) Georgia Nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission (2082 E. Exchange Place, Suite 220, Tucker, GA 30084; telephone number 770.414.3300) Hawaii Post-Secondary Education Authorization Program (Leiopapa A Kamehameha Building, 235 S. Beretania St., Suite 801, Honolulu, HI 96813; telephone number 808.586.7327) Idaho State Board of Education (650 W. State St., 3rd Floor, Boise, ID 83702; telephone number 208.334.2270) Illinois Board of Higher Education (431 E. Adams St., 2nd Floor, Springfield, IL 62701; telephone number 217.782.2551) This institution is authorized by: The Indiana Board for Proprietary Education (101 W. Ohio St., Suite 670, Indianapolis, IN 46204; telephone number 317.464.4400) The Savannah College of Art and Design is registered by the Iowa College Student Aid Commission on behalf of the State of Iowa (430 East Grand Ave., FL 3, Des Moines, IA 50309; telephone number 877.272.4456) Kansas Board of Regents (1000 SW Jackson St., Suite 520, Topeka, KS 66612; telephone number 785.296.4917)

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (1024 Capital Center Drive, Suite 320, Frankfort, KY 40601; telephone number 502.573.1555) Louisiana Board of Regents (1201 N. Third St., Suite 6-200, Baton Rouge, LA 70802; telephone number 225.342.4253) Maine Department of Education (23 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333; telephone number 207.624.6600) Maryland Higher Education Commission (6 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, MD 21201; telephone number 410.767.3301/800.974.0203). The university is subject to investigation of student complaints by the Office of the Attorney General of the Maryland Higher Education Commission. For information about the filing and resolution of student complaints, please see the university’s policies related to complaints and appeals. Massachusetts Department of Higher Education (1 Ashburton Place, Room 1401, Boston, MA 02108; telephone number 617.994.6922) Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (P.O. Box 30004, Lansing, MI 48909; telephone number 517.241.6806) The Savannah College of Art and Design is registered as a private institution with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education pursuant to the Minnesota Statutes, sections 136A.61 to 136A.71. Registration is not an endorsement of the institution. Credits earned at the institution may not transfer to all other institutions (1450 Energy Park Drive, Suite 350, St. Paul, MN 55108; telephone number 651.642.0567). Mississippi Commission on College Accreditation (3825 Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211; telephone number 601.432.6372) Missouri Department of Higher Education (205 Jefferson St., P.O. Box 1469, Jefferson City, MO 65102-1469; telephone number 573.751.2361) Montana University System (2500 Broadway St., Helena, MT 59620; telephone number 406.444.6570) Nebraska’s Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education (140 N. 8th St., Suite 300, Lincoln, NE 68508; telephone number 402.471.2847) Nevada Commission on Postsecondary Education (8778 S. Maryland Parkway, Suite 115, Las Vegas, NV 89123; telephone number 702.486.7330) New Hampshire Department of Education (101 Pleasant St., Concord, NH 03301; telephone number 603.271.3494) New Jersey Secretary of Higher Education (20 W. State St., 4th Floor, Trenton, NJ 08625; telephone number 609.292.4310) New Mexico Higher Education Department (2048 Galisteo St., Santa Fe, NM 87505; telephone number 505.476.8418) New York Office of College and University Evaluation (New York State Education Department, 89 Washington Ave., Room 969 EBA, Albany, NY 12234; telephone number 518.474.1551) The University of North Carolina General Administration (910 Raleigh Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27514; telephone number 919.962.4558) North Dakota University System (10th floor, State Capitol, 600 East Boulevard Ave., Dept. 215, Bismarck, ND 58505; telephone number 701.328.2960) Ohio Board of Regents (25 South Front St., Columbus, OH 43215; telephone number 614.466.6000) Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education (655 Research Parkway, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, OK 73104; telephone number 405.225.9100)

Oregon Office of Degree Authorization (1500 Valley River Drive, Suite 100, Eugene, OR 97401; telephone number 541.687.7400) Pennsylvania Department of Education (333 Market St., Harrisburg, PA 17126; telephone number 717.783.6788) Consejo de Educacion de Puerto Rico (Ave. Ponce de Leon 268, Edificio Hato Rey Center Piso 15, Hato Rey, PR 00918; telephone number 787.641.7100) Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education (The Shepard Building, 80 Washington St., Suite 524, Providence, RI 02903; telephone number 401.456.6010) SCAD is licensed by the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education (1122 Lady St., Suite 300, Columbia, SC 29201; telephone number 803.737.2260). Licensure indicates only that minimum standards have been met; it is not an endorsement or guarantee of quality. Licensure is not equivalent to or synonymous with accreditation by an accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. South Dakota Secretary of State (500 E. Capitol Ave., Suite 204, Pierre, SD 57501; telephone number 605.773.3537) Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Division of Postsecondary School Authorization (404 James Robertson Parkway, Suite 1900, Nashville, TN 37243; telephone number 615.741.3605) Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Division of Academic Affairs and Research (1200 E. Anderson Lane, Austin, TX 78752; telephone number 512.427.6101) Utah Division of Consumer Protection (160 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84111; telephone number 801.530.6601) Vermont State Board of Education (219 North Main St., Suite 402, Barre, VT 05641; telephone number 802.479.1030) Virginia State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (101 N. 14th St., 10th Floor, James Monroe Building, Richmond, VA 23219; telephone number 804.225.2600) Washington Student Achievement Council (917 Lakeridge Way SW, Olympia, WA 98502; telephone number 360.753.7800). The Savannah College of Art and Design is authorized by the Washington Student Achievement Council and meets the requirements and minimum educational standards established for degree-granting institutions under the DegreeGranting Institutions Act. This authorization is subject to periodic review and authorizes the Savannah College of Art and Design to offer specific degree programs. The Council may be contacted for a list of currently authorized programs. Authorization by the Council does not carry with it an endorsement by the Council of the institution or its programs. Any person desiring information about the requirements of the act or the applicability of those requirements to the institution may contact the Council at 917 Lakeridge Way SW, Olympia, WA 98502; telephone number 360.753.7800. West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (1018 Kanawha Boulevard East, Suite 700, Charleston, WV 25301; telephone number 304.558.2101) Wisconsin Educational Approval Board (201 W. Washington Ave., Third Floor, Madison, WI 53703; telephone number 608.266.1996) Wyoming Department of Education (2300 Capitol Ave., Hathaway Building, second floor, Cheyenne, WY 82002; telephone number 307.777.7690)

Nondiscrimination policy In compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and other federal, state, and local laws, SCAD does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, national or ethnic origin, disability, or veteran status in any phase of its employment process, in any phase of its admission or financial aid programs, or other aspects of its educational programs or activities. Questions or concerns regarding the nondiscrimination policy should be directed to the compliance officer (complianceofficer@scad.edu).

Locations and learning modalities SCAD offers accredited degree programs at locations in Savannah and Atlanta, Georgia; in Hong Kong; and online via SCAD eLearning. Coursework also is offered through SCAD-sponsored international and domestic programs in various locations, including the SCAD study abroad location in Lacoste, France. Full degree programs are not offered at SCAD Lacoste. Students accepted to SCAD may request to study at one or more of these locations and online and may combine traditional and travel study with online coursework, except in Hong Kong. Hybrid courses also are offered (see specific program pages for details). Application and admission policies and procedures are the same for all undergraduate or graduate programs offered by SCAD, regardless of location and modality (see admission policies and procedures). Qualified students are eligible to receive scholarships, fellowships, and federal and state financial aid (see student financial services section). Students may begin their study any quarter during the academic year and may choose to be residential or commuting students. Orientation is offered at the start of each quarter for all new students and provides information about academic programs and university resources. SCAD Savannah SCAD Savannah offers a wide range of degree programs, certificate programs and individual courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels. A current listing of certificates and degree

programs offered at SCAD Savannah is available at scad.edu/programs. The SCAD Savannah urban location is large and unique, occupying more than 2 million square feet in nearly 70 facilities throughout one of the most renowned National Historic Landmark districts in the United States. The university is widely acknowledged as a leader in the field of historic preservation, adaptively reusing a variety of historical structures as classrooms, studios, digital labs, darkrooms, galleries, libraries, theaters, bookstore, cafés, residence halls, dining facilities, fitness centers and shopSCAD, a retail store for the sale of work produced by students, faculty, staff and alumni. Intercollegiate and intramural athletics, numerous student clubs and organizations, and professional affiliations provide a broad university experience. Community involvement, internships, competitions and classroom assignments connect students with professionals in businesses, design firms, media and nonprofit organizations. Performances, lectures, exhibitions, festivals, conferences, concerts and athletic events fill the calendar. Signature events include the Savannah Film Festival, deFINE ART, SCADstyle, the Sidewalk Arts Festival, the Sand Arts Festival and the SCAD Fashion Show. SCAD Atlanta SCAD Atlanta offers a wide range of degree programs and individual courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels. A current listing of certificates and degree programs offered at SCAD Atlanta is available at scad.edu/ programs. SCAD Atlanta facilities include wellequipped classrooms, galleries, digital labs, a library, photography darkrooms, printmaking presses, sculpture, painting and television production studios, a visual resources lab, a bookstore, a dining hall, a fitness center, a swimming pool and residence halls. SCAD Atlanta facilities also include the historic Ivy Hall cultural arts and writing center, the three-stage SCADshow theater and the SCAD Digital Media Center for majors such as animation, television producing and visual effects. Intercollegiate and intramural athletics, and a variety of student organizations, including student media and student ambassadors, provide leadership opportunities outside the classroom.

Professional affiliate chapters provide social and co-curricular programming to enhance the learning environment. Students also have opportunities to be active in the community and participate in internships, competitions and classroom assignments related to businesses, design firms, media or nonprofit organizations. Lectures, exhibitions, performances, workshops, conferences, seminars and other activities provide a well-rounded educational experience. SCAD Hong Kong SCAD Hong Kong offers degree programs and individual courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels. A current listing of programs offered at SCAD Hong Kong is available at scad.edu/ programs. SCAD students also may choose to study abroad in Hong Kong for one or more quarters. Interested students should discuss course options and eligibility with their staff adviser. SCAD Hong Kong is located at 292 Tai Po Road in Sham Shui Po, in the historic former North Kowloon Magistracy Building. SCAD has adapted the historic facility to become a leading site for the study of art and design in Asia, while honoring the structure’s historic and cultural significance. Features include a library and art gallery, digital labs and studios, a green screen room, classrooms and lecture halls. The entire building is updated with the most innovative technology to ensure that students are well prepared for professional careers. Situated on the southeastern coast of China, Hong Kong has a tropical climate and is a sophisticated international gateway combining ancient heritage and Western influence. Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China and has a population of approximately 7 million. In addition to Cantonese, English is an official language. Classes at SCAD are taught in English. Courses of study are registered with the Hong Kong Education Bureau, registration numbers: 261958-261971 and 262196-262202. It is a matter of discretion for individual employers to recognize any qualification to which these courses may lead. SCAD eLearning SCAD offers award-winning, accredited degree programs and individual courses at the undergraduate and

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

329

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND POLICIES 330

graduate levels through SCAD eLearning. A current listing of degree programs offered via SCAD eLearning is available at scad.edu/programs. Students who enroll in SCAD eLearning courses must possess adequate computer skills and have regular access to appropriate computer hardware, software and Internet connectivity in order to participate fully in coursework. Specific technology requirements for each program are available at scad.edu/elearning. SCAD eLearning students may begin their study any quarter during the academic year. Courses are unique with regard to media usage and navigation. The online learning environment is introduced via an online orientation with information about SCAD resources and opportunities. Students have access to SCAD presentations, lectures and events through the Virtual Lecture Hall. SCAD eLearning courses adhere to the normal SCAD calendar, and students are expected to complete coursework according to a schedule that stipulates due dates and asynchronous online sessions for students and professors to meet, assess and critique work, or expand upon discussion board postings. Students in SCAD eLearning courses are expected to participate in all assignments, examinations and field trips or other special activities as directed by the professor. Attendance is determined by active login time and participation in required activities. Other online services and resources include online course registration and access to the university’s extensive library collections. Special online events are hosted for SCAD eLearning students concerning peer tutoring and career services. An online bookstore is available for ordering supplies, textbooks and software via MySCAD. The digital community provides a forum where SCAD eLearning students can participate in SCAD happenings and discussion through webcasts, the online student newspaper and other digital programming outlets to offer a broad university experience.

region. SCAD Lacoste offers a rotating schedule of courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels, but does not offer full degree programs. A current listing of courses offered at SCAD Lacoste is available at scad.edu/locations/lacoste/ learn. All courses are developed and taught by SCAD faculty and are offered for academic credit under the authority and accreditation of the university. Students must first apply and be accepted to SCAD before applying to study abroad at SCAD Lacoste. (See admission policies and procedures.) Students may apply their existing SCAD scholarships, fellowships, and federal and state financial aid toward the tuition and fees associated with studying at SCAD Lacoste. Special study abroad scholarships also are available to qualified SCAD students. Students may apply to attend SCAD Lacoste any quarter during the academic year, and should meet with their staff adviser to discuss how courses taken at SCAD Lacoste apply toward their course of study and meet degree requirements. While situated in a centuries-old setting, SCAD Lacoste offers a variety of modern amenities, including computer labs equipped with the most recent software, well-equipped teaching studios for painting, drawing, sculpture, printmaking, photography and digital imaging, as well as dining and residence halls, a library, galleries and administrative offices. Classes are taught in English.

SCAD Lacoste SCAD Lacoste is a study abroad location in a beautifully preserved medieval village in the South of France. SCAD Lacoste offers a unique opportunity for students and faculty to spend an entire quarter immersed in the culture of the

SCAD study abroad programs Through short- or full-term international or domestic study programs in a variety of locations, students have the opportunity to earn credit while gaining a more vivid perspective on art, architecture and design. Programs

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

Locations and majors Students admitted to SCAD may attend any SCAD location. Students may declare majors and minors and earn a degree only at a location where those programs are offered. Course availability varies by location. A list of academic programs by location is published in the annual course catalog and is posted online at scad.edu/programs. After enrolling and attending any SCAD location, students must contact a staff adviser to attend another location or to change locations officially.

and course offerings vary. Current information is available online at scad.edu/ studyabroad. Students must first apply and be accepted to SCAD before applying to study abroad at SCAD Lacoste or in any SCAD short-term domestic or international study program. Students who wish to study at SCAD Lacoste or SCAD Hong Kong should discuss with their staff adviser both course availability and how coursework taken at these locations applies toward their program of study. Tuition for coursework at SCAD is the same at all locations. Additional program costs, including travel, housing, meals, travel visas, insurance, excursions, etc., vary according to program location and duration. Students may apply their existing SCAD scholarships, fellowships, and federal and state financial aid toward the tuition and fees associated with domestic or international study programs. Students should contact a staff adviser for information on applying financial aid and scholarships. Orientation for SCAD Lacoste, SCAD Hong Kong, and short-term domestic and international study programs is offered prior to travel.

Undergraduate programs Undergraduate programs embrace a wide range of major areas and are designed to challenge students to perform at a high level, preparing them for professional careers. A well-rounded curriculum provides students with core courses in foundation studies and general education leading to focused major programs emphasizing development of academic knowledge, technical and analytical skills, aesthetic sensibility, and the ability to express ideas visually and verbally. Bachelor of Arts degree The Bachelor of Arts degree program is a four-year course of study requiring 180 quarter credit hours (equivalent to 120 semester credit hours) and incorporating a foundation studies curriculum, comprehensive general education curriculum, area of concentration curriculum and electives. The majority of the Bachelor of Arts curriculum consists of fine arts, humanities, general education and liberal arts courses. An area of concentration complements the coursework. In the foundation studies

curriculum, students receive instruction in the fundamental principles, elements and techniques of art and design. In the general education curriculum, students are exposed to a broad base of knowledge through courses in humanities/ fine arts, natural sciences/mathematics, social/behavioral sciences, written and oral communication and computer literacy. The area of concentration allows students to develop knowledge and skill in a particular discipline. Students are required to take electives to broaden their experience and interests. Bachelor of Fine Arts degree The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree program is a four-year course of study requiring 180 quarter credit hours (equivalent to 120 semester credit hours) and incorporating a foundation studies curriculum, general education curriculum, major program curriculum and electives. The Bachelor of Fine Arts curriculum is designed to focus intently on acquiring knowledge and skill in the arts and design. In the foundation studies curriculum, students receive instruction in the fundamental principles, elements and techniques of art and design. In the general education curriculum, students are exposed to a broad base of knowledge through courses in humanities/fine arts, natural sciences/mathematics, social/behavioral sciences, written and oral communication, and computer literacy. In the major program curriculum, students work toward developing knowledge, skills and a level of mastery in a specific discipline. Students are required to take electives to broaden their experience and interests. Undergraduate certificate SCAD offers an undergraduate certificate program in digital publishing, which can be earned in combination with any undergraduate degree, except the B.F.A. in graphic design, the B.A. in visual communication with a concentration in graphic design or the graphic design minor. Current students may pursue a certificate by contacting their staff adviser. Degree-seeking students must complete certificate coursework prior to or within the final quarter of registration in degree coursework. New students may apply for admission to a certificate program by following the undergraduate admission requirements.

Undergraduate double majors Many of the undergraduate majors offered at SCAD complement each other, and students may choose to earn a double major. With careful course selection and financial planning, students can double major without substantially prolonging their programs of study. Students who put forth that extra effort gain credentials and expertise that may be invaluable to their careers. In order to double major, undergraduate students must complete all courses unique to each major. Students are not required to take the same course twice, nor must they always take two sets of electives; however, a student may not use major coursework for one major to serve as major coursework in the second major. Major coursework for one major may count as free elective or studio credit in the second major program. Students who wish to double major must follow course requirements as listed in the catalog they are following for their primary major. For information about completing a double major, undergraduate students should consult with a staff adviser. Students also should check to be sure adequate financial aid is available, if needed, to cover the additional time and costs associated with completing coursework above the minimum credit hours required for a bachelor’s degree. SCAD Core The SCAD Core of foundation studies and general education courses is designed to provide undergraduate students with the essential skills necessary for success at SCAD. Foundation studies provide students with a studio foundation that builds visual, conceptual and creative abilities essential to their development as professionals. General education courses in liberal arts are designed to develop students as critical thinkers by providing an intellectual foundation and breadth of knowledge for lifelong learning. Students should complete SCAD Core coursework within their first 90 hours of study. The organization of these courses into a two-year sequence allows students to complete necessary prerequisites for future study and also prepares them for the work of the major. The SCAD Core may consist of a combination of the following courses. Students should consult their faculty or staff adviser for specific course requirements and sequencing.

Foundation studies courses DRAW 100 Drawing I: Form and Space DRAW 101 Drawing II: Composition and Media DSGN 100 Design I: Elements and Organization DSGN 101 Color: Theory and Application DSGN 102 Design II: 3-D Form in Space DSGN 204 Design III: Time General education courses ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications   -ORCMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications COMM 105 Speaking of Ideas ENGL 123 Composition Mathematics/natural sciences (choose one of the following):

ANAT ASTR BIOL MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH

100 General Anatomy 101 Introduction to Astronomy 100 Environmental Science 100 College Mathematics* 101 Intermediate Mathematics* 110 Evidence and Inference: The Power of Statistics* 140 The Geometry of Physical Space* 160 Contemporary Mathematics in Real-world Phenomena* 201 Applied Mathematics* 201 Applied Physics

MATH PHYS * See undergraduate mathematics competency requirement.

Social/behavioral sciences (choose one of the following):

ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology BUSI 180 Introduction to Economics BUSI 250 Macroeconomics COMM 205 Intercultural Communication POLS 100 Politics in America: Freedom, Equality and Power POLS 110 Ideology and Controversy in American Life: Left, Right and Wrong POLS 120 Global Political Issues: From Genocide to Globalization PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology PSYC 126 A Psychology of Self PSYC 260 Creative Thinking Theories and Processes PSYC 280 Psychology of Group Processes Students should consult with their faculty or staff adviser when selecting or registering for any general education or elective course to ensure that the course meets the requirements of the program. Students must meet prerequisites in order to register in any course.

Undergraduate minors Minors are designed to broaden students’ education and enhance their employment opportunities. Students enrolled in any bachelor’s degree program may elect to declare a minor outside the major field of study. Required courses in the foundation studies curriculum or in the general education curriculum may count toward a minor. The minor may require the student to complete more than the minimum

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

331

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND POLICIES

number of quarter hours required for graduation. Thus, students should check to be sure adequate financial aid is available, if needed, to cover the additional time and cost. Students may choose to complete more than one minor or apply the hours earned for a minor toward the completion of a double major. For information about completing a minor, students should consult with a staff adviser. In order to receive designation of a minor on his or her transcript, a student must declare the minor with a staff adviser, successfully complete the required credit hours as specified in the minor program of study, and maintain an overall grade-point average of 2.0 in the minor. Some courses have prerequisites that may require additional credits to complete the minor. Consult course descriptions to ascertain prerequisites. A listing of minor programs offered, including descriptions, courses of study and availability at each SCAD location, is available online at scad.edu/minors. Undergraduate mathematics competency requirement SCAD ensures that all undergraduate students are able to demonstrate fundamental mathematics competency in one of the following ways: by successfully completing one MATH course at SCAD; by presenting proof of a qualifying math score on the SAT (560 or above) or the ACT (24 or above); or by presenting proof of qualifying math scores on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, College-level Examination Program, or other equivalent international examinations as published on the SCAD admission website. These scores may qualify for transfer credit in addition to satisfying the mathematics requirement. Students who have successfully completed a course at another college or university similar in content and level of instruction to a mathematics course at SCAD may be permitted to transfer that course in satisfaction of the mathematics requirement. Undergraduate architecture applicants who present SAT math scores lower than 560, ACT math scores lower than 24, or are unable to demonstrate a competency for the study of mathematics and science may be admitted to the architecture program on a provisional basis and must take MATH 101 Intermediate Mathematics. The credit hours earned in MATH 101 may be applied as an undergraduate general

332

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

education elective. All undergraduate architecture students are required to take MATH 201 Applied Mathematics. Students who demonstrate math competency with exam scores may take any math or natural science class to satisfy the mathematics/natural sciences general education requirement. Students should consult with their staff adviser before registering for any math or science courses to be sure they meet the requirements for their specific program of study. First Year Experience First Year Experience is a required, noncredit, extended orientation course for first-year incoming undergraduate students designed to help prepare them for academic success and professional careers. The course provides a discussion-based environment in which students are introduced to university requirements, their responsibility in the learning process, and skills that enable them to identify and efficiently use university resources. In addition, the course addresses topics such as major exploration, academic advisement and registration, career planning, campus technology and student involvement opportunities. All incoming first-year students are registered for First Year Experience during their first quarter of enrollment. First-year students are required to successfully complete First Year Experience prior to declaring a major, and as a graduation requirement. Students who have transferred to SCAD after attending another institution are not required to complete the course but may opt to participate in the course to take advantage of the learning opportunities presented.

Graduate programs Graduate programs at SCAD are designed for dedicated, self-motivated students who are committed to the pursuit of excellence through advanced study. Graduate curricula are structured to include knowledge of the literature of the discipline and to ensure ongoing student engagement in research and/ or appropriate professional practice and training experiences. Graduate courses require students to analyze, explore, question, reconsider and synthesize old and new knowledge and skills. The graduate experience culminates in a thesis, final project or portfolio demonstrating

a mature and resolved body of work and/or research. Graduates are encouraged to hold leadership positions, to enter a variety of professional disciplines, to teach, or to accomplish other personal and professional goals. Master of Architecture degree (professional) The professional Master of Architecture degree program is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board and satisfies the education requirement for architect licensure in all U.S. jurisdictions. The program includes 180 undergraduate credit hours at the preprofessional level and 90 graduate credit hours at the professional level for a total of 270 quarter credit hours (equivalent to 180 semester credit hours). The M.Arch. degree program requires that students first complete a preparatory or pre-professional undergraduate degree in architecture. At SCAD, the pre-professional undergraduate program is a Bachelor of Fine Arts in architecture degree, which is composed of 180 quarter credit hours. After successfully completing 180 undergraduate credit hours and satisfying all program requirements, students are awarded the B.F.A. in architecture degree, whether or not they pursue graduate level studies. Acceptance of students graduating with a B.F.A. degree from SCAD into the professional M.Arch. graduate program is based on current grade-point average and studio portfolio. Students with a pre-professional or preparatory degree in architecture from other institutions are also encouraged to apply for admission to the M.Arch. program. Acceptance of a student with a pre-professional or preparatory degree in architecture from other institutions to the SCAD graduate program is based on review of academic transcripts, specific coursework and portfolio to ensure that their undergraduate study satisfies NAAB student performance criteria required at the pre-professional level. Based on the results of this review, students may be assigned preparatory (preliminary) courses from the SCAD B.F.A. program prior to admission to the graduate program. The architecture program in its entirety encompasses a foundation studies curriculum, general education curriculum, major program curriculum and electives. The program emphasizes

preparation for a professional career as an architect; it focuses on theory and practice within the university’s unique art and design context. Architectural design is emphasized through design studio courses that meet 10 hours each week and through a sequence of courses in building construction systems, graphic communication, digital technology, sustainability, history, theory and professional practice. Master of Arts degree The Master of Arts degree is an initial graduate degree that requires at least 45 quarter credit hours and up to 60 quarter hours (equivalent to 30 and 40 semester quarter hours) of graduate-level courses in the selected area, complemented by historical, theoretical and related studies. The program requires a minimum of one year for completion with all 45 quarter hours in residency at SCAD (these can include eLearning and study abroad hours). The M.A. culminates with a written thesis or graduate project such as a portfolio or group exhibition, presentation or other creative work product demonstrating a high degree of intellectual or artistic proficiency accompanied by a written component. Formal faculty reviews of sample student work and progress are conducted. The M.A. degree program may be research- and/or practice-oriented to offer students a focused educational experience while engaging in dialogue on the history, theory and practice of the discipline. Students who wish to pursue the M.A. degree should possess a commitment to exploring the field in depth, as well as a desire to foster their individual vision and capabilities; to develop a high degree of proficiency in their technical, creative, expressive or analytical skills; and to participate in a vibrant university community. The M.A. degree may prepare students for positions in related areas or may serve as preparation for advanced graduate degrees such as the Master of Fine Arts or the Doctor of Philosophy in academic disciplines. In some programs, the M.A. degree may be followed by additional study at SCAD leading to an M.F.A. degree. Students planning to continue the next quarter from the M.A. to the M.F.A. in the same major should contact the office of graduate studies prior to the conclusion of their M.A. studies. Approval must be given by the department chair of the area of study.

Master of Fine Arts degree The Master of Fine Arts degree is recognized as the terminal or highest degree for many art and design professions. The M.F.A. degree program requires at least 90 quarter credit hours (equivalent to 60 semester credit hours) of graduate-level courses in studio, art history, theory and related areas. The program requires a minimum of two years for completion, with the final 45 quarter hours in residence at SCAD (these can include eLearning and study abroad hours). The program culminates with a thesis exhibition, project, presentation or other publicly presented creative work demonstrating professional-level competency, accompanied by a written component and reviewed by a graduate thesis committee. Formal faculty reviews of sample student work and progress are conducted. Most M.F.A. programs require at least one field or teaching internship to provide students with a mentored experience of professional practice. Students who wish to pursue the M.F.A. degree should possess a high level of ability and commitment, as well as the desire to develop their personal vision; to evolve a mature understanding of their chosen field’s background, principles and practices as well as its broader cultural context; to gain technical mastery in their chosen discipline; to inform advanced art and design creation with critical and conceptual studies; and to interact with fellow students and professors within a dynamic and challenging arts community. M.F.A. graduates may pursue professional careers as practicing artists, writers, performers and designers; fill positions as studio, writing or performing arts professors in higher education; or work in other related fields. Master of Urban Design degree The Master of Urban Design program requires 90 quarter credit hours (equivalent to 60 semester credit hours) of graduate-level courses in studio, historical, theoretical and related areas. The program requires a minimum of two years for completion, with the final 45 quarter hours in residence at SCAD. The program culminates with a thesis exhibition, project, presentation or other publicly presented work demonstrating professional-level competency, accompanied by a written component and

reviewed by a graduate thesis committee. Formal faculty reviews of sample student work and progress are conducted. The M.U.D. program requires at least one field or teaching internship. Graduate certificate SCAD offers certificate programs at the graduate level. These programs are designed to provide special preparation in an area complementary to the student’s major or profession. Current graduate students may pursue a graduate certificate by contacting their staff adviser. Graduate students may enroll in graduate certificate programs outside their primary department. Required certificate coursework may be used as electives in the primary program of study. Students must be accepted into the graduate certificate program before registering for their certificate coursework. Upon completion of certificate and degree requirements, students receive both the graduate degree and the graduate certificate. Degree-seeking students must complete certificate coursework prior to or within the final quarter of registration in degree coursework. New students may apply for admission to a certificate program by following the graduate admission requirements.  

Course catalog of entry

Both undergraduate and graduate students are expected to follow the degree requirements of the course catalog in effect at the time of their initial enrollment at SCAD. Specific course requirements, including prerequisites, are updated in the catalog annually. Students are expected to adhere to changes to individual courses as they occur. If the curriculum and degree requirements change during the five-year period after the student initially enrolls, the student may elect to follow the new degree requirements, but may not move to a catalog earlier than his or her catalog of entry. If a student does not fulfill the degree requirements of the course catalog of entry within the five-year period, then he or she must follow the requirements of the catalog in effect at the end of that five-year period. Any graduate student who does not complete the program within five years must petition the department of graduate studies for

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

333

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND POLICIES 334

continuation under the current program of study. Students may be required to follow new degree requirements if courses required by previous programs have been eliminated from the course catalog; however, under no circumstances are students required to take any additional credit hours to earn the declared degree within five years of entry.

Academic advisement Academic advisement is provided to all students to assist in the development of their educational plans and career goals and to relate these goals to academic offerings at SCAD. Students have both a staff and a faculty adviser to support them during their SCAD tenure. Staff advisers help students with the general requirements and logistics related to their academic registration and progression. Faculty advisers are recognized as the experts in their disciplines, offering students help with regard to their chosen major of study. Students are encouraged to discuss their program of study, course content and career development each quarter with their faculty adviser, and to contact their staff adviser as needed. First-year freshmen are assigned a staff adviser at enrollment. When students declare a major, they also are assigned a faculty adviser from their major department. Transfer students are assigned a staff adviser and faculty adviser upon enrollment. Transfer students are required to discuss their program of study with their staff adviser their first quarter of enrollment and should consult with their staff adviser at least annually thereafter. Graduate students are assigned both faculty and staff advisers at orientation. These advisers regularly provide assistance with course selection and professional development and help guide students toward fulfillment of requirements for certificate or degree programs. S C A D e Le a r n i n g s t u d e n t s a re assigned faculty and staff advisers at orientation. SCAD eLearning staff members provide additional assistance and serve as liaisons for these students. Students who must fulfill English as a Second Language requirements are assigned an ESL faculty adviser at orientation.

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

Declaring a major Incoming first-time freshmen enter SCAD as undeclared majors. First-year students have the opportunity to declare a major upon successful completion of FSYR 101 First Year Experience, but may remain undeclared through their sophomore year. While undeclared, students are required to consult with their staff adviser prior to registration each quarter. Students should declare a major by the end of the sophomore year. Incoming transfer students enter SCAD as declared majors based on their application for admission. Transfer credit is reviewed and awarded based upon the declared major. All declared students are assigned a faculty adviser who teaches in the major, as well as a staff adviser. Undergraduate students who wish to declare or change a major must consult with a staff adviser. Students may change their major, add a second major, or enroll in a minor at any time during their studies. Graduate students who wish to change their program of study should consult with a graduate staff adviser. Students may declare a major or minor only through a SCAD location where that program is offered.

Quarter system Undergraduate and graduate courses are taught on the quarter system. Most courses carry five hours of academic credit. Each five-credit course meets for at least 2 1/2 hours twice weekly for a total of 50 hours of instruction during the 10-week quarter. One quarter credit hour requires 10 hours of instruction, and students should expect to spend an additional 20 hours of out-of-class time for a total of 30 hours of activity in a quarter. The academic year includes four quarters and students may enroll each quarter, including the summer quarter; however, course offerings may be limited in the summer. Students should expect to spend a minimum of two hours on out-of-class work for each hour of direct faculty instruction in class, including internships, independent studies and studio work. Students enrolled in SCAD eLearning courses should expect to spend a minimum of two hours on out-of-class work to manage course content and complete

assignments for each hour of participation in the digital classroom. SCAD sometimes offers courses in a compressed timeframe of less than a 10-week quarter. In all cases, however, the standard for earning a quarter credit (10 contact hours, plus 20 additional out-of-class hours) is maintained. One quarter credit is equivalent to 0.67 semester credits; one semester credit is worth 1.50 quarter credits.

Grading system At the end of each quarter, faculty members submit grades via MySCAD for all enrolled students. Once all grades have been received, the registrar’s office processes grades, awards credits, and calculates grade-point averages. Grades are assigned according to the following system of letter and quality points evaluation: LETTER QUALITY

POINTS POINTS Undergraduate Graduate

A Excellent B Good C Average D Poor F Failure

4 3 2 1 0

4 3 2 0 0

The following codes may appear on transcripts and do not affect a student’s grade-point average.  W Withdrawal  I Incomplete

S Satisfactory

T Transfer credit U Unsatisfactory N Audit

Graduate students receive no credit for a grade of D or below in any course, and receive no credit for required preliminary courses for a grade of C or below. Full-time undergraduate students who achieve a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher during a quarter term receive an official letter noting dean’s list honors for that term. This honor is also noted on the student’s transcript.

Full-time status The office of the registrar is the official designated authority for determining full-time status for all students requesting enrollment verifications for insurance or any type of financial aid or loans. A full-time undergraduate student is defined as one who is registered for at least 15 quarter hours of credit per quarter. Undergraduate students may register for a maximum of 20 quarter

hours of credit per quarter, provided they have maintained a grade-point average of at least 3.0 during the previous quarter. A full-time graduate student is defined as one who is registered for at least 10 quarter hours of credit per quarter. Graduate students may register for more than 15 quarter hours only with the permission of the chair and by contacting their graduate staff adviser. Less than full-time enrollment status may affect financial aid such as loans and grants, scholarships, university housing, health insurance and visas (if applicable).

Attendance and personal conduct Only students who are properly registered for a class may attend and participate in that class. Students are not permitted to participate in classes in which they are not registered. The official class roster determines enrollment. Students are responsible for ensuring that they are enrolled for each class in which they are participating. Students are expected to attend and participate in all scheduled classes and examination periods. Absences in excess of four class periods per quarter, or 20 percent of the course, result in the student receiving a failing grade for the course, unless the student withdraws from the course in accordance with the withdrawal policy. The withdrawal policy can be found on page 335. Tardiness, early departure or other time away from class in excess of 15 minutes per class session is considered absence for that class session. Classes missed due to late registration are included in the overall absences permitted for the class. Not attending class during the first week of any term will result in a delay in disbursement of financial aid, and may also result in the student being dropped from classes. Students should contact their staff adviser in advance if they expect to miss classes during the first week. Students taking fully online courses or online courses with minimal face-toface meetings are required to check the online course site regularly and participate in the daily work of the course. At minimum, students should log in and participate in the class, or in an academically related activity within the course, two separate days per week. Students demonstrating no activity within the

first three weeks will be dropped from the course. Students who fail to meet the minimum requirement within the first three weeks will be withdrawn from the course. Absences in excess of 20 percent result in the student receiving a failing grade for the course. For hybrid courses, which meet both online and in the classroom, combined absences, including online attendance and classroom attendance, in excess of 20 percent result in the student receiving a failing grade for the course. Students’ appearance and conduct should be appropriate and should contribute to the academic and professional atmosphere of SCAD. The university reserves the right at its sole discretion to withdraw the privilege of enrollment from any student whose conduct is detrimental to the academic environment or to the well-being of other students, faculty or staff members, or to the university facilities.

Dropping and adding courses The first five business days of each 10-week quarter are designated the drop/add period when students may change their course schedules. Students are subject to a late registration charge if they have not registered prior to the first day of classes. The drop/add period for any term less than 10 weeks will vary and will be published in relevant course materials. Students who do not attend a class for which they are registered are dropped from the class and fined US$500 by the university.

Military mobilization SCAD’s military mobilization policy is intended to provide financial relief for students affected by military mobilization. This policy protects students who are members of a state National Guard or reserve forces of the United States and who are ordered to report for state or federal military service. When a currently enrolled student (or the spouse of a currently enrolled student, if the spouse has a dependent child) has received orders to deploy, the student should submit a copy of the orders to the registrar’s office. The registrar’s office will communicate to student financial services that the change in the student’s status is the result of military

mobilization. The student shall be given the option to receive a full refund of tuition and fees for courses that he or she will be unable to complete due to deployment, regardless of the point during the quarter at which the student withdraws. If the student wishes, he or she may opt to receive a grade of incomplete for courses he or she is unable to complete due to deployment, with the option to finish the courses at a later date. Alternatively, the student may make arrangements with his or her instructors for final grades in courses that will not be fully completed. If the student opts for a grade of incomplete, or for final grades prior to the end of the current quarter, registration shall remain intact, and the student will be responsible for tuition and fees in full. If the student seeks an incomplete, he or she will not be eligible to withdraw from the course after the end of the quarter. In order to replace the incomplete grade with a final grade, all work must be turned in by the midterm of the second quarter following the conclusion of military service, except in the case of an eLearning course. In such cases, when the type of deployment allows, work is due by the midterm of the next quarter. If a currently enrolled student is registered in one or more eLearning courses when deployed, the student may decide to remain registered in eLearning courses based on his or her type of deployment. The financial aid office will perform the standard return of Title IV refund calculation based on the student’s withdrawal date. Funds will be returned to the appropriate program as mandated by federal regulation. If the student withdraws, SCAD will refund 100 percent of his or her personal payments for that quarter. Any balance created by the return of funds to appropriate programs and personal funds will be written off by SCAD. If the student receives a grade of incomplete, he or she may enroll in the same class, at no charge, within two quarters of the conclusion of military service.

Withdrawal After the end of the drop/add period and through the last day of the quarter, students may officially withdraw from a course. Students should note that

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

335

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND POLICIES

withdrawing from a course after the drop/add period is not the same as dropping a course during the drop/add period. Withdrawing students do incur a financial obligation for the portion of the course that has passed, but withdrawal may entitle the student or lender to a refund of tuition paid for the remaining portion of the course. Withdrawal from one or more courses also may impact a student’s full-time status and may alter eligibility for financial aid, university housing, health insurance and visas (if applicable). Students should consult with a staff adviser for information. Refund policies are listed under financial information. Students demonstrate their intent to withdraw from a course by completing the electronic withdrawal form available in MySCAD. The withdrawal form is processed automatically, and withdrawal is effective immediately upon receipt of the request by the registrar’s office. If for any reason the automated process is not available, students should contact the office of the registrar immediately at registrar@scad.edu. Withdrawals are final and students may not return to the same course from which they have withdrawn. Withdrawal from a course results in a grade of W, and no credit is earned. Thus, it does not calculate into the student’s grade-point average. A student who is found to be in violation of the academic integrity policy forfeits the right to withdraw from the course. Note that the ability to withdraw from the course is suspended as soon as the instructor notifies the student and/or the registrar of concerns about academic integrity (see “Academic integrity,” page 338, for more detailed information). A student who is withdrawing from SCAD altogether must complete a withdrawal form for each course in which he or she is registered, have an exit interview with a staff adviser, officially drop any courses for which he or she may be preregistered in the subsequent quarter, return his or her student identification card and, if residing in SCAD housing, return all room keys to the office of residence life and housing.

Auditing Currently enrolled degree-seeking, nondegree-seeking or transient students who wish to enroll in a course,

336

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

SCAD is a member of the Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education (ARCHE). The ARCHE cross-registration process facilitates enrollment in courses offered at all member colleges and universities. Students at ARCHE member institutions have the opportunity to broaden their range of study through access to courses not offered at their home institution. SCAD students who wish to participate in the cross-registration program must submit an application to the registrar’s office. Approval for cross-registration does not guarantee placement in courses at the host institution. More information about ARCHE is available online at atlantahighered.org.

must complete the SCAD internship application, including internship start date, duration of internship, number of hours/days per week of employment and any terms of employment. The student must provide the completed internship application signed by the student, the faculty internship supervisor and the department chair, along with a liability waiver signed by the student and payment of tuition. The internship application must show that the student will have adequate faculty and supervisor contact hours during the 10-week quarter that the internship is to take place. For both undergraduate and graduate internships, students are required to work a minimum of 150 hours of internship activity. Graduate teaching internship application materials should be prepared with the supervising professor during the quarter prior to the intended quarter of registration. Internship applications must be submitted prior to the quarter in which the internship is to be conducted. Students must pay tuition upon submission of the approved and completed internship application in order to complete registration of the internship for credit.

Internships

Independent study

Internships offer undergraduate and graduate students valuable opportunities to work in a professional environment and gain firsthand experience to help them prepare for careers. In an approved internship setting, a student typically spends one quarter working with an on-site professional supervisor and a faculty internship supervisor to achieve specific goals and objectives related to the program of study. Internships may be undertaken on a credit or non-credit basis and may be paid or unpaid. An undergraduate student seeking an internship for credit must have completed a minimum of 90 credit hours, or have completed 75 credit hours and be registered in 15 credit hours in the current quarter, with a cumulative gradepoint average of at least 3.0. A graduate student seeking an internship for credit must have completed at least 15 graduate-level credit hours with a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0. In order to complete registration of the internship for credit, the student

Students may wish to earn credit through independent study that allows them to investigate a topic in depth or take advantage of particular resources. An independent study may not be used as a substitute for a course currently offered. Proposals for independent study must be approved by a faculty member and the department chair and submitted prior to the start of the quarter in which the independent study is to be conducted. Proposals should present evidence that the independent study requires at least 150 hours of work. In order to complete registration of the independent study for credit, students also must pay the necessary tuition. Undergraduate students must have completed at least 90 credit hours with a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 to participate in an independent study; graduate students must have completed at least 15 credit hours of graduate-level courses with a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0.

but do not want to receive a grade, may request through the registrar to audit the course, provided space is available. Auditing status is reflected by N on the grade report. Students must be eligible to register for the course they wish to audit. Degree-seeking students should consult a staff adviser before requesting to audit a course to determine the effect this may have on financial aid and scholarship status and awards.

ARCHE cross-registration

Course schedule changes SCAD reserves the right to cancel a course and change the schedule, location or professor of courses at any time. Students are responsible for checking their schedule prior to the start of each quarter to apprise themselves of any changes.

Transient status/credit SCAD students who wish to attend another college or university during their enrollment at SCAD and receive transfer credit may apply for transient status. In order to qualify for transient status, undergraduate students must be in good academic standing and have a minimum grade-point average of 2.0. Graduate students requesting transient status must have a minimum grade-point average of 3.0, and should be advised that transient credit is rare at the graduate level. Students must complete their final 45 hours at SCAD and are not eligible for transient credit during that period. Undergraduate students may transfer no more than 90 total hours of credit, including transient credit. Students who qualify for transient status must consult with their staff adviser in order to complete a transient status application. A course description or syllabus from each course the student wishes to take will be required. The application is evaluated for eligibility for transfer credit, and the student is notified of the decision within two weeks of application. This process must be completed before the student begins transient study. Students should also consult with their staff adviser to determine the impact of transient status/credit on their financial aid or scholarship award. Upon completion of transient study, the student must submit an official transcript from the other institution that reflects the final grade(s) earned in the course(s). These transcripts must be submitted to the transfer admission office by the end of the term immediately following completion of coursework in order for the student to receive transfer of credit. Undergraduate students must earn a minimum grade of C (2.0) for a course to be applied as transfer credit while graduate students must earn a minimum grade of B (3.0). The

credit is recorded as T on the transcript and is not calculated into the student’s cumulative GPA.

Inactive status/readmission Undergraduate students who have attended SCAD, but have not been enrolled at SCAD for at least five consecutive quarters, are considered inactive and must apply for readmission and meet current admission requirements in order to return to SCAD. Undergraduate students who have attended another college or university on any basis other than as a transient student must apply for readmission and meet current admission requirements in order to return to SCAD. All readmission applications are evaluated on an individual basis by the Admission Review Committee. Any prior awards of financial aid and/or scholarships may or may not apply. Students should complete new FAFSA forms and resubmit any required materials to be considered for financial aid or scholarship awards. Upon readmission, students must follow the requirements of the current catalog. Graduate students must adhere to the graduate student continuous enrollment policy.

Graduate student continuous enrollment Graduate students must maintain continuous enrollment by completing at least one program fulfillment course in two separate quarters during each 12-month period based on the student’s initial quarter of enrollment until completion of all degree requirements or until the student withdraws by written notification to the office of the registrar. Students who have completed all other requirements for the degree except the thesis must register for THES 799 Continuing Thesis. Once a student is eligible to enroll in THES 799, he or she must register for this course each fall, winter and spring quarter (up to the five-year degree completion limit) until this degree requirement is met. Students may enroll in THES 799 in summer quarters, but it is optional. Students enrolled in THES 799 maintain their official student ID card and all rights and privileges afforded enrolled students, such as access to facilities and use of equipment and library resources.

International students and online coursework International students attending a SCAD location within the U.S. must follow the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services rules pertaining to online courses. The rules, which are outlined on page 2 of the I-20 visa, include the following regarding registration in online coursework: Registration in an online course is allowed, but 50 percent or more of courses taken in a quarter must be in a classroom (not online). Typically, this means international students can take only one online course out of a total of three courses. For more information on this or other academic matters related to international status, students should contact the international student services office.

Temporary grade of incomplete In the event that a student suffers from serious personal illness or other emergency circumstances and is therefore unable to complete all assignments by the end of the quarter, the student may request a grade of incomplete through the appropriate school dean before the end of the quarter. The student should explain the reason and include documentation of the illness or emergency circumstance. The dean’s decision is final. A student who is assigned a temporary grade of incomplete is required to complete the remainder of the unfinished work in a satisfactory manner by midterm of the following quarter. A temporary grade of incomplete automatically changes to an F if the required work is not completed satisfactorily by midterm of the following quarter. A student may not withdraw from a course after receiving a grade of incomplete. A student who has missed more than four class sessions, 20 percent of classes in a quarter, is not eligible for a grade of incomplete.

Academic standing Students are expected to make satisfactory progress toward their degrees and are responsible at all times for knowing their academic standing and for fulfilling all requirements of the university by referring to published academic policies, regulations and standards and by

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

337

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND POLICIES

consulting with the appropriate dean, department chair or adviser. Students are responsible for ascertaining and meeting course requirements, prerequisite requirements, graduation requirements, appropriate course sequencing and any other requirements of the university. At the sole discretion of the university, a student may be placed on academic warning or probation or may be suspended or dismissed for any reason deemed by SCAD officials to be in the best interest of the student or of the university as a whole or if the university determines that the student is not making satisfactory progress toward degree completion. Good standing For undergraduate students, good academic standing is defined by a 2.0 overall grade-point average. For graduate students, good academic standing is defined by a 3.0 overall grade-point average. Academic warning An undergraduate student whose term grade-point average falls below 2.0 for any quarter or a graduate student whose term grade-point average falls below 3.0 for any quarter receives a warning that his or her academic status is unsatisfactory. Probation An undergraduate student whose term grade-point average falls below 2.0 for two consecutive quarters or a graduate student whose term grade-point average falls below 3.0 for two consecutive quarters is placed on academic probation and is notified by the university. Students who are placed on probation must meet with their staff adviser before the end of the second week of the next quarter to establish a success plan. Students on probation may not withdraw from any course and must abide by the terms outlined in their probation letter. Undergraduate students are removed from probation when they achieve a term grade-point average of at least 2.0; graduate students are removed from probation when they achieve a term grade-point average of at least 3.0. An undergraduate or graduate student enrolled in ESL coursework who does not successfully complete the

338

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

same ESL course for two consecutive quarters is placed on academic probation and is notified by the university. Students who are placed on probation must work with the SCAD Language Studio to establish a success plan by the second week of the next quarter. Students on probation may not withdraw from any ESL coursework and must abide by the terms outlined in their probation letter. Students are removed from probation when they successfully complete the ESL course that they had previously failed.

success programming. Reinstatement is not guaranteed. If the student is reinstated, he or she returns with the status “reinstated on probation” for the first quarter. This status requires that the student successfully complete all ESL courses attempted, meet with the SCAD Language Studio prior to registering for courses and complete a success plan as outlined in the reinstatement letter. Failure to successfully complete the success plan, as outlined in the reinstatement letter, results in dismissal.

Suspension An undergraduate student whose term grade-point average falls below 2.0 for three consecutive quarters is suspended from the university for one calendar year. After that time, the student may submit a written petition to return to SCAD by emailing academicappeals@ scad.edu. The petition should include all potential justification for continued enrollment at SCAD, including, but not limited to, counseling, tutoring, medical treatment or academic success programming. Reinstatement is not guaranteed. If the student is reinstated, he or she returns with the status “reinstated on probation” for the first quarter. This status requires that the student complete all classes attempted, earn a gradepoint average of 2.0 or greater, meet with a staff adviser prior to registering for classes and complete an academic success program as outlined in the reinstatement letter. This may include the requirement to register for specific courses or to take a reduced course load. Failure to meet the minimum 2.0 grade-point average results in dismissal. A graduate student whose term gradepoint average falls below 3.0 for three consecutive quarters is dismissed from SCAD and is not reinstated. An undergraduate or graduate student enrolled in ESL coursework who does not successfully complete the same ESL course for three consecutive quarters is suspended from the university for one calendar year. After that time, the student may submit a written petition to return to SCAD by emailing academicappeals@scad.edu. The petition should include all potential justification for continued enrollment at SCAD, including, but not limited to, counseling, tutoring, medical treatment or academic

Dismissal A student who has been suspended and reinstated and does not meet satisfactory academic progress during the first quarter of his or her return is dismissed from the university.

Academic integrity Under all circumstances, students are expected to be honest in their dealings with faculty, administrative staff and other students. For purposes of this policy, the term faculty or faculty member includes any person engaged by the university to act in a teaching capacity, regardless of the person’s actual title. In speaking with members of the SCAD community, students must give an accurate representation of the facts at hand. Failure to do so is considered a breach of the Student Code of Conduct and may result in sanctions against the student, including suspension or dismissal. In course assignments, students must submit work that fairly and accurately reflects their level of accomplishment. Any work that is not a product of the student’s own efforts is considered dishonest. Students must not engage in academic dishonesty; doing so can have serious consequences. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following: 1. Cheating, which includes, but is not limited to, a) the giving or receiving of any unauthorized assistance in producing assignments or taking quizzes, tests or examinations; b) dependence on the aid of sources including technology beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems or carrying out other assignments; c) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or

other academic material belonging to a member of the university faculty or staff; or d) the use of unauthorized assistance in the preparation of works of art. 2. Plagiarism, which includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. Plagiarism also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials. 3. Submission of the same work in two or more courses without prior written approval of the professors of the courses involved. 4. Submission of any work not actually produced by the student submitting the work without full and clear written acknowledgment of the actual author or creator of the work. If a faculty member suspects a student of academic dishonesty, the faculty member notifies the student of this concern. Once this notification has occurred, the student is prohibited from seeking to withdraw from the course pending the result of a possible investigation. If academic dishonesty is suspected, the faculty member must email all evidence and documentation to academicdishonesty@scad.edu. The chief academic officer receives this email and appoints a designee to investigate the allegation. If, as a result, the investigator finds that academic dishonesty has occurred, the student is informed in writing that he or she will receive an F in the course. The student has five business days from the date on the written notice within which to appeal the decision of the investigator. If no appeal is made, the student is assigned a grade of F in the course and the student forfeits the right to continue to attend the course in which the academic dishonesty occurred. Students wishing to appeal should do so by emailing academicappeals@scad.edu. An appeals committee then convenes to review the case. Findings are presented to the chief academic officer, who sends the student a decision in writing within 30 days of the written appeal. A student found to be in violation of the academic integrity policy may not withdraw from the course(s) in question. Additional

sanctions may also be imposed, including suspension or dismissal. A second finding of academic dishonesty may result in dismissal from SCAD.

Complaints and appeals Students are encouraged to resolve any concerns they may have by directly contacting the office or persons responsible for the area relevant to the concern or complaint (e.g., housing/residence director for residence hall complaints; professor or academic chair for academic complaints). If unsure about the proper way to address complaints, students should contact the ombudsman (ombudsman@scad.edu). As a neutral party, the ombudsman may seek additional information about the situation, assist with appropriate communication and mediate disputes. If unable to satisfactorily resolve issues directly with the relevant office or persons or through the office of the ombudsman, the student may submit a formal written complaint using the procedures referenced herein. SCAD student complaint and appeal policies apply uniformly across SCAD locations and learning modalities. The university protects its students’ right to lodge complaints and appeals according to these procedures and seeks to resolve all student concerns fairly and in a timely manner. The information described herein is a general overview of the policies and procedures for filing complaints and appeals at SCAD. Students are strongly encouraged to consult the student handbook in its entirety and/or MySCAD for information regarding specific complaint and appeal procedures. Complaints and appeals in the areas of academics and/or grades, general non-academic, student conduct and/ or disciplinary action, Americans with Disabilities Act, sexual discrimination and sexual misconduct, discrimination, and financial aid must be in writing in accordance with established university procedures published that follow. Procedures for academic complaints and appeals Complaints and appeals concerning academic matters must be submitted in writing to SCAD’s chief academic officer (for SCAD Savannah, SCAD Lacoste and SCAD eLearning) or the vice president

for SCAD Atlanta or the associate vice president for SCAD Hong Kong via email to academicappeals@scad.edu, in accordance with the policy set forth below. The complaint or appeal must be submitted from the student’s SCAD email address and include the student’s full name, student ID number and phone number. The complaint or appeal must be submitted within 30 calendar days of the incident, describe the issue of concern in detail, include relevant information or documentation, and indicate the desired outcome. The complaint or appeal must be signed by the student and sent from the student’s SCAD email account. The chief academic officer, vice president for SCAD Atlanta or associate vice president for SCAD Hong Kong shall determine the final action and will respond to the student within 30 calendar days of receipt of the complaint or appeal. Academic policy appeals Academic policy appeals are written student requests for exceptions to SCAD academic policies. Students should address all academic policy appeals to the chief academic officer via email to academicappeals@scad.edu. Appeals must be made within 30 calendar days of notification of the action or decision. A decision from the chief academic officer regarding the appeal is made in writing to the student within 30 calendar days following receipt of the appeal or receipt of additional information. The decision is final. Academic integrity appeals The student has five business days from the date on the written notice within which to appeal the decision of the investigator. Students who wish to appeal should do so by emailing academicappeals@ scad.edu. An appeals committee then convenes to review the case. Findings are presented to the chief academic officer or the relevant vice president, who then sends the student a decision in writing within 30 calendar days of the written appeal. The decision is final. Grade appeals Concerns regarding final grades must be addressed directly with the faculty member issuing the grade or, if necessary, with the professor’s department chair. A review of the student’s grade is conducted to validate the grade

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

339

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND POLICIES

assignment. The department chair and school dean must authorize any grade change due to numerical miscalculation by the faculty member issuing the grade. If, after this review, the student is not satisfied, he or she may file a written appeal with the chief academic officer (for SCAD Savannah, SCAD Lacoste and SCAD eLearning) or the vice president for SCAD Atlanta or the associate vice president for SCAD Hong Kong via email to academicappeals@scad.edu. This appeal must include evidence of correspondence with all previous parties and should be submitted within 30 calendar days following the last day of the quarter. The student’s grade appeal will be routed to the appropriate SCAD administrator for investigation. A decision from academic services regarding the appeal is made in writing to the student within 30 calendar days following receipt of the appeal. The decision is final. Procedures for general non-academic complaints Non-academic student complaints, other than the specific complaints outlined in a subsequent section, are submitted, in writing, to the dean of students. SCAD Savannah, SCAD Lacoste and SCAD eLearning student complaints should be submitted to the dean of students in Savannah; SCAD Atlanta student complaints should be submitted to the dean of student success at SCAD Atlanta; SCAD Hong Kong student complaints should be submitted to the director of student success at SCAD Hong Kong. The complaint must include the student’s full name, student ID number, SCAD email address and phone number. The complaint must be submitted within 30 calendar days of the incident and describe the issue of concern in detail, including the date, time and place of the occurrence; the names of any persons involved, including any witnesses; other relevant information or documentation; and the desired outcome. The complaint must be signed by the student or sent from the student’s SCAD email account. A written response will be provided to the student within 30 calendar days of receipt of the written complaint. If dissatisfied with the response, the student may submit a written appeal to

340

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

the vice president for student success, located in Savannah, in accordance with the following process. Procedures for appeals of general non-academic complaints General non-academic appeals are student requests for exceptions to the university’s student services policies. Unless specifically stated otherwise (see below), all such appeals must be submitted in writing to the vice president for student success, in the format noted above, within 14 calendar days following notification of any decision or action. Submissions may be sent to the office of the vice president for student success, located in Bradley Hall, 115 E. York St., Savannah, GA; mailing address: P.O. Box 3146, Savannah, GA 31402; or nonacademicappeals@scad.edu. All supporting documentation must be attached to the appeal; failure to do so may halt the appeal process. The vice president for student success will determine the final action and respond to the student within 30 calendar days of receipt of the appeal. The decision is final. Procedures for specific non-academic complaints Students should refer to procedures outlined in the student handbook and on scad.edu/policies for the appeal process and procedures for other specific non-academic complaints, such as ADA grievances. Code of Student Conduct and disciplinary action appeals A finding of a violation of the Code of Student Conduct and/or imposition of a sanction(s) may be appealed by the respondent (or by the complainant) within three business days of the decision. Appeals must be submitted in writing from a student’s SCAD email address or as a hard copy to the office of the dean of students. Appeals from Hong Kong, Savannah, Lacoste and eLearning students should be submitted to the office of the dean of students in Savannah (deanofstudents@scad.edu); appeals from SCAD Atlanta students should be submitted to the dean of student success at SCAD Atlanta (doss@ scad.edu). The Code of Student Conduct and the process and specific procedures for appealing such decisions are found in the student handbook under “Code of Student Conduct.”

Sex-based discrimination, sexual harassment, and sexual misconduct policy The university’s sex-based discrimination, sexual harassment, and sexual misconduct policy and the process and specific procedures for filing a grievance are available online at scad.edu/policies. Discrimination complaints Students who feel that they have been affected by discrimination (other than sex-based discrimination), can contact the university’s compliance officer (complianceofficer@scad.edu or 912.525.5734) or ombudsman (ombudsman@scad.edu or 912.525.5213), or any of the following: vice president for student success, dean of students, director of student conduct. If a student wishes to file a formal discrimination grievance, the complaint may be submitted, in writing, to any of the individuals listed above, and must include the student’s full name, student ID number, SCAD email address and phone number. The complaint should describe the issue of concern in detail, including the date(s), time(s) and place(s) of the occurrence(s); the names of any persons involved, including any witnesses; other relevant information or documentation; and the desired outcome. The complaint must be signed by the student or sent from the student’s SCAD email account. If preferred, a student may appear in person at any of these offices to make a complaint. Following an investigation, a written response will be provided to the student within 30 calendar days of receipt of the written complaint. Procedures for financial appeals Financial aid Students who receive a written notice of loss of financial aid due to unsatisfactory progress may appeal in writing to the university by completing an unsatisfactory progress appeal form and submitting it to financialaid@scad.edu. The appeal must be received within 30 calendar days of the date on the unsatisfactory progress notification letter. A decision regarding the appeal is made in writing to the student within 30 calendar days following receipt of the appeal or receipt of additional information. The decision is final.

Student account appeals Students with extenuating circumstances may appeal in writing to the university (studentaccounts@scad.edu) for refund or credit. Such appeals must be initiated within 30 days of the end of the quarter for which the refund or credit is requested. The student will receive a written response within 30 calendar days of the date of the written appeal. The decision is final. Procedures for admission appeals Applicants may appeal admission decisions only once. Those who wish to appeal an admission decision must submit the following to the admission appeal committee: 1. A letter of appeal written by the applicant, specifying the reason(s) for the appeal, with the applicant’s identification number provided. 2. A ny updated academic or artistic work that would be relevant to an appeal. Portfolios must be submitted through SlideRoom. Graduate applicants appealing admission decisions must submit portfolio materials that follow their intended major program guidelines. 3. At least one recommendation from a teacher, coach, guidance or career counselor or other mentor/supervisor. Graduate applicants should submit an additional letter of reference from an academic or professional source. All documents must be submitted together with the letter of appeal in order to be considered. The deadline to appeal is 30 calendar days prior to intended enrollment at SCAD. The admission appeal committee may consist of admission staff and administrators. Appeals are considered in the order in which they are received; a final decision is rendered to the applicant within 14 calendar days of receipt of the complete appeal. Applicants seeking appeals on the basis of financial need should contact the admission department. Appeal documents may be delivered in person, by email to admission@scad.edu or by mail to: SCAD Admission Appeal Committee Savannah, eLearning, Hong Kong P.O. Box 2072 Savannah, GA 31402-2072 USA

SCAD Admission Appeal Committee Atlanta P.O. Box 77300 Atlanta, GA 30309 USA

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are: 1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the date SCAD receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The registrar makes arrangements for access and notifies the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the registrar, the registrar shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. That official makes arrangements for access and notifies the student of when and where the records may be inspected. 2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. A student who believes records are inaccurate or misleading should write to the registrar, clearly identify the part of the record he or she wants changed and document why it is inaccurate or misleading. If SCAD decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, SCAD notifies the student of the decision and advises the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding hearing procedures is provided to the student at that time. 3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records (a student consents by completing and submitting an electronic FERPA form via MySCAD), except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the university

in a supervisory, administrative, academic, research or support staff position (including law enforcement personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the university has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor or collection agent); a person serving on the board of trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as disciplinary or grievance committees, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the university discloses a student’s education records to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll without the student’s prior consent. The university also discloses directory information in a student’s education record unless written notice is received from the student that the student does not wish to be included in the disclosure of directory information. Written notice should be sent to the registrar’s office (registrar@ scad.edu). Directory information includes the student’s name, email address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, most recent previous educational agency or institution attended, and photograph. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures of the college to comply with the requirements of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. The name and address of the office that administers the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act is as follows: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Ave. SW Washington, DC 20202-5920

Retaking a course Students may retake a course by registering for the course and paying tuition for that course again. While all grades

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

341

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND POLICIES

remain on the transcript, the student only receives credit once for the course. Only the highest grade is calculated into the cumulative and major grade-point average. Students should consult a staff adviser before retaking a course, as financial aid and/or scholarship awards could be affected.

Certificate completion requirements To earn an undergraduate certificate, students must complete all courses required for the certificate, maintaining at least a 2.0 grade-point average in those courses. To earn a graduate certificate, students must complete all courses required for the certificate, maintaining at least a 3.0 grade-point average in those courses. Current students may pursue a certificate by contacting their staff adviser. Additional coursework may be required to earn a certificate concurrent with a degree.

Bachelor’s degree graduation requirements Bachelor’s degrees are awarded to students who have earned a minimum of 180 quarter hours (equivalent to 120 semester credit hours) of appropriate credit in an approved program of study with an overall cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 or higher, as well as a 3.0 or higher in their major or concentration. Students pursuing a minor must earn a grade-point average of 2.0 or higher in their minor program. To graduate with a double major, students must maintain a minimum grade-point average of 3.0 in each major and a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.0. The final 45 hours of any degree program must be completed at SCAD (may include eLearning and study abroad). Bachelor’s degree students must complete the application for graduation at least two quarters before they complete their degree requirements. The graduation application is required whether or not the student plans to participate in a commencement ceremony. In Atlanta, Hong Kong and Savannah, a commencement ceremony is held at the end of spring quarter. Students who plan to participate in the commencement ceremony must complete all degree requirements no later than the summer quarter following the

342

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

ceremony. Students should note that course offerings may be limited in the summer. At graduation, bachelor’s degree students may be awarded academic honors based on their cumulative grade-point average their last quarter before commencement. Since commencement is scheduled before final grades are submitted, the cumulative grade-point averages of students who complete their graduation requirements spring quarter are based on their averages the previous quarter. Students who have a cumulative grade-point average below a specific honor level prior to commencement, but earn the required average after grades are calculated, have that honor indicated on their diploma.

and/or strong academic and research proficiency required of the discipline and degree program. Academic performance, as demonstrated by individual course grades, also serves as an indication of a student’s readiness to proceed to candidacy. Students who experience academic difficulty should consult with their department chair or graduate coordinator. Additional guidelines for the candidacy review can be found on the graduate studies website in MySCAD. Students who do not pass the review for candidacy may request in writing through the department chair to have a second review. Any student who does not pass the second review may not be allowed to continue in the program.

Honors Cum Laude 3.5 to 3.69 GPA Magna Cum Laude 3.7 to 3.89 GPA Summa Cum Laude 3.9 to 4.0 GPA

Five-year completion limit for graduate degrees

Students enrolled in B.F.A. programs in art history and architectural history are required to complete a thesis as part of their graduation requirements. Students register for the thesis course at the end of their program and are expected to complete the thesis by the end of the final enrollment term. Students who do not finish their theses by the end of the term may request a grade of incomplete subject to the temporary grade of incomplete policy.

Graduate candidacy At the approximate midpoint of each graduate student’s course of study, the student must pass a faculty review for candidacy. In order to be reviewed, the student must have met all requirements for the program up to that point with a grade-point average of at least 3.0 in the major. In the candidacy review, the faculty assesses the student’s complete body of work, as well as the student’s readiness to continue in the program and succeed in the field upon graduation. Reviews are structured according to the discipline and degree program, assessing evidence of knowledge of historical methodology, logical thought and original ideas, as well as aesthetic considerations. Candidates should demonstrate strong fundamental art and design skills, performance skills, technical proficiency,

The completion limit for graduate degrees is five years, including ESL, intensive graduate-level coursework, and/or required undergraduate courses, if assigned, as well as final project, portfolio or thesis. If, for any reason, the student does not complete the program within the five-year period, the student must petition to the office of graduate studies for continuation under the current program of study.

Master’s degree graduation requirements In order to graduate, students seeking master’s degrees are required to be continuously enrolled (at least two quarters per academic year, including continuing thesis, up to the five-year limit), fulfill all requirements of the program of study, and maintain a 3.0 or higher cumulative grade-point average overall as well as a 3.0 or higher cumulative grade-point average in the major area of study. To graduate with a double major or dual degree, graduate students must fulfill all requirements of each major. Specific completion requirements may vary according to the degree program and may require a thesis, final project or portfolio appropriate to the course of study. The subject and nature of thesis projects vary among departments. Final projects and portfolio courses include a written component. See specific program requirements for each major. The final 45 hours of any degree program must be completed at SCAD.

The M.A. degree is awarded to students who have completed at least 45 graduate quarter hours (equivalent to 30 semester credit hours) in an M.A. program of study. The M.F.A. degree is awarded to students who have earned at least 90 graduate quarter hours (equivalent to 60 semester credit hours) in an M.F.A. program of study. M.A. and M.F.A. students who were assigned intensive coursework upon admission must complete the intensive coursework as part of their degree requirements. The professional M.Arch. degree is awarded to students who have completed at least 90 graduate quarter hours in the professional M.Arch. program of study and a pre-professional or preparatory degree. The SCAD professional degree is composed of 180 undergraduate quarter hours and 90 graduate quarter hours for a total of 270 quarter hours (equivalent to 180 semester credit hours). Students may fulfill the undergraduate requirement with either the SCAD B.F.A. degree in architecture or a pre-professional degree in architecture from another institution accepted for admittance to the SCAD professional M.Arch. degree program. The Master of Uban Design is awarded to students who have completed at least 90 graduate quarter hours (equivalent to 60 semester credit hours) in the M.U.D. program of study. Master’s degree students must submit the application for graduation at least two quarters before completing degree requirements. The application may be completed online in MySCAD. The graduation application is required whether or not the student plans to participate in a commencement ceremony. In Atlanta, Hong Kong and Savannah, a commencement ceremony will be held at the end of spring quarter. In order to participate in the commencement ceremony, students must complete all degree requirements no later than the summer quarter following the ceremony. Students should note that course offerings may be limited in summer.

Continued enrollment after degree completion Students who wish to continue to take courses after completion of degree requirements should meet with a staff adviser to discuss options for further study, such as the addition of a second

major or continuation to a master’s degree program. To pursue a second degree, the student must apply through the admission department and be admitted to a new degree program, or apply through the admission department and be admitted as nondegreeseeking. Otherwise, the student is automatically dropped from courses by the registrar. Financial aid and scholarship awards may be affected by continued enrollment after degree completion.

Transcripts and student records Students may request from the registrar’s office official transcripts of all coursework completed at SCAD. A fee is charged for most transcripts. Transcripts and portfolios submitted to SCAD as part of the application process become part of the permanent records of the university and cannot be returned to the student.

Official correspondence and forms Students are expected to read all email messages from SCAD officials and utilize their SCAD email addresses for correspondence with faculty and staff. Students are expected to use the most current registration and academic forms posted on MySCAD. If for any reason online forms are not available, students should contact the office of the registrar.

Student liability

SCAD galleries, shopSCAD or through open studio nights held by academic departments. Students who create copyrightable work with the use of university resources and in furtherance of class projects while enrolled at SCAD grant to the university a royalty-free, nonexclusive, worldwide, transferable and perpetual license to use the work (whether in its entirety or samples), together with photographs and/ or video of students, for the promotion of and/or to advance the interests of the university. This includes the right to reproduce and distribute copies of the work, photographs and/or video. The complete policy on intellectual property is available at scad.edu/about/scad-glance/ disclosures-and-policies/complianceand-policies/intellectual-property.

Copyright compliance SCAD is committed to complying with the United States Copyright Act. Thus, SCAD’s Copyright Compliance Policy encourages and promotes legitimate use of copyrighted materials by faculty members, staff members and students. SCAD expects all faculty members, staff members and students to comply with the Copyright Act and this policy. Compliance is particularly important with respect to digital technology. The complete policy, as well as copyright compliance guidelines, is available at scad.edu/about/ scad-glance/disclosures-and-policies/ compliance-and-policies.

Physical injury and/or other medical problems, as well as loss of or damage to personal property resulting from fire, theft or other causes, are not the responsibility of the university. SCAD recommends that students carry personal insurance.

Rights to use of student work SCAD reserves the right to use samples of student work and photographs or video of students and their work in publications and on SCAD websites or other materials about the university. SCAD may request to purchase student work to be included in the permanent collection. Students are frequently invited to exhibit work in the SCAD galleries and in traveling exhibitions. Students also may be invited to sell their work through the

SCAD.EDU / POLICIES

343

ADMISSION Admission policies and procedures SCAD is committed to the pursuit of excellence and welcomes applicants who have the same high standards. SCAD maintains selective admission policies, accounting for a student body of varied backgrounds with demonstrated intellectual capacity and a passion for the arts. Applicants who meet or exceed the minimum admission requirements are not guaranteed admission. Exceptions to the general rules of admission may be made for applicants of unusual motivation and ability. Application materials cannot be returned. New students may enter fall (September), winter (January), spring (March) or summer (June), although most students begin in September. Summer course offerings may be limited. Online applications are available at scad.edu/apply. As soon as all required application materials are received, the Admission Review Committee considers the applicant’s qualifications and renders an admission decision. The applicant is notified accordingly. Early application is encouraged. Applications for admission are accepted at any time of year and must be received at least 30 days prior to the intended quarter of entry. Students needing a visa are encouraged to apply for admission at least 90 days prior to the intended quarter of entry. Students applying for U.S. federal or state financial aid should complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid online at fafsa.gov and use the SCAD code of 015022. These students also must complete the SCAD application for admission and submit all financial aid information at least 60 days prior to the intended entry term. Otherwise, these students should be prepared to pay first-quarter tuition, room and board through personal funds, as processing of federal or state monies may not be completed until after enrollment. The administrative unit responsible for freshman, transfer and graduate admission decisions is the Admission Review Committee, which consists of admission staff and administrators. Faculty members in the intended area of study also participate in review of 344

SCAD.EDU / ADMISSION

applicants for graduate programs. The committee meets regularly to review applications and to render admission decisions on completed application files. SCAD reserves the right to verify all documents submitted in application for admission. Any falsification of admission documents, portfolio or audition materials constitutes grounds for termination of application procedures or dismissal from SCAD. Permanent residents must submit proof of legal residency such as a copy of the resident alien card. Students planning to attend a SCAD location in a country where citizenship or permanent residency is not already established may need to apply for a student visa. Information is provided during the admission process. Exceptions to the general rules of admission may be made for applicants of unusual motivation and ability. As a private institution, SCAD is not part of Hong Kong’s Joint University Programmes Admissions System (JUPAS). Students may apply through Hong Kong’s Electronic Advance Application System for Post-secondary Programmes (e-APP). All applicants must complete the SCAD admission application and all other requirements in order to be considered for admission.

Undergraduate application requirements First-time freshman applicants 1. Completed application for admission. 2. N onrefundable application fee (US$40). 3. A diploma from a United States high school or equivalent program.* Freshman applicants may receive a preliminary offer of admission based upon unofficial high school transcripts/ mark sheets. If an offer of admission is made, an official transcript/mark sheet from the last high school/secondary school attended showing all years of the student’s grades and proof of completion of the high school/secondary school or equivalent program should be received prior to Aug. 1 for fall enrollment. All transcripts/mark sheets must be in English or accompanied by a certified English translation. The office of admission must receive all official transcripts prior to the first day of class. Failure to comply with this requirement may prohibit the student from attending classes for that quarter.*

SCAD reserves the right to verify all documents submitted in applications for admission. Offers of admission are contingent upon receipt of official documentation and SCAD reserves the right to revoke any offer of admission should discrepancies be found. Any falsification of admission documents, portfolio or audition materials constitutes grounds for termination of application procedures or dismissal from SCAD. 4. Official report of SAT or ACT scores** for citizens and permanent residents of the United States. To have these scores sent directly to SCAD, applicants should use SAT code 5631 or ACT code 0855 on the test form. 5. Evidence of English proficiency for students whose first language is not English.*** 6. Additionally, if applicable, any other documents or materials required to obtain a student visa.**** Exceptions to the general rules of admission may be made for applicants of unusual motivation and ability. Application materials cannot be returned. * A certificate of General Educational Development from the American Council on Education is considered equivalent to a diploma from a U.S. high school. For applicants from countries other than the United States, SCAD generally uses the standards established by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers to determine the equivalent academic achievement. For home-schooled applicants, an academic portfolio is also acceptable and may include, but is not limited to, the following: • Verification that the home school has been recognized by the state of residence of the applicant • Detailed outline of the home-school curriculum, including subject areas studied, time spent on each discipline, and, if applicable, grades awarded. A home-school transcript may fulfill this requirement. • Writing sample that is academic in nature, but not necessarily a graded assignment or one used for coursework. • Résumé of courses taken outside the home; if courses have been taken at

a college or university, official transcripts are required. First-year applicants who attended the Hong Kong secondary school system must complete six years of study in the secondary school system and have satisfactory HKDSE scores. Applicants should score at level three or higher in English Language, level two or higher in Mathematics and Liberal Studies; and score at level two or higher, obtain a grade of E, or receive an Attained in two elective subjects from an appropriate Category A, B or C elective. A score at level two in Chinese language may be used to satisfy one elective requirement. Only one non-English language subject score may be used. * N on-U.S. students, please refer to the international applicant section on page 351 for details. ** Students who have SAT math scores lower than 560, ACT math scores lower than 24, or who are otherwise unable to demonstrate an aptitude for the study of mathematics and science must complete MATH 101 in order to pursue the professional M.Arch. degree. The credit hours earned in MATH 101 may be applied as an undergraduate general education elective toward the 270 credit hours required for the M.Arch. degree. *** English is the language of instruction for all courses at SCAD. In addition to meeting or exceeding all other SCAD admission criteria, applicants who wish to be admitted with no further English proficiency requirements must demonstrate their current level of proficiency by providing official minimum scores on one of the following or will be required to take an Accuplacer ESL test at orientation prior to the first day of classes: • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) minimum scores (SCAD code 5631) a. 550 on the paper-based test b. 85 on the Internet-based test with minimum score of 20 on each section • International English Language Testing System (IELTS) composite score of at least 6.5 with a score of at least 6.5 in both speaking and writing • American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) score of at least “high advanced” on the writing proficiency portion of the test • Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score of at least 500 on the critical reading

portion, or 22 on both the reading and writing sections of the ACT • Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) score of at least 5 in English language Otherwise qualified applicants who do not meet the minimum scores listed above must take a SCAD English language proficiency test to be placed in the appropriate level of ESL upon enrollment. Students must satisfactorily complete ESL coursework through completion of Level VI. For applicants whose native language is English, no additional proof of English proficiency is required. For applicants whose transcripts show extensive study at an institution at which English is the language of instruction, no additional proof of English proficiency is required for admission evaluation, but applicants may be asked to take an English proficiency test upon enrollment at the university. * *** The requested documents may include official certification of sources and funds, a copy of the first page of the applicant’s passport (requested but not required), and a copy of the first page of the passport for any dependent accompanying the student. These documents are used to verify spelling of names, birth dates and other information vital to student registration. Supplementary materials Applicants who do not meet the standard criteria for admission are encouraged to submit supplementary materials. Supplementary materials may include one or more of the following: 1. Recommendations. One to three recommendations from teachers, counselors or community leaders with whom the applicant has had immediate contact. Recommendations should address the applicant’s level of commitment, as well as attributes such as creativity, initiative, motivation, character and academic achievement, to aid in assessing the applicant’s reasonable potential for success as a student at SCAD. Recommendations may not come from friends or family members except in the case of a teacher-parent. 2. Statement of purpose. The statement should be no more than 500 words in length and should provide an overview of the applicant’s academic and personal

experience, describing preparation for and commitment to further study at SCAD, as well as educational and professional goals and aspirations. 3. Portfolio, audition, riding or writing submission. 4. Résumé or list of achievements and awards. 5. In-person or telephone interview (may be scheduled by contacting the admission office). Omitting senior year Applicants are encouraged to complete high school or earn a certificate of General Educational Development before entering SCAD. Exceptions to the general rules of admission may be made for applicants of unusual motivation and ability. Such an applicant may be admitted at the end of the junior year in high school, omitting the senior year, if he or she has a grade-point average of 3.5 or above through grade 11, if SAT or ACT scores are above the national average, and if the applicant’s guidance counselor and teacher recommend admission. In order to be accepted for admission, the applicant must demonstrate an advanced level of maturity, leadership and responsibility. Juniors who wish to be considered for full-time admission must follow the application requirements for first-time freshmen. A high school diploma or GED is required for federal financial aid eligibility. Joint enrollment High school students 16 years of age or older who wish to be admitted for joint enrollment on a part-time basis during the junior or senior year must follow the application requirements for first-time freshmen. In addition, joint enrollment applicants should meet or exceed normal undergraduate admission requirements. Joint enrollment is offered on a space-available basis. Courses are not intended to fulfill high school graduation requirements; they do carry college-level credit and may be used in fulfillment of a certificate or degree program if the student applies and is accepted as a degree-seeking student. Joint-enrolled students may be considered for scholarships, but are not eligible for federal or state financial aid and may not reside in university housing while joint enrolled. Joint-enrolled students who have taken courses on a

SCAD.EDU / ADMISSION

345

ADMISSION 346

nondegree-seeking basis and wish to become degree-seeking must fulfill the application requirements in effect for degree-seeking students. Undergraduate transfer application requirements 1. Completed application for admission. Any student who previously applied and was reviewed for first-time freshman admission to SCAD and then attended another college or university must submit all materials required to be reviewed for transfer admission and scholarship opportunities. 2. N onrefundable application fee (US$40). 3. Official transcript from each college or university attended.* Transfer applicants may receive a preliminary offer of admission based upon unofficial transcripts/ mark sheets from all postsecondary institutions attended. If an offer of admission is made, official transcripts/mark sheets from each college/university attended should be received prior to Aug. 1 for fall enrollment. Transcript evaluations for the award of transfer credit may not be completed without receipt of official transcripts. All transcripts/ mark sheets must be in English or accompanied by a certified English translation. The admission office must receive all official transcripts prior to the first day of class. Failure to comply with this requirement may prohibit the student from attending classes for that quarter.  SCAD reserves the right to verify all documents submitted in application for admission. Offers of admission are contingent upon receipt of official documentation and SCAD reserves the right to revoke any offer of admission should discrepancies be found. Any falsification of admission documents, portfolio or audition materials constitutes grounds for termination of application procedures or dismissal from SCAD.  If the number of college or university credits earned is insufficient for evaluating performance, the applicant may be required to submit a diploma from a U.S. high school or equivalent program* and SAT or ACT** scores. (To have these scores sent directly to SCAD, applicants

SCAD.EDU / ADMISSION

should use SAT code 5631 or ACT code 0855 on the test form. SAT or ACT scores are not required of international applicants or applicants who have been out of high school for at least two years.) 4. Evidence of English proficiency for students whose first language is not English.*** 5. Transfer applicants may be required to provide any other documents or materials necessary to obtain a student visa.**** Exceptions to the general rules of admission may be made for applicants of unusual motivation and ability. Application materials cannot be returned. * A certificate of General Educational Development from the American Council on Education is considered equivalent to a diploma from a U.S. high school. For student applicants from countries other than the United States, SCAD generally uses the standards established by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers to determine the equivalent academic achievement. For home-schooled applicants, an academic portfolio is also acceptable and may include, but is not limited to, the following: • Verification that the home school has been recognized by the state of residence of the applicant • Detailed outline of the home-school curriculum, including subject areas studied, time spent on each discipline, and, if applicable, grades awarded. A home-school transcript may fulfill this requirement. • Writing sample that is academic in nature, but not necessarily a graded assignment or one used for coursework • Résumé of courses taken outside the home. If courses have been taken at a college or university, official transcripts are required. * N on-U.S. students, please refer to the international applicant section on page 351 for details. ** Students who have SAT math scores lower than 560, ACT math scores lower than 24, or who are otherwise unable to demonstrate an aptitude for the study of mathematics and science must complete MATH 101 in order to pursue the professional M.Arch. degree. The credit hours earned in MATH 101 may be

applied as an undergraduate general education elective toward the 270 credit hours required for the M.Arch. degree. *** English is the language of instruction for all courses at SCAD. In addition to meeting or exceeding all other SCAD admission criteria, applicants who wish to be admitted with no further English proficiency requirements must demonstrate their current level of proficiency by providing official minimum scores on one of the following or will be required to take an ESL placement test at orientation prior to the first day of classes: • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) minimum scores (SCAD code 5631): a. 550 on the paper-based test. b. 85 on the Internet-based test with minimum score of 20 on each section. • International English Language Testing System (IELTS) composite score of at least 6.5 with a score of at least 6.5 in both speaking and writing. • American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) score of at least “high advanced” on the writing proficiency portion of the test. • Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score of at least 500 on the critical reading portion, or 22 on both the reading and writing sections of the ACT. • Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) score of at least 5 in English language. Otherwise qualified applicants who do not meet the minimum scores listed above must take a SCAD English language proficiency test to be placed in the appropriate level of ESL upon enrollment. Students must satisfactorily complete ESL coursework through completion of Level VI. SCAD locations where ESL Level I proficiency courses are not available require that students meet the following composite score minimum requirements: 50 on the Internet-based TOEFL, 4.5 on the IELTS, or “intermediate low” on the ACTFL, or 4 on the HKDSE English language test. * *** Official certification of sources and funds, a copy of the first page of the applicant’s passport (requested but not required), and a copy of the first

page of the passport for any dependent accompanying the student. These documents are used to verify spelling of names, birth dates and other information vital to student registration. Supplementary materials Applicants who do not meet the standard criteria for admission are encouraged to submit supplementary materials. Supplementary materials may include one or more of the following: 1. Recommendations. One to three recommendations from professors, teachers, counselors, professionals or community leaders with whom the applicant has had immediate contact. Recommendations should address the applicant’s level of commitment, as well as attributes such as creativity, initiative, motivation, character and academic achievement, to aid in assessing the applicant’s reasonable potential for success as a student at SCAD. Recommendations may not come from friends or family members except in the case of a teacher-parent. 2. Statement of purpose. The statement should be no more than 500 words in length and should provide an overview of the applicant’s academic and personal experience, describing preparation for and commitment to further study at SCAD, as well as educational and professional goals and aspirations. 3. Portfolio, audition, riding or writing submission. 4. Résumé or list of achievements and awards. 5. In-person or telephone interview (may be scheduled by contacting the admission office). Articulation agreements Articulation agreements outline the specific programs of study students may complete at certain colleges in order to transfer to SCAD with advanced standing as a Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor of Arts candidate after earning an associate’s degree. Students must apply (see requirements for “undergraduate transfer application guidelines”) and be accepted to SCAD. A complete listing of SCAD’s articulation agreements is available online at scad.edu/articulation.

Undergraduate transfer credits After an undergraduate transfer applicant is accepted for admission, official transcripts showing completed collegiate coursework are evaluated by the admission office to determine whether or not the student may be granted advanced standing. The coursework must be found to be relevant to the degree the student is seeking at SCAD, with course content and level of instruction resulting in student competencies comparable to or higher than those of students enrolled at SCAD. In assessing and documenting comparable learning through course content and level of instruction, SCAD uses recognized guidelines that aid in the evaluation of credit, such as those published by the American Council on Education and the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers. This policy is consistent with the mission of SCAD and ensures that coursework and learning outcomes are at the collegiate level and comparable to SCAD’s degree programs. Generally, transfer credit may be accepted from institutions that are approved by the U.S. Department of Education and hold regional accreditation, or have appropriate specialized or programmatic accreditation, or have been evaluated and proven to be comparable in course content and level of instruction to SCAD, or are recognized by the ministry of education or equivalent agency in the applicant’s home country. Course content is evaluated by comparing the curricula of other institutions with that of SCAD and assessing whether foundation studies, general education and major discipline courses are comparable to those offered at SCAD. Level of instruction is evaluated by comparing the percentage of faculty at other institutions who hold graduate and terminal degrees with the percentage of faculty at SCAD who hold graduate and terminal degrees. Students who wish to appeal the decision of SCAD regarding transfer of credit from international institutions may provide an outside credential evaluation; SCAD reserves the right to make the final determination of transfer credit. A list of acceptable outside evaluators may be obtained from the admission department. A maximum of 90 quarter hours of undergraduate credit for a bachelor’s

degree may be given for courses appropriate to the SCAD curriculum. Only grades of 2.0 (C) or higher may be transferred for undergraduate credit. Failure to submit an updated transcript may result in loss of transfer credit. A portfolio review is required for final transfer credit determination of specific studio courses before or during the student’s first quarter of enrollment. To receive specific studio course credit, students must follow the portfolio submission criteria and guidelines available through the admission department. Additionally, a review of all course syllabuses may be required. Portfolios are reviewed by faculty members from the applicable department. Transfer credit is granted when the quality of work in the portfolio is found to be at least equivalent to that which would earn a grade of 2.0 (C) or higher in an equivalent or comparable course at SCAD. Failure to submit a portfolio during the first quarter of enrollment results in the loss of opportunity to transfer studio credit. Transfer of credits earned in a distancelearning program is evaluated on a case-by-case, course-by-course basis. Students who wish to appeal the transfer credit process after the first quarter of enrollment must submit a written request to the admission department. Transfer credit appears on the transcript as T and is not calculated in the student’s grade-point average. The final 45 hours of any degree program must be earned at SCAD. Study abroad programs offered by SCAD and SCAD eLearning courses are considered in residence and may be counted as such. Advanced Placement credit Advanced Placement examinations are administered through the College Board to provide documentation of a level of achievement that qualifies a student for advanced standing. Credit is awarded for AP courses taken at the high school level if certain requirements are met. AP credit awarded by another college or university is not transferable without proper documentation. Official AP scores must be submitted to the admission office. Transfer credit from all sources (including AP) may not exceed 90 quarter hours. A chart of credit awarded is available at scad.edu/ap.

SCAD.EDU / ADMISSION

347

ADMISSION

British A-level credit British Advanced-level examinations are well established and internationally recognized. The A-level examinations indicate a level of achievement that may qualify a student for advanced standing. Credit is awarded for A-level examinations if certain requirements are met. Credit awarded by another college or university for A-level examinations is not transferable without proper documentation. Official A-level scores must be submitted to the admission department. Credit is awarded on a selective basis. Transfer credit from all sources (including A-level) may not exceed 90 quarter hours. A chart of credit awarded is available at scad.edu/alevel. British AS-level credit British Advanced Subsidiary-level examinations are well established and internationally recognized. The AS-level examinations indicate a level of achievement that may qualify a student for advanced standing. Credit is awarded for AS-level examinations if certain requirements are met. Credit awarded by another college or university for ASlevel examinations is not transferable without proper documentation. Official AS-level scores must be submitted to the admission department. Credit is awarded on a selective basis. Transfer credit from all sources (including ASlevel) may not exceed 90 quarter hours. A chart of credit awarded is available at scad.edu/aslevel. Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination The Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination indicates a level of achievement that may qualify a student for advanced standing. Credit is awarded for CAPE if certain requirements are met. Credit awarded by another college or university for CAPE is not transferable without proper documentation. Official CAPE scores must be submitted to the admission department. Credit is awarded on a selective basis. A maximum of 45 quarter hours of CAPE credit may be awarded. Transfer credit from all sources (including CAPE) may not exceed 90 quarter hours. A chart of credit awarded is available at scad.edu/cape. College-level Examination Program The College-level Examination Program is administered through the College

348

SCAD.EDU / ADMISSION

Board to provide documentation of college-level achievement that may qualify a student for advanced standing. CLEP credit is awarded if certain requirements are met. CLEP credit awarded by another college or university is not transferable without proper documentation. Official CLEP scores from the College Board must be submitted to the admission department. A maximum of 45 quarter hours of CLEP credit may be awarded. Transfer credit from all sources (including CLEP) may not exceed 90 quarter hours. A chart of credit awarded is available at scad.edu/clep. DANTES/DSST credit Within the U.S. Department of Defense, voluntary education programs are offered through DANTES, Defense Activity for Nontraditional Education Support. SCAD gives consideration to DANTES Subject Standardized Test scores. DSST credit is awarded if certain requirements are met. DSST credit awarded by another college or university is not transferable without proper documentation. Official DSST score results must be submitted to the admission department. A maximum of 45 quarter hours of DSST credit may be awarded. Transfer credit from all sources (including DSST) may not exceed 90 quarter hours. A chart of credit awarded is available at scad.edu/dsst. French Baccalaureate credit French Baccalaureate examinations from the French Ministry of National Education are well established and internationally recognized. The French Baccalaureate program leads to examinations that provide documentation of achievement that may qualify a student for advanced standing. Credit is awarded for French Baccalaureate coursework if certain requirements are met. Credit awarded by another college or university for French Baccalaureate coursework is not transferable without proper documentation. Official French Baccalaureate examination scores must be submitted to the admission department. A maximum of 45 quarter hours of French Baccalaureate credit may be awarded. Transfer credit from all sources (including French Baccalaureate examinations) may not exceed 90 quarter hours. A chart of credit awarded is available at scad.edu/frenchbacc.

German Abitur credit German Abitur credit is well established and internationally recognized. The seven-year gymnasium program leads to German Abitur credit that provides documentation of achievement that may qualify a student for advanced standing. Credit is awarded for German Abitur coursework if certain requirements are met. Credit awarded by another college or university for German Abitur coursework is not transferable without proper documentation. Official German Abitur examination scores must be submitted to the admission department. Transfer credit from all sources (including the German Abitur) may not exceed 90 quarter hours. A policy regarding completion of German Abitur testing after six years of study at a gymnasium has not yet been established. A chart of credit awarded is available at scad.edu/abitur. International Baccalaureate credit The International Baccalaureate program is a pre-university course of study for secondary school students. The IB program leads to examinations that provide documentation of achievement that may qualify a student for advanced standing. Credit is awarded for IB coursework taken at the higher level if certain requirements are met. Credit awarded by another college or university for IB coursework is not transferable without proper documentation. Official IB scores must be submitted to the admission department. Transfer credit from all sources (including IB) may not exceed 90 quarter hours. A chart of credit awarded is available at scad.edu/ib. Military transcripts The American Council on Education maintains military registries with applicable ACE credit recommendations as a resource for colleges and universities. SCAD gives consideration to Joint Services Transcript. Credit is awarded if coursework is relevant to the student’s course of study and determined to be comparable in course content and level of instruction to SCAD’s. Credit awarded by another college or university for Joint Services Transcript is not transferable without proper documentation. Transfer credit from all sources (including Joint Services Transcript) may not exceed 90 quarter hours.

Undergraduate portfolio, audition and writing guidelines Undergraduate portfolios, auditions, writing and riding submissions are accepted from applicants who wish to be considered for achievement scholarships. Applicants may submit any type of work, regardless of the major they are interested in pursuing. All portfolio types should showcase the applicant’s best work, presented as professionally as possible. Portfolios should demonstrate the applicant’s interest in and aptitude for advanced study and, specifically, potential for success at SCAD. Applicants are encouraged to submit only their best work. It is not necessary to add extra work if it is not consistently strong. Applicants should not submit work copied from film, television, photographs, magazine/book illustrations or other sources. All materials submitted should be clearly labeled with the applicant’s name and contact information. Application materials cannot be returned. Submission Applicants must use the online file management system SlideRoom if they wish to submit a portfolio for review. From SlideRoom (scad.slideroom.com), applicants can upload still images, Word documents, and digital and multimedia files. There also are instructions for creating a corresponding inventory of work (required) including titles, dates, media, dimensions and specific responsibilities on group projects, if applicable. A fee of US$10 is charged by SlideRoom for each portfolio submission. More information is available online at scad.edu/portfolio. Portfolio-based course exemption New admitted students may request and submit documentation for portfolio-based course exemption through the admission department. Currently enrolled students should request and submit documentation for portfoliobased course exemption to the appropriate department chair. Documentation should demonstrate mastery of skills and sufficient knowledge of content taught in a specific university-level course. A student who is exempted from a required course does not earn academic credit for that course but

may substitute a course from the same subject area as approved by the department chair to fulfill the number of hours required to complete degree requirements. Undergraduate acceptance Completed applications are reviewed on a rolling basis, and applicants are notified of the admission decision accordingly. In some cases, the Admission Review Committee may request additional materials from applicants whose overall completed application file does not meet or exceed regular admission standards. This may include cases where standardized test scores are below 1000 on the SAT (math and critical reading only) or 21 on the ACT, and/or the secondary school, high school or college grade-point average is below 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. All applicants may submit supporting materials such as portfolio, recommendations or statement of purpose and/or have a personal or telephone interview to enhance their application file. Admission decisions are made on a case-by-case basis. Exceptions to the general rules of admission may be made for applicants of unusual motivation and ability. Application materials cannot be returned.

Graduate admission SCAD encourages applications from students who demonstrate successful completion of appropriate coursework at the undergraduate level and adequate preparedness to undertake graduate-level study. Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree or should anticipate completion of a bachelor’s degree before enrollment in the graduate program. All applicants are evaluated individually according to previous educational experience and level of achievement. Graduate students apply for and are accepted into specific disciplines. Students who wish to change from one discipline to another must meet all admission requirements for the new discipline. For graduate students entering the professional architecture program from preparatory or pre-professional programs, required credit hours are determined on an individual basis, dependent upon review of the student’s academic transcripts and portfolio by SCAD

architecture faculty. Students may be assigned preparatory (preliminary) courses from the SCAD B.F.A. program in addition to two years of graduate study. The graduate admission review ensures that the undergraduate coursework of all applicants to the professional M.Arch. program is evaluated according to the NAAB student performance criteria required at the preprofessional level. All graduate degree applicants should review the graduate candidacy and completion requirements in the academic programs and policies section. Graduate admission with intensive graduate-level coursework Intensive graduate-level coursework provides a bridge for academically qualified graduate students who need additional practical skills, contextual knowledge and studio work in order to prepare for the rigorous specialized disciplines offered at SCAD. Upon admission, graduate students may be assigned an intensive program of up to 15 additional hours (three courses) in their course of study. Intensive programming may not be offered every quarter or at every SCAD location and, thus, may change a student’s entry term and intended location. Intensive graduate-level courses may be assigned in addition to preliminary undergraduate courses. Graduate admission with required preliminary undergraduate courses In some cases, graduate applicants may be required to take preliminary undergraduate courses prior to entering their graduate course of study. Graduate applicants who are assigned undergraduate preliminary courses prior to their graduate course of study must complete these undergraduate courses with a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher in each assigned course. After the preliminary courses are completed satisfactorily, these students are admitted as graduate students and are approved to proceed with the intended graduate course of study. Preliminary undergraduate courses may be assigned in addition to intensive graduate-level courses. Courses are assigned by the Admission Review Committee on the basis of the student’s prior educational experience, level of achievement, and the desired program of study. Students who seek

SCAD.EDU / ADMISSION

349

ADMISSION

exemption from any assigned preliminary course or any intensive graduate course must provide documentation to the admission department that demonstrates mastery of skills and sufficient knowledge of content taught in the specific preliminary or intensive course. A student who is granted exemption does not receive credit for the course, but the course is eliminated from the student’s preliminary or intensive course requirements. Graduate application requirements 1. Completed application for admission. 2. N onrefundable application fee (US$40). 3. A bachelor’s degree or its equivalent.* Graduate applicants may receive a preliminary offer of admission based upon unofficial transcripts/ mark sheets from all postsecondary institutions attended. ** If an offer of admission is made, official transcripts/mark sheets from each college/university attended should be received prior to Aug. 1 for fall enrollment. Prior to enrollment at SCAD, proof of completion of the bachelor’s degree (or its equivalent) must be received by SCAD. All transcripts/ mark sheets must be in English or accompanied by a certified English translation. The admission department must receive all official transcripts prior to the first day of class. Failure to comply with this requirement may prohibit the student from attending classes for that quarter.  SCAD reserves the right to verify all documents submitted in application for admission. Offers of admission are contingent upon receipt of official documentation, and SCAD reserves the right to revoke any offer of admission should discrepancies be found. Any falsification of admission documents, portfolio or audition materials constitutes grounds for termination of application procedures or dismissal from SCAD. 4. Evidence of English proficiency for students whose first language is not English.*** 5. Recommendations. Two letters of recommendation from professors, advisers, supervisors or community leaders who have had immediate contact with the applicant and who have knowledge of the applicant’s level of commitment and

350

SCAD.EDU / ADMISSION

history of achievement. Recommendations should provide relevant information about the applicant’s creativity, initiative, motivation, character and achievements, thus assessing the applicant’s reasonable potential for success as a student at SCAD. Recommendations may not come from friends or family members. 6. Statement of purpose. The statement should be a 500to 750-word overview of the applicant’s academic and professional accomplishments and should demonstrate a high level of interest in and a highly developed understanding of the discipline. The applicant should describe knowledge of the discipline, approach to past work, qualifications for graduate study and intended focus, as well as personal and professional goals. 7. Portfolio, audition or writing submission. The portfolio should be specific to the intended course of study, should represent the applicant’s best work and should demonstrate a high level of craft presented as professionally as possible. (See graduate audition, portfolio and writing guidelines.) 8. Résumé. The résumé should document educational credentials as well as professional and other employment, such as internships or field experience in the intended area of graduate study, and should list commissioned works, exhibitions, performances, publications, honors, memberships, interests and activities, including volunteer work. 9. GRE scores. While not required of most applicants, submission of GRE scores is strongly encouraged for applicants to architectural history, art history, business design and arts leadership and cinema studies. Performance on the GRE may assist in demonstrating adequate educational preparation and ability to succeed in academic coursework at the graduate level.  Applicants whose bachelor ’s degrees are conferred by institutions that are not approved by the U.S. Department of Education and/or do not hold regional accreditation, or do not have appropriate specialized or programmatic accreditation, or have not been evaluated and proven

comparable in course content and level of instruction to SCAD, or are not recognized by the ministry of education or equivalent agency in the applicant’s home country, are required to take the GRE and submit official scores to SCAD. 10. Additionally, if applicable, any other documents or materials must be provided if required to obtain a student visa.**** 11. In-person or telephone interview optional (may be scheduled by con tacting the admission department) Exceptions to the general rules of admission may be made for applicants of unusual motivation and ability. Application materials cannot be returned. * SCAD uses the standards established by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers to determine the equivalent academic achievement of a bachelor’s degree. Transcripts are evaluated to determine the conferment of bachelor’s degrees from institutions that are approved by the U.S. Department of Education and hold regional accreditation, or have appropriate specialized or programmatic accreditation, or have been evaluated and proven to have comparable course content and level of instruction to SCAD, or are recognized by the ministry of education or equivalent agency in the applicant’s home country. Course content is evaluated by comparing the curricula of other institutions with that of SCAD and assessing whether foundation studies, general education and major discipline courses are comparable to those offered at SCAD. Level of instruction is evaluated by comparing the percentage of faculty at other institutions who hold graduate and terminal degrees with the percentage of faculty at SCAD who hold graduate and terminal degrees. ** Non-U.S. students refer to the international applicant section on page 351 for details. *** English is the language of instruction for all courses at SCAD. In addition to meeting or exceeding all other SCAD admission criteria, applicants who wish to be admitted with no further English proficiency requirements must demonstrate their current level of proficiency by providing official minimum scores on one of the

following or will be required to take an Accuplacer ESL test at orientation prior to the first day of classes: • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) minimum scores (SCAD code 5631): a. 550 on the paper-based test b. 85 on the Internet-based test with minimum score of 20 on each section • International English Language Testing System (IELTS) composite score of at least 6.5 with a score of at least 6.5 in both speaking and writing • American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) score of at least “high advanced” on the writing proficiency portion of the test • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) verbal section score of at least 500 (for tests taken before Aug. 1, 2011) or 153 (for tests taken after Aug. 1, 2011). Otherwise qualified applicants who do not meet the minimum scores listed above must take a SCAD English language proficiency test to be placed in the appropriate level of ESL upon enrollment. Students must satisfactorily complete ESL coursework through completion of Level VI. SCAD locations where ESL Level I proficiency courses are not available require that students meet the following composite score minimum requirements: 50 on the Internet-based TOEFL, 4.5 on the IELTS, or “intermediate low” on the ACTFL, or 4 on the HKDSE English language test. For applicants whose native language is English, no additional proof of English proficiency is required. For applicants whose transcripts show extensive study in an institution at which English is the language of instruction, no additional proof of English proficiency is required for admission evaluation, but applicants may be asked to take an English proficiency test upon enrollment at the university. **** Official certification of sources and funds, a copy of the first page of the applicant’s passport (requested but not required), and a copy of the first page of the passport for any dependent accompanying the student. These documents are used to verify spelling of names, birth dates, and other information vital to student registration.

Graduate audition, portfolio and writing guidelines Graduate audition, portfolio or writing submissions are required for graduate enrollment and scholarship consideration. Portfolios should be specific to the intended course of study, should represent the applicant’s best work and should be presented as professionally as possible. Portfolios should demonstrate the applicant’s interest in and aptitude for advanced study and, specifically, potential for success at SCAD. Submission Applicants must use the online file management system SlideRoom to submit their portfolios for review. From the SlideRoom website (scad.slideroom. com), applicants can upload still images, Word documents, and digital and multimedia files. There also are instructions for creating a corresponding inventory of work (required) including titles, dates, media, dimensions and specific responsibilities on group projects, if applicable. A fee of US$10 is charged by SlideRoom for each portfolio submission. Graduate applicants should submit at least 20 images or documents. Specific criteria for each program are published online at scad.edu/portfolio. Graduate transfer credits A maximum of 20 quarter hours of graduate academic credit toward a 90-quarter-hour graduate degree may be given for courses appropriate to the SCAD curriculum. Only graduate courses with grades of at least a 3.0 (B) taken at institutions with a level of graduate course content and level of instruction comparable to that of SCAD may be transferred. Credit may be accepted from institutions that are approved by the U.S. Department of Education and hold regional accreditation, or have appropriate specialized or programmatic accreditation, or have been evaluated and proven to be comparable in course content and level of instruction to SCAD, or are recognized by the ministry of education or equivalent agency in the applicant’s home country. Prior to the end of the first quarter of enrollment, the student must submit to the admission department official transcripts, course descriptions, a portfolio or, in the case of a lecture course, projects and

papers, and a written request for transfer credit review for the course(s) the student wishes to transfer. Materials are reviewed to determine if the work is comparable to that which would earn at least a 3.0 in a SCAD graduatelevel course. Transfer credit appears on the transcript as such and is not calculated in the student’s grade-point average. Students who wish to appeal the transfer credit process after the first quarter of enrollment must submit a written request to the admission department. Graduate combined credit Graduate courses from a previously awarded SCAD graduate degree may be combined in a new program of study. Graduate combined credit must meet the requirements of the new program of study and is allowed on a case-bycase basis.

International applicants SCAD welcomes students from throughout the world. International applicants should adhere to requirements relevant to first-year freshman, undergraduate transfer or graduate applicants. International applicants must submit official transcripts/mark sheets for an admission decision to be rendered. Students may submit transcripts/mark sheets from all secondary school years prior to the final year to receive a preliminary offer of admission. SCAD is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant international students who show evidence of proficiency in the English language and who certify means of financial support for their studies. Documentation of financial support for the first year is required for SCAD to begin the process for an international applicant to obtain a visa. Submission of official certification of sources and funds at the time of application is strongly encouraged and may expedite the visa process. SCAD eLearning applicants residing outside the U.S. are not required to submit certification of sources and funds. Although international students are not eligible to receive U.S. federal or state financial aid, all admitted students are considered for institutional scholarships upon receipt of relevant materials. These funds are limited and are awarded to the earliest qualifiers.

SCAD.EDU / ADMISSION

351

ADMISSION 352

SCAD reserves the right to verify all documents submitted in application for admission. Any falsification of admission documents or portfolio or audition materials constitutes grounds for termination of application procedures or dismissal from SCAD. Permanent residents must submit proof of legal residency such as a copy of a resident alien card. A copy of the first page of each international applicant’s passport is requested, though not required. A copy of the first page of the passport for any dependent accompanying the international applicant also is requested. These documents are used to verify spelling of names, birth dates and other information vital to student registration. In order to help students avoid unexpected costs of health care, SCAD requires all enrolled international students on F-1 visas to have adequate medical insurance. These students must enroll in the SCAD international health insurance plan, and the charges are automatically added to the student account. Exemptions may be granted for students who are already covered under certain government- or embassy-sponsored plans. See scad. edu/life/student-services/internationalstudent-information for additional information and fee structure. English is the language of instruction for all courses. Proof of English proficiency is required for admission if English is not the student’s first language. For students whose native language is English, or whose academic transcripts show extensive study at an institution in which English is the language of instruction, no additional proof of English proficiency is required for admission evaluation, but applicants may be asked to take an English proficiency test upon enrollment at the university. Otherwise qualified applicants who do not meet minimum required test scores may be considered for admission to SCAD. These students must take a SCAD English language proficiency test to be placed in the appropriate level of ESL upon enrollment. Students must satisfactorily complete ESL coursework through completion of Level VI. All new international students who are not granted a waiver from ESL are required to take an English language proficiency test upon arrival at SCAD. Students are placed in the appropriate level of English as a Second Language, as determined by their scores on the

SCAD.EDU / ADMISSION

test. Students wishing only to take ESL courses must submit a separate application form and should contact the admission office for information.

Other types of admission Certificate Applicants to an undergraduate certificate program should follow the application guidelines for first-time freshman or transfer applicants. Applicants to graduate certificate programs should follow the application guidelines for graduate degree applicants. For more information, certificate applicants should contact the admission department by telephone or email or visit the SCAD website at scad.edu/admission. Nondegree-seeking Enrollment of nondegree-seeking students is offered on a space-available basis for individuals who, while not wishing to pursue a degree, would like to enroll in SCAD courses. Nondegreeseeking applicants must submit an application for admission, a résumé, and a nonrefundable US$40 application fee submitted via scad.edu/apply. Applicants denied admission to SCAD as degreeseeking students may or may not be eligible for enrollment as nondegree-seeking students. Performance in courses taken as a nondegree-seeking student does not automatically qualify an applicant for admission as a degree-seeking student. Nondegree-seeking students who wish to become degree-seeking must fulfill the application requirements in effect for degree-seeking students. Nondegree-seeking students are not eligible for financial aid or scholarships, but they may reside in SCAD housing on a space-available basis. The administrative unit responsible for nondegree-seeking admission decisions is the Admission Review Committee. I-20s cannot be issued to international students who are nondegree-seeking. All students for whom English is not the first language must pass an English proficiency test before being allowed to enroll in any academic or studio courses at SCAD. These students may be asked to submit TOEFL or other English proficiency documentation and may be required to enroll in and successfully complete English as a Second Language coursework before being allowed to register for academic or studio courses.

Transient Enrollment of transient students is offered for individuals who, while enrolled at another college or university, would like to enroll for one quarter at SCAD. Undergraduate transient applicants must submit an application for admission, a nonrefundable US$40 application fee submitted via scad.edu/apply, a résumé, and a letter of good standing from their college or university indicating permission to take specific courses. Graduate transient applicants must submit an application for admission, a nonrefundable US$40 application fee submitted via scad.edu/apply, transcripts from their undergraduate degree program and current graduate program, a résumé, and a letter of good standing from their college or university indicating permission to take specific courses. International students wishing to be transient must be granted exemption from English as a Second Language coursework. Applicants denied admission to SCAD as degree-seeking students may or may not be eligible for enrollment as transient students. Performance in courses taken as a transient student does not automatically qualify an applicant for admission as a degreeseeking student. Transient students who wish to study longer than one quarter may be required to reapply for admission to SCAD. Transient students who wish to become degree-seeking at SCAD must fulfill the application requirements in effect for degree-seeking students. Transient students are not eligible for financial aid or scholarships through SCAD, but they may reside in SCAD housing on a space-available basis. The administrative unit responsible for transient student admission decisions is the Admission Review Committee. Readmission Students who have attended SCAD, but have not been enrolled at SCAD for at least five consecutive quarters, or have attended another college or university in the interim, must apply for readmission and meet current admission requirements and fees. All readmission applications are evaluated on an individual basis by the Admission Review Committee. Any prior awards of financial aid and/or scholarships may or may not apply. Students should complete new FAFSA forms and re-submit any required materials to be considered for aid or scholarship awards.

SCAD and ACA alumni application and enrollment fee waiver The application fee and enrollment fee are waived for SCAD and ACA alumni who apply and are accepted to any undergraduate or graduate program at SCAD, and their SCAD transcripts may be provided to the admission department at no charge. Continued enrollment from M.A. to M.F.A. In some programs, the M.A. degree may be followed by additional study at SCAD leading to an M.F.A. degree. Students planning to continue the next quarter from the M.A. to the M.F.A. in the same major should contact the office of graduate studies prior to the conclusion of their M.A. studies. Approval must be given by the department chair of the area of study.

Summer programs SCAD offers an array of summer courses and workshops to students, educators and adults. These programs provide educational enrichment, prepare high school students for university-level coursework, and foster the artistic talents of both youth and adults. Participants may wish to earn college credit, fine-tune creative pursuits or simply seek personal enrichment or professional development. SCAD Rising Star is a five-week residential program for students who have completed their junior year of high school and wish to earn university credit. Participants have full access to SCAD facilities, stay in a SCAD residence hall and have their meals at a SCAD dining facility. Rising high school sophomores, juniors and seniors may enroll in Teen Summer Workshops and SCAD Summer Seminars, workshops for residential or commuting students that offer opportunities for talented teens to meet others from around the world and experience a taste of university life under the guidance of SCAD professors and graduate students. More information and registration guidelines are available at scad.edu/ summer.

Admission contacts SCAD Atlanta Phone 877.722.3285 or 404.253.2700 Fax 404.253.3466 scadatl@scad.edu SCAD Admission Department P.O. Box 77300 Atlanta, GA 30357-1300 USA Packages may be sent to: SCAD Admission Department 1600 Peachtree St., NE Atlanta, GA 30309 USA

SCAD Hong Kong 852.2253.8044 (in Hong Kong) or 800.869.7223 (in U.S.) Fax 912.525.5986 admission@scad.edu.hk SCAD Admission Department P.O. Box 2072 Savannah, GA 31402-2072 USA Packages may be sent to: SCAD Admission Department 22 E. Lathrop Ave. Savannah, GA 31415 USA

SCAD Savannah 800.869.7223 or 912.525.5100 Fax 912.525.5986 admission@scad.edu SCAD Admission Department P.O. Box 2072 Savannah, GA 31402-2072 USA Packages may be sent to: SCAD Admission Department 22 E. Lathrop Ave. Savannah, GA 31415 USA

SCAD eLearning 800.869.7223 or 912.525.5100 Fax 912.525.5986 admission@scad.edu SCAD Admission Department P.O. Box 2072 Savannah, GA 31402-2072 USA Packages may be sent to: SCAD Admission Department 22 E. Lathrop Ave. Savannah, GA 31415 USA

SCAD.EDU / ADMISSION

353

SCHOLARSHIPS SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS FOR ENTERING UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS (nonrepayable funds)

Through the admission office, SCAD administers a number of scholarships for entering students. Scholarship recipients are expected to be particularly strong and positive leaders at SCAD, excelling academically and representing SCAD well within the community. Scholarships are available to both United States citizens and non-U.S. citizens and are awarded to entering students prior to first-quarter attendance. Entering students may be offered a scholarship from SCAD based on demonstrated academic achievements and/or other achievements, including leadership, volunteer and community service, extracurricular involvement, and artistic accomplishment. Financial need, as indicated by completion of the FAFSA or other documentation, is taken into consideration for need-based scholarships. A scholarship recipient may accept additional scholarships from other sources, as well as additional forms of financial aid, if qualified. Most scholarships are awarded to degreeseeking students, are applied quarterly, and may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0. Students who plan to pursue a double major or multiple minors should meet with a staff adviser to determine if aid is sufficient. An annual award is intended to be disbursed over 45 hours of credit earned in three quarters at SCAD and, if necessary, prorated based on enrollment. Students may qualify for more than one scholarship and may receive a combined total up to the cost of tuition. Scholarships are offered on a rolling basis. SCAD scholarship offers for undergraduate students vary according to whether students reside in SCAD housing. A scholarship student who accepts an on-campus award as an entering student, but moves out of SCAD student housing at any time, is considered to be declining the on-campus award amount and accepting the off-campus

354

SCAD.EDU / SCHOLARSHIPS

award, thus reducing his or her award to 70 percent of the on-campus award amount. Therefore, a balance due may be created. These students must resolve any resulting charges incurred with the SCAD student accounts office.

Academic honors scholarships A limited number of academic honors scholarships may be awarded to accepted students based on gradepoint averages evaluated on a 4.0 scale and/or standardized test scores (SAT scores evaluated on a scale of 1600; ACT scores on a scale of 36) with consideration given to math and critical reading sections of the SAT and the ACT composite score. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0. Academic honors scholarships may be awarded in addition to other awards, up to the cost of tuition.

Achievement honors scholarships A limited number of achievement honors scholarships may be awarded to students accepted for admission whose co-curricular accomplishments are judged to be of exceptional quality by the Admission Review Committee. A résumé or list of activities and accomplishments detailing leadership, volunteer and community service contributions, extracurricular involvement, and/or artistic portfolio, audition, riding or writing submission are required for achievement honors scholarship consideration. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0. Achievement honors scholarships may be awarded in addition to other awards, up to the cost of tuition. May and Paul Poetter Scholarship In honor of two of the university’s founders and longtime administrators, a limited number of May and Paul Poetter Scholarships may be awarded to

accepted students whose official standardized test scores and grade-point averages are superior. Grade-point averages are evaluated on a 4.0 scale. SAT scores are evaluated on a scale of 1600 and ACT scores on a scale of 36, with consideration given to math and critical reading sections of the SAT and the ACT composite score. The scholarship covers full tuition. Room, board, books and supplies are not included, but may be paid through scholarships from other non-SCAD sources, loans or financial aid. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0. To be considered for this scholarship, students are encouraged to submit their application materials before Feb. 15 of the intended year of enrollment. An interview may be requested by the admission department. Pamela E. Poetter Memorial Scholarship In honor of a beloved mentor and an influential leader at SCAD for 25 years, the Pamela E. Poetter Memorial Scholarship may be awarded to a limited number of accepted students who demonstrate outstanding academic and artistic achievement. Minimum requirements include a grade-point average of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, SAT/ACT score of at least 1220/27, demonstration of outstanding leadership potential, and documentation of extracurricular activities, honors and recognition. In addition, a portfolio, audition, riding or writing submission is required and must be judged to be of exceptional quality by the Admission Review Committee. The award may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0. Frances Larkin McCommon Scholarship A limited number of Frances Larkin McCommon scholarships may be awarded to accepted students who have a strong academic profile and whose

portfolio, audition, riding or writing submission is judged to be exceptional by the Admission Review Committee. The scholarship covers full tuition. Room, board, books and supplies are not included, but may be paid through scholarships from other sources, loans or financial aid. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0. To be considered for this scholarship, students are encouraged to submit their application materials before Feb. 15 of the intended year of enrollment. An interview may be requested by the admission department.

Combined honors scholarships A limited number of combined honors scholarships may be awarded to accepted students who demonstrate outstanding academic and other achievements. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0. ACA Scholarship A limited number of ACA Scholarships may be awarded to accepted students who demonstrate outstanding academic and artistic achievement. Minimum requirements include a grade-point average of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, SAT/ ACT score of at least 1220/27, demonstration of outstanding leadership potential, and documentation of extracurricular activities, honors and recognitions. In addition, a portfolio, audition, riding or writing submission is required and must be judged to be of exceptional quality by the Admission Review Committee. The award may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of least 3.0. Savannah Coca-Cola Bottling Company Scholarship The Savannah Coca-Cola Bottling Company Scholarship may be awarded to one accepted applicant to SCAD

Savannah from Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi or South Carolina. This scholarship is awarded to applicants who meet or exceed normal admission standards, present a portfolio and demonstrate interest in advertising, animation, motion media design, film and television, graphic design, illustration or industrial design. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly for up to four years through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD, maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 and demonstrates continued interest in the fields listed. SCAD Distinguished Scholars A limited number of SCAD Distinguished Scholar awards may be awarded to accepted students who demonstrate exceptional academic and artistic achievement as well as leadership, extracurricular activities, honors and awards. Minimum requirements include a grade-point average of at least 3.75 on a 4.0 scale, SAT/ACT score of at least 1350/30, demonstration of outstanding leadership potential, and documentation of extracurricular activities, honors and awards. In addition, a portfolio, audition, riding or writing submission is required and must be judged to be of exceptional quality by the Admission Review Committee. The award may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0. Nominations must be postmarked or emailed to nominations@scad.edu no later than Feb. 15 of the intended year of enrollment. Mayor’s Next Step Scholarship The Mayor’s Next Step Scholarship may be awarded to a limited number of students accepted to SCAD Atlanta who are members or alumni of the Next Step Program in Atlanta. Applicants must be Georgia residents and must demonstrate outstanding academic and artistic achievement. Minimum requirements include a grade-point average of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, SAT/ACT score of at least 1220/27 or completion of an International Baccalaureate diploma program, demonstration of outstanding leadership potential, and

documentation of extracurricular activities, honors and awards. In addition, a portfolio, audition, riding or writing submission is required and must be judged to be of excellent quality by the Admission Review Committee. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0. Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship Phi Theta Kappa members who apply, are accepted and enroll at SCAD, having met or exceeded admission requirements, are awarded an academic scholarship of at least US$5,000 per year of enrollment at SCAD, up to 225 attempted quarter hours, or until completion of a bachelor’s degree. This scholarship may not be granted in addition to other academic scholarships. SCAD Transfer Scholars The Transfer Scholars award may be offered to a limited number of accepted transfer students who demonstrate outstanding academic achievement and excellence in areas of art and design, riding or writing. Minimum requirements include 45 quarter hours or 27 semester hours of college-level coursework maintaining a cumulative grade-point average of 3.75 or higher on a 4.0 scale, demonstration of outstanding leadership potential and documentation of extracurricular activities, honors and awards. In addition, a portfolio, audition, riding or writing submission is required and must be judged to be of excellent quality by the Admission Review Committee. Students who have earned less than 45 quarter hours or 27 semester hours should refer to the ACA Scholars and SCAD Distinguished Scholars award descriptions. The Transfer Scholars award may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains at least a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average. In order to be considered for this award, students must be nominated by a faculty member from their current institution. Nominations must be postmarked or emailed to nominations@scad.edu no later than Feb. 15 of the intended year of enrollment.

SCAD.EDU / SCHOLARSHIPS

355

SCHOLARSHIPS

Need-based scholarships and grants Atlanta Board of Visitors Endowed Scholarship The Atlanta Board of Visitors scholarship may be presented to one incoming, first-year SCAD Atlanta student from the metro Atlanta area who meets or exceeds normal SCAD admission standards. The applicant must demonstrate academic achievement, artistic excellence and financial need by completion of the FAFSA or other documentation. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly for up to four years through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD, maintains a grade-point average of at least 3.0 and demonstrates continued financial need. Community Foundation Scholarship The Community Foundation Scholarship may be awarded to a limited number of accepted SCAD Atlanta applicants who meet or exceed normal SCAD admission standards and who demonstrate financial need through completion of the FAFSA or other documentation. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly for up to four years through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD, maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 and demonstrates continued financial need. Eckburg Scholarship The Eckburg Scholarship may be awarded to a limited number of students graduating from Savannah Christian Preparatory School or to students graduating from other schools within a 200-mile radius of Savannah. This scholarship is awarded to U.S. citizens who meet or exceed normal SCAD admission standards, and who demonstrate financial need through completion of the FAFSA or other documentation. The Eckburg Scholarship may be renewed quarterly for up to four years through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD, maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 and demonstrates continued financial need.

356

SCAD.EDU / SCHOLARSHIPS

European Board of Visitors Endowed Scholarship One scholarship may be awarded to a European student accepted to SCAD who demonstrates outstanding academic and artistic ability, and financial need. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly for up to four years through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD, maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 and demonstrates continued financial need. Goizueta Scholarship The Goizueta Scholarship may be awarded to a Hispanic/Latino applicant accepted to SCAD Atlanta or SCAD Savannah whose families reside in the United States. Funding is provided by an endowment from The Goizueta Foundation. Applicants must meet or exceed normal SCAD admission standards and demonstrate financial need through completion of the FAFSA or other documentation. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly for up to four years through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD, and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0. Jane C. Thurber Scholarship The Jane C. Thurber Scholarship may be awarded to an incoming undergraduate student interested in painting or fashion who demonstrates outstanding academic and artistic achievement and financial need through completion of the FAFSA or other documentation. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly for up to four years through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD, maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 and demonstrates continued financial need. Jordan Siegel Equestrian Scholarship The Jordan Siegel Equestrian Scholarship may be awarded to an incoming first-year student eligible for walk-trot or walk-trot-canter divisions in Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association competition who meets eligibility requirements for the SCAD equestrian team. Eligible students must have a high school grade-point average of at least 3.0, must

have athletics experience (any sport) and must demonstrate financial need through completion of the FAFSA or other documentation. The scholarship may be renewed quarterly for up to four years (up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient maintains satisfactory academic performance and competes on the SCAD equestrian team. SCAD Grant SCAD grants may be awarded to accepted freshman and transfer applicants who meet or exceed normal admission standards and who demonstrate financial need through completion of the FAFSA or other documentation. These grants may be renewed quarterly for up to four years through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD, maintains satisfactory academic progress and continues to demonstrate financial need. Student Opportunity Scholarship A limited number of scholarships may be awarded to accepted undergraduate or graduate students who meet or exceed the normal SCAD admission standards and who demonstrate financial need through completion of the FAFSA or other documentation. These scholarships may be awarded in addition to any other scholarship awarded by SCAD, up to the cost of tuition. Funding is limited. Eligibility criteria are available by contacting the admission department.

SCHOLARSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS FOR ENTERING GRADUATE STUDENTS (nonrepayable funds)

Through the admission office, SCAD administers a number of scholarships, fellowships and grants for entering graduate students. Recipients are expected to be particularly strong and positive leaders at SCAD, excelling academically and representing SCAD well within the community. These awards are available to both U.S. citizens and non-U.S. citizens and are offered to entering students prior to first-quarter attendance. Entering students may be offered an award from SCAD based on artistic and/or academic achievement with

consideration given to financial need as indicated by completion of the FAFSA or other documentation. Award recipients may accept additional scholarships from other sources, as well as additional forms of financial aid, if qualified. Awards are offered to degree-seeking students, are applied quarterly, and may be renewed quarterly until completion of a graduate degree at SCAD, as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.25. An annual award is intended to be disbursed over 45 hours of credit earned in three quarters at SCAD and, if necessary, prorated based on enrollment. Graduate award recipients are not required to reside in SCAD housing. SCAD Academic Honors and Achievement Honors A limited number of SCAD Academic Honors and SCAD Achievement Honors scholarships may be awarded to accepted graduate students who demonstrate outstanding artistic and/or academic achievement through outstanding portfolio, audition or writing submission; Graduate Record Examination scores of 600 or higher on the verbal section, 740 or higher on the quantitative section, and 5 or higher on the analytical writing section; a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale; or presentation of outstanding portfolio, audition or writing submission and above-average grades and test scores. Graduate Fellowship A limited number of graduate fellowships may be awarded to applicants to any SCAD graduate program at any location who have been determined through the admission process to be exceptionally strong candidates for advanced study and scholarship. The number of fellowships awarded on an annual basis may vary according to the number of applicants and their qualifications. Graduate fellowship recipients are expected to be strong leaders in their respective academic schools and departments, and are assigned specific duties relative to the needs of the university. Eligibility requirements include an undergraduate cumulative gradepoint average of at least 3.3 on a 4.0 scale, and submission of a portfolio and statement of purpose that are judged to

be of exceptional quality by the Admission Review Committee. Qualified semifinalists may be invited to participate in an interview to determine final selection. To be considered for this award, students are encouraged to submit their application materials before Feb. 15 of the intended year of enrollment. Dean’s Fellowship Dean’s fellowships may be awarded to applicants to any SCAD graduate program at any location who have been determined through the admission process to be exceptionally strong candidates for advanced study and scholarship. The number of fellowships awarded on an annual basis may vary according to the number of applicants and their qualifications. Dean’s fellowship recipients are expected to be strong leaders in their academic schools and departments, and are assigned specific duties relative to their qualifications and the needs of the department. Eligibility requirements include an undergraduate cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, and submission of a portfolio and statement of purpose that are judged to be of exceptional quality by the Admission Review Committee. Qualified semifinalists may be invited to participate in an interview to determine final selection. To be considered for this award, students are encouraged to submit their application materials before Feb. 15 of the intended year of enrollment. Student Opportunity Scholarship A limited number of scholarships may be awarded to accepted undergraduate or graduate students who meet or exceed the normal SCAD admission standards and who demonstrate financial need through completion of the FAFSA or other documentation. These scholarships may be awarded in addition to any other scholarship awarded by SCAD, up to the cost of tuition. Funding is limited. Eligibility criteria are available by contacting the admission department.

individual merit. Criteria include high school academic record, standardized test scores, recommendations, achievements, leadership in extracurricular activities, and other documentation of ability to contribute to and benefit from the educational experience at SCAD. Educator Scholarship Educators who are employed full time or in an adjunct capacity at the elementary school through university level at a public or private institution recognized by the applicant’s state department of education at the time of application may be eligible to receive a half-tuition scholarship to attend SCAD at any location or via SCAD eLearning. To be eligible to receive this award, an educator must apply and be accepted to SCAD and must provide proof of employment in good standing from his or her school administrator or human resources department. These awards are available to qualified applicants to undergraduate or graduate degree programs at SCAD. Scholarship amount is based on enrollment in three classes (15 credit hours) each quarter. The amount is prorated for those who enroll in fewer courses. Horatio Alger Scholar Award A scholarship is awarded to each Horatio Alger Scholar who is accepted and enrolls at SCAD. Horatio Alger Scholars also may be eligible for other financial aid, grants, loans or scholarships. The award is renewable for up to four years through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours), provided the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains a grade-point average of at least 3.0.

OTHER AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS

International Baccalaureate Scholarship International Baccalaureate diploma recipients who apply, are accepted and enroll at SCAD are awarded scholarships on a score-based scale, per year of enrollment at SCAD, up to 225 attempted quarter hours or until completion of a bachelor’s degree. This award may not be granted in addition to other academic scholarships. The award scale is available online at scad.edu/ib.

Athletic Award Athletic awards may be awarded to undergraduate students who demonstrate outstanding athletic ability and

International Student Scholarship A limited number of scholarships may be awarded each year to degree-seeking international students who apply

SCAD.EDU / SCHOLARSHIPS

357

SCHOLARSHIPS

and are accepted to SCAD. To be considered for an international student scholarship, applicants should meet or exceed normal admission standards and must request scholarship consideration by submitting a 500-word essay explaining how an international education would influence their artwork, goals and experiences. Legacy Scholarship Scholarships of at least US$3,000 are awarded to dependents of SCAD alumni who apply and are accepted to any undergraduate or graduate program. The undergraduate scholarship may be renewed quarterly through completion of a bachelor’s degree (or up to 225 attempted hours) provided the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0. Graduate scholarship awards may be renewed quarterly until completion of a graduate degree at SCAD, as long as the recipient remains enrolled at SCAD and maintains a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.25. This scholarship may not be granted in addition to other SCAD scholarships. Multicultural Student Scholarship A limited number of scholarships may be awarded each year to help make the benefits of a postsecondary or postgraduate education available to degree-seeking students of various ethnic backgrounds who apply and are accepted to SCAD. Students should meet or exceed normal admission standards and must request scholarship consideration by submitting a 500-word essay that addresses how their artwork, goals and experiences are influenced by their cultural background. SCAD and ACA Alumni Scholarship/application and enrollment fee waiver Scholarships of at least US$250 per course may be awarded to SCAD and ACA alumni who apply and are accepted to any undergraduate or graduate program at SCAD. The application fee and enrollment fee are waived for SCAD and ACA alumni who apply and are accepted to any undergraduate or graduate program at SCAD, and their transcripts may be provided to the SCAD admission department at no charge. This scholarship may not be granted in addition to other SCAD scholarships.

358

SCAD.EDU / SCHOLARSHIPS

SCAD Challenge Scholarship Competition Offering high school/secondary school students an international stage to exhibit their work, the SCAD Challenge seeks the next generation of talented artists and designers. High school seniors and juniors, and students completing their last two years of secondary school, compete for SCAD scholarships and funding to attend SCAD’s pre-college programs. More information is available online at scad.edu/scadchallenge. SCAD eLearning Pre-college Scholarship Qualified high school or home-schooled students admitted to SCAD for joint enrollment may be eligible to receive up to a half-tuition scholarship to enroll in courses offered through SCAD eLearning. To be eligible, the student must follow the application requirements for first-time freshmen, be recommended for joint enrollment by a counselor or teacher, and be admitted for joint enrollment. This award may be applied only toward courses completed as a part-time, nondegree-seeking, jointenrolled student. Joint enrollment students who have taken courses on a non– degree-seeking basis and who wish to become degree-seeking must reapply as a degree-seeking student and adhere to all first-time freshman admission requirements. The scholarship amount is based on enrollment in three courses (15 credit hours) each quarter. The amount is prorated for those who enroll in fewer courses. Available courses may vary. Scholastic Art and Writing Award Scholarship SCAD is proud to recognize students’ outstanding artistic achievement. Gold Key and Gold Portfolio Award recipients may be eligible for SCAD Achievement Honors scholarships should they apply and be accepted to SCAD. More information is available online at scad.edu/ scholastic. Yellow Ribbon Program Grant SCAD voluntarily participates in the Yellow Ribbon GI Education Enhancement Program, a provision of the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008. Through the Yellow Ribbon Program, eligible veterans who apply and are accepted to SCAD may receive grant money from SCAD and a matching

amount from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs toward their tuition at SCAD. Qualified students may receive either the Yellow Ribbon Grant or a SCAD scholarship based on academic and/or other achievement, whichever is higher. Although those who accept the Yellow Ribbon Grant are not eligible to receive other institutional scholarship awards from SCAD, they may qualify for additional federal or state aid and outside scholarships. Students are encouraged to complete the FAFSA and the Georgia aid application to receive maximum financial aid benefits. In order to qualify for this grant, the student must provide SCAD with a copy of his or her VA Certificate of Eligibility. Recipients continue to receive the grant as long as SCAD participates in the Yellow Ribbon Program, and as long as the student maintains satisfactory academic progress, conduct and attendance and has remaining entitlement with the VA. For eligibility requirements and to verify SCAD’s participation and contribution amount for the current academic year, visit the Yellow Ribbon Program page through the VA website at gibill.va.gov.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR CURRENT STUDENTS Scholarships may be available to currently enrolled SCAD students based on academic achievement and/or financial need. To be eligible, students must be on schedule to complete a minimum of 45 undergraduate hours or 15 graduate hours at SCAD by the end of spring quarter. The scholarship application for current students is available online through MySCAD, during the month of April only. Award recipients are notified by mid-June. Applicants are automatically considered for all applicable scholarships. Additional information is available online at scad.edu/ studentscholarships.

FINANCIAL POLICIES AND STUDENT ACCOUNTS Upon enrollment, students are assigned an adviser to help them develop educational plans that relate their career goals with academic offerings. Advisers also assist the student and family with any financial questions or concerns regarding educational expenses at SCAD. Students may consult individually with their adviser in person, by phone or by email.

STUDENT ACCOUNTS Student accounts include billing and the receipt and recording of payments for tuition, housing, meals and any fees. New students are responsible for notifying the admission department of any changes in name, address or other matters that may affect the timely receipt of bills and payment of account balances. Current students should notify their adviser of any changes, or make changes through MySCAD. All students must include their SCAD ID number on all transactions and correspondence to ensure proper credit. New student enrollment fee Each degree-seeking new student is required to pay a one-time, nonrefundable enrollment fee of US$500 to indicate intention to enroll. Each new certificate, nondegree-seeking and transient student is required to pay a nonrefundable tuition deposit of US$200 per class prior to enrollment. Housing reservation fee A nonrefundable housing reservation fee of US$250 for new students and US$500 for continuing students is required to reserve SCAD housing. Space is confirmed upon full payment of the housing balance and receipt of a signed housing agreement. Payment dates for the housing balance and tuition are published and must be adhered to in order to avoid being dropped from class or SCAD housing. Late fees may be charged when fees are paid after the university’s published due dates. Billing statements Monthly billing statements are issued July through October for the fall quarter

and immediately after the registration periods for winter, spring and summer quarters. Prompt registration ensures that students receive their billing statements in time to meet the payment due dates. All registered students receive billing statements at their SCAD email address. Account balances can be accessed in real time through MySCAD via the My Student Account Online link, found in the My Info tab. Students must notify their adviser in order to request that billing statements be sent to a third party. Payment dates schedule May 1 Fall new student enrollment fee due. June 1 Fall housing reservation fee due. Aug. 1 Fall tuition, housing and meal plan balance due. (Aug. 17 for SCAD Hong Kong) Sept. 1 Winter new student enrollment fee due. Nov. 1 Winter housing reservation fee due. Dec. 1 Winter tuition, housing and meal plan balance due. (Dec. 8 for SCAD Hong Kong) Dec. 1 Spring new student enrollment fee due. Feb. 1 Spring housing reservation fee due. March 1 Summer new student enrollment fee due. March 14 Spring tuition, housing and meal plan balance due. May 1 Summer housing reservation fee due. June 1 Summer tuition, housing and meal plan balance due. Terms of payment All SCAD fees are payable in accordance with the applicable due dates indicated on the SCAD student billing statement. These due dates apply to students, parents, guardians or any third party taking responsibility for a SCAD student account. Students are encouraged to make any necessary financial arrangements (including federal or state financial

aid, vocational rehabilitation, benefits provided by an organization outside SCAD or scholarship programs) well in advance of payment due dates. Fees not remitted by a parent, guardian or responsible third party remain the responsibility of the student and must be paid by applicable due dates. Payments from a third party A third-party sponsor is an entity that has agreed to pay all or a specified portion of a student’s charges at SCAD, such as a state prepaid college plan, a governmental or international sponsor or a scholarship program. Students with third-party arrangements should be aware of the anticipated payment from the third party and pay the difference by the payment due date. Failure to pay the portion not covered by the third party as stated on the student’s guarantee/authorization could result in late penalties and classes being dropped. If the third party fails to make payment, the outstanding balance becomes the responsibility of the student.

Late fees

A late-payment fee is charged when a student has an outstanding balance after the payment due date indicated in the SCAD student billing statement. The fee is 5 percent of the outstanding balance. A student who is in arrears to any SCAD department may not receive academic transcripts or a diploma. Collection costs are added to all accounts assigned to a collection agency. Failure to meet financial obligations may result in dismissal from SCAD. Payment options SCAD Savannah, Atlanta, Lacoste and eLearning • Cash, check, money order or traveler’s check in U.S. dollars. Check and money orders should be made payable to “SCAD” and include the student’s name and ID number. In person: Cash, checks, money orders or traveler’s checks in U.S. dollars are accepted at SCAD student accounts in Atlanta and Savannah; Turner Express in Savannah; and the SCAD Card Services offices in Atlanta and

SCAD.EDU / SFS

359

FINANCIAL POLICIES AND STUDENT ACCOUNTS

Savannah. By mail: Checks, money orders or traveler’s checks in U.S. dollars may be sent to SCAD Student Accounts, P.O. Box 2701, Savannah, GA 31402-2701. • MySCAD online secure payment in U.S. dollars by electronic check or credit or debit card (see scad.edu/ payment for accepted card types). A convenience fee of 2.75 percent or $3.00, whichever is greater, is applied to debit and credit card transactions. • Payment Plan: Automated drafts in U.S. dollars from a credit or debit card (see scad.edu/payment for accepted card types) or bank account may be made through TouchNet, accessible in MySCAD. Each quarter, the payment plan automatically drafts multiple installments of the balance due for tuition, housing and meal plan. A convenience fee of 2.75 percent or $3.00, whichever is greater, is applied to debit and credit card transactions. Students must enroll in the payment plan quarterly and pay a payment plan enrollment fee of 3 percent of the outstanding balance. • Wire Transfer: Funds in U.S. dollars may be transferred to SCAD’s bank by wire. The originating bank must indicate the student’s name and SCAD ID on the transfer, and the originating party is responsible for all transfer fees. Allow five to seven business days for SCAD to receive notice of the transfer. Instructions for bank wire transfer may be found on the SCAD website at scad.edu/content/ student-accounts-payment-options. • International Wire Transfer: Students needing to make international wire transfers can pay from any country and any bank using the peerTransfer service. This service also provides the ability to track the status of the transfer via a student dashboard. An email confirmation will be sent when payment is received by the university. This service is accessible via MySCAD or at peertransfer.com/ school/scad.

Payment options SCAD Hong Kong Students must use one currency consistently, either U.S. dollars or Hong Kong dollars, when making payments during their course of study. • C ash, check, money order or traveler’s check in Hong Kong dollars. In

360

SCAD.EDU / SFS

person: cash, checks, money orders or traveler’s checks in Hong Kong dollars are accepted by SCAD Hong Kong Student Accounts. Checks, money orders and traveler’s checks should be made payable to “SCAD Foundation (Hong Kong) Limited” and include the student’s name and SCAD ID number on the back of the check. By mail: Checks, money orders or traveler’s checks in Hong Kong dollars may be sent to SCAD Hong Kong, 292 Tai Po Road, Sham Shui Po, Hong Kong. • M ySCAD online secure payment in U.S. dollars by electronic check, credit or debit card (see scad.edu/ payment for accepted card types). A convenience fee of 2.75 percent or $3.00, whichever is greater, is applied to debit and credit card transactions. • Payment Plan: Automated drafts in U.S. dollars from a credit or debit card (see scad.edu/payment for accepted card types) or bank account may be made through TouchNet, accessible in MySCAD. Each quarter, the payment plan automatically drafts multiple installments of the balance due for tuition, housing and meal plan. A convenience fee of 2.75 percent or $3.00, whichever is greater, is applied to debit and credit card transactions. Students must enroll in the payment plan quarterly and pay a payment plan enrollment fee of 3 percent of the outstanding balance to participate. Students paying in Hong Kong dollars enroll in person with a SCAD Hong Kong staff adviser. Disbursement schedule for financial aid funds Disbursement of financial aid funds begins following the drop/add period each quarter. The following information is important to the disbursement of financial aid, is in compliance with federal and state regulations and is subject to change. To be eligible for financial aid funds, students must be enrolled in a degree program and must be enrolled at least half time (some exceptions may apply). Before disbursement of financial aid funds, eligibility is reviewed and necessary adjustments are made based on enrollment, class level and programspecific eligibility requirements. Program-specific requirements include:

• Attendance in all registered classes is verified before financial aid is disbursed. • SCAD academic and achievement scholarships are prorated by the number of credit hours in which the student is enrolled, require a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 for undergraduate students or 3.25 for graduate students, and may be subject to reduction if living off campus. • H OPE and Zell Miller scholarships (Georgia state aid) are prorated by the number of credit hours in which the student is enrolled through the drop/add period and require at least half-time enrollment. • GTEG (Georgia state aid) requires full-time enrollment. • Federal grants are prorated by enrollment and may require at least halftime enrollment. • Federal loans require at least halftime enrollment. All required documentation, including FAFSA results, must be completed and approval received by SCAD before the loan(s) is disbursed. • S pecific program requirements include the following: – Direct Loan: acceptance through MySCAD, completion of a master promissory note and entrance loan counseling. – Graduate PLUS Loan: positive credit check, approved loan application and completion of a master promissory note and entrance loan counseling. – Parent PLUS Loan: positive credit check, approved loan application and completion of a master promissory note. • Detailed information is available at studentloans.gov. Loan proceeds are reduced by the federally required loan origination fee. Students without access to the Internet can schedule an appointment with their adviser to complete entrance loan counseling. • Alternative loans (or private loans) require a positive credit check and generally require at least halftime enrollment (exceptions are program-specific). Adjustments made when funds are disbursed, or anytime thereafter, can create a balance due on the student’s account, which is immediately due.

Funds are credited to the student account to pay for educational charges incurred. Parent PLUS loans are the last funds to be credited to the student’s account and credit balances resulting from Parent PLUS loan proceeds are refunded to the parent borrower or student if authorization is received. Refunds After all SCAD charges have been paid, any credit in excess of charges may be refunded. Credit balances created by Federal Title IV aid programs are available for refund to students the second week of each quarter. To claim their refunds, students must have been awarded aid and must meet the enrollment and attendance criteria for their aid programs. SCAD does not provide cash advances prior to the drop/add period. Students must plan ahead and have their own funds available to purchase books and supplies, pay rent, etc. Students should elect to have their refunds deposited directly into their bank accounts in order to avoid delays in receiving funds. Students can sign up for direct deposit via MySCAD by clicking on the link “Direct Deposit for Student Refunds” located in the My Student Account channel on the My Info tab. Any refund check that goes uncashed by a student/parent will result in the associated Title IV funds being returned to the federal government as required by Title IV federal student aid regulations. Book provision Pell Grant recipients may be eligible for finances to purchase books and supplies prior to the end of the first week of class. To be eligible, students must have received the Pell Grant, must have a Federal Title IV credit balance for the quarter and must have met all requirements for disbursement 10 calendar days prior to the start of the quarter. Eligibility is reviewed each quarter. The complete book provision policy is available at scad.edu/financialpolicies. Authorization for Disposition of Financial Aid Funds By signing an Authorization for Disposition of Financial Aid Funds form, students or parents authorize SCAD to apply Federal Title IV funds and other financial aid to all legitimate institutional charges, request that SCAD retain credit on their accounts for budgeting

purposes, and indicate in whose name refund checks should be issued. Federal Title IV funds include Pell and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) and student and parent federal loans. This is a one-time authorization and is valid for subsequent award years. The form and conditions are available on the SCAD website at scad.edu/studentaccounts and may be modified in writing through the student accounts office. Drop for nonpayment SCAD reserves the right to drop any student from registered classes for nonpayment of tuition by the published due dates. Returned check fees The charge for a returned check is US$35. After two checks (paper or electronic) have been returned, all checkwriting privileges are revoked. A student whose tuition payment check is returned for insufficient funds may be charged a late payment fee of 5 percent of the balance due, as well as a returned check charge of US$35. Financial policy for withdrawal It is the responsibility of students who have decided not to attend to drop their classes via MySCAD or notify the office of the registrar in writing prior to the beginning of the quarter in order to avoid being held liable for all fees. Failure to pay fees, not attending classes or informing a faculty member that a student has decided to withdraw do not constitute official forms of notification. After the drop/add period, students should complete a withdrawal form available through the office of the registrar or the office of student success. The date the withdrawal form is submitted becomes the withdrawal date for computing any tuition credit applied to the student account. Credit posted to a student’s account is based on the assessment of charges and not on the amount paid by the student or number of classes attended. A student may cancel his or her enrollment at any time before the commencement of the quarter. A student not requesting cancellation online or through written documentation by the beginning of the quarter is considered enrolled and liable for all fees.

The application fee and one-time new student enrollment fee are retained to cover processing costs and are nonrefundable. The enrollment fee is nontransferable to other students or charges. If a student is dismissed from SCAD as a result of disciplinary action, he or she is responsible for all tuition and fees (including all unused residence hall fees). If a student is academically dismissed from SCAD, all payments for tuition, housing and meals for a subsequent quarter are refunded. A student who withdraws from SCAD during the first 40 percent of the quarter receives a pro rata credit of tuition according to the following schedule. Withdrawal Credit/refund form received available Between the sixth and 10th working days

55 percent

Between the 11th and 15th working days

35 percent

Between the 16th and 20th working days

15 percent

Some states mandate unique refund schedules for eLearning students who are residents of their state. Those state-specific eLearning refund schedules are available at scad.edu/elearning-state-withdrawal. Students are entitled to financial aid as long as they are enrolled, provided they meet the related stipulations. In accordance with federal financial aid regulations, length of enrollment each quarter determines whether or not a student has earned the use of all the aid disbursed or scheduled to be disbursed. When a student with federal or state aid withdraws from SCAD, any unearned aid must first be returned to the appropriate aid programs in accordance with federal and state regulations to reduce the overall debt. If any credit remains, it is applied first toward any outstanding charges on the student account. Any remaining credit is then refunded to the student. Requests for refunds sent by mail are dated according to the date received. Payment is made to the student unless the student directs otherwise in writing.

SCAD.EDU / SFS

361

FINANCIAL POLICIES AND STUDENT ACCOUNTS

FINANCIAL AID Financial aid is made available to qualified students to assist them in paying for their education at SCAD. Financial aid information is updated annually regarding the types and amounts of financial aid available, the process to apply for aid, policies and procedures related to the awarding of financial aid, and disbursement information for each aid program. This information is published on the SCAD website at scad.edu/financialaid with links to other applicable sites and publications, such as the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, the Georgia aid application for Georgia residents, the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program and noninstitutional scholarship searches. Students can access their SCAD financial records through MySCAD at scad.edu to review financial aid application requirements, download required forms, receive award notification and view all aid applied to their student accounts. Students applying for admission to SCAD should contact the admission office regarding financial aid: Atlanta 877.722.3285 or  404.253.2700 or  scadatl@scad.edu Hong Kong +852.2253.8044  or admission@scad.edu.hk Savannah/eLearning  800.869.7223 or 912.525.5100  or admission@scad.edu Continuing SCAD students should contact their staff adviser: Undergraduate Atlanta 404.253.3400 or  atl_advise@scad.edu Hong Kong +852.2253.8044 or  advisement@scad.edu Savannah/eLearning  912.525.5820 or  advisement@scad.edu Graduate Atlanta 404.253.3400 or  gradstudiesatl@scad.edu Hong Kong +852.2253.8044 or  advisement@scad.edu Savannah/eLearning 912.525.6315  or graduatestudies@scad.edu Financial aid application process Students should complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid online at fafsa.gov, and include SCAD

362

SCAD.EDU / SFS

as a school choice using the SCAD code number 015022. Accurate income tax information should be used and is accessible on the FAFSA website through the Internal Revenue Service’s data retrieval tool. Within three to five days after filing the FAFSA online, students should receive a Student Aid Report from the federal government. Students should review the SAR for accuracy and submit any necessary revisions to the federal processor. Students who receive a request for additional information from the SCAD financial aid office should complete and return the information promptly. If selected for verification, students may be required to submit documentation in the form of a prior year’s IRS tax transcript. Further information is available online at scad.edu/verification. After all information has been received and processed, an official award of financial assistance is sent via email to the student from SCAD. The award lists all financial assistance the student can receive, including scholarships, grants and loans. Students must apply for admission at scad.edu/apply and be accepted to SCAD in order to be offered financial aid.

Federal aid U.S. citizens and legal residents who hold a high school diploma or GED may apply for federal aid by filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) with the federal processing center as soon as possible after Jan. 1 each year. This can be done online at fafsa.gov. The SCAD FAFSA code is 015022. Federal aid applicants are encouraged to complete the FAFSA as soon as their annual income tax figures become available. SCAD processes federal aid throughout the year on a first-completed, first-awarded basis. Early application is encouraged and allows more time for students to explore all financial aid options. After the FAFSA is processed, the government generates a multipage Student Aid Report (SAR) for each applicant. After SCAD has received an electronic version of the SAR from the government and if the applicant is officially admitted to SCAD, a financial aid package is determined. This process generally begins in early March for fall enrollment.

SCAD accepts and enrolls new students each quarter. Students who intend to use financial assistance to pay tuition, room and board should plan to complete the application for admission and the FAFSA at least 60 days prior to the intended entry date. Otherwise, the student should plan to pay first-quarter expenses out of personal funds. Students should review each specific aid program for details at scad. edu/financialaid. Further information about federal aid can be found at studentaid.ed.gov. Concurrent enrollment and transient status A student who wishes to be degreeseeking at two or more postsecondary institutions concurrently may receive federal/state financial aid at only one college. Once a student has requested financial aid to attend SCAD, he or she may not apply for federal/state aid at any other institution for the same term. Transient students who receive the Georgia HOPE scholarship may be eligible to receive it while in transient status and should contact their staff adviser for details. Currently enrolled SCAD students who wish to attend another college or university as a transient student and transfer credits back to SCAD must pursue transient status through the registrar’s office at SCAD before taking classes at the other institution.

Federal grants Pell Grant (nonrepayable funds) The Pell Grant is a need-based grant available to degree-seeking students who are pursuing their first undergraduate degree. Student eligibility is based upon the Expected Family Contribution as calculated by the federal government based on information the student provided in completing the FAFSA. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (nonrepayable funds) The SEOG program was established to assist in making the benefits of postsecondary education available to first-time, degree-seeking undergraduate students. Awards are based upon the remaining unmet need of Pell eligible students. Funds are available to full- and half-time students on a very limited basis.

Federal loans

Student employment

William D. Ford Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loan (repayable funds) The direct loan program enables students to borrow funds directly from the U.S. Department of Education to assist with educational expenses. Undergraduate student borrowers can borrow from US$5,500 to US$12,500 per academic year (three quarters), depending on class level and dependency status as determined by the FAFSA. The amount of subsidized vs. unsubsidized loan that can be borrowed is determined by results from the FAFSA and remaining need. Regular graduate student borrowers can borrow US$20,500, unsubsidized, per academic year (three quarters). Graduate student borrowers admitted with required preliminary undergraduate coursework are subject to undergraduate loan limits and enrollment rules until they proceed into the regular graduate program. The loan amount credited to the student account is reduced by the federally mandated loan origination fee. Repayment of direct loans begins after graduation, dropping below half-time enrollment or ceasing enrollment, and follows a six-month grace period.

The student employment office assists degree-seeking undergraduate and graduate students with their employment search process, while maintaining compliance with federal and state regulations. Students must meet specific eligibility requirements in order to participate in the Federal Work-study Program (FWS) or to work in institutionally funded positions on campus. Job opportunities are designed to complement and reinforce career development and provide a valuable opportunity to develop skill sets relevant to a student’s desired career. For more information regarding the university’s student employment program, or to review eligibility requirements, visit scad.edu/studentemployment or email stemploy@scad.edu. Staff can also be reached by phone during normal business hours at 912.525.8776.

William D. Ford Federal Direct PLUS Loan for Graduate Students (repayable funds) The Grad PLUS loan program enables credit-worthy graduate-level students to borrow funds for educational purposes. Graduate students may borrow up to the full cost of attendance or any educational expenses that other student aid does not cover. Grad PLUS loans are collateral-free, low-interest loans with a minimum 10-year repayment term and several repayment options. William D. Ford Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan Program (repayable funds) The PLUS loan program enables creditworthy parents and stepparents (must be listed on the FAFSA) of dependent students to borrow funds for educational purposes. Parents may borrow up to the full cost of attendance or any educational expenses that student aid does not cover. PLUS loans are collateral-free, low-interest loans with a minimum 10-year repayment term and several repayment options.

Working in the local area Students who do not qualify for the FWS program or are interested in working off campus may opt to pursue employment in the local area. Community partners may post temporary or seasonal positions that offer students opportunities to enhance their academic program and career goals. Additionally, a variety of community service opportunities are available for FWS-eligible students.

Hong Kong aid The Student Financial Assistance Agency of Hong Kong offers certain types of financial aid for SCAD Hong Kong students. Eligibility requirements include the right of abode in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, permission to stay in Hong Kong without restriction, or to have resided or have had their home in Hong Kong continuously for three complete years immediately prior to the commencement of the program/course (not including those studying in Hong Kong who hold student visas). SCAD Hong Kong students are eligible to apply for Hong Kong government grants and low-interest loans. The government currently offers the Financial Assistance Scheme for Postsecondary Students, the Non-means-tested Loan

Scheme for Postsecondary Students and the Student Travel Subsidy Scheme to students pursuing self-financing accredited postsecondary education courses. These programs are administered by the Student Financial Assistance Agency. For more information, visit wfsfaa.gov.hk.

State aid Students who qualify for state programs that are payable to out-of-state colleges should contact their state’s educational authority for information on application and payment. SCAD will provide an invoice for a state program that requires one. Funding does not show as a credit on the student’s account until payment is received. Incoming new students who qualify for state programs that are not payable at out-of-state colleges should contact the admission office directly at 800.869.7223 or 912.525.5100 in Savannah, or 877.722.3285 or 404.253.2700 in Atlanta, for information on possible assistance. Vocational rehabilitation aid Many states offer vocational rehabilitation benefits to qualified students requiring these services. Any student who has a qualifying condition for vocational rehabilitation benefits should contact the appropriate state agency directly. If the state agency requires a financial aid offer prior to determining or distributing state funding, eligible students must complete the financial aid process before that offer may be presented to the agency.

Georgia aid programs Georgia Student Access Loan (repayable funds) The Georgia Student Finance Commission offers a 1 percent interest loan to Georgia students who have exhausted all other means of financial assistance. Students must apply for this loan and be selected via a lottery system through the Georgia Student Finance Commission and must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress. Complete information is available at gacollege411.org and information on SCAD’s Satisfactory Academic Progress policy is available at scad.edu/financialpolicies.

SCAD.EDU / SFS

363

FINANCIAL POLICIES AND STUDENT ACCOUNTS

Georgia Tuition Equalization Grant (nonrepayable funds) The Georgia Student Finance Commission administers the GTEG program for resident students attending eligible private colleges in Georgia, such as SCAD. The program is restricted to full-time students who are Georgia residents and who are seeking an undergraduate degree. Personal or family income is not a factor for eligibility. All Georgia residents attending SCAD should apply for the GTEG. Complete information is available at gacollege411.org. Georgia Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally Scholarship (nonrepayable funds) The Georgia Student Finance Commission offers the HOPE scholarship program to Georgia students who graduated from an eligible high school and who have achieved a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher as determined by Georgia state guidelines. Students must maintain a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 (reviewed periodically throughout the academic year in accordance with program rules) for eligibility. Complete information is available at gacollege411.org. Zell Miller Scholarship (nonrepayable funds) The Georgia Student Financial Commission offers the Zell Miller Scholarship program to Georgia students who graduated from an eligible high school, who have achieved a grade-point average of at least 3.7 as determined by Georgia state guidelines, and who have achieved a combined critical reading and math score of at least 1200 on the SAT or a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT. Students must maintain a cumulative grade-point average of 3.3 (reviewed periodically throughout the academic year in accordance with program rules) for eligibility. Complete information is available at gacollege411.org.

Alternative funding sources Personal funds, institutional scholarships, outside scholarships, and federal/ state aid programs may fall short of a student’s anticipated budget for educational expenses. Alternative (creditbased) loans from private lenders are one source of funding that may help compensate for any shortfall. However,

364

SCAD.EDU / SFS

parents and students should be aware that these loans may be a more expensive way of borrowing and they should read all the information available on these loans to select the lender with the most suitable terms. Regarding private education loans, the best source of information is the lender. Programs and qualifying regulations are subject to change without notice. Current information is available at scad.edu/financialaid.

Policy on satisfactory academic progress All students receiving Federal Title IV financial aid, Georgia state financial aid SCAD grant aid or Veterans Affairs benefits must adhere to the university’s policy on satisfactory academic progress. The Higher Education Act as amended by U.S. Congress mandates that higher education institutions establish minimum standards of “satisfactory academic progress” for students receiving financial aid. Requirements to meet satisfactory academic progress include the following: Students must pass 67 percent of all coursework attempted; undergraduate students must earn a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 point scale; graduate students must earn a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 point scale. Satisfactory academic progress standards are evaluated as follows: Degreeseeking students in a program longer than one year are evaluated annually. Students enrolled in a degree program of one year or less are evaluated at the end of each payment period (quarter). The same review standards and sanctions (financial aid probation and assignment of an academic plan) apply to all students, regardless of the frequency of review (either quarterly or annually). The SCAD financial aid office does not utilize financial aid warnings, but does work closely with faculty and advisers to utilize an early alert system and proactive outreach to help students attain their academic goals. The complete policy is available online at scad.edu/financialpolicies.

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2015–2016 FALL QUARTER 2015 Fall quarter begins ..............................................................................Sept. 14, 2015 Makeup class day* ............................................................................................... Sept. 25, 2015 Mid-Autumn Festival ..........................................................................................Sept. 28, 2015 National Day ................................................................................................................Oct. 1, 2015 Makeup class day* ....................................................................................................Oct. 2, 2015 Chung Yeung Festival ........................................................................................... Oct. 21, 2015 Makeup class day* ................................................................................................. Oct. 23, 2015 Fall quarter ends..........................................................................................................Nov. 19, 2015

WINTER QUARTER 2016 Winter quarter begins ............................................................................Jan. 6, 2016 ............................................................................. Jan. 18, 2016 Martin Luther King Jr. Day ........................................................................................... Jan. 22, 2016 Makeup class day* Lunar New Year holiday ..................................................................................Feb. 8–10, 2016 Makeup class day* ..................................................................................................Feb. 19, 2016 ...............................................................................March 15, 2016 Winter quarter ends Makeup class day* ..............................................................................................March 16, 2016 Makeup class day* .............................................................................................. March 17, 2016 Winter quarter ends .......................................................................................... March 17, 2016

SPRING QUARTER 2016 Spring quarter begins ...........................................................................March 28, 2016 Spring quarter begins ......................................................................................March 30, 2016 Ching Ming Festival ...............................................................................................April 4, 2016 Labour Day .................................................................................................................May 2, 2016 Makeup class day* ................................................................................................... May 6, 2016 ................................................................................... June 2, 2016 Spring quarter ends ..........................................................................................June 4, 2016 Commencement Makeup class day* ..................................................................................................June 8, 2016 Spring quarter ends ..............................................................................................June 8, 2016 Commencement .....................................................................................................June 11, 2016

SUMMER QUARTER 2016 Summer quarter begins ................................................................... June 20, 2016 SAR Establishment Day ..........................................................................................July 1, 2016 ............................................................................ July 4, 2016 Independence Day holiday ..............................................................................................July 8, 2016 Makeup class day* Summer session 1 ends ........................................................................................ July 21, 2016 Summer session 2 begins .................................................................................. July 25, 2016 Summer quarter ends..............................................................................................Aug. 25, 2016 * Required when holiday falls on a regularly scheduled class day so that students receive no fewer than 20 periods of instruction per course each quarter. Students should refer to orientation schedules and specific study abroad program dates prior to making travel arrangements. The traditional academic year extends from fall (September) through spring (June), encompassing three quarters and nine courses. Many students take advantage of optional summer programs including international and domestic study abroad programs, as well as summer courses offered in Savannah, Atlanta, Lacoste, Hong Kong and online. Dates are subject to change.

SCAD.EDU / CALENDAR

365

TUITION AND FEES 2015–2016 SCAD ATLANTA, SCAD SAVANNAH, SCAD ELEARNING Undergraduate tuition Annual tuition (based on three courses per quarter enrollment for three quarters) Total full-time student for one academic year................................................................................................. US$34,470 Quarterly tuition Full-time student, three courses per quarter (15 hours of credit, 150 hours of instruction)............ US$11,490 Part-time student, two courses per quarter (10 hours of credit, 100 hours of instruction)............... US$7,660 Less than part-time student, one course per quarter (five hours of credit, 50 hours of instruction)...US$3,830

Graduate tuition Annual tuition (based on three courses per quarter enrollment for three quarters) Total full-time student for one academic year..................................................................................................US$35,325 Quarterly tuition Full-time student, three courses per quarter (15 hours of credit, 150 hours of instruction)............. US$11,775 Full-time student, two courses per quarter (10 hours of credit, 100 hours of instruction)................ US$7,850 Part-time student, one course per quarter (five hours of credit, 50 hours of instruction)................ US$3,925 THES 799 Continuing Thesis.......................................................................................................................................... US$500 GRAD 795 Continuing Graduate Research.............................................................................................................. US$500

New student application and enrollment fees Application fee (nonrefundable).....................................................................................................................................US$40 One-time enrollment fee due May 1 for fall enrollment....................................................................................... US$500

Housing fees for one academic year* New student housing reservation fee (nonrefundable) due June 1 for fall enrollment...........................US$250 Continuing student housing reservation fee........................................................................................................... US$500 Total residence hall fees (nonrefundable) due Aug. 1 for fall enrollment Dormitory style, Savannah, double occupancy (meal plan required)..................................................US$8,889 Dormitory style, Savannah, triple occupancy (meal plan required)...................................................... US$8,235 Apartment style, Savannah (no private bedroom; meal plan optional)................................................ US$9,150 Apartment style, Savannah (private bedroom; meal plan optional).....................................................US$10,221 Summer, dormitory style, Savannah, double occupancy (meal plan required)............................... US$2,979 Summer, apartment style, Savannah (5-week master program in Alice).............................................US$1,830 Dormitory style, Atlanta, double occupancy (meal plan required)........................................................US$8,310 Dormitory style, Atlanta, triple occupancy (meal plan required)............................................................ US$7,374 Apartment style, Atlanta (with kitchen)............................................................................................................ US$9,150 Apartment style, Atlanta.........................................................................................................................................US$10,221 Summer, dormitory style, Atlanta, double occupancy (meal plan required).................................... US$2,979 Summer, apartment style, Atlanta.......................................................................................................................US$3,372 * Includes accommodations, furnishings, utilities, and local phone, cable and Internet services. Some variations exist in residence hall accommodations. Specifics are provided to students who request college housing. No guarantees may be made regarding specific housing requests/assignments. Housing is limited, and assignments are confirmed beginning July 1 each year as quarterly payments and signed housing contracts are received.

Meal plan fee Basic rate per quarter (available to all students; several options)................................................................. US$1,710

English as a Second Language (10-week regular session) Levels I, II, III and IV (20 hours/week).....................................................................................................................US$2,860 Level V (10 hours/week)*...............................................................................................................................................US$1,430 Level VI for undergraduate students (five hours/week)*..................................................................................... US$715 Level VI for graduate students (10 hours/week)*................................................................................................US$1,430 * ESL course fees only. Does not include academic course fees.

366

SCAD.EDU / FEES

TUITION AND FEES 2015–2016 SCAD HONG KONG Undergraduate tuition Annual tuition (based on three courses per quarter enrollment for three quarters) Total full-time student for one academic year................................................................................................ HK$267,143 Quarterly tuition Full-time student, three courses per quarter (15 hours of credit, 150 hours of instruction)...........HK$89,048 Part-time student, two courses per quarter (10 hours of credit, 100 hours of instruction)............HK$59,366 Less than part-time student, one course per quarter (five hours of credit, 50 hours of instruction)......... HK$29,683

Graduate tuition Annual tuition (based on three courses per quarter enrollment for three quarters) Total full-time student for one academic year............................................................................................... HK$273,769 Quarterly tuition Full-time student, three courses per quarter (15 hours of credit, 150 hours of instruction)............HK$91,257 Full-time student, two courses per quarter (10 hours of credit, 100 hours of instruction).............HK$60,838 Part-time student, one course per quarter (five hours of credit, 50 hours of instruction)................................HK$30,419 THES 799 Continuing Thesis....................................................................................................................................... HK$3,875 GRAD 795 Continuing Graduate Research........................................................................................................... HK$3,875

New student application and enrollment fees Application fee (nonrefundable) Online (preferred)........................................................................................................................................................... HK$310 Paper................................................................................................................................................................................... HK$542 One-time enrollment fee for degree-seeking students due one month prior to enrollment........... HK$3,875

Housing fees for one academic year* Housing reservation fee (nonrefundable) due one month prior to enrollment...................................... HK$1,950 Apartment style, Hong Kong (master).........................................................................................................HK$83,080* Apartment style, Hong Kong (medium)...................................................................................................... HK$79,205* Apartment style, Hong Kong (small)............................................................................................................ HK$75,330* Summer, apartment style, Hong Kong (master)........................................................................................ HK$27,156* Summer, apartment style, Hong Kong (medium).....................................................................................HK$26,133* Summer, apartment style, Hong Kong (small)............................................................................................HK$25,134* * Estimate; based on availability

English as a Second Language (10-week regular session) Levels I, II, III and IV (20 hours/week)....................................................................................................................HK$22,165 Level V (10 hours/week)*............................................................................................................................................. HK$11,083 Level VI for undergraduate students (five hours/week)*.................................................................................HK$5,541 Level VI for graduate students (10 hours/week)*.............................................................................................. HK$11,083 * ESL course fees only. Does not include academic course fees. Students attending a SCAD program where they do not have citizenship may incur additional expenses related to student visas. Displayed amounts are shown in whole dollars and may vary slightly from billed accounts, which include cents, due to currency conversion from U.S. to Hong Kong dollars.

SCAD LACOSTE Program fee (includes room, meals, Paris excursion, site visit fees)..........................................................US$6,425

SCAD.EDU / FEES

367

ACCREDITATION DEGREES OFFERED

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) Master of Arts (M.A.) Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.)

Alan B. Whitaker III, Chair Nancy Herstand Pharris Johnson Chan Lai Wa Robert L. Nardelli Sally Waranch Rajcic Stuart Saunders, M.D. Anita Thomas

MISSION STATEMENT The Savannah College of Art and Design exists to prepare talented students for professional careers, emphasizing learning through individual attention in a positively oriented university environment.

NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY SCAD is an equal opportunity institution and complies with all applicable federal, state and local laws including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. SCAD prohibits and does not tolerate discrimination on the basis of age, race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, creed, national or ethnic origin or ancestry, disability, genetic information, veteran status or other protected characteristics in any phase of employment, in the administration of its admission or financial aid programs, or in any other aspects of its programs or activities. Further, SCAD prohibits any form of discipline, reprisal, intimidation or retaliation for good faith reports or complaints of incidents of discrimination of any kind, pursuing any discrimination claim or cooperating in related investigations. Questions, concerns, reports, or claims pursuant to this policy should be directed to the compliance officer.

MEMBERSHIPS American Academy in Rome American Council on Education Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education Cumulus, International Association of Universities and Colleges of Art, Design and Media EDUCAUSE eLearning Guild European League of Institutes of the Arts Georgia Independent College Association Online Learning Consortium Southeastern College Art Conference U.S. Distance Learning Association

ACCREDITATION* Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges Hong Kong Council for Accreditation of Academic and Vocational Qualifications National Architectural Accrediting Board Council for Interior Design Accreditation * For a complete description of institutional and programmatic accreditations, see the academic policies section.

Programs of study are effective Fall 2015, unless otherwise noted. This official university publication supersedes all others. This catalog does not constitute a contract, and all portions are subject to change. Printed in the USA. © 2015 The Savannah College of Art and Design Catalog content and design is produced entirely by SCAD staff, students, alumni and faculty. SCAD and The University for Creative Careers are registered trademarks of the Savannah College of Art and Design.

368

SCAD.EDU / ACCREDITATION

ATLANTA HONG KONG LACOSTE SAVANNAH eLEARNING

SCAD.EDU